Re: KR> Melting lead

2017-02-02 Thread Bill Jacobs via KRnet
At work we salvaged a large amount of silver solder from a failed solder pot by 
using mapp gas instead of propane on the surface. That choice was driven by the 
shear amount involved.  Propane would have worked just fine.Regards, 
Bill Jacobs Daytona Beach, Fl. 

On Thursday, February 2, 2017 2:18 PM, Sid Wood via KRnet 
 wrote:
 

 Lead can be melted with direct application of a propane torch. 




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Re: KR> Melting lead

2017-02-02 Thread Sid Wood via KRnet
Lead can be melted with direct application of a propane torch.  That does 
tend to oxidize the lead, so you do get more slag.  Solder is a mixture of 
lead and tin.  These will oxidize at different rates under the torch flame. 
That could change the mixture ratio of the solder.  Maybe not a big deal, 
but could be.  If you can get at the underside of the pot, suggest you apply 
the torch there.


Sid Wood
Tri-gear KR-2 N6242
Mechanicsville, MD, USA
--

Speaking of melting lead, I have been trying to figure out for the past
few days how to deal with my solder pot that just crapped out that I use
for mass soldering of circuit boards.  It is a big 2,000 Watt electric
pot that is regulated at 250 degrees C.  I have a new solder pot on the
way, but am trying to figure out the best way to melt out the 75 pounds
of solder in the old pot and put it in the new one.  At today's prices
for bar solder it is $1,500 worth of solder.  It takes about an hour to
melt when the pot is working so I am not sure if I can effectively just
remove the pot from the whole machine and heat on the stove or heat it
with a torch.  Withe any luck the heating element on the new pot is the
same as the old one and I can just transfer it to the old pot.  Can't
buy just the heating element.

Brian Kraut
904-536-1780
br...@eamanuacturing.com






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Re: KR> Cockpit vacuum gauge

2017-02-02 Thread Jeff Scott via KRnet

 
 

Jeff said,

> "I don't think the manifold pressure gauge [vacuum gauge] is going to
tell you much other than your throttle setting for a given altitude."

It won't even do that if you fly wide open throttle - which if above 8K I
assume everyone does.

Steve Bennett had a chart that showed what information could be derived
from a vaccuum gauge. I just went looking for it but couldn't find it.
It's out there on the internet - behavior of the needle indicating
various possible engine problems. Steve once recommended I put one in so
I did . . . but I've never found the gauge useful at all. The way I fly,
unless I've just taken off and am climbing, it always reads zero.

Mike
KSEE
---

Actually, a manifold pressure gauge will show absolute pressure, which changes 
with altitude even at full throttle. (30 in manifold pressure at sea level vs 
20 in manifold pressure at 10,000').  That allows you to calculate percent 
power.  FWIW, I am almost always flying above 8000' since the airport is at 
7200', but I rarely cruise at full throttle.

I suspect the initial question was asked based on the vacuum gauge 
interpretations on this web site: 
.  First off, the 
interpretations on that web site are pretty lose interpretations.  Secondly, 
the things they are interpreting via a vacuum gauge would be detected much 
earlier during any type of regular engine maintenance (differential compression 
test, mag drop test on run-up, and mag timing check).  The third point is that 
a manifold pressure gauge is usually installed with a restricted port, and a 
fairly long 1/8" copper line, so any of the vacuum interpretations from that 
web site would be pretty well buffered out of the manifold pressure gauge 
readings.  That is by design in order to prevent having a significant vacuum 
leak into the intake manifold should the line to the manifold pressure gauge 
fail.

-Jeff Scott
Los Alamos, NM

 

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Re: KR> Melting lead

2017-02-02 Thread Mark Wegmet via KRnet
If it is a true eutectic, you can put it in an oven set at 425F - 63/37 SnPb
melts at 361F. If you have a ladle and are VERY careful with appropriate
PPE, you can transfer it to your new pot. If your old pot has a "drain" set
up, again, with proper PPE, you can 'dump' it into the new pot. Obviously,
you will destroy everything on your old pot except the solder pot itself by
doing this.

You could also disassemble your old set up and build a mini kiln with
firebrick/refractory brick and propane or gas torches to accomplish the same
thing.

I hope you are knowledgeable about handling molten metal... this is not a
task for the uninitiated.

BTW, I spent almost 30 years building circuit boards, including assemblies
with SMD fine pitch, wave solder systems, IR/Solder paste, etc. In any event
BE CAREFULL!

Mark W
N952MW

-Original Message-
From: KRnet [mailto:krnet-boun...@list.krnet.org] On Behalf Of Sid Wood via
KRnet
Sent: Thursday, February 2, 2017 1:17 PM
To: krnet@list.krnet.org
Cc: Sid Wood
Subject: Re: KR> Melting lead

Lead can be melted with direct application of a propane torch.  That does
tend to oxidize the lead, so you do get more slag.  Solder is a mixture of
lead and tin.  These will oxidize at different rates under the torch flame. 
That could change the mixture ratio of the solder.  Maybe not a big deal,
but could be.  If you can get at the underside of the pot, suggest you apply
the torch there.

Sid Wood
Tri-gear KR-2 N6242
Mechanicsville, MD, USA
--

Speaking of melting lead, I have been trying to figure out for the past few
days how to deal with my solder pot that just crapped out that I use for
mass soldering of circuit boards.  It is a big 2,000 Watt electric pot that
is regulated at 250 degrees C.  I have a new solder pot on the way, but am
trying to figure out the best way to melt out the 75 pounds of solder in the
old pot and put it in the new one.  At today's prices for bar solder it is
$1,500 worth of solder.  It takes about an hour to melt when the pot is
working so I am not sure if I can effectively just remove the pot from the
whole machine and heat on the stove or heat it with a torch.  Withe any luck
the heating element on the new pot is the same as the old one and I can just
transfer it to the old pot.  Can't buy just the heating element.

Brian Kraut
904-536-1780
br...@eamanuacturing.com






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KR> Why messages appear empty - it's probably not "plain text"

2017-02-02 Thread Mark Langford via KRnet
The number one reason why posts show up with nothing in them is because
the message was sent as HTML, rather than plain text.  The system
doesn't pass HTML because HTML requires a lot more bandwidth to
transfer, which means higher data rates (which is important for folks
with limited data plans or slow internet), and it further bloats the
archive.  The default for many email systems is HTML, but it's a pretty
simple matter to change message type to "plain text" rather than "HTML".
 Many also allow you to set message type automatically based on
destination.  I have mine set to automatically make any email sent to
www.krnet.org be sent in plain text only.  

Google is your friend here..."how to send plain text messages from
.

Mark Langford, Harvest, AL
ML "at" N56ML.com
www.N56ML.com



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Re: KR> Melting lead

2017-02-02 Thread Mark Wegmet via KRnet
Forgot to mention - not a household oven, but an industrial oven - 63/37
SnPb weighs in at about 570#/cu. Ft. 

-Original Message-
From: KRnet [mailto:krnet-boun...@list.krnet.org] On Behalf Of Mark Wegmet
via KRnet
Sent: Thursday, February 2, 2017 6:38 PM
To: 'KRnet'
Cc: Mark Wegmet; 'Sid Wood'
Subject: Re: KR> Melting lead

If it is a true eutectic, you can put it in an oven set at 425F - 63/37 SnPb
melts at 361F. If you have a ladle and are VERY careful with appropriate
PPE, you can transfer it to your new pot. If your old pot has a "drain" set
up, again, with proper PPE, you can 'dump' it into the new pot. Obviously,
you will destroy everything on your old pot except the solder pot itself by
doing this.

You could also disassemble your old set up and build a mini kiln with
firebrick/refractory brick and propane or gas torches to accomplish the same
thing.

I hope you are knowledgeable about handling molten metal... this is not a
task for the uninitiated.

BTW, I spent almost 30 years building circuit boards, including assemblies
with SMD fine pitch, wave solder systems, IR/Solder paste, etc. In any event
BE CAREFULL!

Mark W
N952MW

-Original Message-
From: KRnet [mailto:krnet-boun...@list.krnet.org] On Behalf Of Sid Wood via
KRnet
Sent: Thursday, February 2, 2017 1:17 PM
To: krnet@list.krnet.org
Cc: Sid Wood
Subject: Re: KR> Melting lead

Lead can be melted with direct application of a propane torch.  That does
tend to oxidize the lead, so you do get more slag.  Solder is a mixture of
lead and tin.  These will oxidize at different rates under the torch flame. 
That could change the mixture ratio of the solder.  Maybe not a big deal,
but could be.  If you can get at the underside of the pot, suggest you apply
the torch there.

Sid Wood
Tri-gear KR-2 N6242
Mechanicsville, MD, USA
--

Speaking of melting lead, I have been trying to figure out for the past few
days how to deal with my solder pot that just crapped out that I use for
mass soldering of circuit boards.  It is a big 2,000 Watt electric pot that
is regulated at 250 degrees C.  I have a new solder pot on the way, but am
trying to figure out the best way to melt out the 75 pounds of solder in the
old pot and put it in the new one.  At today's prices for bar solder it is
$1,500 worth of solder.  It takes about an hour to melt when the pot is
working so I am not sure if I can effectively just remove the pot from the
whole machine and heat on the stove or heat it with a torch.  Withe any luck
the heating element on the new pot is the same as the old one and I can just
transfer it to the old pot.  Can't buy just the heating element.

Brian Kraut
904-536-1780
br...@eamanuacturing.com






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Re: KR> Melting lead

2017-02-02 Thread brian.kraut--- via KRnet
That is exactly what I did, plaster of paris molds that were baked in
the oven to get the moisture out.  I think I made the initial male mold
out of wax if I remember correctly then poured on the plaster of paris
to make a female mold then baked in the oven and poured out the melted
wax to get my female molds.

I used lead fishing sinkers and melted them in a cat food can on my gas
stove, but I think an electric stove would do fine also.

One recommendation I have on your aileron ballance weights is to not
have them as big rectangles.  Keep in mind that you want most of the
mass of lead to be on a long arm away from the hinge point.  It takes
twice the weight to ballance as it would if the weight was twice as far
from the hinge point.  I recall Jim Faughn's (If I am remembering
correctly) ballance weight on one aileron breaking off in flight at a
gathering one year.  His weights were huge rectangles with a lot of mass
near the hinge point so they were a lot heavier than they needed to be
which makes the whole aileron and counterbalance assembly heavier and
more prone to flutter even when ballanced.  I made mine more wedge
shaped with most of the mass far from the hinge point.

Speaking of melting lead, I have been trying to figure out for the past
few days how to deal with my solder pot that just crapped out that I use
for mass soldering of circuit boards.  It is a big 2,000 Watt electric
pot that is regulated at 250 degrees C.  I have a new solder pot on the
way, but am trying to figure out the best way to melt out the 75 pounds
of solder in the old pot and put it in the new one.  At today's prices
for bar solder it is $1,500 worth of solder.  It takes about an hour to
melt when the pot is working so I am not sure if I can effectively just
remove the pot from the whole machine and heat on the stove or heat it
with a torch.  Withe any luck the heating element on the new pot is the
same as the old one and I can just transfer it to the old pot.  Can't
buy just the heating element.

Brian Kraut
904-536-1780
br...@eamanuacturing.com



 Original Message 
Subject: Re: KR> Melting lead
From: Parley T Byington via KRnet 
Date: Sat, January 28, 2017 1:56 pm
To: "krnet@list.krnet.org" 
Cc: Parley T Byington 

Date: Saturday, Jan.28,2017
Subject: Melting lead and safety precautions

When making my counter weights, I built some molds out of plaster of
Paris to shape then used the female mold to pour melted lead into. 

ONE VERY IMPORTANT POINT HERE; that is heat the mold (plaster) in the
oven to a high temperature to ensure there is NO water left in the
plaster PRIOR to pouring molten lead in it. FAILURE to do this will
result in an explosion of molten lead that will cover everything with in
a 10 ft radius INCLUDING the person pouring the lead! ALWAYS WEAR
PROTECTIVE CLOTHING, GLOVES, EYE, FACE, ARM, AND BODY PROTECTION.


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KR> Cockpit vacuum gauge

2017-02-02 Thread Mike Stirewalt via KRnet
Jeff said, 

> "I don't think the manifold pressure gauge [vacuum gauge] is going to
tell you much other than your throttle setting for a given altitude."

It won't even do that if you fly wide open throttle - which if above 8K I
assume everyone does.  

Steve Bennett had a chart that showed what information could be derived
from a vaccuum gauge.  I just went looking for it but couldn't find it. 
It's out there on the internet - behavior of the needle indicating
various possible engine problems.  Steve once recommended I put one in so
I did . . . but I've never found the gauge useful at all.  The way I fly,
unless I've just taken off and am climbing, it always reads zero.  

Mike
KSEE


1 Odd Method 'Restores' Your 20/20 Vision. Try This Tonight
The Lost Ways
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/589375afac8f075af3f17st02vuc

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