Re: [GO] sequels/series

2004-11-14 Thread Nicky Smith

- Original Message -
From: Ellen Jordan [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Sunday, November 14, 2004 7:40 AM
Subject: Re: [GO] sequels/series


 Pam writes:

 I wondered  when book sequels  series first became common? . .
.Series
 feature largely in GO fiction - was there anything much before Alcott
/
 Montgomery / Oxenham series  Brazil's pairs?

Ellen suggested

 The earliest I can think of at the moment are The Fairy Bower and The
 Lost Brooch by Harriett Mozley, both published in 1841. Charlotte
Yonge
 saw them as the inspiration for the whole genre of books for girls.


I've not read Sandford and Merton but the publication dates are
1783-1789 so I assume it was published in several volumes. I don't think
we are ever going to come up with an official 'earliest sequel' !
There's also Through the Looking Glass which hasn't been mentioned.
There's also Leila books of the 1840s (the first is 1839, the second
1842 - I've been looking through Gillian Avery !). But I think American
children's writers have always been more series conscious - as well as
Alcott, there's Katy and Elsie. And there has never been a British
equivalent to the Stratmeyer (sp) syndicate books - the nearest is some
of the story papers which would draft in subsitute authors when the main
one was on holiday. I don't own the Phantom Friends guide to series but
IIRC that includes quite a few nineteenth century books.

Nicky

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Re: [GO] sequels/series PS

2004-11-14 Thread ReggieRhino



I ought to qualified 'girls' school stories' by 'British and Commonwealth' 
at some point - while the American girls' school story is very interesting (and, 
given 'What Katy Did at School', very important for the development of the 
British genre), the Book, and my knowledge, is mostly confined to these islands 
and our old Empire.

Sue
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Re: [GO] sequels/series

2004-11-14 Thread kirkhead
Ellen said:

Charlotte Yonge herself was a great one, if not exactly for series, at
least for linked novels. The first in her group was Scenes and
Characters published in 1847, but over the years she kept introducing
characters from one book into another until by the time she wrote Modern
Broods in 1900 the characters from a large number of her major novels
had become related to one another by marriage

So THAT'S where EJO got her ideas from!!!
Pam K
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Re: [GO] sequels/series

2004-11-14 Thread Ellen Jordan
Yes Nicky is right. If one broadens the category to children's books
more generally, one can find examples of series/sequels even back in the
1780/1810 period. 

I have just pulled from the shelf two tiny little books with
marbled-paper covers that I'd almost forgotten I had. One is called
Frank/In Four Parts/PartIII/ Eighth of the Series of Early Lessons by
Maria Edgworth and is dated 1803. The other is Frank Part IV. I'm not
sure if her Harry and Lucy stories (mentioned I think in Little Men)
began as a series, but according to Copac they were issued as Practical
Education in 1780, and the Copac lists suggest she went on writing
others to follow.

I'm not so sure about Sandford and Merton being a series, though. Copac
lists a number of copies in libraries with the date 1783, and then a
1790 fifth edition, corrected. There was also an abridged edition
embellished with elegant plates published in 1790, but no suggestion
of anything that could be seen as a sequel.



Ellen Jordan
University of Newcastle
Australia
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Re: [GO] sequels/series

2004-11-14 Thread Nicky Smith

- Original Message -
From: Ellen Jordan [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]; [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Sunday, November 14, 2004 10:21 AM
Subject: Re: [GO] sequels/series


  I have just pulled from the shelf two tiny little books with
 marbled-paper covers that I'd almost forgotten I had. One is called
 Frank/In Four Parts/PartIII/ Eighth of the Series of Early Lessons by
 Maria Edgworth and is dated 1803. The other is Frank Part IV. I'm not
 sure if her Harry and Lucy stories (mentioned I think in Little Men)
 began as a series, but according to Copac they were issued as
Practical
 Education in 1780, and the Copac lists suggest she went on writing
 others to follow.

 I'm not so sure about Sandford and Merton being a series, though.
Copac
 lists a number of copies in libraries with the date 1783, and then a
 1790 fifth edition, corrected. There was also an abridged edition
 embellished with elegant plates published in 1790, but no suggestion
 of anything that could be seen as a sequel.


According to the DNB it was published in three volumes (1783, 1786, and
1789), it tells how rebellious Tommy Merton, the spoilt son of a wealthy
plantation owner from Jamaica, and his friend Harry Sandford, the poor
but worthy son of a local farmer, are patiently educated by the Revd Mr
Barlow-and how Master Tommy is brought, by precept and self-discovery,
to see the error of his ways.

I don't know enough about 18th century publishing to know whether each
volume is complete in itself - I would assume so.but don't know for
sure.  Has anyone read the book ? It was still being read at the end of
the 19th century (I think there's a joke in Three Men in a Boat about a
very good boy being nicknamed Sandford and Merton). Probably a lot of
early novels that we think of as complete were actually published in
more than one part (see Little Women/Good Wives which are thought of as
all one book in the US though they were definitely published as two)

I remembered Edgeworth but I'm not sure if that is the same thing.
Aren't the individual Harry and Lucy stories all self-contained short
stories (I like some of her children's stories enormously especially The
Little Merchants, set in Italy and the Frank and Rosamund stories.
Alcott was a big fan - Lazy Laurence, used as a chapter heading in Good
Wives, comes from Edgeworth). Interestingly the DNB article on her
hardly  mentions her children's stories at all. I would have thought
that insofar as she is remembered now, it is because she is discussed in
histories of children's literature, rather than for her adult fiction
which may be influential but probably isn't read except by those doing
university courses on The Early Novel. Perhaps she needs an Andrew
Davies adaptation to get her on the map again. You can find some of her
stories at http://www.gutenberg.net/etext/3655 including The Barring Out
which is a famous early boarding school story. Sadly though I can't find
The Purple Jar which is probably her most famous story.

Nicky

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Re: [GO] sequels/series

2004-11-13 Thread Nicky Smith

- Original Message -
From: kirkhead [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Sunday, November 14, 2004 12:19 AM
Subject: [GO] sequels/series


 I've just finished watching UK terrestrial TV's premiere of 'Bridget
Jones'
 Diary' and noted the links between it and 'Pride  Prejudice' (didn't
spot
 the plot links on my first viewing at the cinema - doh!!). Anyway,
given BJD
 has a sequel  ('Edge of Reason'), although P  P doesn't, I wondered
when
 book sequels  series first became common? I know the Bible 
Shakespeare
 have several, but I meant in modern (20th century) fiction -
especially
 children's stuff. Series feature largely in GO fiction - was there
anything
 much before Alcott / Montgomery / Oxenham series  Brazil's pairs?

 Pam

The Fairchild Family was published in c1820 and part two appeared 20
years later (presumably by popular demand because kids just can't get
enough of evangelising over rotting corpses). Non-GO there's Robinson
Crusoe which has a largely forgotten sequel where he goes to Russia. Or
CM Yonge - she must be the queen of the nineteenth century sequel.

Nicky

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Re: [GO] sequels/series

2004-11-13 Thread Ellen Jordan
Pam writes:

I wondered  when book sequels  series first became common? . . .Series
feature largely in GO fiction - was there anything much before Alcott /
Montgomery / Oxenham series  Brazil's pairs?

The earliest I can think of at the moment are The Fairy Bower and The
Lost Brooch by Harriett Mozley, both published in 1841. Charlotte Yonge
saw them as the inspiration for the whole genre of books for girls. 

Charlotte Yonge herself was a great one, if not exactly for series, at
least for linked novels. The first in her group was Scenes and
Characters published in 1847, but over the years she kept introducing
characters from one book into another until by the time she wrote Modern
Broods in 1900 the characters from a large number of her major novels
had become related to one another by marriage. 

On the other hand I can only think of three examples of specific
sequels, and the only set that could really be called a series were her
Langley School stories, first begun in the 1840s, abandoned for many
years, and then resurrected in the 1880s and featuring a new generation
of the same families in the same village. 

Ellen Jordan
University of Newcastle
Australia
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
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