Re: two world clocks AND Time after Time

2005-01-25 Thread Poul-Henning Kamp
In message [EMAIL PROTECTED], Clive D.W. Feather writes:
Poul-Henning Kamp said:
 [That is, if the equinox was actually on March 9th, would anyone outside
 the astronomical community notice?]

 I doubt it.

 I'm not so certain about the summer and winter solstice however.
 here in the nordic countries were're quite emotionally attached to
 those.

Hmm, that's because you actually get midnight sun and midday night (or
approximations like the White Nights).

That is probably how a foreigner would say it.  We would tend to say
it's because it's so bloddy dark all winter :-)

But given that these dates move a day or two each year anyway because of
leap year effects, you wouldn't notice the drift without being told.

More superstition is attached to those, so people might not take it
(as) lightly.

And talking about superstition...

The NeoPagans will demand that we rotate Stone Henge to match.

The UFOlogist will insist that we turn the Great Pyramid accordingly.

And just wait until the astrologers find out...

Poul-Henning

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Re: two world clocks AND Time after Time

2005-01-25 Thread Steve Allen
On Tue 2005-01-25T09:57:46 +, Clive D.W. Feather hath writ:
 I think you're out by a factor of 10. Would the Man On The Clapham Omnibus
 be able to identify the solstice or equinox to within 14 days? Other than
 knowing the conventional dates?

 [That is, if the equinox was actually on March 9th, would anyone outside
 the astronomical community notice?]

The answer is in Duncan Steel's book Marking Time
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471298271.html

The answer is yes, and it is evident in the orientation of churches
in England built before and after the English calendar reform in 1752.

Churches were built oriented to sunrise on their saint's day.
In 1752 the calendar shifted, and sunrise shifted.  Additions made to
pre-reform churches were oriented to sunrise on the new saint's day.
The result was crooked churches.  Steel counts 81 such churches
within Oxfordshire alone.

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