Re: mmm ... toys ..

2001-03-27 Thread James Powell

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 01:59:18AM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 mmm .. 
 
 by some dint of fate I appear to be the proud owner of a rather nice new
 Dell laptop.
 
 Bit slow ( 850mhz P3 ) and 128 mb of ram is hardly enough to run Vi in is
 it ..  a poxy 32Gb hard disc means I'll probably run out of space soon
 too. (thinks .. this is considerably more powerful than my workstation ..
 h..)

Sounds acceptable to me, I'll have it if you don't want it.

Alternatively if anyone has one of the titanium macs going spare?

 all I need to do now is partition magic it and install Linux ... does
 anyone know if fips.exe can resize partitons without hoovering the lot ??
 or shuold I get partition magic anyway ?

I've found gnu parted to be good - should be able to get it on a linux
boot disk somewhere.


jp



Re: mmm ... toys ..

2001-03-27 Thread Dominic Mitchell

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 01:59:18AM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 mmm .. 
 
 by some dint of fate I appear to be the proud owner of a rather nice new
 Dell laptop.
 
 Bit slow ( 850mhz P3 ) and 128 mb of ram is hardly enough to run Vi in is
 it ..  a poxy 32Gb hard disc means I'll probably run out of space soon
 too. (thinks .. this is considerably more powerful than my workstation ..
 h..)

*grin*

 the best bit is the video card .. 32mb ATI Mobility  .. runs two monitors
 in 1400 * 1050 high colour .. and you can move between one and the other
 (just like you;ve been able to do on Macs since the years dot.) ..  the
 15in 1400*1050 screen is good too and seems to allow a decent viewing
 angle instead of the usual 5 degrees or so.

I have an ATI Mobility M1 in my laptop, too (Vaio z600tek).  You'll be
glad to know that it's supported under XFree86.  The bad news is that 3d
acceleration isn't supported (and I don't know whether it's likely to
be), so leave a winders partition lying around if you want to play
games.

 all I need to do now is partition magic it and install Linux ... does
 anyone know if fips.exe can resize partitons without hoovering the lot ??
 or shuold I get partition magic anyway ?

Fips should be able to.  All it does is shrink your FAT partition (NTFS
need not apply).  When looking at the partition table, also, don't
change the 4th partition towards the end of the disk, if there is one.
It's the suspend to disk partition (can't remember what id it is, sorry :-(  )

-Dom



Re: mmm ... toys ..

2001-03-27 Thread Piers Cawley

James Powell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 01:59:18AM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
  mmm .. 
  
  by some dint of fate I appear to be the proud owner of a rather nice new
  Dell laptop.
  
  Bit slow ( 850mhz P3 ) and 128 mb of ram is hardly enough to run Vi in is
  it ..  a poxy 32Gb hard disc means I'll probably run out of space soon
  too. (thinks .. this is considerably more powerful than my workstation ..
  h..)
 
 Sounds acceptable to me, I'll have it if you don't want it.
 
 Alternatively if anyone has one of the titanium macs going spare?

Mmm neeed...

-- 
Piers




Re: mmm ... toys ..

2001-03-27 Thread Robert Shiels

- Original Message -
From: "James Powell" [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: 27 March 2001 09:41
Subject: Re: mmm ... toys ..


 Alternatively if anyone has one of the titanium macs going spare?

I have an original bondi-blue iMac, running MACOS9 at the moment, with 32Mb
RAM. I was in an Apple shop at the weekend and found that a 128Mb upgrade
and OSX will only set me back about 200gbp. I was assured that all my OS9
applications will still work (my wife uses Clarisworks for WP, and the kids
play their games), does anyone know if this is the case.

And also, will I be able to install perl,apache,mysql and other *nix
goodness on it too - I've never gotten to grips with macperl really.

/Robert




Re: mmm ... toys ..

2001-03-27 Thread Leo Lapworth

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 10:15:00AM +0100, Robert Shiels wrote:
 
 I have an original bondi-blue iMac, running MACOS9 at the moment, with 32Mb
 RAM. I was in an Apple shop at the weekend and found that a 128Mb upgrade
 and OSX will only set me back about 200gbp. I was assured that all my OS9
 applications will still work (my wife uses Clarisworks for WP, and the kids
 play their games), does anyone know if this is the case.

Not 100% about this, in theory yes, but Netscape for example bombs out
unless you do things in a specific order (e.g. make a connection
before opening the browser.

 And also, will I be able to install perl,apache,mysql and other *nix
 goodness on it too - I've never gotten to grips with macperl really.

Perl - Yes,
Apache - Yes
MySQL - Yes
Xwindows - Yes.

All of the above have been ported or work. And apparently it's
very simple to port most *nix type apps, what with is being BSD
underneath (there are a few minor differences to standard BSD,
in terms of compiling).

Leo



RE: white wine

2001-03-27 Thread Jonathan Peterson

 On Mon, Mar 26, 2001 at 11:22:34PM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
  Unfortunately, the lovely Italian wine I found in caffs
 throughout Naples
  back in November does not seem to be available over here at all.

 Why ship the good stuff to the ignorant Brits when they can
 keep it for
 themselves? Sounds like pretty good thinking to me.

Which reminds me - when the Brits acquired a taste for lager rather than
ale, why did we start drinking lager from every country in Europe except
Germany, who are the only ones to actually make drinkable stuff?




Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-27 Thread Jonathan Stowe

On Mon, 26 Mar 2001, Aaron Trevena wrote:

 On Mon, 26 Mar 2001, Roger Burton West wrote:
 
  On Mon, Mar 26, 2001 at 05:19:12PM +0100, Leo Lapworth wrote:
  Just to let you all know I'm on the market again.
  
  Me too. 
 
 er.. and me.


Ah.  The DotCom Apocalypse :)

/J\
 




RE: white wine

2001-03-27 Thread Jonathan Peterson

 Graves, Monbazilac etc.  and had a very nice Trochenbeerenauslese a
 month or so ago that I reckon was just s good (and it
 should have been

It is a sad sad thing that it's darn near impossible to get decent German or
Austrian wine in this country since the Austrian anti-freeze scandal (and
since crap Liebfraumilch).

Anyone know a decent London win merchant who stocks a good range of German
or Austrian wines. Not just the desert wines, but the lighter ones too. I've
only ever seen eiswine for sale in a small number of restaurants, usually at
10UKPS / glass +




RE: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-27 Thread Jonathan Peterson

   On Mon, Mar 26, 2001 at 05:19:12PM +0100, Leo Lapworth wrote:
   Just to let you all know I'm on the market again.
  
   Me too.
 
  er.. and me.
 Ah.  The DotCom Apocalypse :)

Rumour has it that many people are bringing tech in house, which is hitting
conslutancies and agencies harder. I'm still not convinced that there's a
major downturn in the total number of tech jobs.





Re: upgrade fund

2001-03-27 Thread David Cantrell

On Mon, Mar 26, 2001 at 11:41:50PM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:

 Usually when people talk about servers with 600 gigabytes of data its
 fair to assume that their will be a considerable load on them, clearly
 thats not the case here .. so I'm sure IDE will be just fine.

500Gb - RAID-5 means I have to 'waste' a drive.

I know, half a terabyte seems a little silly for personal use, but I've
probably got tenth of that already in divxs, aiffs (I'm a location sound
recordist as well, and I archive *everything*), mp3s ... and that's
excluding the archive of ISO9660 images that I've downloaded or created
myself.

 Pity, I know of some very nice rack mount RAID solutions with
 fibrechannel  architecture  and up to a terrabyte in 3U ... sure you can;t
 be tempted ? ;)

I can be *tempted* but I doubt the bank account would stand it.  sigh if
only it was someone elses money ...

-- 
David Cantrell | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/

This is a signature.  There are many like it but this one is mine.

** I read encrypted mail first, so encrypt if your message is important **

 PGP signature


Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-27 Thread Greg McCarroll

* Jonathan Peterson ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
 
 Rumour has it that many people are bringing tech in house, which is hitting
 conslutancies and agencies harder. I'm still not convinced that there's a
 major downturn in the total number of tech jobs.
 

i also think there is still room for sensible consultancies and contracting.
i think the 1000 quid a day for web development companies will have a 
major problem however.

and tech sector jobs / spending isnt on the decrease yet, its the rate
of increase that has slowed down - this allows people more time to
breath and do recruitment / development sensibly

at cebit, BT devices crashed and burned - why? they had been rushed
out. BT is essentially a good technology if done right, the same is
true for web sites, the industry just needs to slow its self down

profits need to be had before you double the size of your development
force and once the rate of change in the industry comes under control,
the market will be even more sucessful (however individuals may not)




-- 
Greg McCarroll  http://www.mccarroll.uklinux.net



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-27 Thread Dave Cross

At Tue, 27 Mar 2001 11:08:04 +0100, Greg McCarroll [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 at cebit, BT devices crashed and burned - why? they had been rushed
 out. BT is essentially a good technology if done right, the same is
 true for web sites, the industry just needs to slow its self down

'BT' eq 'Bluetooth'
'BT' ne 'BT'

For those who misparsed that the way I did when I first read it :)

Dave...



RE: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-27 Thread Jonathan Peterson


 i also think there is still room for sensible consultancies
 and contracting.
 i think the 1000 quid a day for web development companies will have a
 major problem however.

I hope so, they deserve it.

 at cebit, BT devices crashed and burned - why? they had been rushed
 out. BT is essentially a good technology if done right, the same is
 true for web sites, the industry just needs to slow its self down

I couldn't agree more. Of the .com companies I've seen screwing their
technology up, ridiculous deadlines for development have been the root cause
in most cases. The whole 'Doing business in Internet time' hype is stupid,
and just leads to people acting without thinking and then being charged
twice as much for shoddy work that appears to be completed quickly.




RE: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-27 Thread Simon Wilcox

At 10:31 27/03/2001 +0100, Jonathan Peterson wrote:

Rumour has it that many people are bringing tech in house, which is hitting
conslutancies and agencies harder. I'm still not convinced that there's a
major downturn in the total number of tech jobs.

That's exactly what we're doing. I have a full development program for the 
foreseeable future and we've decided to bring it in house.

We will still use external resources for really tricky bits that we don't 
have the knowledge for. My experience is that I get better performance out 
of people with a vested interest in the company and what we're doing than 
from any outside agency who, for all their protestations and claims of 
"partnerships", are still there to make a profit.

That's not to say it doesn't work (my company, Williams Lea, *is* an 
outsourcer) but when it's core to your business and changing fast, keeping 
it in house makes it easier to control cost and quality.

plug type="vacancies"
We are looking for two perl developers to work on intranet based systems 
integration and information/knowledge management projects.
In addition to all the usual requirements, experience with Micro$oft tech 
(IIS/VB/MTS) will be an advantage as would exposure to systems integration.
A "corporate tolerant" attitude is also required, to avoid upsetting all 
the poor people not doing cool web stuff around here (like the beancounters :)
If you are interested, please let me know off-list.
/plug

Simon.




Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-27 Thread Greg McCarroll

* Dave Cross ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
 At Tue, 27 Mar 2001 11:08:04 +0100, Greg McCarroll [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
wrote:
 
  at cebit, BT devices crashed and burned - why? they had been rushed
  out. BT is essentially a good technology if done right, the same is
  true for web sites, the industry just needs to slow its self down
 
 'BT' eq 'Bluetooth'
 'BT' ne 'BT'
 
 For those who misparsed that the way I did when I first read it :)
 

sorry force of habit


-- 
Greg McCarroll  http://www.mccarroll.uklinux.net



Re: mmm ... toys ..

2001-03-27 Thread David Cantrell

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 09:43:44AM +0100, Dominic Mitchell wrote:

 Fips should be able to.  All it does is shrink your FAT partition (NTFS
 need not apply).  When looking at the partition table, also, don't
 change the 4th partition towards the end of the disk, if there is one.
 It's the suspend to disk partition (can't remember what id it is, sorry :-(  )

a0 IIRC, although some machines put it at the beginning of the disk, some
at the end.

-- 
David Cantrell | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/

This is a signature.  There are many like it but this one is mine.

** I read encrypted mail first, so encrypt if your message is important **

 PGP signature


Re: white wine

2001-03-27 Thread David Cantrell

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 10:22:27AM +0100, Jonathan Peterson wrote:
  On Mon, Mar 26, 2001 at 11:22:34PM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
   Unfortunately, the lovely Italian wine I found in caffs
  throughout Naples
   back in November does not seem to be available over here at all.
 
  Why ship the good stuff to the ignorant Brits when they can
  keep it for
  themselves? Sounds like pretty good thinking to me.
 
 Which reminds me - when the Brits acquired a taste for lager rather than
 ale, why did we start drinking lager from every country in Europe except
 Germany, who are the only ones to actually make drinkable stuff?

Because we didn't acquire a taste for lager but rather had it shoved down
our throats by marketroids who saw an opportunity to mass-produce fizzy
crap instead of brewing properly.

Anyway, Shurely you're forgetting about the Netherlands, Belgium and the
Czech Republic, all of whom manufacture some fine lagers.

-- 
David Cantrell | Doesn't Do Lager | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/

  This is a signature.  There are many like it but this one is mine.

 PGP signature


Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-27 Thread Greg McCarroll

* Simon Wilcox ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
 At 10:31 27/03/2001 +0100, Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 
 Rumour has it that many people are bringing tech in house, which is hitting
 conslutancies and agencies harder. I'm still not convinced that there's a
 major downturn in the total number of tech jobs.

 have the knowledge for. My experience is that I get better performance out 
 of people with a vested interest in the company and what we're doing than 
 from any outside agency who, for all their protestations and claims of 
 "partnerships", are still there to make a profit.
 

this is probably one of the worst things about being a contractor/
consultant - that you end up having this off and on love affair with
a company, you care for it - but your almost pushed away by the
realities of your relationship

i currently love Symbian, i want to make them the best that they
can be, but i've been here before with some other companies
(eBookers, BBC, Interwoven) and know that its hard just to get
fully comfortable

greg

-- 
Greg McCarroll  http://www.mccarroll.uklinux.net



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-27 Thread Matthew Byng-Maddick

On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Greg McCarroll wrote:
 ironically, a lot of .com problems could of been avoided and yet they
 still would of made the deadlines imposed by `internet time', if they
 had slowed down and used traditional business techniques such as
 cost/benefit analysis to prioritise functionality

spam has a high cost/benefit ratio... :(

 taking a random site - lastminute.com

spammers.

 i just went there, no their business model is essentially - sell
 stuff at the last minute, generally targetting people with
 disposable income

and spamming.

 so i look at their site, they have chatroom functionality! why?
 why does a site selling this sort of thing need chatroom
 functionality? what is the benefit compared to its cost

well, quite. So you can chat about how crap they are. And of course,
because everyone else is doing it, so we have to too. :(

MBM

-- 
Matthew Byng-Maddick   Home: [EMAIL PROTECTED]  +44 20  8980 5714  (Home)
http://colondot.net/   Work: [EMAIL PROTECTED] +44 7956 613942  (Mobile)
Knebel's Law: It is now proved beyond doubt that smoking is one of the
  leading causes of statistics.




Re: originality

2001-03-27 Thread Chris Heathcote

on 26/3/01 10:04 pm, Greg McCarroll wrote:

 The problem of course with London (London.pm?) is that
 every activity we can think of is drink related.

Well we do have a river here ya know ;)

Other ideas:

taking over a London Eye pod
hiring a room in the VA, Science Museum or Nat Hist Museum
Sunday morning Perl advocacy at Speaker's Corner
Walking round London with a PERL SALE board

i'll get me coat
c.
-- 
 every day, computers are making people easier to use

  http://www.unorthodoxstyles.com




Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-27 Thread Greg McCarroll

* Matthew Byng-Maddick ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
 On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Greg McCarroll wrote:
  ironically, a lot of .com problems could of been avoided and yet they
  still would of made the deadlines imposed by `internet time', if they
  had slowed down and used traditional business techniques such as
  cost/benefit analysis to prioritise functionality
 
 spam has a high cost/benefit ratio... :(
 

i dont really have a problem with spam, i think its just a symtom
of the general problem of immature (from a functionality not
technical implementation perspective) messaging/information systems



-- 
Greg McCarroll  http://www.mccarroll.uklinux.net



RE: originality

2001-03-27 Thread Jonathan Peterson


 taking over a London Eye pod

Did this on Friday. Not worth the money. Especially in the fog.

 hiring a room in the VA, Science Museum or Nat Hist Museum

If you could get a private view (so to speak) of the difference engine or
the BABY stuff they are doing in the Sci museum, that would be cool.

 Sunday morning Perl advocacy at Speaker's Corner

LoL that would rock, but only if we do it in fire-brand preacher style with
badly painted boards saying "Many are tempted by Java but all can be saved
if they take Perl into their businesses" and "Sun says 'Only Java can
deliver enterprise class solutions' but those who hear the word of Wall know
'There is more than one way to do it'".

 Walking round London with a PERL SALE board

Or a P is my B board? [duck]




Re: originality

2001-03-27 Thread Dave Cross

At Tue, 27 Mar 2001 11:41:05 +0100, Chris Heathcote [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Sunday morning Perl advocacy at Speaker's Corner

This _really_ should happen.

Dave...



RE: originality

2001-03-27 Thread Jonathan Peterson

 This _really_ should happen.

Can we get some O'Reily collateral to hand out to the congregation?





Re: white wine

2001-03-27 Thread Dave Cross

At 00:07 27/03/2001, you wrote:
* Simon Cozens ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
 
  Ooh good. I got one of them for Christmas and still haven't gotten 
 around to
  drinking it. Not sure I'll like it though, because Italian reds tend to be
  very thin, and I like chewy wines. We'll see.
 

I don't want to sound like a twat, but it may be too late already so here
goes, one of the things i hate about going out to a italian restaurant
is the wine.

Nonsense. You just order the most expensive Barolo on the wine list.

Dave...
[Who doesn't understand this fascination with white wine - nasty stuff]



-- 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] http://www.mag-sol.com
Data Munging with Perl http://www.manning.com/cross/





Re: originality

2001-03-27 Thread Mark Fowler

Greg said:

 Chris said:

  Sunday morning Perl advocacy at Speaker's Corner
 
 i like this
 

Sunday mornings!  We're all in bed then[1]!  Think who you are talking to!

Later.

Mark.

[1] Apart from those of us that get up each week to watch hollioaks[2]
[2] Or walking across London.  Yeah, whatever

-- 
print "\n",map{my$a="\n"if(length$_6);' 'x(36-length($_)/2)."$_\n$a"} (
   Name  = 'Mark Fowler',Title = 'Technology Developer'  ,
   Firm  = 'Profero Ltd',Web   = 'http://www.profero.com/'   ,
   Email = '[EMAIL PROTECTED]',   Phone = '+44 (0) 20 7700 9960'  )








Re: white wine

2001-03-27 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 10:22:27AM +0100, Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 Which reminds me - when the Brits acquired a taste for lager rather than
 ale,

Did we? :)

 why did we start drinking lager from every country in Europe except
 Germany, who are the only ones to actually make drinkable stuff?

Rule One? Because we got the habit from America?

-- 
The complex-type shall be a simple-type.  ISO 10206:1991 (Extended Pascal)



Re: originality

2001-03-27 Thread Greg McCarroll

* Dave Cross ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
 At Tue, 27 Mar 2001 11:41:05 +0100, Chris Heathcote [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 
  Sunday morning Perl advocacy at Speaker's Corner
 
 This _really_ should happen.
 

well then, lets store it up - next time we get a visitor whos up for
it, we will do it, then retire to somewhere for sunday lunch.


-- 
Greg McCarroll  http://www.mccarroll.uklinux.net



Re: Mac OS X (was Re: mmm ... toys ..)

2001-03-27 Thread Neil Ford

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 11:41:17AM +0100, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Mysql has been ported to OSX. You can find it at
 
   http://www-u.life.uiuc.edu/~mwvaugh/MacOSX/Packages/
 
 I was playing with it for a while and it seems fairly stable.
 The only real problem I had was installing DBD::mysql which
 couldn't find libraries etc. Finally I found a guide at
 
   http://invictus.usask.ca/macosx/
 
 and everything went hunkdory.
 
 Well that's my first post out the way, I'm going to go and hide again now.
 
 Steve

You should be ashamed sir, a first post that was vaguely on topic and helpful
into the bargain. What are things coming too :-)

Thanks for the info btw - most useful.

Neil.
-- 
Neil C. Ford
Managing Director, Yet Another Computer Solutions Company Limited
[EMAIL PROTECTED]



Re: originality

2001-03-27 Thread Mark Fowler

On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Greg McCarroll wrote:

 * Dave Cross ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
  At Tue, 27 Mar 2001 11:41:05 +0100, Chris Heathcote [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  
   Sunday morning Perl advocacy at Speaker's Corner
  
  This _really_ should happen.
  
 
 well then, lets store it up - next time we get a visitor whos up for
 it, we will do it, then retire to somewhere for sunday lunch.
 

Okay, may I suggest the summer?

Later.

Mark.

-- 
print "\n",map{my$a="\n"if(length$_6);' 'x(36-length($_)/2)."$_\n$a"} (
   Name  = 'Mark Fowler',Title = 'Technology Developer'  ,
   Firm  = 'Profero Ltd',Web   = 'http://www.profero.com/'   ,
   Email = '[EMAIL PROTECTED]',   Phone = '+44 (0) 20 7700 9960'  )








Re: white wine

2001-03-27 Thread Robert Shiels

From: "Dave Cross" [EMAIL PROTECTED]

 I don't want to sound like a twat, but it may be too late already so here
 goes, one of the things i hate about going out to a italian restaurant
 is the wine.

 Nonsense. You just order the most expensive Barolo on the wine list.
homer
mmm Barolo
/homer

 Dave...
 [Who doesn't understand this fascination with white wine - nasty stuff]
I'm with you there...

/Robert




Buffycode (was Re: That book)

2001-03-27 Thread Philip Newton

Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
 The other possibility, I guess, given that it's london.pm is 
 to make it relate to buffy in some way :)

That reminds me of an idea I had this morning on the way to work -- encode
text using "Buffy" with uppercase and lowercase letters: uppercase letters
stand for "0" bits and lowercase letters for "1" bits. (Or, if you prefer,
bit 5 / 2**5 / 32 of each character represents the bit to be encoded.) Then
you just have to chop the message into 5-bit chunks (adding 0 bits at the
end if needed to pad to a 5-bit boundary) and translate.

"London.pm"[1], in this method, turns into "BuFFy bUFFy bUffy bUffY bufFY
buFFy BUFfy Buffy BufFy buFFY bUffy BUffy BUFFY buFfy BuFFY". See? Bears no
resemblance to "London.pm" at all; all spies' attempts at figuring out the
true meaning will be thwarted!

Alernatively, there's the "beer" code, which has the advantage of mapping 4
bits handily to one nybble; "London.pm" then turns into "BeER beER BeeR beer
BeeR beeR BeeR BeER BeeR beer BeeR beeR BEeR beeR Beer BEER BeeR beEr".

Cheers,
Philip

[1] "London.pm" = 4c 6f 6e 64 6f 6e 2e 70 6d hex, or 01001100 0110
01101110 01100100 0110 01101110 00101110 0111 01101101 binary, or
01001 10001 10111 10110 11100 11001 00011 0 01101 11000 10111 00111
0 11011 01+000 in 5-bit groups
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-03-27 Thread Philip Newton

Paul Makepeace wrote:
 The world would be a much better place if everyone habitually quoted
 their phone number +access_code area_code local_number. You don't
 realise how important this is 'til you have to repeatedly find people
 in various desolate stations dotted all over the world with scant,
 unlabelled, and usually too few, digits culled from a unkempt LDAP
 directory...
 
 C Paul S Makepeace, +1 831 238 0902

Still not enough. It'll work for the Americans (yet again...)[1] but if you
have a phone number whose country codes identifies it as being in country X,
and you are in country X on a business trip and want to call that person,
leaving off the country code is, in general, not enough. In Germany and
England, you have to add a 0 (e.g. +49-40-76470386 turns into (040)
76470386), but in other places, that might be a 9 -- or something else. If
you're not familiar with the country, you may not know what to add.

Cheers,
Philip

[1] Though, strictly speaking, I think America requires you to add "1" at
the beginning; though it's not part of the area/STD code as the 0 is in
England and Germany, I think most places require it to show you're dialling
a long-distance call.
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Buffycode (was Re: That book)

2001-03-27 Thread Dave Cross

At Tue, 27 Mar 2001 13:39:34 +0200, Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
wrote:
 Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
  The other possibility, I guess, given that it's london.pm is 
  to make it relate to buffy in some way :)
 
 That reminds me of an idea I had this morning on the way to work -- 
 encode text using "Buffy" with uppercase and lowercase letters: 
 uppercase letters stand for "0" bits and lowercase letters for "1" 
 bits. (Or, if you prefer, bit 5 / 2**5 / 32 of each character 
 represents the bit to be encoded.) Then you just have to chop the 
 message into 5-bit chunks (adding 0 bits at the end if needed to pad 
 to a 5-bit boundary) and translate.

I'm pretty sure I've seen something like this before. You encode text
using the word 'moo'. I think it used upper and lower case 'o' and also
a zero. I'm sure there was a web page somewhere that converted text
to and from 'moo's.

Or maybe I dreamt it.

Dave...



Helping Less... er... Able... Programmers

2001-03-27 Thread Dave Cross


I've developed this weird habit of hanging around places where less
able Perl programmers congregate and trying to distribute clues.

The latest place I've found is the BBS for readers of Liz Castro's
book. It certainly gives you some perspective[1] on her target
audience.

Here's an example response to a question (the question used 
for (;;;) loops:

=

Erm, My eyes keep darting to your FOR loops. For is mainly used in javascript, and 
perl doesnt handle them, mainly because of the semicolons used to split the 
operations. Instead of for, use foreach, because thats close to the perl equivalent of 
for. I'm not sure exactly what that would translate to into perl, but if you want to 
do something in a foreach loop, it would look like 

foreach $ArrayItemYouNeedToChange (@TheArray) { 
#do this 
} 

Remember, for loops are for JS, not perl. You cant use semicolons in perl, unless 
theyre before a carriage return. 

=

I particularly like the last bit about where it's legal to use
semicolons in Perl.

When the original poster pointed out that there were for loops in
Castro's book, he got the response:

=

Hrm. I Dont really know. Email xxx@xxx Thats VulKen's email. He's the only one on this 
board thats better than me, except Liz. 

=

A couple of days ago I suggested that the CGI::param function was
better than someone's homegrown CGI parser (radical notion, I know!)
and got this response:

=

Problem with the param() is securityusers can enter malicious things that'll cause 
havoc...which isnt very good at all really :) 

=

I've asked for further clarification, but none has been forthcoming.

Anyway, I didn't want to keep this delight to myself. If anyone wants
to join in my fun, the board is at:

http://www.cookwood.com/cgi-bin/lcastro/perlbbs.pl

Share  Enjoy,

Dave...

[1] "Yeah, too _much_ fuckin' perspective" - name that film.



Re: Helping Less... er... Able... Programmers

2001-03-27 Thread Matthew Byng-Maddick

On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Dave Cross wrote:
 I've developed this weird habit of hanging around places where less
 able Perl programmers congregate and trying to distribute clues.

You've also developed the bad habit of referring to them as "programmers".

 The latest place I've found is the BBS for readers of Liz Castro's
 book. It certainly gives you some perspective[1] on her target
 audience.

Yeah /me read it and now wants to run away fast, though it is quite
amusing...

 Anyway, I didn't want to keep this delight to myself. If anyone wants
 to join in my fun, the board is at:
 http://www.cookwood.com/cgi-bin/lcastro/perlbbs.pl

Haven't got the time to do my standard flamey stuff, and my asbestos suit
is looking a little worn at the moment... :)

MBM

-- 
Matthew Byng-Maddick   Home: [EMAIL PROTECTED]  +44 20  8980 5714  (Home)
http://colondot.net/   Work: [EMAIL PROTECTED] +44 7956 613942  (Mobile)
Knebel's Law: It is now proved beyond doubt that smoking is one of the
  leading causes of statistics.




Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Philip Newton

Dave Cross wrote:
 At Sun, 25 Mar 2001 22:21:52 +0100 (BST), Jonathan Stowe 
 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Anyhow what are we going to do about the 'C++' ones :)
 
 Ignore them. Pretend they aren't there :)

You misspelled "Rewrite them in Perl". HTH.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Philip Newton

Mark Fowler wrote:
 1) Is POSIX.pm a standard module

I believe it is, but the functionality might not be the same everywhere -- I
think it just gives you as much as the platform itself provides. However,
strftime so basic I'd guess any vaguely ANSI-/POSIX-compliant C library
should have it.

 (and how do I work this out for myself)

Er, download the Perl source and see if it's in there?

 and supported on all O.S.es so I don't have to rewrite strftime.

If you have a POSIX compliant compiler/C library, it should be there. I'd
say most are, nowadays. (Certainly now that Perl *requires* an ANSI C
compiler to build.)

 2) How do I get strftime to produce th/st/nd for the date?  I 
 can't see it on man strftime, but I might just be going blind.

I don't think you can.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Jonathan Stowe

On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Mark Fowler wrote:

 1) Is POSIX.pm a standard module (and how do I work this out for
 myself) and supported on all O.S.es so I don't have to rewrite strftime.


Its definitely in the 5.00404 on one of the machines here so I would that
it could be said to be standard. Anyhow I'm using it somewhere so it
should be :)

/J\




Re: Helping Less... er... Able... Programmers

2001-03-27 Thread Jonathan Stowe

On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Dave Cross wrote:
 Anyway, I didn't want to keep this delight to myself. If anyone wants
 to join in my fun, the board is at:

 http://www.cookwood.com/cgi-bin/lcastro/perlbbs.pl

 Share  Enjoy,


Must .. Control .. The .. Keyboard .. Of .. Fire 

/J\




Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Robert Shiels

From: "Robin Houston" [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: 27 March 2001 14:59


 On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 02:08:11PM +0100, Mark Fowler wrote:
  2) How do I get strftime to produce th/st/nd for the date?  I can't see
it
  on man strftime, but I might just be going blind.

 use POSIX 'strftime';
 my @th=(qw(th st nd rd),("th")x16)x2; $th[31]="st";

 my @time=localtime;
 print strftime("%e$th[$time[3]] %b %Y\n", @time);


%e seems to be Linux specific. %d works on both Linux and Windows.

/Robert, possibly making his first perl contribution to the list!




Re: Perl Training Courses

2001-03-27 Thread Philip Newton

Mark Fowler wrote:
  b) This is how to get objects from CPAN, these are a few 
 critical classes that you need to know about.  E.g. this
 is Data::Dumper, it's fscking useful.  LWP::Simple is
 your friend.  Etc, etc.  Something of a quick tour.

LWP::Simple is a good example, since if you're downloading .tar.gz's, you'll
want not LWP-Simple-1.23.tar.gz but rather libwww-perl-4.5678.tar.gz (or
something like that), which may not be immediately obvious. Similarly with
Net-SMTP-1.23.tar.gz, which is actually in libnet-4.56.tar.gz.

(Don't know whether CPAN.pm knows this for you. It may.)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Perl Training Courses

2001-03-27 Thread Matthew Byng-Maddick

On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Philip Newton wrote:
 (Don't know whether CPAN.pm knows this for you. It may.)

Yes, it does.

MBM

-- 
Matthew Byng-Maddick   Home: [EMAIL PROTECTED]  +44 20  8980 5714  (Home)
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Knebel's Law: It is now proved beyond doubt that smoking is one of the
  leading causes of statistics.




Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Robin Houston

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 10:14:22PM +0100, Robert Shiels wrote:
 
 %e seems to be Linux specific. %d works on both Linux and Windows.

Not Linux-specific, it's part of the Single Unix Specification.

Point taken about Win32.

 .robin.

-- 
select replace(a, CHR(88), replace(a,,'')) from (
select 'select replace(a, CHR(88), replace(a,,)) from (
select ''X'' a from dual)' a from dual)



Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Robin Houston

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 01:29:57PM +, Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:

  my @th=(qw(th st nd rd),("th")x16)x2; $th[31]="st";
 
 That's an evil and gross hack.
 
 sub th{(($_[0]-10-$_[0]%10)/10%10)?(qw(th st nd rd),('th')x6)[$_[0]%10]:"th"}


TIMTOWTDI, thank ghod ;-)

 .robin.

-- 
"It really depends on the architraves." --Harl



Benchmarking [was] Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Simon Wilcox

At 13:29 27/03/2001 +, Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
  my @th=(qw(th st nd rd),("th")x16)x2; $th[31]="st";

That's an evil and gross hack.

[snip]

sub th{(($_[0]-10-$_[0]%10)/10%10)?(qw(th st nd rd),('th')x6)[$_[0]%10]:"th"}

The first one I understood. Not sure about the second but I'll work it out ;-)

I thought I would play around with Benchmark.pm, because I don't use it 
nearly often enough, so I made this script:

#! /usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use Benchmark;
use POSIX 'strftime';
use vars qw(@th);

@th=(qw(th st nd rd),("th")x16)x2; $th[31]="st";
sub th{(($_[0]-10-$_[0]%10)/10%10)?(qw(th st nd rd),('th')x6)[$_[0]%10]:"th"}
my $count=10;


timethese($count, {
 'Array' = '{
 my @time=localtime;
 my $dummy = strftime("%e$th[$time[3]] %b %Y\n", 
@time);
 }',
 'Sub' = '{
 my @time=localtime;
 my $th=th($time[3]);
 my $dummy = strftime("%e$th %b %Y\n", @time);
 }'
});

Now - I don't know if I've used this right at all - comments and criticisms 
gladly accepted.

The output is:

Benchmark: timing 10 iterations of Array, Sub...
  Array:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.33 usr +  0.09 sys =  3.42 CPU)
Sub:  6 wallclock secs ( 5.27 usr +  0.06 sys =  5.33 CPU)

So - Did I get this heinously wrong or is MBM's sub really a lot slower ?

Simon.




Re: Benchmarking [was] Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Philip Newton

Simon Wilcox wrote:
 So - Did I get this heinously wrong or is MBM's sub really a 
 lot slower ?

Well, remember that the sub effecticaly recalculates (what amounts to) the
array each time. To be fair, you should include the array initialisation
inside the loop and see who wins then.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Benchmarking [was] Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread David Cantrell

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 04:19:08PM +0100, Simon Wilcox wrote:

 I thought I would play around with Benchmark.pm, because I don't use it 
 nearly often enough, so I made this script:
 
 @th=(qw(th st nd rd),("th")x16)x2; $th[31]="st";
 sub th{(($_[0]-10-$_[0]%10)/10%10)?(qw(th st nd rd),('th')x6)[$_[0]%10]:"th"}
 
 Benchmark: timing 10 iterations of Array, Sub...
   Array:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.33 usr +  0.09 sys =  3.42 CPU)
 Sub:  6 wallclock secs ( 5.27 usr +  0.06 sys =  5.33 CPU)
 
 So - Did I get this heinously wrong or is MBM's sub really a lot slower ?

No, you got it right.  You would expect the sub version to be slower, as it
has to make a subroutine call and do some calculations every time, whereas
the array version pre-calculates everything and then just does a tonne of
comparitively inexpensive array lookups.

-- 
David Cantrell | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/

This is a signature.  There are many like it but this one is mine.

** I read encrypted mail first, so encrypt if your message is important **

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Re: Benchmarking [was] Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Robin Houston

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 05:40:19PM +0200, Philip Newton wrote:
 Well, remember that the sub effecticaly recalculates (what amounts to) the
 array each time. To be fair, you should include the array initialisation
 inside the loop and see who wins then.

Hey, that's not _fair_!
The whole point of using an array is that you can pre-populate it.
(also it's more concise, and I find it more comprehensible. YMMV)

 .robin.

-- 
Beware. The paranoids are watching you.



Re: Benchmarking [was] Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Simon Wilcox

At 16:53 27/03/2001 +0100, Robin Houston wrote:
On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 05:40:19PM +0200, Philip Newton wrote:
  Well, remember that the sub effecticaly recalculates (what amounts to) the
  array each time. To be fair, you should include the array initialisation
  inside the loop and see who wins then.

Hey, that's not _fair_!
The whole point of using an array is that you can pre-populate it.
(also it's more concise, and I find it more comprehensible. YMMV)

I agree, it's how I would have done it. I was just trying to see it really 
deserved the label "evil and gross hack".

It seems to me that it doesn't but as you say, YMMV and I got to practice 
my benchmarking :-)

Simon.




four-argument select()s

2001-03-27 Thread David Cantrell

Some of you will have seen me posting in #london.pm asking about the
four-arg form of select().  Some other people confessed ignorance too.
I eventually figgered it out by gratuitously copying and pasting from
POE::Kernel and then poking it to see how it broke :-)  For anyone who's
interested, here's a very simple bit of code which listens on three
sockets and as soon as you tickle one of them it dies telling you which
one it was.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use IO::Socket;

my %ports=( # Associate some understandable names with socket numbers
test1 = 21000,
test2 = 21001,
test3 = 21002
);
my %sockets=(); # IO::Sockets will go here, with the same keys as above

foreach my $port (keys %ports) {  # create the IO::Sockets
$sockets{$port}=IO::Socket::INET-new(
Listen= 5,
LocalPort = $ports{$port},
Proto = 'tcp'
);
}

while(1) { waitForConnections(); }# wait for summat to happen

sub waitForConnections {
print "Waiting for connection ...\n";
my $rin=fhbits(values %sockets);  # get bit-mask
my $hits=select(
$rin,
undef, undef, # I'm only intersted in sockets becoming readable
10# Timeout
);
if($hits != -1) { # If select found something ...
# compare bitmask with file descriptors for each socket,
# and snarf any that have become readable
my @sockets=grep {
vec($rin, fileno($sockets{$_}),1)
} keys %sockets;
die(join("\n", @sockets));   # shout it to the world
}
}

sub fhbits { # calculate bitmask of all
my @fhlist=@_;   # IO::Handles passed as
my $bits=0;  # arguments
for (@fhlist) { vec($bits, fileno($_), 1)=1; }
$bits;
}

-- 
David Cantrell | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/

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Re: mmm ... toys ..

2001-03-27 Thread Chris Devers

At 10:15 AM 27.3.2001 +0100, Robert Sheils wrote:
I have an original bondi-blue iMac, running MACOS9 at the moment, with 
32Mb RAM. I was in an Apple shop at the weekend and found that a 128Mb
upgrade and OSX will only set me back about 200gbp. I was assured that
all my OS9 applications will still work (my wife uses Clarisworks for WP,
and the kids play their games), does anyone know if this is the case.

I've got about the same setup, but with 64 mb. It's really slow for me, though not as 
bad as the public beta was. Running it with 128 or more would definitely be 
adviseable. 

I haven't yet noticed any problems (mainly because Classic brings everything to a 
creeping halt with 64 mb of ram, so I'm avoiding it as much as possible), but as I've 
mentioned on (void), I keep hearing complaints about some applications not playing 
nicely, particularly with regard to the way OSX/Mach manages memory -- i.e. apps that 
only worked on OS9 when you disabled virtual memory don't work now because OSX doesn't 
seem to let you mess around with memory settings. Aside from that though, I'm not 
having any trouble with it. 

And also, will I be able to install perl,apache,mysql and other *nix
goodness on it too - I've never gotten to grips with macperl really.

Comes preinstalled with, among others, Apache, Java, OpenSSL, Perl, PHP, TCL, tcsh 
(and sh, csh,  zsh), etc. I'm booted into OS9 at the moment, so I can't browse the 
various */bin directories, but it comes with a pretty standard unixy toolkit (except 
for ssh). I thought I saw something about PostgreSQL being installed, but I may be 
imagining it now. 





--
Chris Devers [EMAIL PROTECTED]




Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-03-27 Thread Chris Devers

At 01:44 PM 27.3.2001 +0200, you wrote:
I think America requires you to add "1" at the beginning; though it's not
part of the area/STD code as the 0 is in England and Germany, I think 
most places require it to show you're dialling a long-distance call.

Correct. Standard format is an implicit 1, a three digit area code, a three digit 
local code and a four digit extension. The local code  extension are always 
mandatory, so effectively phone numbers are 7 digits long -- the local code is just 
useful to give a rough idea where the number may be base (but then with cell phones 
it's meaningless, so the original purpose, already diluted, is disappearing). 

We're burning through phone numbers very very quickly, to the point that new area 
codes are being added all the time and as a result people's phone numbers are changing 
all the time. To control the hemmoraging, some areas are going to full ten digit phone 
numbers; we'll see how much it helps. 

In any event, the leading 1 is never part of the phone number, but you always have to 
dial it whenever making a "long distance" call. This used to mean anything beyond a 
certain distance from your local calling area /or anything outside of your area code, 
but with 10 digit numbers you'll probably just have to put it in front of about every 
number dialled, thus giving everyone in the country an 11 digit phone number. 




--
Chris Devers [EMAIL PROTECTED]




Re: mmm ... toys ..

2001-03-27 Thread Robert Shiels

From: "Chris Devers" [EMAIL PROTECTED]


 At 10:15 AM 27.3.2001 +0100, Robert Sheils wrote:
 I have an original bondi-blue iMac, running MACOS9 at the moment, with
 32Mb RAM. I was in an Apple shop at the weekend and found that a 128Mb
 upgrade and OSX will only set me back about 200gbp. I was assured that
 all my OS9 applications will still work (my wife uses Clarisworks for WP,
 and the kids play their games), does anyone know if this is the case.

 I've got about the same setup, but with 64 mb. It's really slow for me,
though not as bad as the public beta was. Running it with 128 or more would
definitely be adviseable.

Thanks for everyone's advice on this, as an inveterate bit-fiddler, I will
probably go for the whole package just so I can play with everything. My
family can just boot it into OS9 for their stuff.

One more thing, is my 4Gb drive enough...

/Robert




Re: Benchmarking [was] Re: Not Matt's Scripts

2001-03-27 Thread Matthew Byng-Maddick

On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Simon Wilcox wrote:
 At 16:53 27/03/2001 +0100, Robin Houston wrote:
 On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 05:40:19PM +0200, Philip Newton wrote:
   Well, remember that the sub effecticaly recalculates (what amounts to) the
   array each time. To be fair, you should include the array initialisation
   inside the loop and see who wins then.
 Hey, that's not _fair_!
 The whole point of using an array is that you can pre-populate it.
 (also it's more concise, and I find it more comprehensible. YMMV)
 I agree, it's how I would have done it. I was just trying to see it really 
 deserved the label "evil and gross hack".

Because it was only meant to deal with things up to 31, if you try and
(for some reason) try to put 32 in, you would get 32th (because it has
populated the array). I don't like that kind of thing. It's a personal
choice. I think the bit I objected to most was the $th[31]="st" bit. I
shouldn't have put it like that, but as Robin says, TIMTOWTDI,so yeah.

 It seems to me that it doesn't but as you say, YMMV and I got to practice 
 my benchmarking :-)

:) I did expect it to be slower, it also copes with any number.

MBM

-- 
Matthew Byng-Maddick   Home: [EMAIL PROTECTED]  +44 20  8980 5714  (Home)
http://colondot.net/   Work: [EMAIL PROTECTED] +44 7956 613942  (Mobile)
Knebel's Law: It is now proved beyond doubt that smoking is one of the
  leading causes of statistics.




Re: white wine

2001-03-27 Thread David H. Adler

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 02:09:21PM +0100, Aaron Trevena wrote:
 
 /me only drinks belgian beers/lagers.. or ales/bitter esp not any of that
 american crap.

Ahem.  There are some fine american beers.  You probably just don't see
them over there (lord knows they're hard enough to find here...)

dha
-- 
David H. Adler - [EMAIL PROTECTED] - http://www.panix.com/~dha/
tastes filling! less great!   - ignatz in #perl



Re: Buffycode (was Re: That book)

2001-03-27 Thread David H. Adler

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 01:07:44PM +0100, Greg McCarroll wrote:
 
 agreed, this is just f*cking crazy, sorry for the swearing, but this
 is the craziest thing i've seen this year

What, no CiP rating???

dha
-- 
David H. Adler - [EMAIL PROTECTED] - http://www.panix.com/~dha/
Just Install Perl.  - Chris Nandor



Re: four-argument select()s

2001-03-27 Thread Mark Rogaski

An entity claiming to be Robin Houston ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
: 
: IO::Select will take the pain away.
: use IO::Select;
: 

However, when you start to throw signals, timers, and other nastiness into
the mix, I have found Event.pm to be terribly useful.

Mark

-- 
[]   | "Girls in occupied countries always
[] Mark Rogaski  | get into trouble with soldiers," she
[] [EMAIL PROTECTED] | said, when I asked her what the Virgin
[]   | birth was.  -- Florence King, CoaFSL

 PGP signature


Re: Buffycode (was Re: That book)

2001-03-27 Thread Jonathan Stowe

On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Greg McCarroll wrote:

 agreed, this is just f*cking crazy, sorry for the swearing, but this
 is the craziest thing i've seen this year


I wouldnt get too carried away after all its only march :)

/J\




Fwd: Sheffield LUG: Linux 2.4 kernel meeting

2001-03-27 Thread David Cantrell

Just in case any of our northerly lurkers are interested ...

-- 
David Cantrell | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/

This is a signature.  There are many like it but this one is mine.

** I read encrypted mail first, so encrypt if your message is important **






  Sheffield Linux Users Group (ShefLUG)

1 pm Saturday 14th April 2001 finish at about 4 p.m.

 ShefLUG Venue: Blackwell's Bookshop
West Street
Sheffield S1 3ST

 for the location of Blackwell's bookshop see

 http://www.multimap.co.uk

you need to dial in the postcode which is S1 3ST. For
information about trams, trains and buses phone 01709
515151.Starting at 1 p.m. Rusty Russell will give a
talk about 2.4 kernel code and related issues.

Rusty Russell is flying in from Oz to give us a talk on
the 2.4 kernel code and related issues. Rusty is well
known for his abilities with a keyboard. Rusty is
best known as packet filter maintainer for the Linux
Kernel. Most recently, he created a generic packet
filtering architecture "netfilter", on top of which he
implemented a new packet filtering and full NAT
systems. His many distractions include editing the
File Hierarchy Standard 2.2, writing Rusty's Unreliable
Guides, and the Linux Graphing Project.

We would very much like to see a large crowd turn up
for this meeting.  If you would like to download the
flyer for this and print it out for the wall at work or for your
school or University then please do. It's not very often
that Rusty comes to this country and we'd like to make
him feel welcome.

 For related information have a look at...

  http://www.sheflug.co.uk/meeting.html



Thank you

Richard

Sheffield Linux
User's Group

http://www.sheflug.co.uk



 GNU the choice of a complete generation.




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Re: white wine

2001-03-27 Thread Chris Heathcote

DavidC:
 According to the critics, it is 'acceptable if not great' but fuck it,
 *I* liked it.

Remember a lot of wine suffers from the holiday effect, and doesn't seem
quite as nice on a wet blustery Thursday night.

 Lachryma Christi del Vesuvio, in case anyone is interested.

Ah, I have heard of it (my Italian knowledge is very limited), so I guess it
wouldn't be too hard to come by. Of course, the Internet is crap for this
sort of thing.

RobinS:
 Also (being half  Hungarian) am rather fond of  Tokai .. 5 Putonyos of
 course. Quite a different taste to most other things.

I haven't seen it mentioned, but a few weeks ago Tokai was in danger because
of flooding - it was only an inch or two away from flooding the entire
cellars :(

 Anyone know a decent London win merchant who stocks a good range of German
 or Austrian wines. Not just the desert wines, but the lighter ones too. I've
 only ever seen eiswine for sale in a small number of restaurants, usually at
 10UKPS / glass +

There's one that advertises in Wine magazine as a German specialist. I
remember when I was hunting down mythical German Reds (in the end I went to
Germany and bought some myself).

Wine magazine is probably a good place to find Italian specialists as well.
You can always hide it in a brown paper bag ;)

c.
(too young to really believe he's having this conversation)





Re: white wine

2001-03-27 Thread David Cantrell

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 12:09:21PM +0100, Chris Heathcote wrote:
 DavidC:
  According to the critics, it is 'acceptable if not great' but fuck it,
  *I* liked it.
 
 Remember a lot of wine suffers from the holiday effect, and doesn't seem
 quite as nice on a wet blustery Thursday night.

Ah no, the few bottles I did bring back with me were just as good as I
remember.  Particularly on a wet blustery Thursday night in Cornwall just
before christmas, IIRC.

-- 
David Cantrell | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/

This is a signature.  There are many like it but this one is mine.

** I read encrypted mail first, so encrypt if your message is important **

 PGP signature


Re: Fwd: Sheffield LUG: Linux 2.4 kernel meeting

2001-03-27 Thread Chris Benson

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 09:18:51PM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
 Just in case any of our northerly lurkers are interested ...

This northerly lurker thanks you.  Of course Sheffield-Newcastle direct
is via Virgin,  the alternative is GNER to Doncaster.   Neither of these
seem particularly appealing!

   Sheffield Linux Users Group (ShefLUG)
 
 1 pm Saturday 14th April 2001 finish at about 4 p.m.
 
  ShefLUG Venue: Blackwell's Bookshop
 West Street
 Sheffield S1 3ST
 
  for the location of Blackwell's bookshop see
 
  http://www.multimap.co.uk

-- 
Chris Benson



Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-03-27 Thread Paul Makepeace

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 01:44:49PM +0200, Philip Newton wrote:
 Still not enough. It'll work for the Americans (yet again...)[1] but if you
 have a phone number whose country codes identifies it as being in country X,
 and you are in country X on a business trip and want to call that person,
 leaving off the country code is, in general, not enough. In Germany and
 England, you have to add a 0 (e.g. +49-40-76470386 turns into (040)
 76470386), but in other places, that might be a 9 -- or something else. If
 you're not familiar with the country, you may not know what to add.

I'm assuming the user is intelligent enough to read a phone book or ask
at the reception desk and learn how to make a national phone call...

There is, IMO, no need to document the inner machinations of the
local phone system in fully qualified phone numbers of the +X Y
Z format.  Besides, it looks ugly on business cards having +44 /
(0) 117 924 ...  :-)

Paul




Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-03-27 Thread Chris Devers

At 03:28 PM 27.3.2001 -0800, you wrote:
With 10 digit dialling, it's 10 digit dialling, no extra '1' required.
E.g. if I was in Houston (which has three area codes and is 10-digit) I
would dial 713 555 1212 regardless of whether I was already in 713.

Ahh. This explains why a cell phone works whether or not the leading 1 is included 
with the rest of the number. 

In fact, if the whole country went 10 digit, the need to use the '1'
would even disappear.

I thought it had a purpose as a sort of control character for the phone companies, 
with any number beginning with a 0 or 1 having special meaning. I guess that special 
meaning evaporates under 10 digit schemes...

PS That single-\n paragraph formatting is evil, IMO. 

Yeah I know, I don't like it either. Blame Eudora...




--
Chris Devers [EMAIL PROTECTED]




Re: white wine

2001-03-27 Thread Paul Makepeace

On Mon, Mar 26, 2001 at 11:31:00PM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 then we get on to the 'wine so sweet you could stand a spoon up in it'. I
 am a complete sucker for anything from Sauternes, Lupiac, Pauliac,
 Graves, Monbazilac etc.  and had a very nice Trochenbeerenauslese a

You would enjoy the _Monsieur Pamplemousse_ detective series then.

Paul



Re: Mac OS X (was Re: mmm ... toys ..)

2001-03-27 Thread Paul Makepeace

I don't suppose anyone else chose 'root' as their primary account
name during install?

I did and am wondering if this is why my OS X installation is totally
hosed  useless: I can't open folders in my (own!) Home (Insufficient
Privileges), all Applications in Finder appears as folders, all
non-Finder applications in the Dock are presented as folders and
not executable ("Can't find associated application to run this"-type
message). I can't get a terminal either (Apple-K then 127.0.0.1 didn't
work). And I find myself Capitalizing words all the time :-)

Paul



Re: Mac OS X (was Re: mmm ... toys ..)

2001-03-27 Thread Neil Ford

On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 04:11:13PM -0800, Paul Makepeace wrote:
 I don't suppose anyone else chose 'root' as their primary account
 name during install?
 
 I did and am wondering if this is why my OS X installation is totally
 hosed  useless: I can't open folders in my (own!) Home (Insufficient

That would be it. Root on Mac OS X is a special user that by default isn't
enabled and doesn't have a home directory, etc.

You probably need to re-install and choose a normal user name. This user will
be set up as an administrator and have pretty good access rights. For easy
access you can do 'sudo tcsh' or if you want to enable root via
Applications|Utilities|NetInfo - it's a menu option.

Neil.
-- 
Neil C. Ford
Managing Director, Yet Another Computer Solutions Company Limited
[EMAIL PROTECTED]