Re: building consensus

2006-06-07 Thread Clive D.W. Feather
Rob Seaman said: As I've said before, eventually the notion that the solar day contains 24h of 60m of 60s will have to be abandoned. It'll be awfully hard to maintain when an hour involves two human sleep-wake cycles, out in the limit when the Moon is fully tidally locked and 1 lunar month =

Re: building consensus

2006-06-07 Thread Clive D.W. Feather
John Cowan said: Historians aren't exactly consistent on the question. In European history, dates are Julian or Gregorian depending on the location; dates in East Asian history seem to be proleptic Gregorian. Even worse, Julian can have more than one meaning. In the UK in 1750, there were

Re: building consensus

2006-06-07 Thread Rob Seaman
On Jun 7, 2006, at 2:01 AM, Clive D.W. Feather wrote: Actually, the evidence from experiments is that the natural sleep- wake cycle is about 27 hours long, but force-locked to the day-night cycle (it's easier to synchronise a longer free-running timer to a shorter external signal than

Re: building consensus

2006-06-07 Thread Rob Seaman
On Jun 7, 2006, at 2:03 AM, Clive D.W. Feather wrote: In the UK in 1750, there were two different Julian calendars in use: the day and month enumeration matched, but year numbers changed at different dates (1st January in Scotland, 25th March in England and Wales). I've heard this said, but

Re: building consensus

2006-06-07 Thread John Cowan
Poul-Henning Kamp scripsit: I belive this was because the year followed the taxation cycle of the government whereas the day+month followed the religiously inherited tradtion. Indeed. For that matter, the start of the U.K. tax year was left alone when the calendar changed, and is now 6 April

Re: building consensus

2006-06-07 Thread Ed Davies
Rob Seaman wrote: On Jun 7, 2006, at 2:03 AM, Clive D.W. Feather wrote: In the UK in 1750, there were two different Julian calendars in use: the day and month enumeration matched, but year numbers changed at different dates (1st January in Scotland, 25th March in England and Wales). I've

Re: building consensus

2006-06-07 Thread Rob Seaman
Tim Shepard replies: Also hard to imagine how one gracefully transitions from one to two sleep cycles a day. It is already the norm in some places: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siesta Thanks for the chuckle. One is then left wondering whether our far future, Clarkeian Against the Fall

Re: building consensus

2006-06-07 Thread John Cowan
Rob Seaman scripsit: References for this? Your explanation makes a lot of sense and I'm prepared to be convinced, but have been skeptical of experimental design as applied to questions of human behavior since participating in studies as a requirement of undergraduate psychology coursework.