Re: [ietf-privacy] Big Data Ethics (was: recent scholarship wrt privacy law, obligations, legal theories frameworks

2014-05-15 Thread Robin Wilton
Excellent - thanks Jeff. Just leaving for SFO to present a paper on Ethical 
Data Handling.

R

Sent from my iPod

On 14 May 2014, at 15:59, =JeffH jeff.hod...@kingsmountain.com wrote:

 And, building upon Solove's work, there's this...
 
 
 Big Data Ethics
 http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2384174
 
 Neil M. Richards
 Jonathan H. King
 
 January 23, 2014
 
 Wake Forest Law Review, 2014
 
 Abstract:
 
 We are on the cusp of a Big Data Revolution, in which increasingly large 
 datasets are mined for important predictions and often surprising insights. 
 The predictions and decisions this revolution will enable will transform our 
 society in ways comparable to the Industrial Revolution. We are now at a 
 critical moment; big data uses today will be sticky and will settle both 
 default norms and public notions of what is no big deal regarding big data 
 predictions for years to come.
 
 In this paper, we argue that big data, broadly defined, is producing 
 increased powers of institutional awareness and power that require the 
 development of a Big Data Ethics. We are building a new digital society, and 
 the values we build or fail to build into our new digital structures will 
 define us. Critically, if we fail to balance the human values that we care 
 about, like privacy, confidentiality, transparency, identity and free choice 
 with the compelling uses of big data, our Big Data Society risks abandoning 
 these values for the sake of innovation and expediency.
 
 In Part I, we trace the origins and rapid growth of the Information 
 Revolution. In Part II, we call for the development of a Big Data Ethics, a 
 set of four related principles that should govern data flows in our 
 information society, and inform the establishment of big data norms. First, 
 we must recognize privacy as an inevitable system of information rules 
 rather than merely secrecy. Second, we must recognize that shared private 
 information can remain confidential. Third, we must recognize that big data 
 requires transparency. Fourth, we must recognize that big data can compromise 
 identity. In Part III, we suggest how we might integrate big data ethics into 
 our society. Law will be an important part of Big Data Ethics, but so too 
 must the establishment of ethical principles and best practices that guide 
 government, corporations, and users. We must all be part of the conversation, 
 and part of the solution. Big Data Ethics are for everyone.
 
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[ietf-privacy] recent scholarship wrt privacy law, obligations, legal theories frameworks

2014-05-14 Thread =JeffH
Some interesting recent research/thinking around privacy law, obligations, 
legal theories  frameworks...



The FTC and the New Common Law of Privacy
by Daniel Solove * April 13, 2014
http://www.concurringopinions.com/archives/2014/04/the-ftc-and-the-new-common-law-of-privacy-2.html


10 Reasons Why Privacy Matters
by Daniel Solove * January 14, 2014
http://www.concurringopinions.com/archives/2014/01/10-reasons-why-privacy-matters.html


What Is Personally Identifiable Information (PII)? Finding Common Ground in 
the EU and US

by Daniel Solove * June 26, 2013
http://www.concurringopinions.com/archives/2013/06/what-is-personally-identifiable-information-pii-finding-common-ground-in-the-eu-and-us.html


Privacy Self-Management and the Consent Dilemma
by Daniel Solove * May 21, 2013
http://www.concurringopinions.com/archives/2013/05/privacy-self-management-and-the-consent-dilemma.html


Harvard Law Review Privacy Symposium Issue
http://www.concurringopinions.com/archives/2013/05/harvard-law-review-privacy-symposium-issue.html
May 21, 2013

The privacy symposium issue of the Harvard Law Review is hot off the 
presses.  Here are the articles:


SYMPOSIUM
PRIVACY AND TECHNOLOGY
Introduction: Privacy Self-Management and the Consent Dilemmas
Daniel J. Solove
http://www.harvardlawreview.org/issues/126/may13/Symposium_9475.php

What Privacy is For
Julie E. Cohen
http://www.harvardlawreview.org/issues/126/may13/Symposium_9476.php

The Dangers of Surveillance
Neil M. Richards
http://www.harvardlawreview.org/issues/126/may13/Symposium_9477.php

The EU-U.S. Privacy Collision: A Turn to Institutions and Procedures
Paul M. Schwartz
http://www.harvardlawreview.org/issues/126/may13/Symposium_9478.php

Toward a Positive Theory of Privacy Law
Lior Jacob Strahilevitz
http://www.harvardlawreview.org/issues/126/may13/Symposium_9479.php

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[ietf-privacy] Big Data Ethics (was: recent scholarship wrt privacy law, obligations, legal theories frameworks

2014-05-14 Thread =JeffH

And, building upon Solove's work, there's this...


Big Data Ethics
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2384174

Neil M. Richards
Jonathan H. King

January 23, 2014

Wake Forest Law Review, 2014

Abstract:

We are on the cusp of a Big Data Revolution, in which increasingly large 
datasets are mined for important predictions and often surprising insights. 
The predictions and decisions this revolution will enable will transform our 
society in ways comparable to the Industrial Revolution. We are now at a 
critical moment; big data uses today will be sticky and will settle both 
default norms and public notions of what is no big deal regarding big data 
predictions for years to come.


In this paper, we argue that big data, broadly defined, is producing 
increased powers of institutional awareness and power that require the 
development of a Big Data Ethics. We are building a new digital society, and 
the values we build or fail to build into our new digital structures will 
define us. Critically, if we fail to balance the human values that we care 
about, like privacy, confidentiality, transparency, identity and free choice 
with the compelling uses of big data, our Big Data Society risks abandoning 
these values for the sake of innovation and expediency.


In Part I, we trace the origins and rapid growth of the Information 
Revolution. In Part II, we call for the development of a Big Data Ethics, 
a set of four related principles that should govern data flows in our 
information society, and inform the establishment of big data norms. First, 
we must recognize privacy as an inevitable system of information rules 
rather than merely secrecy. Second, we must recognize that shared private 
information can remain confidential. Third, we must recognize that big 
data requires transparency. Fourth, we must recognize that big data can 
compromise identity. In Part III, we suggest how we might integrate big data 
ethics into our society. Law will be an important part of Big Data Ethics, 
but so too must the establishment of ethical principles and best practices 
that guide government, corporations, and users. We must all be part of the 
conversation, and part of the solution. Big Data Ethics are for everyone.


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Re: Privacy law

2000-04-06 Thread Martin Montenegro

Salvador Vidal [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
I think that as much conflicts that can be solved without the traditional
way: regulation + represion = burocracy + injustice, will be better for
users.
But on privacy questions we can try first to give technical solutions, i.e.
ways  to follow stamped data to oversee companies behavior and then inform
users about it automaticaly when they get in contact with these
companies,..., well I don´t know which utilities will work, but I think is
worthy to try some before being driven to legal solutions that only will be
able to reapir damages not to avoid them.

I think that we are in front of the progress ´s victory over the politics
's ideas.
See the advance of technology like a flood and the politics like a glass.
The humanity is really in front of the product of the knowledge of some
persons and is trying to save your houses of the flood with a small glass.
That bring an inevitable break of the actually concepts about the limits
and jurisdictions of the law.
Some countries(goverments) are afraid to lose the domain on commerce and 
in a future they will take acctions(any action!!) to regulate all in this
actually paradise of finances.



Martin Montenegro