War of the Worlds

2006-01-11 Thread Rob Seaman
I see Steve Allen has already supplied a thorough answer. Interested individuals might also scrounge through the list archives (http:// rom.usno.navy.mil/archives/leapsecs.html) since the topic has come up before. In fact, Demetrios Matsakis speculated on solar system wide timescales even

Re: War of the Worlds

2006-01-11 Thread John Cowan
Rob Seaman scripsit: I don't have an envelope large enough, but there are various issues to consider. The Hurtling Moons of Barsoom are much smaller than our own and should have a negligible tidal breaking effect. (See http:// www.freemars.org/mars/marssys.html, for instance, for their

Re: War of the Worlds

2006-01-11 Thread Neal McBurnett
I referenced this page, but missed the most interesting part of it: http://www.exo.net/~pauld/physics/tides/tidalevolution.htm The height of a tidal bulge on a planet is proportional to the inverse cube of the distance between the planet and the object causing the tidal bulge. The torque

Re: War of the Worlds

2006-01-11 Thread John Cowan
Neal McBurnett scripsit: I wouldn't be too quick to dismiss tidal braking from Phobos. It's awfully close to Mars, and tidal braking is as you say an inverse-cube effect. The formula (kai Wikipedia) is (2GMmr)/R^3, where M and m are the masses, r is the radius of the primary, and R is