Re: our customers' needs

2005-01-27 Thread Clive D.W. Feather
Rob Seaman said:
 Our modern sensibility may lead us to discount Egyptian and Druidic (or
 earlier) world views, but surely the many cultures worldwide that
 produced pyramids and other monolithic structures do demonstrate the
 frequent centrality of spirituality in human decision making.  Those
 cultures most definitely knew the motions of the Sun, Moon, stars and
 planets intimately.  Steve Allen already provided a convincing real
 world example of the response of a more recent mainstream religious
 community to civil calendar issues.

This would be the point about sunrise on saints' days?

All these issues have one thing in common - they pre-date the introduction
of atomic time, but rather date back to when mean solar time was assumed to
be constant rate and therefore unchanging.

What, I wonder, did the various churches do about the Eleven Days? They can
hardly have been taken down and rebuilt at a slight angle, after all.

 At this critical point in world
 history, what possible justification could there be for truncating the
 discovery process for uncovering similar requirements placed on civil
 time by the great religions of the world before making a large change
 in the definition of civil time?

I have no problem with trying to identify the issues involved. But we can
reasonably ask whether the alignment of a few buildings in Oxfordshire [*]
is grounds for forcing the whole world to cope with the kludge of leap
seconds for the next thousand years.

[* Usual Cambridge-Oxford rivalry deleted for brevity.]

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Re: The Eleven Days

2005-01-27 Thread John Cowan
Clive D.W. Feather scripsit:

 See also http://www.davros.org/misc/easter.html and the Easter Act 1928.

Most interesting, and an excellent Web site.

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