Re: 4.9R changing MTA to Postfix - no periodic.conf

2004-04-23 Thread Charles Swiger
On Apr 23, 2004, at 2:12 PM, Danny wrote:
On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 11:51:28 -0400, Bill Moran wrote
/etc/defaults/periodic.conf has all the default values for periodic.
Defaults as a reference, or the defaults that are currently enforced 
even
without /etc/periodic.conf?
Yes, to both.  The two aren't exclusive.

 You should _NOT_ endit /etc/defaults/periodic.conf ... the point is
that /etc/periodic.conf overrides those defaults.
So, in theory, IF (which I won't, don't worry) I did edit
the /etc/defaults/periodic.conf, and disabled the postfix  sendmail
specified settings, those changes would be enforced even without
a /etc/periodic.conf?
Sure.  But your changes might get blown away the next time you updated 
the system and ran mergemaster, unless you were careful.  Putting the 
changes in /etc/periodic.conf is the right thing to do...

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Re: Slow loading websites

2004-04-23 Thread Charles Swiger
On Apr 23, 2004, at 1:38 PM, Jammet wrote:
When i go to a website, say Slashdot or freshmeat, or any where that
involves ads on the page some where, about 99% of the time it can take
upwards of 2-3 minutes to load the entire page. [ ... ]
I guess my main question is, anyone ever seen this, if so ever get it
fixed?
Most probably, you are running into delays because your browser queries 
websites for an IPv6 address before trying an IPv4 address.  
Reportedly, many ad-sites use broken nameservers which botch IPv6 
queries, causing the delay.  The problem lies on their end, not yours, 
but disabling IPv6 or using a proxy server like Squid will probably 
remove the delays.

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Re: Items missing from the handbook and/or FAQs.

2004-04-23 Thread Charles Swiger
On Apr 23, 2004, at 3:37 PM, Joe Rhett wrote:
Sorry, it's been quite a while since I've played with FreeBSD and some
things are taking a while to get used to.  The configuration system has
come a long way... but the documentation seems to be lacking a bit.
I'll make a try at answering the issues you raise, but the best way of 
handling missing documentation is to submit PR's which update the 
manpages or the Handbook with something better.

1. How to disable ppp ?

The handbook has lots of information on how to configure it.  
Apparently I
chose to enable it during install (I don't remember this) and I'm 
trying to
get rid of the ppp0 and sl0 interfaces.  The answer was to copy related
parameters from /etc/defaults/rc.conf to /etc/rc.conf and change them.
You mean, setting network_interfaces?  I have these interfaces disabled 
in the kernel config file, myself:

#pseudo-device  sl  1   # Kernel SLIP
#pseudo-device  ppp 1   # Kernel PPP
...but it's not as if they do harm if they were compiled in.

2. How to configure a wireless card?

If you're coming from any other unixy OS, you're going to be looking 
for
iwconfig and relatives.  Just a note somewhere that all wireless
configuration is handled through ifconfig would have saved me some 
time.
1-tanya% which iwconfig
iwconfig not found
2-tanya% uname -a
Darwin tanya 7.3.0 Darwin Kernel Version 7.3.0: Fri Mar  5 14:22:55 PST 
2004; root:xnu/xnu-517.3.15.obj~4/RELEASE_PPC  Power Macintosh powerpc

1-pong# which iwconfig
iwconfig not found
2-pong# uname -a
SunOS pong 5.8 Generic_117000-03 sun4u sparc SUNW,Ultra-4 Solaris
...and I could repeat this with a few other Unix systems and not find a 
iwconfig on them, either.  ifconfig ought to be used for configuring 
network interfaces, IMO.

Also a note to create /etc/start_if.{ifname} to put the wireless 
options in
would also have saved me reading through the rc scripts.  I asusme 
that's a
general case for all interfaces, but it could bear repeating in the 
wireless
documentation. (when there is some...)
I believe the PPP section of the handbook has a discussion of start_if.

3. Choosing filesystem types

During setup you can create filesystems other than FreeBSD, but you are
supposed to magickally know their filesystem type numbers.  The setup
documenation and the fdisk tools only tell you the filesystem numbers 
for
freebsd, linux and dos.  An option to get a list would be nice.
Agreed.

4. Why is xdm still listed as the way to set up X?

Okay, I'm certain that a bunch of people will respond to tell me that 
gnome
and kde are evil and should be destroyed, but the vast majority of 
people
are expecting modern graphical interfaces.
If so, why would they want to use X?

Fifteen years ago, Sun with NeWS and NeXT/Adobe with Display PostScript 
solved problems that still plague X-- things like transparency, or a 
unified imaging model that works with printing too, or font support 
that doesn't suck.

Aqua under MacOS X uses PDF rather than DPS, but it retains most of the 
advantages of DPS.

1. How to put DHCP on the wireless card?

I still haven't figured this out. I run dhclient on the interface by 
hand
after every reboot and it works fine, but I'm assuming there is some
standard method of telling the system that wi0 should be a 
dhcp-managed, right?
Add a line like:

	ifconfig_wi0=DHCP

...I believe.

2. What is interface faith0 ?

It took a ridiculous amount of searching to determine that faith0 was 
an
ipv4 - ipv6 interface.
man faith or apropos faith gives useful information without having 
to search.

 And I can find nothing about how to disable it.
(and if you say compile a new kernel and make world, excuse me while I 
puke)
FreeBSD configures the OS to have IPv6 support by default.
If you don't want IPv6 support, yes, you will need to recompile world.
I won't say that IPv6 support is completely transparent at this time, 
but it usually doesn't get in the way...

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Re: NFS-bug or not ?

2004-05-12 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 12, 2004, at 3:31 AM, Mikhail E. Zakharov wrote:
When playing with NFS under FreeBSD, I've noticed something strange.
You know it's impossible to export 2 directories of the same file 
system on the server to the 1 nfs-client:
server# cat /etc/exports
/usr/c client
/usr/d client
server# killall -HUP mountd
server# showmount -e
/usr/c Everyone

There is no /usr/d exported. And we got errors in /var/log/messages:
mountd[377]: can't change attributes for /usr/d
mountd[377]: bad exports list line /usr/d
Please refer to _Managing NFS and NIS_, O'Reilly, p92:

2. You cannot export any subdirectory of an exported filesystem unless 
the
 subdirectory is on a different physical device.

 3. You cannot export any parent directory of an exported filesystem 
unless
 the parent is on a different physical device.

Basicly, NFS exports work on a per-filesystem basis, although one can 
use symbolic links to achieve results similar to what you are trying to 
do by exporting different subdirectories of the same filesystem.

There's a more extensive writeup about this here:

http://www.pkix.net/~chuck/doc/NFS/article.html

But it's possible(!) to fool mountd when using the -network key.
Let's try to export /usr/a as read-only system for the whole network, 
and /usr/b writable for one host, and not readable for other. NB! Our 
NFS-client (192.168.12.98) is from 192.168.0.0/16 network. See this 
example:
[ ... ]
When we mounted them on client. Let's make additional tests:
client# echo something stupid  /mnt/test.txt
client# echo something stupid1  /mnt1/test1.txt
client# cat /mnt/test.txt
something stupid
client# cat /mnt1/test1.txt
something stupid1
Oh, my God! Both of the exported directories are writable.
If you export one filesystem ro to an entire subnet, and then also 
export the same filesystem rw to a specific machine, the machine 
granted r/w permissions can write to that filesystem, yes.  That's by 
design.

If some other machine could write to the filesystem, or if you choose 
to export two different filesystems with different permissions, that 
would indicate a problem...

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Re: Setting Up IMAP

2004-05-12 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 12, 2004, at 9:29 AM, Jason Dusek wrote:
 Problem 1
My mail server's certificate 'fails' the authenticity test because it 
is self-assigned. Why is this bad (aren't I *supposed* to get a 
certificate with
 # make cert
in the stunnel port?) and what do I do to get a better certificate?
You can add the certificate of the local CA you used to sign the SSL 
cert to your mail client's list of trusted CAs.

You can also pay a real CA like Verisign, enTrust, etc for a 
commercial SSL cert which will be accepted by default, as mail clients 
already know those CAs.

 Problem 2
Kmail allows me accept the bad certificate and logs in succesfully. It 
then shows me my *entire* home directory, not just the mail folder. 
Why does this happen?
There may be an option named IMAP path prefix which will let you 
change this, or you can recompile the UWash IMAP server after changing 
the default path where mail is kept.

You'll probably need to go to /usr/ports/mail/cclient, do a make 
extract, and then cd to work/imap-2002d.  Read docs/CONFIG, 
specificly:

[ ...begin excerpt... ]
 Example 2: suppose you want to change c-client's idea of the
user's mailbox directory to be the mail subdirectory of the user's
home directory instead of the user's home directory.  You will want to
change variable mailsubdir, changing the line that reads:
static char *mailsubdir = NIL;  /* mail subdirectory name */
 to be:
static char *mailsubdir = mail;/* mail subdirectory name */
...and then do a make deinstall ; make reinstall from the port's 
directory.

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Re: Start BIND on boot

2004-05-11 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 11, 2004, at 1:13 PM, Nuno César Pires wrote:
[ ... ]
 The result is that the boot process takes a very long time in the 
Starting
Standard Daemons [ph]ase. After boot the result of ndc status is: 
(server is
initialising itself) and then nothing happen.

Starting de named manually works just fine.
Hmm.  There isn't enough information available to say what's going on 
for certain, but what you are doing ought to work fine.

Do you have a permanent network connection which is available when your 
system boots?  If the network isn't available, named can't talk to 
other nameservers and it will probably cause a very long delay which 
matches your description.

Check /var/log/messages after a system reboot for messages relating to 
named.  You ought to see something like this:

May 11 15:21:19 daemon.notice pi named[9319]: starting 
(/etc/named.conf).  nam
ed 8.3.7-REL Tue Dec  2 14:40:53 EST 2003   
[EMAIL PROTECTED]:/usr/obj/usr/s
rc/usr.sbin/named
May 11 15:21:19 daemon.warn pi named[9319]: limit files set to 
fdlimit (1024)
May 11 15:21:19 daemon.notice pi named[9320]: Ready to answer queries.
May 11 15:21:19 daemon.warn pi named[9320]: check_hints: A records 
for B.ROOT-
SERVERS.NET class 1 do not match hint records

If there were problems with your named.conf file or one of the zone 
files, you'd see warning messages which ought to be fixed.

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Re: Where to send binary packages bugs?

2004-05-03 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 3, 2004, at 12:09 PM, Kyryll A Mirnenko wrote:
  Where to send the bugs (e.g. porters faults, not authors) in binary
packages? [EMAIL PROTECTED] seems to be source-ports only
maillist.
Binary packages are built from sources, right?  The way binary packages 
get fixed involves changing the sources and rebuilding the package...

In other words, reporting problems with packages to 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] is helpful.  CC'ing the maintainer is 
generally also helpful.

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Re: Suexec with Apache 1.3.29

2004-05-03 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 3, 2004, at 12:42 PM, Marty Landman wrote:
Maybe this is a foolish question, but how can reasonable security on a 
server running Windows/Apache be achieved?
I'm not convinced that Windows can be configured to offer 
Internet-reachable services with reasonable security, but excluding 
that concern: configure Apache to run as a system service started upon 
boot as an untrusted user which lacks permissions to change the files 
under Apache's document root.

If the answer is what I fear, do you think that the 'native' MS 
server, IIS can be configured more securely than Apache?
A review of the security history of both web servers suggests that IIS 
is significantly less secure than Apache.  IIS and/or SQLserver 
sometimes get installed and enabled by surprise when a user installs 
certain other M$ software, like the dev tools

Looking at it in another way, is it possible to have a secure, network 
accessible server of any type w/o the Unix style permissions concept 
in place?
Certainly.  Systems which do not use Unix-style permissions tend to use 
an access-control-list (ACL) schema instead, which some people like 
better, but there are other security models as well.

[ This thread is drifting off-topic for a FreeBSD list. ]

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Re: Abnormal network errors?

2004-05-05 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 5, 2004, at 2:27 PM, adp wrote:
On this server I'm thinking I need two things:

1. More sockets available.
2. Larger sockbufs for send and recv.
Is this an accurate assessment?
Given the application of this system, you might want to up the value of 
kern.ipc.nmbclusters by a factor of four or so (it's NBMCLUSTERS in the 
kernel config file).  However, it's not essential-- your netstat -m 
is OK, and your TCP send and receive windows are reasonably sized as-is 
by default.

What is 2432320 packets for unknown/unsupported protocol? What
specifically does this mean? (In other words, what should I do to 
resolve
this?)
It means machines are sending non-IP traffic on your network, which is 
normal if you have Windows protocols (NetBEUI, SPX/IPX) or Macs 
(AppleTalk) around.  Or chatty network devices like some printers

See /usr/include/net/ethernet.h for an idea, or maybe tcpdump not ip 
might give some idea of what's going by.

What about 921363 calls to icmp_error?
ICMP messages like responding to a ping, or people sending traffic with 
RFC-1918 unroutable addresses (gives dest unreachable)...

Under tcp I have 481930 embryonic connections dropped. I assume that 
means
I don't have enough sockets available for when this server gets loaded.
Correct?
More likely, these are someone doing a port scan and leaving half-open 
connections lying around to get cleaned up.

	

It might be helpful if you gave us some idea as to what the performance 
problem you were seeing was?  Is NFS access slow, or some such?  Are 
you seeing errors or collisions in netstat -i or in whatever statistics 
your switch keeps per port?

The following areas struck me as being relevant:

# ifconfig rl0
First, consider upgrading to a fxp or dc-based NIC.

udp:
272987897 datagrams received
[ ... ]
19976574 dropped due to full socket buffers
This is high enough to represent a concern, agreed.

ip:
578001924 total packets received
[ ... ]
4899083 fragments received
4 fragments dropped (dup or out of space)
750 fragments dropped after timeout
842689 packets reassembled ok
[ ... ]
609745425 packets sent from this host
1914687 output datagrams fragmented
10496350 fragments created
Second, you're fragmenting a relatively large number of packets going 
by, you ought to see what's going on with your MTU and pMTU discovery.  
I suppose if you're using large UDP datagrams with NFS, that might be 
it.

[ The machines I've got around with comparible traffic volume might 
have 400 frags received, and 10 transmitted, or some such. ]

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Re: segmentation fault-- is my array too long?

2004-05-06 Thread Charles Swiger
This doesn't have much to do with FreeBSD, but...
On May 6, 2004, at 2:58 PM, Caroline Korves wrote:
Any idea on what I should change to make the program run with large
numbers of elements in my arrays?
Automatic variables get allocated from the stack, which can only grow 
to handle 8 MB or so by default.  If you dynamicly allocate these 
arrays using malloc(), or else add the static keyword before the 
following declarations, you can probably increase the size of persons 
by a factor of 10 or more:

   double ncost[persons][scens];
   double nuts[persons][scens];
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Re: Tape

2004-05-14 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 14, 2004, at 4:05 AM, Axel S. Gruner wrote:
I am looking for a good Tape drive (ok, Ultrium 2 LTO is just a little 
bit to expensive ;-)). The Tape Drive should be a DLT Drive with 40/80 
GB per tape. Also i want to use FreeBSD 5.x and the Server will be a 
IBM x345 machine. Backup Software is bacula.
[ ... ]
I found one, the Freecom TAPEWARE DLT-VS80 ES SCSI, but i do not know 
if this one is a good on or not.
Quantum is the vendor who originated the DLT format, and I would 
recommend picking up a Quantum DLT 8000 model if it doesn't cost much 
more than the one you mention above.  I've never heard of Freecom, 
although they may be fine, there is something to be said for buying 
from a vendor you know.

DLT is a very good tape format, though...
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Re: sendmail on lan

2004-05-14 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 14, 2004, at 11:34 AM, Vulpes Velox wrote:
How do I get sendmail to work on the lan?
The easiest way to get sendmail to work properly on your LAN is to 
configure DNS for the local machines.

It's also possible to configure sendmail with the nocanonify FEATURE 
and configure mail routing directly (using raw IP addresses within a 
mailertaible, ie [1.2.3.4]).

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Re: sendmail on lan

2004-05-14 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 14, 2004, at 4:59 PM, Vulpes Velox wrote:
The topic and from and to are...
From: kit [EMAIL PROTECTED]gateway hostname
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]gateway hostname
Subject: v42.gateway hostname 05/14/04:14.00 system
check
Not really sure if this is a sendmail problem or not here... :/
BTW know of any good tutorials or any good reads I can find online for
this?
If the message is being delivered OK now, and other mail is also 
working, it's not a sendmail problem.

The sendmail.org site has quite a bit of documentation available, 
including a FAQ that is worth reading.  There's also the 
comp.mail.sendmail Usenet newsgroup, which is quite helpful.

This box orginally had log sentry on it too, which appears to have
screwed up some of the periodic stuff too...
What is the easiest way to get back to what defualt periodic security
checks and ect?
I'd assume you could pkg_delete logsentry, if you'd built it from 
ports, anyway.  Otherwise, take a look in /etc/periodic/daily, and/or 
double-check your crontabs

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Re: SMTP AUTH

2004-05-29 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 27, 2004, at 12:39 PM, Noah wrote:
how do I configure sendmail to support smtps (SSL before SMTP)  I want 
to
configure this.  any links out there show how to do this please?
Doing STARTTLS is better than SMTPS, because it is backwards compatible 
with traditional SMTP.

In any event, to answer your question, install 
/usr/ports/security/stunnel, and read the manpage-- which is very well 
written, and has examples of doing SMTP and IMAP over SSL, I believe...

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Re: Measuring the stack usage of a program

2004-05-30 Thread Charles Swiger
On May 26, 2004, at 7:09 PM, Michael Sig Birkmose wrote:
Does anyone know, if it is possible to meassure the maximum stack 
usage of
a C program throughout it's entire execution?
Sure.  See man getrusage, specificly:
long ru_isrss;   /* integral unshared stack size */
...which tends to give you the maximum usage on most systems (because 
they don't shrink the stack if it becomes smaller).  You can also 
compare the addresses of automatic variables within the code of the 
program itself to see how the stack grows:

/* Test program to measure stack usage... */
void *
test_function(int count)
{
int foo = 1;
#if 0/* make the local frame much bigger */
char buf[1000];
sprintf(buf, %d\n, count);
#endif
if (count  0) {
return test_function(count - 1);
} else
return foo;
}
int
main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
int depth = 100;
unsigned long delta;
if (argc  1) depth = atoi(argv[1]);
delta = (unsigned long)depth - (unsigned long)test_function(depth);
printf(\nchange in stack size: %lu bytes.\n, delta);
return 0;
}
[ Yeah, yeah, I should use ptrdiff_t, but you get the idea... ]
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Re: Whatever happened to the sticky bit (for files)

2004-06-01 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 1, 2004, at 10:08 AM, Bill Moran wrote:
Unless I'm mistaken, at one time turning on the sticky bit on a binary 
would
tell the kernel not to swap out that program when it was running (or
somtehing similar ... I think it used to mean kernel must never swap 
out
this data)
That's right, although it's been a few years since that has been used 
by any OS I can point to.  :-)

The general idea was that if the system is under VM pressure, it would 
end up swapping out pages of memory from inactive processes, only you 
don't want to swap out parts of /bin/sh, or cron, or some other 
long-running daemons, because you'll end up wanting those pages 
resident again soon.  So you'd mark certain important executables with 
the sticky bit to help the VM system focus on evicting less critical 
pages.

Anyway ... considering the arguments that swap algorithms can be stupid
(they have to balance the need for disk cache with the need for app 
space)
Wouldn't it make sense to put some of that power back in the hands of 
the
admins and developers?
Maybe.  The situation may more closely resemble the case of using the 
register keyword in C code.  At one point, that helped the compilers 
focus on optimizing the right variables, and also had the advantage of 
preventing usage of those variables from being potential memory aliases 
to other parts of memory.

Nowadays, the compilers do a good enough job of optimizing register 
usage for themselves that the register keyword is somewhere between 
not very useful and counterproductive.

VM paging algorithms have improved since the usage of the sticky bit 
was common, and available physical memory on typical systems has also 
increased significantly.  VM systems which use a global page-fault 
frequency algorithm to help balance memory usage between processes tend 
to give /bin/sh and other essential daemons enough RAM that you don't 
tend to swap out their pages anyway when the VM system is looking for 
pages to evict.

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Re: Networking w/ FreeBSD

2004-06-01 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 1, 2004, at 2:07 PM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
My question is this: How would I set something up to perform the same
functionality, as when I had windows? I'm just not sure what needs to 
be
installed on either system? Any ideas or comments would be great!
FreeBSD supports mounting Samba/CIFS shares.  See man mount_smbfs.
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Re: Running FreeBSD/PostgreSQL on high-end dual Xeon box

2004-06-03 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 3, 2004, at 5:42 PM, Kenji M wrote:
I am currently specing a 2U dual Xeon server and hope to use
RAID 0+1 capability.  The question is for PostgreSQL admins...
1) Which RAID controller should we use?
You haven't mentioned whether you plan to use SCSI or IDE drives.  The 
PERC RAID controller in Dell's PowerEdge's works quite well for the 
former, but you might consider the 3ware twe if you're doing IDE.

2) Considering Q1, does it not even make sense to use 
FreeBSD+PostgreSQL
and bite the bullet and go with Linux (assuming it has better hw RAID
support) and run PostgreSQL on that using a fancier journaling 
filesystem.
Hmm.  What makes you think that a journalling filesystem gains you much 
when you are running a database?

Databases do their own transaction management using two-phase commit 
and logfiles for rollback in case of a crash using a few very large 
files, which they'll write to directly using async/directIO (whatever 
the term you wish to use is), rather than using OS/filesystem 
buffering

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Re: Leaving a server on all day

2004-06-08 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 8, 2004, at 1:27 PM, Jonathon McKitrick wrote:
Hopefully I'll get my flat screen back soon from repair.  I guess 
those use
less power, right?  Also, a 1.8GHz Athlon won't use any more power than
necessary during idle time, right?
Yes, a flat screen typically uses about 50W; a big CRT might use 100 to 
150W.

AMD processors now have fairly good thermal behavior when they are 
idle, although it obviously helps if one can enable APCI and power 
management capabilities to either throttle down the CPU speed or even 
go into sleep mode.

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Re: Leaving a server on all day

2004-06-08 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 8, 2004, at 2:54 PM, Cordula's Web wrote:
AMD processors now have fairly good thermal behavior when they are
idle, although it obviously helps if one can enable APCI and power
management capabilities to either throttle down the CPU speed or even
go into sleep mode.
What about other architectures? If you don't need x86 compat,
perhaps CPU models in other arches have much lower consumption?
Certainly this is true of the ARM and even the Motorola 68K, as you 
mention:

For a box that runs mainly as router, apache, postfix, cyrus, ...
even an old MC68k would do just fine (esp. if you are limited
by bandwidth, not CPU cycles...).
...there are a lot of people using an embedded M68K as a low-power 
applicance computing device.

Perhaps something like Soekris boards could be useful? Has
someone used them to build a power-saving server?
Sure.  I've got a Soekris net4801 sitting right next to me which is 
running some custom network monitoring/IDS/IPS software, and the Via 
EPIA mini-ITX form factor is another good choice for low-power 
computing.  The EPIAs seem to have slightly flaky ATA support, though.

Anyone living in a country with exorbitant high taxes on power
lurking here?
People here in the US got to pay for Enron and the like, sure, 
especially those in CA.

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Re: Leaving a server on all day

2004-06-08 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 8, 2004, at 4:06 PM, Bill Moran wrote:
Charles Swiger [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
No need to guess, use an amp-meter.  :-)
What a crazy idea.
I seem to remember plugging monitors into a UPS in an attempt to use 
the cheesy
load meter lights to tell which was drawing more juice, when that 
didn't
show us any difference, we tried watching the power meter outside ... 
trying to
guess which monitor made it spin faster ...
:-)  The smart versions of UPSes (as in, APC's SmartUPS line) will 
often have a serial connection which not only does the deassert DTR 
when the battery is low thingy, but will communicate other information 
about the state of the UPS.  That will include the power consumption of 
the load measured more accurately than 5 green LEDs would be able to 
show you.

A really serious UPS, such as a PowerWare 9330, may have ethernet and 
SNMP support and will do things like tell you the power factor of the 
load, typically about 0.9 for computer stuff.  But I admit, a 20kVA UPS 
is outside of what a normal home user would want.  And the batteries 
are freaking heavy... :-)

I have one machine with an AMD 1800+ (1.54 MHz T'bred-B), which runs 
at
perhaps 48 or 50 C if the system is idle.  If I run something like
[EMAIL PROTECTED] for a day or so, the CPU will go up to around 56 or even 57 
C
as a result of the load.  The difference in thermal output due to load
is very obvious.
But is thermal output a reliable indicator of power usage?  Logically, 
it seems
like it would be, but I'd hate to assume.
Conservation of energy is a law, so any assumptions being made are 
pretty safe.

When you pump 0.5 amps @ 120VAC into a 60 watt light-bulb, you end up 
getting about 54 watts of radiant heat and about 6 watts of visible 
light.  A computer's CPU eats about the same amount of power, and sends 
a watt or so back out in terms of data signals, but most of the energy 
used by the processor to actually process data gets emitted as heat.

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[OT] Re: Leaving a server on all day

2004-06-08 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 8, 2004, at 5:06 PM, Bernt. H wrote:
No need to guess, use an amp-meter.  :-)
Well If it measure trueRMS then you could use it, otherwise no.
You are correct that one needs to measure the voltage and use the RMS 
value, or DC series equivalent if you like that phrase, in order to 
figure out the power consumption accurately, but an {ammeter, 
amp-meter, DMM} which can deal with AC will do the right thing.

Radio Shack and the like will sell something with male and female 
plugs that will measure both voltage and current, and give you the 
current power load in Watts.  Smart UPSes may also have a similar 
capability.
Yes but it will only show you the correct value if the load is a pure 
resistans, not if it's reactiv, as all switching psu's are.
The ratio between the actual load and a purely resistive load is known 
as the power factor, and is why UPS are rated in terms of kVA rather 
than in terms of the wattage of the load.  For computer equipment [1], 
the power factor is lagging, representing an inductive rather than 
capacitive load, and the PF is typically about 0.9.

However, the electric company bills you for the power you draw from 
them, they don't give you a refund for the power wasted because your 
load is not purely resistive, so the notion of measuring the kVA rather 
than the useful wattage is not really incorrect.

--
-Chuck
[1]: And almost everything else, too.  Most things use a transformer to 
convert line voltage into whatever voltage the device wants, which is 
inductive, or consist of a motor, also inductive.  Motors which draw a 
lot of current when starting (which is most of them) tend to have a 
starting capacitor to help manage the surge current and also help 
adjust the power factor back towards 1.0 to improve their efficiency.  
The so-called ballast in fluorescent lights serves much the same 
purpose.

We thank you for tuning in to basic electronics, and return you to your 
regularly scheduled FreeBSD programming.  :-)

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Re: Some Simple Questions

2004-06-14 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 14, 2004, at 12:28 AM, Spuds wrote:
1) Is FreeBSD truly free, as in I don't have to pay for it and can  
download it at no charge or is FreeBSD just a name?
Yes, FreeBSD is free as in you don't have to pay for it.  You can  
download .iso images of the CDs to burn yourself for no charge from  
ftp.freebsd.org or other mirrors from:

http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/mirrors- 
ftp.html

2) Is FreeBSD in any way affected by the SCO lawsuits against Linux  
distributors and commercial users, as I am aware that FreeBSD is based  
on Unix? I believe it is the fact that Linux may have Unix code, but I  
am not sure, as I have read many different opinions.
FreeBSD is Unix, as in derived from the BSD sources.  SCO hasn't made  
any efforts to sue FreeBSD users or the project, and IMO are even less  
likely to succeed if they tried then they are likely to win their cases  
against Linux.

3) Is FreeBSD compatible with Linux software? I believe I read that  
somewhere.
Yes, there is Linux binary compatibility support which gives you  
something close to a RedHat 7 environment.

4) Can FreeBSD run on a laptop that is hardware compatible, as I know  
some OS's cannot run on laptops but can on desktops?
Sure.
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Re: FreeBSD 4-10 install, RAM parity errors that don't seem to happen inLinux.

2004-06-14 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 14, 2004, at 1:38 PM, Derrick MacPherson wrote:
Derrick MacPherson dmacpherson at mainframe.ca writes:
I am trying to move as much of our servers as I can to FreeBSD, and
there's a few boxes that they have here that the RAM is a about 2 mm
high and requires the case (1U machines) to press on the RAM when
closed. These machines run RH Linux for months without a problem, yet 
3
out of 4 I just pulled are giving RAM parity problems during FreeBSD
instalation.

Does FreeBSD not allow/recover from those types of errors the same way
Linux does? Any solutions?
I posted this last week and hadn't seen a repsonse to it, is there 
someone that
cares to take a poke at this?
Well, if you are using ECC, normally they will correct all single-bit 
errors and notice but not correct larger multibit errors.  This is done 
at a fairly low level in the hardware (which is why the BIOS typically 
controls the use of ECC), and is not something that is supposed to vary 
depending on which OS you are using.

That being said, Linux and FreeBSD might be using different portions of 
memory which hit different RAM chips, and so you see the errors for one 
and not the other, but if you've got failing RAM, your systems are not 
going to be stable under heavy load regardless of what OS you use.  I 
would expect you to see signs of problems under Linux, too, but 
consider running memtest86 for a day or so and see what you see:

http://www.memtest86.com/
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Re: Anyone else having trouble with Ethereal freezing up?

2004-06-14 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 14, 2004, at 3:23 PM, Bill Moran wrote:
Ethereal starts, but when I try to start a capture, it just freezes.
Anyone else seeing this trouble?  Anyone got any suggestions?
Hmm, try using tcpdump?  Also, I've seen packet sniffers freeze like 
this if they try to perform DNS lookups and are waiting for answers 
(due to DNS being slow, unavailable, etc)

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Re: Sendmail for Large Sites

2004-06-18 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 18, 2004, at 7:13 AM, Martin McCormick wrote:
How well does the administration of Sendmail scale up to sites
serving as many as 25,000 users?
Sendmail is fine for the task, as the main issues to be concerned about 
have more to due with user-agents reading the mail (as in, your POP and 
IMAP servers), and how mailboxes are kept, than with the MTA and 
SMTP-level issues.

I am mainly interested in Sendmail's capacity at this time in
order to suggest it as a possibility if it is realistic to do so.
Sure, sendmail can solve the problem as specified.  Let me mention a 
book by Nick Christenson, SENDMAIL Performance Tuning, ISBN 
0-321-11570-8, because it would certainly help you, and because it has 
a section worth quoting here on page 10:

---
1.7 Email System Profiling
More times than I care to remember, I've had a conversation with 
someone trying to specify an email system that went like the following:

Them: I need to build an email server using Sun equipment that will 
handle X number of users.  What hardware should I buy?

Me:   Well, that completely depends.
Them: On what?
Me:   On their usage profiles.  How many messages does each person send 
and receive each day?  What is the average message size?  How fast is 
your Internet connection?  What percentage of your peak day's total 
traffic occur during the peak hour?

[ ... ]
When it comes to email servers, it seems that just about the only 
information anyone can obtain from a prospective client is the number 
of users.  Unfortunately for performance purposes, this figure is just 
about the least useful metric for evaluating email service load.

There are other considerations such as the facts that all
incoming and outgoing messages are checked for malicious attachments.
ldap is used to drive the setting of customer mail delivery
preferences and even their user ID choice.
Cyrus' IMAP and SASL software will play friendly with LDAP, as will 
sendmail itself.  amavisd + clamav is a good solution for scanning mail 
for viruses and the like.

You should strongly consider using maildir rather than mbox-style mail 
delivery.
You might want to consider postfix instead of sendmail.

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Re: any use to build from source?

2004-06-18 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 18, 2004, at 2:29 PM, Patrick Useldinger wrote:
Certainly, it allows you to compile with the compiler options you 
want, you are able to optimize the binaries for your CPU, but: does it 
really matter? Are the speed improvements really visible?
Tweaking the compiler flags and targetting your specific CPU 
architecture generally doesn't make a visible difference.  More 
precisely, if you aren't benchmarking the changes, they are likely to 
not be significant enough that you can tell.

However, for some categories of software, such as multimedia players 
and the like which want to take advantage of MMX/SSE/3Dnow!/etc, doing 
so can make quite a difference.

Dependencies was another argument: you compile with the correct 
headers of dependant files, well... is that really so? If you upgraded 
the dependant binaries, wouldn't you get the same effect?
If the dependencies are done correctly, you'll get the same effect.
However, as soon as you start considering options like which version of 
BerkeleyDB to use, or which version of SASL, etc, the number of 
combinations becomes large enough that the generic precompiled packages 
may not correspond to your specific environment.

One certain drawback of compiling from source is the compilation time. 
Large packages like KDE or OpenOffice take ages, so you can't just 
quickly upgrade a whole system, or a large part of it. I might add 
that I am more the typical desktop user, not using my machines for 
real and specific server apps.
Well, yes.  KDE and OpenOffice are vast, bloated, suffer from creeping 
featurism, and thus resemble the Windows products they attempt to 
emulate in more ways then their authors probably want them to.

One could pick on Mozilla or many other large, cross-platform software 
packages for this sort of thing as well.  Mozilla seems to internally 
re-implement most of the BSD sockets APIs internally, as well as bits 
and pieces of many other Unix/POSIX APIs.

So, my question is basically: did you, in your experience, find that 
compiling from source *really* has any serious advantages that make up 
for the time it takes?
Oh, yes.  The first time you run into a problem and fix it yourself, or 
make a change to the programs to add some feature that you want, you 
will discover the serious advantages.

However, if you never try to fix bugs or write code for yourself, then 
you aren't going to gain nearly as much from using source compared with 
using precompiled binaries.

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Re: Sendmail and /var/spool/mqueue

2004-06-19 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 17, 2004, at 2:39 PM, Bill Moran wrote:
What does it mean when I have a lot of files in /var/spool/mqueue?  I 
don't
really understand what that particular queue is for.
That is the queue of unsent messages which sendmail will periodicly 
attempt to resend (every four hours, by default).  You can try to flush 
them via sendmail -v -q.

This client is not having any problems getting/sending mail, and the 
mailq
command only shows one mail in the queue, but I have 3867 files in this
directory.
Hmm.  Sendmail tends to accumulate spam-related bounces which can't be 
delivered because the spam used forged headers, and I've seen some 
signs that sendmail doesn't always manage to clean up the queue files 
of such messages after they can't be delivered for 5 days.

[ I seem to recall that the sendmail operations guide recommends moving 
mqueue to oqueue, creating a new mqueue, and then processing the oqueue 
by hand.  Once that is completed, delete oqueue and any leftover 
files ]

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Re: Installing FreeBSD on Sparc Ultra II clone

2004-06-21 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 21, 2004, at 3:23 PM, Matthew Seaman wrote:
I admit I had never heard of a sparc clone
made by them. Seeing as the sparc based models listed on the
www.tsti.com site look kind of old hat nowadays, I don't thing it's
safe to assume 'Tatung' means 'Sparc Clone' any more...
A client of ours once bought one for use for development purposes 
before going into production with real Sun hardware,  The Tatung SPARC 
clones closely resemble the Sun Ultra 10s.

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Re: Redirection with a bridge ?

2004-06-21 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 21, 2004, at 4:48 PM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
Is it possible to redirect packets that are being passed through a 
bridge
based on their protocol/port, so that if a HTTP packet (port 80) goes
through the bridge, no matter what its destination is, it will be
redirected to IP address 4.3.2.1.
Yes.  In order to redirect packets to a different IP address, you have 
to rewrite those packets, which is what natd or ipnat do, working at 
layer 3.

Thats what I'm trying to solve.  I know that you can do the above
successfully if you are using a NAT (ipnat) or if you are doing routing
(IPFW's forward command), but is it possible to do it with a bridge?
Bridging works at layer-2.  Without using NAT, bridging alone will 
forward the traffic but not change the destination IP to 4.3.2.1.

Note that the IPFW forward command redirects traffic via a specific 
outbound interface, it does not perform layer-3 routing (ie, your 
traditional IP stuff using netmasks, gateways, and the local routing 
table that most people mean by the word routing).

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Re: Msn Voice conversation

2004-06-21 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 21, 2004, at 4:21 PM, Dj Uwins wrote:
I'm trying to get msn voice conversation working through NATD. I've 
been
reading alot of posts and there are others who can't seem to get this
working by trying to forward ports in natd.conf.
Yes, the H.323 protocol family is a nightmare in terms of complexity 
and it simply doesn't play nice with NAT or reasonable firewall 
configurations.  My recommendation would be to block the H.323 protocol 
entirely and use something else rather than compromise one's security.

Does anyone know how to make this happen?
This is a hard problem which may not be solvable without paying license 
fees for proprietary H.323 resources and documentation.  Have you 
looked into getting a commercial firewall which supports H.323 proxying 
via NAT...?

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Re: Redirection with a bridge ?

2004-06-21 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 21, 2004, at 5:10 PM, Matt Juszczak wrote:
[ ... ]
So basically, I either have to use some other form of redirecting web 
packets (a bogus DNS server maybe), or switch to a NAT instead of a 
bridge.  Correct?
Yes, more or less.  There are other approaches which could be taken 
which are more complex, but the basic answer is that NAT is probably 
the right approach.

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Re: something through nat - something not

2004-06-23 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 23, 2004, at 4:27 PM, Tomica Crnek wrote:
box is connected to one (outside) network with 2 interfaces
What does this mean?
what I want to do is to configure it to route packets to these 
chosen subnets directly - no nat, but I want to be able to see 
entire outside network from inside net also.
Standard IP-based routing will move packets from one subnet to another 
subnet, without using NAT.  I'm not sure what you mean by able to see 
in this context, however: are you talking about being able to send IP 
traffic to them, are you talking about having them on the same physical 
subnet by bridging, and thus be able to ARP the hosts even though they 
are on two different logical networks, or what?

So these packets should be passed to natd. I don't know which outside 
interface will be chosen because both outside interfaces are in 
dynamic routing backbone.
Above you said no nat, here you ask about passing some traffic to 
natd.  What are you trying to do?  Do you want to use NAT or not?

Your second comment about which outside interface will be chosen is 
also unclear.  What dynamic routing is going on, and what does the 
topology look like?

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Re: Redirection with a bridge ?

2004-06-23 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 22, 2004, at 9:02 AM, Matt Juszczak wrote:
What are some of the other approaches (if you dont mind).  I can't 
really do a NAT, I'd really like to stay with a bridge and not do any 
routing.
Normally, something like squid listens on a specific port and only 
proxies requests which are explicitly sent to it.  If you set up Squid 
on a dual-homed machine acting as a firewall, you can configure all 
clients to use it without them being able to route traffic outside of 
the firewall themselves.  In that case, squid will talk to the outside 
world using the external interface, but talk to the clients using 
whatever local subnet IP addresses they have, without using NAT or 
anything else.

A more complex approach would be to the network interface in 
promiscuous mode and use a divert socket to forward all normal web 
traffic (HTTP, 80/tcp) to the Squid proxy regardless.  That has the 
advantage of not having to configure the clients to use a proxy, 
however.  Anyway. I don't think setting this up is easier than using 
NAT, but perhaps you might find the concept useful

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Re: Mozilla, where did I go wrong?

2004-06-23 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 23, 2004, at 5:32 PM, LW Ellis wrote:
I installed Mozilla 1.5 thur the ports package, on FreeBSD 5.2
When I run in it KDE
It disotrts the KDE background image.
THe toolbar color of the Mozilla browser is a dark maroon or purple,
The background of the pages are a light purple.
What color depth are you running your X server at?
If you're running in 8-bit orpossibly even 16-bit modes, Mozilla may be 
stealing colors for itself that other programs like KDE were using; if 
so, switch to running at 24/32-bit color depth...

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Re: A few X questions (small X load for small drive needed)

2004-06-25 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 25, 2004, at 5:21 PM, Joe Schmoe wrote:
What are some options I can add to the standard `make
install` command for that port to significantly reduce
the size of X ?
Any general comments on making a smaller/faster/more
efficient X for an old laptop are greatly appreciated.
X11 doesn't really fit the criteria of small and efficient, I'm afraid. 
 This being said, you can try to install just x11/XFree86-4-libraries 
and the specific X11 client apps you want to run...

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Re: REPOST: Performance problems with FTP

2004-06-29 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 29, 2004, at 2:02 PM, Bill Moran wrote:
I'm having some really weird problems with ftp performance on FreeBSD 
4.10
that I just can't seem to figure out.

My uplink here maxes out at about 35k/sec.  If I scp to the machine in 
question
I get about 30k/sec (which is expected) but when I ftp, I never get 
anything
better than 15k/sec, and occasionally as low as 8k/sec.
[ ... ]
I tried running the ftp daemon that ships with FreeBSD, as well as 
Proftpd and
they both exhibit the same performance issues.
I haven't seen any signs of such problems with 4.10.  Given that you've 
reproduced this using different FTP servers, it seems more likely to be 
a network issue or some hardware glitch (cables? flaky NIC?) than a 
software issue.

Have you asked your ISP about the issue?
Can you reproduce by moving ftp to a different port #?  (Perhaps some 
quality-of-service thingy is providing different bandwidth by port...)
Does passive versus active FTP make a difference?
Anything interesting in 'netstat -s'?

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Re: REPOST: Performance problems with FTP

2004-06-29 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 29, 2004, at 3:38 PM, Bill Moran wrote:
Charles Swiger [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
I haven't seen any signs of such problems with 4.10.  Given that 
you've
reproduced this using different FTP servers, it seems more likely to 
be
a network issue or some hardware glitch (cables? flaky NIC?) than a
software issue.
I hadn't even considered hardware, becuase scp is always as fast as I
would expect.  I wouldn't suspect a NIC or HDD, unless the problem was
consistent with _all_ file transfers, and it's not.  The performance
issue only occurs with FTP.  If I'm wrong on this, I'd be happy to hear
about it, though.
You're not wrong, and I don't see anything obviously wrong, so I'm 
reaching for possibilities to check.  :-)

Can you reproduce by moving ftp to a different port #?  (Perhaps some
quality-of-service thingy is providing different bandwidth by port...)
I haven't tried that, but I forgot to mention that a Debian box located
right next to the problem box (on the same network) gets speeds equal
to what would be expected.  To me, that ruled out QOS, routing and 
other
beyond-my-control Internet problems.  Again, I'm happy to be corrected
if there's something here I'm not aware of.
Well, that does tend to rule out a bunch of issues.  Have you tried 
changing the MTU of the FreeBSD box down to 1400 or so (or even 512), 
just to see whether that does anything?

This is just a snippet ... but it looks like an awful lot of 
retransmits
and duplicates to me.  I hadn't looked at this before, is this 
indicative
of any particular problem?
You're seeing ~1% or less retransmits, that's pretty normal.
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Re: Using syslog(3) after chroot-ing

2004-06-30 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 29, 2004, at 6:22 PM, Mikhail Teterin wrote:
Is there a similar trick to make it use the local timezone instead of
UTC? I'm surprised, the time is interpreted by the sender (rather than
by the syslogd-recipient), but it is -- and I want it to be local,
without copying /etc/localtime into the chroot tree.
What happens if you set TZ in the environment which syslogd is started 
up from?

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Re: REPOST: Performance problems with FTP

2004-06-30 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 29, 2004, at 11:08 PM, Bill Moran wrote:
Charles Swiger [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
Well, that does tend to rule out a bunch of issues.  Have you tried
changing the MTU of the FreeBSD box down to 1400 or so (or even 512),
just to see whether that does anything?
OK.  I've had a bit of success here ...
By setting the MTU down to ~650, I get the best performance I've seen
with this setup (about 27k/sec ... which isn't too bad)  I set
SocketOptions maxseg 650 in the proftpd.conf file for now, which 
seems
to help a good bit.
Bingo, found something!  All should be easy from here on out...  :-)
But I'm really confused.  Why does reducing the MTU improve 
performance?
I would have thought it would hurt performance by increasing the # of
packets, thus increasing overhead.
Using a smaller MTU normally does hurt performance, as you have to send 
more packets (as you've said) and because the overhead (ratio of packet 
header size to data size) becomes larger.  However, using an MTU which 
is too big means packets have to be fragmented and reassembled, which 
slows things down a lot, too.

Anyway, it is likely that one of the networks involved in the 
connection has a smaller MTU than normal, which means large data 
packets get fragmented, resulting in delays.  FTP data connections tend 
to show this more than scp does, as the latter seems to vary the packet 
size more: perhaps a result of using compression/encryption within the 
SSH protocol.

I did some captures using Ethereal, and I'm seeing a weird pause (with
the MTU at the default) where the client will send three packets, 
there'll
be a pause, then the ack comes back, then three packets, pause, ack ...
That rings a bell.  Are you using path MTU discovery?  Is some firewall 
in place that might be blocking ICMP_UNREACH_NEEDFRAG messages (ICMP 
type 3, subtype 4)?

You should try doing a traceroute which can do pMTU testing; I'm not 
sure whether the stock FreeBSD traceroute can do this, but a search 
ought to dig up something.

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Re: Using syslog(3) after chroot-ing

2004-06-30 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jun 30, 2004, at 3:00 PM, Mikhail Teterin wrote:
=What happens if you set TZ in the environment which syslogd is started
=up from?
That's an idea. Can I just call tzset() (or tzsetwall()?) prior to
chroot-ing?
I suspect that you could indeed.  Again, just to be clear: the 
timestamps are produced by syslogd, not by the program doing the 
logging, so you'd have to change syslogd itself.

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Re: strange pw behaviour

2004-07-02 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jul 2, 2004, at 6:47 AM, Jonas Sonntag wrote:
must ask again... I'm still stuck with this. It's pretty weird. I have 
10
directories each owned by a unique group. All 10 directories are set 
750.
The groups have been added using pw and user www has been made a 
member of
every group by using pw. This has worked a hundred times. Information 
is
correct in /etc/group.
How many groups is the www user in?  By default, the system only 
permits a user to belong to up to 16 groups...

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Re: max physical memory per process?

2003-09-12 Thread Charles Swiger
On Friday, September 12, 2003, at 04:19 PM, Steven G. Kargl wrote:
Assuming that a user has the proper resource limits
set and assuming that the system has sufficient physical
memory, what is the maximum amount of physical memory
that a process can allocate?  In particular, if I have
a Tyan K8W (dual opteron platform) with 16 GB of memory,
can my numerical simulation allocate up 15+ GB?
If FreeBSD takes advantage of the Opteron as a 64-bit (LP) platform, 
yes.  Otherwise, you're probably limited to around 3 GB.

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Re: antiviruos for FreeBSD mail server ?

2003-09-25 Thread Charles Swiger
On Thursday, September 25, 2003, at 03:39 AM, Armand Passelac wrote:
[ ... ]
In the community, the Vexira Antivirus seems to have a very very good 
reputation : http://www.centralcommand.com/vexira_mailarmor_linux.html

You can see this article for a good anti-virus list : 
http://www.tummy.com/articles/VirusScanners
Vexira/Central Command has a habit of astroturfing newsgroups and 
mailing lists attempting to sell their product.  They've made deceptive 
and misleading claims about the performance of their products on 
comp.mail.sendmail and refused to substantiate them.

	---

From: Per Hedeland ([EMAIL PROTECTED])
Subject: Re: Antivirus and sendmail
Newsgroups: comp.mail.sendmail
Date: 2002-09-16 16:35:06 PST
As I'm sure the faithful readers of this group has noticed, there is
some virus protection software called Vexira MailArmor out there. These
users have posted one or more articles praising it to the group in the
last month:
 Allen Campbell [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Bob Culinski [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Chris Jalowski [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 George Wilson [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Henrik Stroemer [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Jason T. Simon [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Martin TauerBach [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Looking a bit closer at their postings, I noticed a strange coincidence:
They all use a newsreader called MicroPlanet Gravity v2.50. Now, I
know nothing about this newsreader, I'm sure it's great - but it doesn't
seem very common among the posters to this group. In fact, out of the
2000+ posts currently in my news spool, only 21 were made using it - and
strangely enough 15 of those talk about the abovementioned software (a
few of them are asking or answering questions about it rather than
praising it).
Or, put another way - if you want to buy virus protection software from
spammers, you know where to find it.
--Per Hedeland
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
-- forwarded message --

From: Chuck Swiger [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Newsgroups: comp.mail.sendmail
Subject: Re: Need to stop viruses from going through Sendmail
Date: Thu, 28 Nov 2002 18:27:41 + (UTC)
Kelvin Tigg [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
Vexira MailArmor is also priced per domain with something like 5-6K 
users
included with a standard license. We chose the an unlimited license 
for us
though. Sure we looked at rav antivirus and had some issues with it 
but I
see no need to discuss all the problems we had with it here. When we 
tested
actual performance of the virus scanning  Vexira clearly is a true
enterprise class virus scanner for Sendmail. We pumped the test from
10-100-1000 msg per second and Vexira had no issues with the volume. I 
am
not here to persuade you to use anything I am simply posting our 
experience
with Vexira and what we found out.
My dear astroturfing friend, you should probably read the FTC's rules on
advertising and marketing:
http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/buspubs/ruleroad.htm
http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/guides/endorse.htm
What's going to happen is that you are going to identify the hardware 
that you
tested Vexira with 1000 message per second throughput, as well as 
which
company you work for, and provide full disclosure of any connections 
you have
with Central Command per section 255.5 Disclosure of material 
connections.

Or a certain company in Ohio is going to learn something about 
jurisdiction.
Apropos of nothing in particular, if someone was found to have forged
endorsements from, say, Ford Motor Company, they might also learn 
something
about how understanding corporate laywers from large companies are, 
besides
having the FTC asking friendly questions.

I look forward to your response,
-Chuck
   Chuck Swiger | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | All your packets are belong 
to us.
   
-+---+---
   The human race's favorite method for being in control of the 
facts
is to ignore them.  -Celia Green

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Re: Configuring imap-uw difficulties

2003-09-29 Thread Charles Swiger
On Monday, September 29, 2003, at 01:10 PM, Ryan Sandridge wrote:
My trouble is with changing some of the defaults.  Unless I'm missing 
something, all configuration is done through re-compiling rather than 
a configuration file.  Not my preference, but I can deal with that.  
In particular I modify .../src/osdep/unix/env_unix.c to change the 
mail subdirectory name.

I thought after making this change, all I needed to do was '$ cd 
/usr/ports/mail/imap-uw' then type '$ make' to rebuild it with the 
changes.  But it seems to think it is up to date (so doesn't 
recompile).  So perhaps my confusion is really due to lack of 
understanding of the Ports system or of how to compile.
You should try the following:

cd /usr/ports/mail/imap-uw
make clean
make deinstall
make patch
[ ...change the env_unix.c file under the work subdir... ]
make
make install
--
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Re: tar vs cp

2003-10-01 Thread Charles Swiger
On Wednesday, October 1, 2003, at 04:03 PM, Felix Deichmann wrote:
Chuck Swiger wrote:
tar handles symbolic links properly, whereas cp will copy through 
the contents of the link.
Also true for cp -R? :-)
No, but not all systems have cp -R, although FreeBSD does.  Likewise 
for the -p or --preserve-permissions option...

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Re: Porting to FreeBSD

2003-10-16 Thread Charles Swiger
On Thursday, October 16, 2003, at 06:11 PM, Daniela wrote:
I found many interesting Linux programs on sourceforge.net and other  
sites,
but they're not in the ports collection. So I thought I'll port some  
of these
to FreeBSD. However, I'm still pretty new to FreeBSD and I never ported
anything.
Start here:  
http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/porters-handbook/ 
index.html

I can't even compile most of the programs on my system, and I'm almost  
sure it
has to do with dependencies in 99% of all cases.  How do I find out  
what ports/programs it depends on? And yes, I have RTFM, but I still  
have no clue.
Most programs have a README which identifies any dependencies they  
might have.  If a Linux package exists for the program (ie, such as an  
RPM), you could also look at that to gain an idea as to the  
dependencies.   Beyond that, however, the problem lies in the fact that  
many people don't write particularly portable code, and you will need  
to resolve such issues by patching the program to work under FreeBSD.

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Re: Third Party Patches that link to OpenSSL

2003-10-16 Thread Charles Swiger
On Thursday, October 16, 2003, at 07:09 PM, Matthew Luckie wrote:
I've written an OpenSSL plugin for gaim that allows gaim to use the 
OpenSSL libraries that come installed with FreeBSD.  Gaim is a GPL 
application, OpenSSL is BSD licensed, and apparently there are license 
issues to deal with as a result.

http://www.openssl.org/support/faq.html#LEGAL2
The first part of that reference starts with On many systems including 
the major Linux and BSD distributions, yes (the GPL does not place 
restrictions on using libraries that are part of the normal operating 
system distribution).

...and that would apply here, since FreeBSD supports OpenSSL as part of 
the normal OS distribution.

They've said that unless the gaim project sanctions the use of OpenSSL 
with their code, that I should not release the code.  Apparently that 
would require contacting all of the prior developers to get their 
permission.
Who is they?

Anyway, if there was a meaningful license conflict between Gaim and 
OpenSSL, the GPL (section 7) would forbid you from redistributing your 
modified version of Gaim+OpenSSL, but it would not forbid you from 
redistributing your patches by themselves.

The upshot is that while the end-user using those patches might be 
subject to patent infringement issues due to OpenSSL including RC5, 
IDEA, or other such algorithms which are patented in some parts of the 
world-- and thus would not be able to redistribute the result of 
applying your patches for the same reasons mentioned above-- they would 
be able to personally _use_ the result without violating the GPL.

IANAL, TINLA.  Does this help...?  :-)

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Re: Error Message

2003-10-20 Thread Charles Swiger
On Monday, October 20, 2003, at 02:11 PM, Bob Moore Computer Recruiters 
TekJobs.com wrote:
I'm doing
pine -inbox-path=users/tekjobs/mail/Trash
Gives me this message
Your terminal, of type ansi, is lacking functions needed to run pine.
What do I need to do?
Where are you running pine?  If you're logging in directly on the 
machine, setting TERM to 'cons25' is likely correct.  If you're running 
X-windows, try using 'xterm' or 'vt100' as the value of TERM.

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Re: unable to use multiple exports for mountd

2003-10-21 Thread Charles Swiger
On Tuesday, October 21, 2003, at 11:21 AM, Jason Cribbins wrote:
I have been dealing with this problem for many years and never really
found a reasonable solution or explanation and now it has come to a
point where I can no longer find work arounds to make it work the way I
need it.
How do I export more than one folder for export with different options
for each?
Use symlinks to create seperate export points which refer to that same 
one folder.  I've written up a document which might give you some 
insight:

http://www.pkix.net/~chuck/NFS/article.html

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Re: RAID 0 After the install?

2003-10-28 Thread Charles Swiger
On Tuesday, October 28, 2003, at 02:57 AM, Joe Pokupec wrote:
- If I use a hardware ATA RAID card, are there certain system settings
required for FreeBSD to recognize this, or is the RAID format done at a
platform-independent level (BIOS or other boot utilities)?
It depends.  Some have a OS-level driver or utility (perhaps one that 
runs under Linux emulation), others work via the BIOS.

- If one of the 2 hard drives fail, the data will still be visible and
accessible on the remaining drive correct?
No.  RAID-0 provides no redundancy; use RAID-1 mirroring instead.

How easy is it to replace the
failed drive? Will the data from the good drive automatically copy 
over to
the newly replaced drive or are there a lot of shenanigans involved?
This also depends.  Generally, you have to kick of a mirror rebuild via 
the BIOS, but some hardware is smarter about this than other hardware.

- Is it possible to stripe only 1 drive as RAID 0 with the intention of
dropping in another drive later?
Yes, but doing so isn't useful: the end result is a concatenation 
rather than a true RAID-0 stripe, and you don't gain any performance 
advantages.

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Re: Load Average more than 400

2003-10-28 Thread Charles Swiger
On Tuesday, October 28, 2003, at 12:05 PM, Varshavchick Alexander wrote:
can you please hint as what parameters I have monitor to find the 
cause of
sudden splashes of load of a FreeBSD 4.6.2-RELEASE server? This box is
acting as a database/mysql server and periodically goes up to 400 of 
load
average values and then gradually returns to a normal 4-5 value.
What does ps auxw look like when you have this load spike?

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Re: internet setup

2003-10-29 Thread Charles Swiger
On Oct 29, 2003, at 4:16 PM, B F wrote:
FreeBSD machine
|
|
   \|/
Switch--Cable modem-internet
   /|\
|
|
WindowsXP machine
I have Roadrunner cable service ( i know, it sucks, but i get it for 
free).  Can someone just tell me step by step how to get my internet 
running starting from a FreeBSD clean install?  I have spent days 
trying different things I've read on websites and books, but have yet 
to get it working.  Thanks.
If your switch is something like a Linksys broadband router, which runs 
it's own DHCP server and maybe PPPOE, you should be able to just do a 
dhclient on the FreeBSD machine and be good to go.

Otherwise, you can set up your own local subnet on the switch, and then 
set up internet connection sharing on one machine or the other, but 
you'll need to add a second NIC, run NAT and PPPOE, and so forth.

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Re: Just curious, how large is FreeBSD?

2003-10-30 Thread Charles Swiger
On Oct 30, 2003, at 4:20 PM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
I just purchased FreeBSD 5.1 and got it installed 
sucessfully-YEAH!-yesterday.  I am a new newbie with no previous 
experience with UNIX, so I feel this is a wonderful accomplishment.  I 
ran accross one problem, though.  Every time I installed ALL, the 
installation froze after about 30 minutes.  I tried this about 8 times 
and realized that every time it froze on the exact same place.
Congratulations on trying something new; I hope you'll enjoy FreeBSD.

Anyway, your problem sounds a lot like APCI firing (ie, your machine 
going into sleep mode)-- try disabling APM/APCI via the BIOS or via the 
FreeBSD boot screen and see whether that helps.

  I eventually came to the conclusion that ALL could not fit on my 
hard drive (4Gb total) and installed the USER configuration with the X 
thing and only KDE packages and the installation was successful.  So 
was my conclusion correct?  Do I need a larger harddrive? Is 4Gb not 
enough for ALL?  How big is FreeBSD anyway?
That depends on how you partition your disk, but 4GB should be plenty.  
You can fit a full install into about 1 GB...

Good luck,
--
-Chuck
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Re: what happens when connection is lost ?

2003-10-31 Thread Charles Swiger
On Oct 31, 2003, at 11:54 AM, M.D. DeWar wrote:
Hello,
If I am logged in on a FreeBSD machine with ssh.
And doing say a ./configure or make  and I lose connection does that 
stop
what I was doing ?
In general, yes-- what happens is that a broken connection results in a 
hangup (HUP) signal being sent to the process group containing ssh, 
your shell, and whatever commands might have been running.

data get corrupted etc ?
Generally not.  The point of the HUP signal is to allow processes to 
shut down cleanly.  See man nohup, man signal

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-Xhuxk
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Re: M/B Bios Settings

2003-11-03 Thread Charles Swiger
On Nov 1, 2003, at 11:43 AM, Lowell Gilbert wrote:
knomadness [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
When setting up the video card configuration in
X-windows, how do you indicate or direct it to use the
AGP slot not a PCI slot?
Usually, by inserting a video card into an AGP slot instead of a PCI
slot.  If you have both installed, then the answer kind of depends on
why you did that; the PC architecture doesn't deal well with such a
configuration.
PC hardware deals fine with a video card in both the AGP slot and one 
or more PCI slots-- at least for the purposes of having several 
displays running at relatively high resolutions (eg, 1280x1024x32) 
doing normal desktop activities.  3D hardware acceleration isn't going 
to run very quickly on several PCI devices at once, true, or even one, 
if that was the concern, but 2D works fine.

This was on relatively generic hardware-- a buncha Dell machines 
between the 440 LX and BX chipsets [P2-300 through P3-700's], using 
mainly nVidia TNT2/early GeForce or ATI Radeon AGP cards and PCI-based 
Matrox Millenium's.  The admin who was setting these up ended up having 
around forteen monitors going between four machines.

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Re: lan bandwidth issue

2003-11-06 Thread Charles Swiger
On Nov 6, 2003, at 10:26 AM, Jack L. Stone wrote:
This price advice then implies that if Realtek simply raised their
prices, the card would be just fine...??
No.  The price advice implies that a NIC that is worth $5 is probably 
not as good as a NIC which is worth $50.  If Realtek raised their 
prices, their cards would become overpriced cheapo NICs rather than 
cheap cheapo NICs.  :-)

One should not just go by expensive, but do some research not just 
based
on that easy benchmark. The cheapo measurement is very misleading
considering some cards may just be on sale and are fine cards. ...or 
just
because they use the rlx driver
Speaking of which, /usr/src/sys/pci/rl.c provides some very specific 
technical details as to the design flaws with this chipset family:

/*
 * The RealTek 8139 PCI NIC redefines the meaning of 'low end.' This is
 * probably the worst PCI ethernet controller ever made, with the 
possible
 * exception of the FEAST chip made by SMC. The 8139 supports bus-master
 * DMA, but it has a terrible interface that nullifies any performance
 * gains that bus-master DMA usually offers.
 *
 * For transmission, the chip offers a series of four TX descriptor
 * registers. Each transmit frame must be in a contiguous buffer, 
aligned
 * on a longword (32-bit) boundary. This means we almost always have to
 * do mbuf copies in order to transmit a frame, except in the unlikely
 * case where a) the packet fits into a single mbuf, and b) the packet
 * is 32-bit aligned within the mbuf's data area. The presence of only
 * four descriptor registers means that we can never have more than four
 * packets queued for transmission at any one time.
 *
 * Reception is not much better. The driver has to allocate a single 
large
 * buffer area (up to 64K in size) into which the chip will DMA received
 * frames. Because we don't know where within this region received 
packets
 * will begin or end, we have no choice but to copy data from the buffer
 * area into mbufs in order to pass the packets up to the higher 
protocol
 * levels.
 *
 * It's impossible given this rotten design to really achieve decent
 * performance at 100Mbps, unless you happen to have a 400Mhz PII or
 * some equally overmuscled CPU to drive it.

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Re: Anymore help out there? Re: mail never gets sent

2003-11-07 Thread Charles Swiger
On Nov 6, 2003, at 6:32 PM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
Jonathan Chen [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote on 11/06/2003 03:23:43 PM:
The timeouts look suspicious. Is your upstream blocking outgoing SMTP
connections (perhaps in an attempt to stop spam)? A quick way to check
would be to:
telnet mx4.mail.yahoo.com smtp
No response would mean that someone is blocking you out (either
upstream or the receivers).
Tried that, it just sits on

simradusa# telnet mx4.mail.yahoo.com smtp
Trying 216.136.129.5...
and never connects.
OK, so you can be reasonably sure your ISP is blocking port 25.  You 
will probably need to configure your mail server to relay via your ISPs 
SMTP server instead-- change the SMART_HOST definition in 
/etc/mail/freebsd.mc and do a make restart in /etc/mail, and see 
whether that helps...

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Re: [OT?] Tying a socket to stdin/stdout w/dup2() ?

2003-11-07 Thread Charles Swiger
On Nov 7, 2003, at 12:19 PM, Chris Pressey wrote:
I've got a C program that opens a TCP/IP socket and makes a client
connection.  What I'd like to do is to 'tie' the socket to this
program's standard I/O, so that anything that is fed into this 
program's
stdin, is immediately sent to the socket, and anything that appears on
the socket, is immediately sent out this program's stdout.  (The end
effect being a sort of pathologically simple version of what telnet,
(or inetd or ucspi-tcp) does.)
Take a look at netcat, from /usr/ports/net/netcat.

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Re: Routing selectively

2003-11-10 Thread Charles Swiger
On Nov 10, 2003, at 11:13 AM, Dimitris Xochellis wrote:
In my local network I have two routers that provide
internet services.
-Can I use them both simultaneously?
Yes.

-Do I need to have a second ethernet card (And add a
second interface to rc.conf) in order to use them
both?
No, but it might be easier to configure a sensible network topology 
using two cards.  Otherwise, you can configure a virtual interface 
(ifconfig rl0 alias YYY)...

-Can I configure my FreeBSD box to use the first
router when I am sending packets to a specific
internet subnet and the second otherwise?
Sure.

-Any relative Docs or Examples please?
Normally, one has one default route, which tells all non-local 
traffic to go via your preferred router.  You can add additional routes 
like so:

route add -net 1.2.3.0/24 router1
route add -net 4.5.6.0/24 router2
There are better ways of managing routing than this, including setting 
up BGP/EGP peering with your ISPs, or some other routing protocol 
(OSPF), but this should get you started

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Re: Anymore help out there? Re: mail never gets sent

2003-11-10 Thread Charles Swiger
On Nov 10, 2003, at 3:05 PM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
Thanks Chuck, and the others with the same suggestion. I've set that
parameter in the freebsd.mc file and still have the same problem. I 
ssh'd
into my current web server box, running RedHat, and sent a message from
the cli mail and watched the messages, and did the same on the FreeBSD 
box
(which will replace the Linux box soon as mail works). Look at the two
sections below, notice the lines 250 in each section - they are the
reverse of each other. The message sent from the Linux box went 
through to
its destination, but not the message from the FreeBSD box.
Your examples are showing the handoff between untrusted local mail 
client using SMTP to localhost:25 to deliver the mail to the local 
spool, and not the communication from your machine to the next SMTP 
server.

[ Prior versions of sendmail were setuid-root, and mail -v output was 
more useful; 8.12 is not installed setuid-root anymore... ]

The Linux box had no configuring done to make it send mail out. I have 
set up previous versions of FreeBSD, all the way back to 3.0, and have 
never had to do any configuring to get any to send mail out. It has 
always just worked,
including a previous setup here in this office connected to the same
network. So I'm wondering what has changed in 5.1 to cause this 
problem,
if anything. Or is it just a bad install?
It's unlikely to be a bad install.  Try running:

   echo 3,0 [EMAIL PROTECTED] | sendmail -bt

...on the Linux machine, and see whether the last line relays through 
your ISP's smarthost, or directly to smtp-mx.mac.com.  Compare that to 
what the FreeBSD machine is doing.

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Re: binary execute restrictions

2004-01-13 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 12, 2004, at 9:52 PM, Jefferson San Juan wrote:
How do I restrict normal users from executing their own compiled 
executable
binary files?
Give them a restricted shell which limits the commands they can run 
to ones you specify.  See man zshall for one example, although other 
restricted shells exist which might come closer to what you want than 
ZSH particularly:

RESTRICTED SHELL
   When the basename of the command used to invoke  zsh  starts  
with  the
   letter  `r'  or the `-r' command line option is supplied at 
invocation,
   the shell becomes  restricted.   Emulation  mode  is  determined 
 after
   stripping  the  letter `r' from the invocation name.  The 
following are
   disabled in restricted mode:

   o  changing directories with the cd builtin

   o  changing or unsetting the PATH, path, MODULE_PATH,  
module_path,
  SHELL,  HISTFILE,  HISTSIZE,  GID,  EGID,  UID,  EUID, 
USERNAME,
  LD_LIBRARY_PATH,LD_AOUT_LIBRARY_PATH, LD_PRELOAD  
   and
  LD_AOUT_PRELOAD parameters

   o  specifying command names containing /

   o  specifying command pathnames using hash

   o  redirecting output to files

   o  using the exec builtin command to replace the shell with 
another
  command

   o  using jobs -Z to overwrite the shell process' argument 
and envi-
  ronment space

   o  using  the ARGV0 parameter to override argv[0] for 
external com-
  mands

   o  turning off restricted mode with set +r or unsetopt 
RESTRICTED

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Re: 5.2, SYSVSHM and IPFILTER

2004-01-13 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 13, 2004, at 7:59 PM, Zoltan HERPAI wrote:
i'm having problems compiling a new kernel. relevant parts of the 
config
are:
options SYSVSHM
options SHMMAXPGS=524288
This quantity is measured in 4K virtual memory pages; make it smaller 
and try again.

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Re: imap-uw port problem on 5.2

2004-01-14 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 14, 2004, at 1:15 PM, Paulo Roberto wrote:
building imap-uw with: WITHOUT_SSL=YES seems to have no effect. I keep
getting Login Disabled messages thru syslog. I searched the net and
found a lot of similar cases like this, but all the solutions I tried
did not work. I had this port on a 4.7 machine and it did install
perfectly. Any ideas?
Rebuild the mail/cclient port as well, per 
/usr/ports/mail/imap-uw/pkg-message:

===   NB: IMAP-UW now rejects non-encrypted logins by default. To 
change this
===   behaviour, recompile and reinstall cclient and imap-uw ports 
with one of
===   the following make variables defined:

WITHOUT_SSL - build without SSL/encryption support.
WITH_SSL_AND_PLAINTEXT - build with SSL/encryption support, but allow
non-encrypted logins.
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Re: binary execute restrictions

2004-01-14 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 13, 2004, at 9:04 PM, Lowell Gilbert wrote:
I suspect that a restricted shell isn't going to be appropriate in
this case.  Restricted shells are useful for avoiding shooting
yourself in the foot, but they're really not intended to be secure.
You're probably right that my suggestion is only a partial solution, 
but using a restricted shell and chroot()ing these users to a home 
directory that isn't owned/writable by that UID should come pretty 
close to solving the Original Poster's problem.

It might also be the case that the OP might be better off not 
generating normal user accounts, but using application-specific user 
databases (such as found in software like Cyrus) to give controlled 
access to a particular service.

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Re: Turn off user email

2004-01-16 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 16, 2004, at 5:32 PM, Grant Peel wrote:
Other than setting a /var/mail quota to 0 for a user, how does one 
turn off
mail for a UNIX user without affecting ftp or shell access?
You can configure the system not to accept mail for that user, 
something like:

To:[EMAIL PROTECTED]		550 Email to someuser has been disabled

...in /etc/mail/access.  You could set up a redirect alias and point 
mail for them to some other location, or even redirect mail for that 
user to /dev/null-- or via a REJECT or DISCARD entry in the access map.

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Re: UDP errors and syslog BSD

2004-01-20 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 20, 2004, at 12:02 PM, Brent Bailey wrote:
the errors im concerned about are
5775699 dropped due to full socket buffers
and
 319427 dropped due to no socket
the first makes me think that the buffers are depleted and cant 
written to
if so ...how do i correct this ?
netstat -m should list the network memory buffers and their usage.  
You might try adding:

options NMBCLUSTERS=8192

...to your kernel config file and rebuilding your kernel, if you were 
running low.

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Re: grepping distinct lines from many text files ?

2004-01-20 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 20, 2004, at 1:56 PM, Ion-Mihai Tetcu wrote:
CUCU=`cat /path/do/dir/* | some_filer_program`

and have in $CUCU the distinct lines from all the files.
Try:

CUCU=`cat /path/to/files/* | sort | uniq`

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Re: how to config FBSD pc to work on non-dhcp lan

2004-01-20 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 20, 2004, at 3:27 PM, fbsd_user wrote:
[ ... ]
FBSD Lan PC can not ping Public Internet ip address or resolve
domain names.  Ping to public internet ip address get msg
sendto no route to host
[ ... ]
rc.conf
clear_tmp_enable=YES
moused_enable=YES
moused_port=/dev/psm0
moused_type=auto
moused_flags=-m 2=3
allscreens_flags=-m on -c blink -h 200
saver=warp
hostname=gateway.fbsdjones.com
ifconfig_dc0=inet 10.0.10.1 netmask 255.255.255.248
/etc/rc.conf should have a statement like:

defaultrouter=10.0.10.2

...or try adding a default route by hand, route add default 10.0.10.2.

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Re: syslog news log?

2004-01-22 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 22, 2004, at 2:02 PM, fbsd_user wrote:
What is the facility news used for?
Usenet news.  See /usr/ports/news/inn.

Can I remove all the news stuff from /etc/syslog.conf file?
Sure.  But it doesn't do any harm to leave the defaults alone.

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Re: FDisk won't detect or accept correct disk geometry from BIOS

2004-01-22 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 22, 2004, at 5:24 PM, Keith Kelly wrote:
I already tried (with both 4.9 and 5.1) letting the FreeBSD install 
proceed
with fdisk's  geometry value assumptions, and what I always get is a
non-bootable hard drive that gives the Missing operating system 
error at
boot.
Sufficiently old motherboards and BIOS versions don't understand the 
LBA addressing mode used by modern drives, and are limited to seeing 
approx 8.4 GB using the classic C/H/S values.  See whether the BIOS 
lets you configure the drive to LBA mode rather than automatic, 
C/H/S, or extended C/H/S mode.  If it doesn't, check to see whether 
there is a BIOS update available for your hardware.

It may be the case that this doesn't resolve the issue.  You can try to 
create a small (say 32MB) DOS partition using classic MS-DOS 6.x or a 
utility from the drive manufacturer, and verify whether you can boot 
into that.  If you can't and still get the missing OS error, you've 
got hardware issues and should consider replacing your MB.  If you can 
boot to a DOS partition on the hard disk, then try installing FreeBSD 
to the remaining space, leaving the DOS partition intact.  This will 
give you a better shot of using a geometry that your BIOS is able to 
boot.

[ The only hardware I've seen which required that kind of thing was a 
no-name P133 grade machine... ]

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Re: FDisk won't detect or accept correct disk geometry from BIOS

2004-01-22 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 22, 2004, at 6:04 PM, Keith Kelly wrote:
The motherboard is not old.  It is an MSI KT4 Ultra motherboard, if I
remember the model number correctly off the top of my head, for the 
Athlon
XP architecture.  The BIOS doesn't even explicitly list what mode 
(LBA, CHS,
extended CHS) it is using to address the drive -- I just set it to 
Auto,
it detects the device name, and fills out a small listing telling me 
the
C/H/S geometry it is using.  The motherboard is already running the 
latest
available BIOS update from MSI.
OK, but if the auto mode uses the wrong C/H/S translation, this default 
may be the source of your problem.  What happens when you switch from 
using auto to explicitly using LBA?

[ ... ]
I definitely do not have hardware issues, because Linux, Windows XP, 
Windows
2000, BeOS, and SkyOS have all worked fine at various points, and 
Windows XP
continues to work fine :-)
Your error message reflects a BIOS-level failure to find a bootable 
partition.

Do you already have a bootable partition on the system, and are trying 
to install FreeBSD in a second partition?  If so, which partition is 
marked active?

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Re: freebsd 4.8 and the spamassassin 2.6x port

2004-01-23 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 23, 2004, at 1:07 PM, Michael Whitley wrote:
I have read through the archives and seen that newer versions of 
Spamassassin have fits with freebsd because of an outdated perl 
version. I noticed that there is a SpamAssassin 2.6 port out for 
freeBSD 4.9 but was wondering if anyone has had success with 
installing it on a 4.8 system?
FreeBSD 4.8 should be recent enough that you can use a modern ports 
tree without the CONFLICTS feature causing problems, so use CVSUP to 
update your ports tree to the current version.  From there, install 
/usr/ports/lang/perl5.8, and then run use.perl port.

That should give you the latest version of Perl, from which you can 
then install the p5-Mail-SpamAssassin port (or spamass-milter, or 
amavisd, or whatever).  You can also try installing the software via 
perl -MCPAN -e shell \;, and do an install Mail::SpamAssassin, but 
the ports mechanism is better tested.

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Re: freebsd 4.8 and the spamassassin 2.6x port

2004-01-24 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 23, 2004, at 8:13 PM, Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
Why perl 5.8?  My 5.2 machine is running postfix, perl 5.6.1 and 
amavisd-new
without any trouble at all.
I don't believe that there is anything wrong with perl-5.6.x.

For that matter, I don't feel religious opposition to using the stock 
perl as shipped with FreeBSD 4.x, but even earlier versions of 
SpamAssassin recommended using 5.6 or later.  SA has a bunch of 
dependencies on various perl modules (HTML and MIME-handling stuff, 
mostly), and 5.8 obviously comes with a more recent version of such.

There is some dichotomy between upgrading Perl stuff via CPAN versus 
via the ports, which is why it might be reasonable for individuals to 
decide whether they want to follow the Perl archive directly or wait 
for the ports to be tested and updates committed.

--
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PS: I don't have the port version of perl installed on most of my 
FreeBSD systems, but I do have 5.8 installed on everything which is 
running SpamAssassin.  Aside from an issue circa SA-2.6.1_2? or so 
where the Subject: header rewriting stopped working until the port was 
upgraded again (I think someone else mentioned this, too), SA+perl-5.8 
has been working well.  YMMV.

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Re: CURL in PHP performance question

2004-01-24 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 23, 2004, at 7:05 PM, Brent Wiese wrote:
I've never used it, but based on the way it reads, it seems like the
overhead of the calls on even a moderately busy site could have serious
server impacts.  Am I worried about nothing or do I need to put my 
foot down so he doesn't affect the other jail users by taking up all 
the resources?
What resource(s) are you worried about CURL consuming?  CPU time?  Tell 
the user to run these processes using nice so that other user's tasks 
will be minimally effected.

If you're concerned about VM usage, or I/O, or something, experiment a 
bit and determine whether there is an issue, then consider saying no, 
or tuning the system, or changing /etc/login.conf to adjust resource 
limits appropriately.

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Re: Adaptec 2400A Performance

2004-01-24 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 24, 2004, at 12:51 AM, Rishi Chopra wrote:
I was rather disappointed with the results.  Can anyone suggest what 
might be causing such slow disk speeds, or whether these speeds are 
out of the ordinary for a 4-disk FreeBSD RAID5 installation?  I have 
done nothing to configure the card aside from striping the array in 
BIOS; FreeBSD seems to automatically detect the disks.
For us to be able to comment beyond generalizations, it's necessary to 
also benchmark how a single disk performs.  I can still answer your 
question, though:

RAID-5 is slow.  RAID-5 trades availability against performance and 
hardware costs.  With RAID-0, n drives gives n drives' worth of usable 
space.  With RAID-5, n drives gives n-1 drives' worth of usable space.  
The performance is between RAID-0 and RAID-1 is comparible for large 
accesses.  For small accesses, particularly small writes, RAID-5 
performance is much worse than plain RAID-0 or a plain disk.

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Re: sis0 short cable fix

2004-01-24 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 24, 2004, at 9:20 AM, scott renna wrote:
I'm wondering exactly, however, what would cause a
message such as this to be displayed in dmesg:
kernel:  sis0:  Applying short cable fix(reg=e8)

My card seems to be working fine, and I'm wondering
exactly what this means.
Does anyone know and has anyone used this patch
successfully?  I never saw this message in earlier
versions of BSD.  I'm running 5.2 now.
I remember testing this or a variant of this patch; I have a:

sis0: NatSemi DP83815 10/100BaseTX port 0x1000-0x10ff mem 
0xf4102000-0xf4102fff irq 9 at device 15.0 on pci0
sis0: Ethernet address: 00:a0:cc:75:97:29
miibus1: MII bus on sis0
ukphy0: Generic IEEE 802.3u media interface on miibus1
ukphy0:  10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, auto

I gather the chipset tries to compute or adjust some DSP parameter 
based on cable length, only it doesn't do the right thing for short 
cable lengths, so the fix resets the value to something which works 
better than the value the code would otherwise choose (absent this 
fix).

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Re: permissions problems

2004-01-30 Thread Charles Swiger
On Jan 30, 2004, at 1:33 PM, Spades wrote:
What if one of my admin accidentally did a:

chmod -R o+rx /

and changed my entire system permissions.
What should i do to restore it?
See man mtree.

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Re: PPC ver of freeBSD ? isent that the main body of os X

2004-02-04 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 4, 2004, at 10:31 AM, Lucas Holt wrote:
The userland is freebsd.. i.e. the executables in /usr/bin, /bin, etc. 
 I'm sure apple alters a few things.  The part of OSX that differs is 
in the kernel.  Roughly half the kernel is FreeBSD 5.0 and the other 
half is based on the Mach 3.0 kernel design.
The MacOS X userland originally and primarily derives from NEXTSTEP.  
The original PPC port of NEXTSTEP, called Rhapsody, included a bunch of 
changes from NetBSD and FreeBSD (in that order), and OS X has since 
followed changes made to FreeBSD more closely.

MacOS X is using a monolithic kernel which derives from between the CMU 
Mach project v2.0 and v2.5 circa 1990, which was Avie Tenavian's grad 
project at CMU.  Apple is not using the Mach 3.0 microkernel, nor is it 
using half of the FreeBSD 5 kernel.

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Re: PPC ver of freeBSD ? isent that the main body of os X

2004-02-04 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 4, 2004, at 3:05 PM, Lucas Holt wrote:
MacOS X is using a monolithic kernel which derives from between the 
CMU Mach project v2.0 and v2.5 circa 1990, which was Avie Tenavian's 
grad project at CMU.  Apple is not using the Mach 3.0 microkernel, 
nor is it using half of the FreeBSD 5 kernel.
Incorrect!   The original OS X code base does come from next but apple 
has upgraded the code in 10.3 to use FreeBSD 5.0 code.  
apple.com/macosx even mentioned that when panther was released.  
Another document on apple's site i'm looking for again specified that 
the latest 10.3 kernel was in fact using only the messaging and memory 
architecture of Mach and the rest was in fact FreeBSD 5.0 code!

http://developer.apple.com/darwin/history.html
This page isn't wrong, and I believe that the OS X kernel does include 
some FreeBSD 5 code, just as OS X's userland includes some FreeBSD and 
some NetBSD-derived programs.  However, let's consider some real data:

8-base# ident /bin/* /sbin/* /usr/bin/* /usr/sbin/* 2 /dev/null | 
fgrep '$FreeBSD:' | wc -l
 138
9-base# ident /bin/* /sbin/* /usr/bin/* /usr/sbin/* 2 /dev/null | 
fgrep '$NetBSD:' | wc -l
 281
10-base# ident /bin/* /sbin/* /usr/bin/* /usr/sbin/* 2 /dev/null | 
fgrep '$Id:' | wc -l
1403
11-base# uname -a
Darwin base.codefab.com 6.8 Darwin Kernel Version 6.8: Wed Sep 10 
15:20:55 PDT 2003; root:xnu/xnu-344.49.obj~2/RELEASE_PPC  Power 
Macintosh powerpc

1-tanya# ident /bin/* /sbin/* /usr/bin/* /usr/sbin/* 2 /dev/null | 
fgrep '$FreeBSD:' | wc -l
 258
2-tanya# ident /bin/* /sbin/* /usr/bin/* /usr/sbin/* 2 /dev/null | 
fgrep '$NetBSD:' | wc -l
 143
3-tanya# ident /bin/* /sbin/* /usr/bin/* /usr/sbin/* 2 /dev/null | 
fgrep '$Id:' | wc -l
 898
4-tanya# uname -a
Darwin tanya 7.2.0 Darwin Kernel Version 7.2.0: Thu Dec 11 16:20:23 PST 
2003; root:xnu/xnu-517.3.7.obj~1/RELEASE_PPC  Power Macintosh powerpc

So much for userland; shall we consider the kernel, as well?

First, CMU largely stopped work on Mach by the end of 1993 and the Mach 
3 microkernel was largely developed by U/Utah and the OSF, some of 
which became Flex and Flux, if memory serves.  Neither FreeBSD nor 
Apple uses a microkernel, largely because the performance hit for 
context switching between kernel and userspace all of the time is so 
extreme for a true microkernel architecture.

While neither of the two kernels is monolithic, and they support 
dynamic loading of kernel extensions, device drivers reside in kernel 
space, networking is in kernel space, filesystem management (the 
vnode/VFS abstraction) is in kernel space.  A true microkernel would 
have those in userspace and would have nothing beyond a scheduler, VM, 
and basic thread/task management.

Apple did incorporate KAME's IPv6 code, IPFW, and the sysctl MIB 
infrastructure from BSD, and they are offering various POSIX API's like 
pthreads, but POSIX threads itself largely derives from Mach's thread 
model and the Cthreads interface dating back to NEXTSTEP 2.x or 
earlier.

Apple's IOKit depends on Mach and CoreFoundation, and uses Mach 
primitives and abstractions which are quite distinct from BSD-style 
device drivers.  Take a look at the xnu sources, or how kernel 
extensions and device drivers are implemented under 
/Developer/Examples/IOKit.

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Re: AMD vs Intel ...

2004-02-09 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 9, 2004, at 11:16 AM, Marc G. Fournier wrote:
G'day all ...

  Simple question, I would hope ... I want to spec out a new server, 
and
want to compare AMD vs Intel ... is there anything online that gives
approx equivalents?  ie. a Xeon 2.4Ghz processor would be approx
equivalent to an AMD ... ??
I know you're not a troll, Marc, but this question is much like asking 
whether emacs or vi makes a better editor.  :-)  An Intel Xeon 2.4GHz 
CPU approximately resembles an AMD 2400MP CPU in terms of capabilities 
and performance.  By this I mean they get very similar scores from 
www.spec.org's spec2000int:

Epox 8KHA+, AMD Athlon XP 2400+: 782
Dell PowerEdge 2650 (2.4 GHz Xeon): 792
...although the spec2000fp numbers are 641 vs. 726, so the Xeon does 
better at floating point.  For that particular test, anyway.  Do you 
require SMP capabilities?  What are you trying to do with this machine?

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Re: rsync question

2004-02-09 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 9, 2004, at 12:34 PM, Darryl Hoar wrote:
I'm running 5.1-release.  I've installed rsync from ports.
I've looked at the man pages and only saw where I
can specifiy the log format.  How do I  specify a log
file?  or must I :  rsync -av /test/ /tmp/test  mylog.txt ?
The rsync documentation says that logging goes to stdout:

   --log-format=FORMAT
  This allows you to specify exactly what the rsync client 
logs to
  stdout  on  a  per-file basis. The log format is 
specified using
  the  same  format  conventions  as  the  log  format  
option  in
  rsyncd.conf.

...so redirecting the output to the logfile as you've done is right.

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Re: AMD vs Intel ...

2004-02-09 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 9, 2004, at 1:20 PM, Marc G. Fournier wrote:
On Mon, 9 Feb 2004, Charles Swiger wrote:
I know you're not a troll, Marc, but this question is much like asking
whether emacs or vi makes a better editor.  :-)
Actually, I wasn't asking which one was better though :)  I'm only 
curious
as to how I can compare the two ... its kinda like Sun vs Intel ... I 
know
that the Sun should usually outperform Intel on fp, but Intel tends to 
do
a pretty good job against Sun on int operations ...
I'd tend to agree, and Kenneth also, it seems-- the raw FP performance 
of the P4s is kinda pokey compared to their int performance.  But 
whether that matters depends on what tasks you're doing.

...although the spec2000fp numbers are 641 vs. 726, so the Xeon does
better at floating point.  For that particular test, anyway.  Do you
require SMP capabilities?  What are you trying to do with this 
machine?
Server environment, Dual Processor ... web/mail/ftp generally ... all 
our
current servers are Intel based, but looking at the costs, the AMD are 
so
much cheaper, just figured for next one I'd check out what AMD had to
offer as comparable ...

Just trying to do some comparison shopping ... :)
OK.  The price difference for AMD vs. Intel is pretty significant, but 
be aware that you'll also pay a significant premium for dual-proc 
hardware versus single-proc machines: compare an AMD 2400MP versus the 
2400XP price, or the 2.4GHz Xeon P4 vs. a Northwood P4, and then factor 
in the additional costs for a MP-capable motherboard.

Are your machines especially busy, ie CPU-bound?  Two 2.4GHz processors 
is a lot of computing horsepower, although dynamic web content 
generation or virus scanning can be resource intensive if there's 
enough traffic...

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Re: AMD vs Intel ...

2004-02-10 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 10, 2004, at 12:58 PM, Chad Leigh -- Shire.Net LLC wrote:
Just a note:  If you want ECC with an AMD Athlon (not AMD64), you need 
to buy a dual board anyway, since I don't know of anyone who makes a 
board with a chipset that supports ECC that isn't a dual.
Hi, Chad--

I've got a Shuttle AK31v3 motherboard which does registered+ECC memory, 
which is a single-proc motherboard:

System Mainboard
Manufacturer : HOLCO (Shuttle)
MP Support : No
Model : VT8366-8233
BIOS ID : 04/17/2002-VT8366-8233-6A6LVH2CC-00
Chipset : VIA KT266/A Chipset
[ ... ]
Logical/Chipset Memory Banks
Bank 0 Setting : 128MB DDR-SDRAM Registered 8-1-1-1R 4-1-1-1W 2.5-3-3CL 
1CMD
Bank 1 Setting : 128MB DDR-SDRAM Registered 8-1-1-1R 4-1-1-1W 2.5-3-3CL 
1CMD
Bank 2 Setting : 256MB DDR-SDRAM Registered 8-1-1-1R 4-1-1-1W 2.5-3-3CL 
1CMD
Speed : 2x 133MHz (266MHz data rate)
Multiplier : 1/1x

Memory Modules
Memory Module 1 : Micron 18VDDT3272DG-265Z1 080EBD07 256MB 18x(16Mx8) 
ECC
DDR-SDRAM PC2100R-2533-750 (CL2.5 upto 133MHz) (CL2 upto 100MHz)
Memory Module 2 : Micron 9VDDT3272G-265B2 1B1B108E 256MB 9x(32Mx8) ECC
DDR-SDRAM PC2100R-2533-750 (CL2.5 upto 133MHz) (CL2 upto 100MHz)

...but you are right that ECC support is quite uncommon for AMD 
motherboards.

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Re: What settings are you using in /etc/make.conf?

2004-02-11 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 11, 2004, at 4:59 AM, Bryan Cassidy wrote:
Just wondering if people wouldn't mind sharring their /etc/make.conf
settings with others.
Here's what I use on -STABLE:

KERNCONF=NORMAL
#KERNCONF=GENERIC
CPUTYPE=pentium
CFLAGS= -O2 -pipe
COPTFLAGS= -O -pipe
BOOTWAIT=5000
#NO_CPU_FLAGS=true
IPFW2=true
NO_FORTRAN= true# do not build g77 and related libraries
NO_I4B= true# do not build isdn4bsd package
NO_LPR= true# do not build lpr and related programs
NOPROFILE=  true# Avoid compiling profiled libraries
NOUUCP= true# do not build uucp related programs
USA_RESIDENT=   YES
FETCH_ENV=  HTTP_PROXY=http://proxy:3128
FETCH_ENV=  FTP_PROXY=http://proxy:3128
SUP_UPDATE= yes
SUP=/usr/local/bin/cvsup
SUPFLAGS=   -g -L 2
SUPHOST=cvsup15.FreeBSD.org
SUPFILE=/etc/stable-supfile
PORTSSUPFILE=   /etc/ports-supfile
DOCSUPFILE= /etc/doc-supfile
TOP_TABLE_SIZE= 997
DOC_PREFIX= /usr/doc
# sendmail
SENDMAIL_MC=/etc/mail/sec.pkix.net.mc
SENDMAIL_CFLAGS+= -DMILTER -DSTARTTLS -DHASURANDOMDEV -DSASL2
SENDMAIL_CFLAGS+= -I/usr/local/include
SENDMAIL_LDFLAGS+= -L/usr/local/lib
SENDMAIL_LDADD+=-lsasl2 -lssl -lcrypto
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Re: sendmail confi help

2004-02-11 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 11, 2004, at 8:52 AM, stan wrote:
How can I configure FreeBSD's default sendmail to work like this:

If the message is for domain1 or domain2, deliver directly.
If not, use a smarthost
You also need to add domain1 and domain2 to /etc/mail/local-host-names. 
 Then do a make restart in /etc/mail to rebuild the .cf file and 
restart sendmail with the new config, and see whether that does what 
you want...

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Re: inbound http authentication proxy

2004-02-11 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 11, 2004, at 11:20 AM, jr315 wrote:
building a FreeBSD email-gateway/proxy server. need to
filter inbound mail and http/webmail requests for an
exchange server. need to find good http authentication
proxy for server running IIS. need proxy package that
will authenticate inbound http sessions and forward
them to the IIS/exchange server. Any good
recommendations???
squid can be used as an authenticating web proxy.  sendmail, postfix, 
and a number of other MTAs can be used to relay email.

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Re: cdrom

2004-02-11 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 11, 2004, at 4:02 PM, Wouter Grol wrote:
I have an old pc on witch I want to install freebsd, only when the 
bios does not see the cdrom drive.  But windows does.
Hi--

If the BIOS doesn't recognize the CD-ROM drive, that's generally a 
NO-GO for FreeBSD working with the drive.  You probably have a 
proprietary driver for the device to make it work under Windows.  
However, I think FreeBSD had limited support for some of the old 
pre-ATAPI CD-ROM drives from Mitsumi and Sony (rebranded by 
Creative)...from LINT see:

#
# Miscellaneous hardware:
#
# mcd: Mitsumi CD-ROM using proprietary (non-ATAPI) interface
# scd: Sony CD-ROM using proprietary (non-ATAPI) interface
Is your drive one of these?  Otherwise, it's probably better to spend 
$50 and get a standard CD-ROM drive...

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Re: Mounting to freebsd ufs under WinXP

2004-02-13 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 13, 2004, at 1:45 PM, Matthew Marino wrote:
Samba works but the configuration can be a cuss. It's the NetBEUI name 
server that takes a deeper understanding of Microsoft Networking than 
the average Joe has. If your really up for a challenge try sharing the 
same ufs volume with Windows and Macintosh clients via Samba and 
NetAtalk. Can be done with enough Coke and HoHos to keep you awake for 
two days.
My biggest problem with supporting Windows and Mac clients 
simulaneously was when Sun switched from Solaris 2.6 to Solaris 7 and 
the new 64-bit kernel interfaces broke the 32-bit network libraries 
netatalk wanted to link from.  (Years ago, now.)

Samba would not solve the original poster's problem; he wants to mount 
a UFS filesystem under Windows on the same machine, not remotely mount 
a UFS system from a running FreeBSD box

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Re: NFS server usage

2004-02-26 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 26, 2004, at 2:30 PM, Michael Conlen wrote:
Does FreeBSD's NFS implementation allow for caching of documents on 
the client side, either its self or through the VM system's inactive 
pages?
Yes to both.  NFS clients typically use something called biod or 
nfsoid, which implements some combination of caching and I/O request 
coalescing in order to reduce the amount of network traffic going to 
the server.

[ Yes, this means that fsync() over NFS isn't guaranteed to actually 
have bits written to disk, at least historically... ]

The reason I'm asking is that I'm trying to size an NFS server using a 
few of many similar sites that I hope to cluster. The performance so 
far has been great, but I'm worried that there's something I'm missing 
here that will cause the performance/usage to change in a very 
nonlinear way. Any thoughts on the subject are appreciated.
Well, you are going to be bottlenecked potentially by your network or 
by the maximum I/O rate that your NFS server can sustain.  Your data 
suggests you ought to be able to handle about two orders of magnitude 
more net traffic, if you're over a dedicated 100 Mbs connection between 
server and clients (ie, using a switch), so it's likely that you're 
going to run into limits due to your disks well before then.

You can probably switch to using rsync or some other replication scheme 
instead of NFS if you do run into limits, and keep the files locally if 
need be.

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Re: FreeBSD box as router adding latency

2004-02-26 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 26, 2004, at 4:53 PM, Aloha Guy wrote:
Here is the HZ setting:

kern.clockrate: { hz = 100, tick = 1, profhz = 1024, stathz = 128 }
There's your issue right there: if you care about the millisecond level
granularity of network traffic going by this router, you ought to set
HZ to 1000 as documented in man dummynet.
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Re: Recovering Data from a reformatted drive

2004-02-26 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 27, 2004, at 12:27 AM, Benjamin P. Keating wrote:
I have a hard drive that had lots of important data on it. It was 
reformatted and I have no backups (lesson learned). It was a ccd 
mirror of two 100gig drives. Once the reformat of this ccd completed 
the machine was shut down to prevent writing to this disk even more 
so.
By this you mean, you used ccd to reformat the drive as part of a newly 
created RAID-1 mirror?

If you just newfs'ed the disk, most of the data blocks will still be 
intact and can be recovered (to some extent).  However, if you did 
create a RAID filesystem on the disk, you are out of luck.  The process 
of creating a RAID-1 or -5 volume involves syncronizing all of the 
disks, which will overwrite every sector on the drive.

I'm sorry that you lost data.

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Re: FreeBSD box as router adding latency

2004-02-26 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 26, 2004, at 5:59 PM, Aloha Guy wrote:
Charles Swiger [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
There's your issue right there: if you care about the millisecond 
level
granularity of network traffic going by this router, you ought to set
HZ to 1000 as documented in man dummynet.
[ ... ]
Knew I forgot to read something.  I guess I forgot all about dummynet 
is the one doing the traffic shaping as I never used traffic shaping 
on the other boxes when they were used as both Ethernet and T1 
routers.  I've always had NMBCLUSERS set to 32768 which I assume is 
fine.
Thats a lot of NMBCLUSTERS, but if you've got the memory you should be 
okay.

Also, is there a way to use two NICs like a xl0 and a fxp0 and bond 
them together with just one IP?
Yes, netgraph.  See man ng_one2many

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Re: NFS server usage

2004-02-26 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 26, 2004, at 4:57 PM, Michael Conlen wrote:
[ ... ]
The production system will use dual channel U320 RAID controllers with 
12 disks per channel, so disk shouldn't be an issue, and it will 
connect with GigE, so network is plenty fine, now I'm on to CPU.
Sounds like you've gotten nice hardware.  Four or so years ago, I built 
out a roughly comparible fileserver [modulo the progess in technology 
since then] on a Sun E450, which housed 10 SCA-form-factor disks over 5 
UW SCSI channels (using 64-bit PCI and backplane, though), and could 
have held a total of 20 disks if I'd filled it.  I mention this 
because...

Low volume tests with live data indicate low CPU  usage however when I 
best fit the graph it's dificult to tell how linear (or non linear) 
the data is. [ ... ] Does that kind of curve look accurate to you 
(anyone)?
...even under stress testing on the faster four-disk RAID-10 volume 
using SEAGATE-ST336752LC drives (15K RPM, 8MB cache), each on a 
seperate channel, with ~35 client machines bashing away, the fileserver 
would bottleneck on disk I/O without more than maybe 10% or 15% CPU 
load, and that was using a 400MHz CPU.

The notion that an NFS fileserver is going to end up CPU-bound simply 
doesn't match my experience or my expectations.  If you have 
single-threaded sequential I/O patterns (like running dd, or maybe a 
database), you'll bottleneck on the interface or maximum disk 
throughput, otherwise even with ~3.5 ms seek times, multi-threaded I/O 
from a buncha clients will require the disk heads to move around so 
much that you bottleneck at a certain number of I/O operations per 
second per disk, rather than a given bandwidth per disk.

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Re: Problems resolving hosts

2004-02-27 Thread Charles Swiger
On Feb 27, 2004, at 4:18 PM, JJB wrote:
Well if you had paid closer attention to what Travis wrote you would
have read that nothing had changed on that 5.2 lan box or his lan
network so your guess about resolv.conf is way off base, and that
UFS2 being the problem is a much more sound opinion.
Sigh.  I didn't claim that his resolv.conf changed; I didn't claim that 
his LAN network changed; I said that the behavior he describes is quite 
close to what would happen if one of the nameservers referenced in 
resolv.conf was having problems.

Do you not comprehend this?

And as far as IPFW goes, your statement is again another case of you
not paying attention to what was written. You really need to read
closely before opening your mouth saying things which are not true.
I never said that IPFW is completely broken what I said is ipfw
stateful rules do not work in an Lan network when ipfw's
divert/nated legacy subroutine is used. This subject was beat to
death in a long thread back around the first of the year. You should
check the archives for the technical details before you sound off
demonstrating to everyone how little you know about what truly has
transpired. Open mouth insert foot.
Young one, you are considerably less clever than you evidently think 
you are.  That's not surprising; this is unfortunately true of most 
people.  A tone of condescending snobbery pretty much is never 
appropriate, regardless of who is right or wrong.

I don't need to review the archives to remember that discussion; at 
that time I read them and concluded that you were unable to understand 
how to make IPFW+NAT work the way you expected it to.  However, there 
are lots of people who use IPFW+NAT successfully (success by their 
definitions, that is), just as there are people who use PF or other 
tools.

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Re: USB 2.0 harddisk performance

2004-03-01 Thread Charles Swiger
On Mar 1, 2004, at 11:36 AM, Guy Van Sanden wrote:
Is firewire fully supported on FreeBSD?
Firewire support has been pretty good, at least for accessing mass 
storage devices.  I haven't beaten on IP-over-Firewire or some of the 
other capabilities that one might also experiment with

The disk does have a firewire link, I can buy an addon card for about 
30
, but I wanna make sure that it will work better.
I was seeing about 35 MB/s read and about 20 MB/s using a Maxtor 5000DN 
external drive via Firewire; this drive also supports USB 2, but at the 
time I was testing OHCI USB was all that was available to me, not EHCI.

(USB 1 was giving ~1.2 MB/s...)

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Re: Installing Squirrel Mail from the Ports

2004-03-03 Thread Charles Swiger
On Mar 3, 2004, at 1:00 PM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
what I can do to get the port downloaded again?  or how can I clean up
after a failed install?
make clean is the most thorough procedure-- it will also clean 
dependencies of the current port-- or you could simply delete the work 
subdirectory...

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Re: Can Not ping Hosts by name when Underscores are Present.

2004-03-03 Thread Charles Swiger
On Mar 3, 2004, at 12:56 PM, Martin McCormick wrote:
Does the ping utility do some sort of name checking when one
wants to ping a particular host by name?
Ping uses gethostbyname2() to resolve the target hostname.

A person with an account on a FreeBSD system demonstrated to
me that one could successfully look up a given host using nslookup but
if you pinged that host by name as in
ping host_name.domain, one got an immediate complaint from the ping
utility like:
ping: cannot resolve cl_mail1.mydomain: Unknown server error
That sounds about right.  nslookup is a testing utility which allows 
one to query RRs for string you want, including ones which correspond 
to invalid hostnames.

The underscore is not allowed in Internet hostnames-- see RFC-952 and 
-1123.

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Re: Installing Squirrel Mail from the Ports

2004-03-03 Thread Charles Swiger
On Mar 3, 2004, at 1:47 PM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
After running a make clean and removing the file from 
/usr/ports/distfiles
It still downloads the file and shows it as being corrupt.  Is there 
any
way that i can specify a different server for it to download the bz2 
from?
corrupt meaning the downloaded file doesn't pass the checksum test?  
Anyway, yes, you can download the file by hand from any SourceForge 
server you want.  If it helps, I've put a copy at:

http://www.pkix.net/mirror/squirrelmail-1.4.2.tar.bz2

...which seems to have an the right checksum:

MD5 (squirrelmail-1.4.2.tar.bz2) = 8d8271c704a9f23d53138a4ceea38fb4

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Re: 1 processor vs. 2

2004-03-03 Thread Charles Swiger
On Mar 3, 2004, at 5:20 PM, Reko Turja wrote:
RAID-1 will be about 50% faster than RAID-5 doing reads regardless of
size, and will also be *much* faster doing small writes-- by a factor
of 4, perhaps.
The abovementioned figures seem more like comparing RAID-0 (striping)
to RAID-5 (striping with ECC) than RAID-5 to RAID-1 (mirroring).  In
my experience mirroring is always the slowest RAID in terms of
retrieving data, writes might be quite comparable with RAID-1 and
RAID-5 though.
Your mileage may vary.  :-)

However, consider that RAID-1 (mirroring) read performance should 
always be better than RAID-0 (striping) because you can get the data 
you want using a single read from either device regardless of size, and 
you can do things like distribute reads geometrically to reduce head 
motion for the RAID-1 case-- whereas with reads above the stripe size, 
the RAID-0 case requires you to access both devices and glue the 
results together.

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