Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-08 Thread Salvador Vidal
Hi folks and all, At 10:04 06/04/00 JST, Masataka Ohta wrote: Online business patents are, at large, ineffective and harmless. We can have servers outside of US and there is no legislation (even under US laws. note that the servers can serve yet another countries) to make the servers illegal.

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-08 Thread John Stracke
Masataka Ohta wrote: Even if it's not true in the general case, a sufficiently expensive lawyer might be able to convince the court that, since the Internet makes location irrelevant, the location of the infringement is irrelevant. that US patents are applicable even if both servers,

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-08 Thread Jon Crowcroft
as ye sow, so shall ye weep...in reading this thread i guess i saw several problems: oxymoron alert "thought...patent" tautology alert "sufficiently expensive...lawyer" internet bogon alert "find the server" is a server where the ip address, DNS name, lat/long of the CPU, memory, disk, or

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-06 Thread Stewart Bryant
Check with the lawyers, but I think that you will find that this is strictly a US view of patents. In every other country any public disclosure anywhere immediately voids the right to patent. Even NDA disclosure can be tricky, because an offer for sale counts as a disclosure. Stewart Doug

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-06 Thread John Stracke
Brijesh Kumar wrote: Granting of patents only means that a person grated a particular patent was first to make "a claim" about the novelty of an idea or technique as far as the patent office knows on the basis of "previous claims submitted to it.". At least in the US, at least sometimes,

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-06 Thread John Stracke
Masataka Ohta wrote: We can have servers outside of US and there is no legislation (even under US laws. note that the servers can serve yet another countries) to make the servers illegal. Mmm...that sounds like a grey area. A company using patented tech to do business in the US may be

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-06 Thread Masataka Ohta
John; We can have servers outside of US and there is no legislation (even under US laws. note that the servers can serve yet another countries) to make the servers illegal. Mmm...that sounds like a grey area. A company using patented tech to do business in the US may be subject to US

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-05 Thread David L. Nicol
Dave Miller wrote: - I wonder how much of government we can get rid of if we keep chipping away at it? I see this a lot in discussions of government reform: Imagine your reform happens, and bureaucratic rot sets in. After a hundred years or so, you will have something very similar to the

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-05 Thread Doug Royer
"David L. Nicol" wrote: After publishing your idea somewhere, for public critique, you have a year to file your patent application. After that it becomes a public prior art. Am I wrong? Or if it is a little past a year, and you can show that you have done your best - you can also get the

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-03 Thread Henning Schulzrinne
I suppose it depends which conferences you attend. I can tell you from personal experience (and the angry phone calls...) that papers from "famous" people do get rejected, frequently. Are you arguing that there should be no peer review, given that it fails on occasion or because some people are

RE: A thought about patents

2000-04-02 Thread Dave Miller
Would you have the same people checking the claims of how much it cost to develop an idea that now check the technical claims...? Excellent point. The problem, as usual, is in the execution. So could self-regulation be the answer? (I'm not a lawyer, but...) Consider a voluntary public

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-01 Thread Jon Crowcroft
My thought is this: I'd like to see a presumption of lack of novelty if an idea gets raised in a public forum, even if it happens _after_ a patent has been applied for, unless it can be shown that the information came from leakage of proprietary information. intersting idea i would

Re: A thought about patents

2000-04-01 Thread Vernon Schryver
From: Jon Crowcroft [EMAIL PROTECTED] ... perhaps the length of patent protection should be directly related to the cost of developing an idea - in pharmaceutical industry, long patents make sense because of the large investment in testing a new drug safely - similar i nthe automotive and