Re: 24:00 versus 00:00

2006-02-27 Thread Rob Seaman
On Feb 17, 2006, at 12:30 PM, Markus Kuhn wrote: Clive D.W. Feather wrote on 2006-02-17 05:58 UTC: However, London Underground does print 24:00 on a ticket issued at midnight, and in fact continues up to 27:30 (such tickets count as being issued on the previous day for validity purposes, and

Re: 24:00 versus 00:00

2006-02-17 Thread Ed Davies
Ed Davies scripsit: If only the 24:00 for end of day notation wasn't in the way we could look at positive leap seconds as just being the result of deeming certain days to be a second longer than most and just use 24:00:00. We wouldn't have to muck with the lengths of any of the hours or minutes

Re: 24:00 versus 00:00

2006-02-17 Thread John Cowan
Ed Davies scripsit: No, it amounts to saying that some days are 24 hours and 1 second long. When you're half a second from the end of such a day you are 24 hours, zero minutes and half a second from the start. I grant that. Nonetheless, the third-from-last figure in a broken-out timestamp

Re: 24:00 versus 00:00

2006-02-17 Thread Rob Seaman
Clive Feather wrote: London Underground does print 24:00 on a ticket issued at midnight, and in fact continues up to 27:30 An even better example. We cannot expect to dissuade such usage. Deploying systems that require it be avoided is folly. Wouldn't think the modulus operator would be

Re: 24:00 versus 00:00

2006-02-17 Thread Markus Kuhn
Clive D.W. Feather wrote on 2006-02-17 05:58 UTC: However, London Underground does print 24:00 on a ticket issued at midnight, and in fact continues up to 27:30 (such tickets count as being issued on the previous day for validity purposes, and this helps to reinforce it). The tickets of UK

Re: 24:00 versus 00:00

2006-02-16 Thread Markus Kuhn
Steve Allen wrote on 2006-02-16 19:25 UTC: No reply from an NTP server shall ever represent any point in time between 23:59:60 and 24:00:00 of a UTC day. Minor point, I think it has to read more like this between 23:59:60 of a UTC day that ends with a positive leap

Re: 24:00 versus 00:00

2006-02-16 Thread Ed Davies
Markus Kuhn wrote: With the 24-h notation, it is a very useful and well-established convention that 00:00 refers to midnight at the start of a date, while 24:00 refers to midnight at the end of a date. Thus, both today 24:00 and tomorrow 00:00 are fully equivalent representations of the same

Re: 24:00 versus 00:00

2006-02-16 Thread John Cowan
Ed Davies scripsit: If only the 24:00 for end of day notation wasn't in the way we could look at positive leap seconds as just being the result of deeming certain days to be a second longer than most and just use 24:00:00. We wouldn't have to muck with the lengths of any of the hours or

Re: 24:00 versus 00:00

2006-02-16 Thread Warner Losh
From: Markus Kuhn [EMAIL PROTECTED] Subject: Re: 24:00 versus 00:00 Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2006 19:53:22 + Steve Allen wrote on 2006-02-16 19:25 UTC: No reply from an NTP server shall ever represent any point in time between 23:59:60 and 24:00:00 of a UTC day. Minor point, I think

Re: 24:00 versus 00:00

2006-02-16 Thread Clive D.W. Feather
Markus Kuhn said: Writing 24:00 to terminate a time interval at exactly midnight is pretty common practice and is even sanctioned by ISO 8601. See for example the railway timetable on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24-hour_clock where trains arrive at 24:00 but depart at 00:00. Usual UK