Re: Source code language identification

2011-05-04 Thread Andreas van Cranenburgh

Prolog code is also incorrectly identified as Perl code. The
extension .pl is used by both, so heuristics could be:

1) whether the file starts with a Perl shebang
2) signs that it is Prolog: whether the file has lines starting with %
(comments in Prolog), lines ending with ., and frequent occurrences
of :-.

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Re: Source code language identification

2011-05-03 Thread Chris Mear
On 3 May 2011, at 08:50, Tony Mechelynck antoine.mechely...@gmail.com wrote:

 On 02/05/11 14:15, milasudril wrote:
 How does github identify language? If I have a C++ include file,
 should it end with .hpp rather than .h?
 
 
 Does git need to know about language? (I mean, beyond the fact that the file 
 is text or binary)

It doesn't, but GitHub has a 'graphs' feature which, among other things, does a 
percentage breakdown of what languages your project is written in.

I'm guessing milasudril was just curious about how that worked.

Chris

 
 *.h files can be C, Ch, C++, Objective-C or Objective-C++. When compiling a 
 program that includes such a file, the compiler will parse it according to 
 where the *.h file is included, and your make target should set the 
 appropriate dependencies, but a versioning system? I would only expect it to 
 deliver the file version corresponding to whatever changeset you have made 
 current, either by fetching the appropriate full copy of the file, or by 
 applying the appropriate diff compared with the current version.
 
 
 Best regards,
 Tony.
 -- 
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 83. Batteries in the TV remote now last for months.
 
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Re: Source code language identification

2011-05-03 Thread milasudril


 I'm guessing milasudril was just curious about how that worked.

 Chris

That is right

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Re: Source code language identification

2011-05-03 Thread milasudril


On May 3, 2:58 pm, Kyle Neath k...@github.com wrote:
 Our .h/.c detection is still a little blurry between C, C++ and Obj-C. We 
 have some plans to improve this based on files in the directory (if there's a 
 .cpp, the .h is most likely C++) or keywords (If there's an @implementation 
 keyword, it's most likely Obj-C) but we haven't had a chance to deploy it yet.

Thank you

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