Re: Odd idiom

2001-05-29 Thread Dave Cross

On Mon, May 28, 2001 at 11:20:04PM -0700, Paul Makepeace 
([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
 Why do people say inherits from the Foo::Bar manpage and not Foo::Bar
 module/class? I mean, how can something inherit from a lump of
 documentation? Is this one of those klutz kult phenomenon or something
 I'm not in on? :)

It's a bug (or maybe just a limitation) in the pod2man converter. If you say

  see LFoo::Bar for more information

then it's expanded to see the Foo::Bar manpage for more information. This is
fine mot of the time, but can occasionally lead to the kind of weirdness that
you describe above.

Dave...




umm MakeMaker?

2001-05-29 Thread Robin Szemeti


so .. I've RTFM and still don't get it.

ExtUtils::MakeMaker .. how do I get it to run a script at make time .. I
have a .pl in a directory that I need run every 'make'  .. I know how
to add it as a POSTOP or PREOP to a 'make dist' or whatever .. but not
just on a plain 'make' ...

-- 
Robin Szemeti   

Redpoint Consulting Limited
Real Solutions For A Virtual World 



XML

2001-05-29 Thread Jonathan Peterson



Hi folx,

Why is it that every time I spend 2 hours working with XML I discover a new twist that 
makes everything more complex than it used to be? And that's deliberately ignoring the 
advanced stuff.

Anyway, does anyone know of any XML authoring tools (any platform) that let you 
compose XML against a Schema (latest spec), enforcing validation as you go?

XML-Spy seems great in most respects but appears to have bugs in this last one.


-- 
Jonathan Peterson
Technical Manager, Unified Ltd, 020 7383 6092
[EMAIL PROTECTED]




Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Leon Brocard

Paul Makepeace sent the following bits through the ether:

 Are there modules/frameworks that exist to create classes from a
 grammar spec (e.g. EBNF)?

Well, Parse::RecDescent[1] probably does what you want. Check out the
autotree directive.

Parsing is fun. Let's try and parse everything!

[1] Or Parse::Yapp, but I betcha it'll be more work
-- 
Leon Brocard.http://www.astray.com/
Iterative Software...http://www.iterative-software.com/

... Careful. We don't want to learn from this. - Calvin



Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Simon Wistow

Paul Makepeace wrote:
 
 Are there modules/frameworks that exist to create classes from a
 grammar spec
 (e.g. EBNF)? Restating, I'm envisaging something where the input is a
 grammar and the output is a class or set of classes that provides
 parsing capabilities and validating accessor methods.
 
 Immediate application is feeding the PDF spec 

I started looking into this when I first started doing the SWF stuff ...
a kind of YACC for file formats. Describe it in a BNF-a-like language
and then run a program over it et voila - you have a library for reading
and creating that file format (he says, glossing over lots of
complications and gotchas). Write that program for each different
language and lots of different languages/systems have access to lots of
different fiel formats and every time a format changes the spec gets
updated and everyone runs their grammar-library programs again and
everybody's got full functionality again.

I think this article talks about it some
http://advogato.org/article/59.html

Like I said, I looked into and didn't find anything and didn't have the
time/experience/inclination to start doing something myself - too many
gotchas :(

-- 
simon wistowwireless systems coder
i think, i said i think this is our fault.



Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Marcel Grunauer

On Tuesday, May 29, 2001, at 11:18  AM, Simon Wistow wrote:

 I started looking into this when I first started doing the SWF stuff ...
 a kind of YACC for file formats. Describe it in a BNF-a-like language
 and then run a program over it et voila - you have a library for reading
 and creating that file format (he says, glossing over lots of
 complications and gotchas). Write that program for each different
 language and lots of different languages/systems have access to lots of
 different fiel formats and every time a format changes the spec gets
 updated and everyone runs their grammar-library programs again and
 everybody's got full functionality again.

As Leon points out, Parse::RecDescent is One Way To Do It. However, it's
mostly used to parse some input according to some grammar and to 
construct
the desired result directly. If you need a different result from the same
grammar, you have to specify the grammar and actions again.

It might be an idea to have grammars packed up in modules (i.e., 
reusable)
and make the actions callbacks (some sort of autoaction might do that),
much like HTML and XML parsers do it. I imagine lots of little Parse::*
modules (Parse::Regex, Parse::PDF, Parse::RPN etc.).

Is that a) a good idea, b) a bad idea, c) common practice anyway and I 
just
haven't found it?

Marcel

--
$ perl -we time
Useless use of time in void context at -e line 1.



Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Leon Brocard

Marcel Grunauer sent the following bits through the ether:

 Is that a) a good idea, b) a bad idea, c) common practice anyway and
 I just haven't found it?

japhy's apparently kinda doing this:
http://search.cpan.org/doc/PINYAN/YAPE-Regex-3.01/extra/YAPE.pm

  The YAPE hierarchy of modules is an attempt at a unified means of
  parsing and extracting content. It attempts to maintain a generic
  interface, to promote simplicity and reusability. The API is
  powerful, yet simple. The modules do tokenization (which can be
  intercepted) and build trees, so that extraction of specific nodes
  is doable.

Other programming languages need code generators to spit out
libraries. Perl doesn't need to do this as it's dynamic, baby. This is
why Parse::RecDescent / Template Toolkit are so groovy, yeah.

[Of course, the reason nobody's done this before is that everyone
wants a slightly different interface...]

Leon
-- 
... We're not worthy! We're not worthy!



Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Matthew Byng-Maddick

On Tue, May 29, 2001 at 02:27:40AM -0700, Paul Makepeace wrote:
 Anyway, PDF is easier re: packing/endianness since it's a text format!
 The only time you get binary data is for unencoded streams (which they advise
 against, although it's permitted, for example PDFlib generates it)
 like a  /Filter /FlateDecode streamzlib-deflated-dataendstream 

Not quite, it's a human-readable binary format. All the indexes rely on
offsets in the file, and the various fun with the newline conventions
mean that in my book, it's a binary format, you can't just go along and
edit it with a text editor, because it won't work anymore. Sure, the only
bits that are non-*ASCII* are the streams, but even so...

MBM




Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Paul Makepeace

On Tue, May 29, 2001 at 10:45:59AM +0100, Leon Brocard wrote:
 [Of course, the reason nobody's done this before is that everyone
 wants a slightly different interface...]

Surely it should be possible to specify the underlying *functionality*
of the system and then have a perl source filter (or other component of
perl's mind-addling n-tier parsing architecture) that
rewrites/re-presents the interface in the API style du jour...

Paul



Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Marcel Grunauer

On Tuesday, May 29, 2001, at 11:49  AM, Paul Makepeace wrote:

 Surely it should be possible to specify the underlying *functionality*
 of the system and then have a perl source filter (or other component of
 perl's mind-addling n-tier parsing architecture) that
 rewrites/re-presents the interface in the API style du jour...

Separate the end-user API from the parser's action API. I.e., each parser
module specifies the grammar and uses a fixed style of action that 
creates
something like an abstract syntax tree. Then have several end-user APIs 
to
access that AST. I.e., one that traverses the tree and makes callbacks 
for
each node. Or one that uses an XPath-like syntax to get at certain nodes 
in
the tree. Or, in the spirit of the model-view controller, make it a tree
model and have various tree viewers (Leon will recognise this idea; as 
I've
been going on about this since before the German Perl Workshop...) so you
could also 'view' the tree as an XML document, as a Data::Dumper-like
output, as a directory hierarchy (where nodes are directories and leaf
entries are files), or whatever one's sick mind can come up with.

Marcel

--
my int ($x, $y, $z, $n); $x**$n + $y**$n = $z**$n is insoluble if $n  2;
I have discovered a truly remarkable proof which this signature is too
short to contain.  (20 Aug 2001: Pierre de Fermat's 400th birthday)



Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Paul Makepeace

On Tue, May 29, 2001 at 10:48:54AM +0100, Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
 Not quite, it's a human-readable binary format. All the indexes rely on
 offsets in the file, and the various fun with the newline conventions
 mean that in my book, it's a binary format, you can't just go along and
 edit it with a text editor, because it won't work anymore. Sure, the only

Yeah, a dumb editor for sure -- if the editor can figure out the
line-ending conventions from the magic number I don't see a problem.

Hmm, I suppose if a pathological editor mixed cr/lfs then that scheme
wouldn't work.

But yeah, the line-ending (esp. in the xref table[1]) is a bit bizarre. 
PDF seems optimised for the PDF writing application placing burden on
the reader.

What possible point is there in specifying the length of a stream object
as an indirect reference? The spec says (in essence) so the writing
application can write out the length of variable data without knowing a
priori its length (to use an
e.g.[2] from before, a deflated object). Now, surely the point of having a
length spec at all is so that the reader can a) allocate a chunk of
memory in advance b) know when the endstream isn't part of the
stream itself. What c) am I missing that where the length is useful?

Hmm, I suppose using the xref it could seek() for the length object,
read it and then seek() back to the stream. Like I say, no regard for
the woes of the reader, or something being piped from HTTP...

[1] [For those that don't know, the cross-ref table consists mostly of
object IDs and byte offsets. Each xref line is 20bytes in which the
final char is a space if the line-ending isn't a full crlf
(i.e. is either(!) of cr or lf. *toke, toke*]

[2] Bollocks, autoformat did it again.

 bits that are non-*ASCII* are the streams, but even so...
 
 MBM
 



Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Robin Szemeti

On Tue, 29 May 2001, Leon Brocard wrote:

 Other programming languages need code generators to spit out
 libraries. Perl doesn't need to do this as it's dynamic, baby. This is
 why Parse::RecDescent / Template Toolkit are so groovy, yeah.

I propose a new convention : we all shout 'CAMEL' if Leon uses the words
qw/ baby groovy yeah/ in the same mail. ..  this could be quite often.

-- 
Robin Szemeti   

Redpoint Consulting Limited
Real Solutions For A Virtual World 



Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Simon Wistow

Paul Makepeace wrote:

  Like I said, I looked into and didn't find anything and didn't have the
  time/experience/inclination to start doing something myself - too many
  gotchas :(
 
 Like what kind of gotchas, besides the padding/endianity stuff?

Well, Parse::RecDescent didn't do binary (I looked at patching it, hence
File::Binary, but didn't get round to it) plus some files store things
as binary offsets in files and do nasty optimisation tricks like ..

1. $x = next 5 bits as an UINT
2. if ($x==32) $x next 8 bits as an UINT
3. next 5 variables are all SINTS and are $x bits long 

doing it (i.e a BNF that described Binary files) wouldn't be impossible
but I don't have enough experience with other file formats to think of
other gotchas and/or the time to write this sort of stuff. I'd have to
think of some sort of IDL as well I suppose.



Forthcoming Meetings

2001-05-29 Thread Cross David - dcross


Social Meeting: Thursday 7th June

Unless anyone comes up with a better idea in the next 24 hours, we'll go to
the Penderels Oak for this.

Technical Meeting: Thursday 21st June

Need a venue for this please people. And speakers. If any speakers want to
practise TPC or YAPC::E talks, then this might be a good time to do it.

Dave...

-- 


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I have my life back!

2001-05-29 Thread Lucy McWilliam


Greetings all.  The beerfest is now over, thank god.  Was getting a bit
blase about all that free beer.  Anyway, I'm now and expert in fence
building, floor laying, cotton condoming (!), and estimated I pulled
over a thousand last week.  Pints that is.

So, what did I miss?

L.





Re: I have my life back!

2001-05-29 Thread Tony Kennick


On Tue, 29 May 2001 12:19:54 +0100 (BST)
Lucy McWilliam [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 
 Greetings all.  The beerfest is now over, thank god.  Was getting a bit
 blase about all that free beer.  Anyway, I'm now and expert in fence
 building, floor laying, cotton condoming (!), and estimated I pulled
 over a thousand last week.  Pints that is.

recruitment mode

Sorry to just randomly attack you like this after reading your mail to
London.pm's list. But a) are you a Camra member and b) are you going to
work the great British beer festival in London this summer and/or you
interested in working/going to beer festivals in general?

/recruitment mode

-- 
Tony Kennick
TechnoPhobia Limited.
Phone: +44 (0)114 2212123  Fax: +44 (0)114 2212124
Email: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
WWW: http://www.technophobia.com
Registered in England and Wales Company No. 3063669
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(Chief) Wizard for hire...

2001-05-29 Thread Dave Hodgkinson


All the current projects are done and dusted and the T-shirts are at
the printers (really!). I'm looking for the next round of excellent
clients to work with.

Take a look at my site at http://www.hodgkinson.org/ to see what I'm
up to.

Thanks,

Dave

-- 
Dave Hodgkinson, http://www.hodgkinson.org
Editor-in-chief, The Highway Star   http://www.deep-purple.com
  Interim CTO, web server farms, technical strategy
   



Re: (Chief) Wizard for hire...

2001-05-29 Thread Dave Hodgkinson


James Powell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 You've got a link to 127.0.0.1 on your CV page (sorry, I'm nosy).

Fixed, ta. The perils of a two-tier Apache :-)

 
 Also, I see you've worked with the devil known as Illustra!
 
 Me too, condolences!

They had the right idea... ;-)

Still, at least one guy walked away with plenty of money!


-- 
Dave Hodgkinson, http://www.hodgkinson.org
Editor-in-chief, The Highway Star   http://www.deep-purple.com
  Interim CTO, web server farms, technical strategy
   



Re: God bless Micro$oft

2001-05-29 Thread Roger Horne

On Mon 28 May, Paul Makepeace wrote:
 http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/4/19239.html

Entertaining (and http:www.gateway.co.uk would not let me in today.) But I
wonder what the site is for. The main Government site has been
http://www.open.gov.uk . That is closing, because presumably Government is
no longer to be open. But it is claimed that it is to be replaced by the
ghastly http://www.ukonline.gov.uk, not the gateway site.

(From the ukonline site: Life Episodes: A helping hand with the events in
your life click Having a baby ..)

  
Roger
-- 
Roger Horne, 11 New Square, Lincoln's Inn, London WC2A 3QB
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
http://www.hrothgar.co.uk/



geek movie _Center of the World_ (was Re: Sara Cox - was Re: FHM Top 100 Sexiest Women

2001-05-29 Thread Yeoh Yiu

So have you seen _Center of the World_ yet ?

YY

duncan [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
 see i dont mind 'lad's' magazines being covered in naked women,
 because i mean thats kinda what makes up the content of the magazine.
 but im very irritated by the fact that technology magazines are using
 sex to sell themselves.  i have a copy of 'stuff' and 't3' and both
 have semi naked models holding the gadgets and things being reviewed.
 i find it very annoying, because im only interested in the gadgets.
 if i wanted mild porn then i'd buy FHM!
 
 
 
 
 duncan



Re: geek movie _Center of the World_ (was Re: Sara Cox - wasRe: FHM Top 100 Sexiest Women

2001-05-29 Thread Paul Mison

On 29/05/2001 at 18:04 +0100, Yeoh Yiu wrote:
So have you seen _Center of the World_ yet ?

Nah, 'cos it's not out here yet. No release date is listed on IMDB.
Salon didn't like it, though:

http://www.salon.com/tech/review/2001/04/19/center_of_the_world/index.html

which I read as I Fear Not the Spoiler, and I was in NY at the time,
heinously disconnected from the Web and the ability to AvantGo sync,
and other nettish goodness. Of course, I could have gone to see it
then, but the dazzling skyscrapers and lure of beer tempted me.

--
:: paul
:: stay all day
:: if you want to





Fwd: [info@yapceurope.org: YAPC::Europe conference, August 2-4, 2001, Amsterdam.]

2001-05-29 Thread London.pm - Dave Cross

- Forwarded message from YAPC::Europe spamrobot :) [EMAIL PROTECTED] -

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Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 10:02:48 +0200
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From: YAPC::Europe spamrobot :) [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: YAPC::Europe conference, August 2-4, 2001, Amsterdam.
To: London.pm - Dave Cross [EMAIL PROTECTED]

You are listed as the contact address for London.pm on
http://www.pm.org/groups.shtml. Please forward this message to the
members of your Perl Mongers group, if appropriate.

The European Yet Another Perl Conference will take place August 2-4,
2001, in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

The success of the conference depends upon participation from groups all
over Europe. You are encouraged to send speech proposals--including
lightning talks--to [EMAIL PROTECTED] asap.

Tickets will be on sale soon; look at the website at
http://www.yapc.org/Europe/ for the latest details, or join the
discussion mailing list advertised on the site.

Best regards,

--
Jan-Pieter Cornet


- End forwarded message -



Re: I have my life back!

2001-05-29 Thread David Cantrell

On Tue, May 29, 2001 at 03:02:49PM +0100, Tony Kennick wrote:

 recruitment mode
 
 Sorry to just randomly attack you like this after reading your mail to
 London.pm's list. But a) are you a Camra member and b) are you going to
 work the great British beer festival in London this summer and/or you
 interested in working/going to beer festivals in general?
 
 /recruitment mode

And is anyone else going to the Glastonwick Beer Beer Poetry and More Beer
Festival next weekend?

-- 
David Cantrell | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/

  Rip, Mix, Burn, unless you're using our most advanced operating system
   in the world which we decided to release incomplete just for a laugh



Re: (Chief) Wizard for hire...

2001-05-29 Thread Peter Haworth

On Tue, 29 May 2001 15:43:49 +0100, James Powell wrote:
 Also, I see you've worked with the devil known as Illustra!
 
 Me too, condolences!

Me too. I even wrote DBD::Illustra for it, although by the time I got permission to 
release it, no one else in the World appeared to want it.

-- 
Peter Haworth   [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Remember: Perl abhors a naked circularity
-- Tom Christiansen



Re: geek movie _Center of the World_ (was Re: Sara Cox - was Re: FHM Top 100 Sexiest Women

2001-05-29 Thread Elaine -HFB- Ashton

Paul Mison [[EMAIL PROTECTED]] quoth:
*On 29/05/2001 at 18:04 +0100, Yeoh Yiu wrote:
*So have you seen _Center of the World_ yet ?
*
*Nah, 'cos it's not out here yet. No release date is listed on IMDB.
*Salon didn't like it, though:

Salon has good taste too. Sucked harder than watching the queen mum on
Ascot Day. Boring and torporific well beyond my low expectations for the
movie. Go see Shrek instead.

e.



Re: (Chief) Wizard for hire...

2001-05-29 Thread James Powell

On Tue, May 29, 2001 at 07:39:33PM +0100, Peter Haworth wrote:
 On Tue, 29 May 2001 15:43:49 +0100, James Powell wrote:
  Also, I see you've worked with the devil known as Illustra!
  
  Me too, condolences!
 
 Me too. I even wrote DBD::Illustra for it, although by the time I got permission to 
release it, no one else in the World appeared to want it.

Ooh that would have been very useful for me at one time.

Illustra - Nice ideas, shame about the locking approach
(and lack of outer joins, etc etc)!

 
 -- 
   Peter Haworth   [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Remember: Perl abhors a naked circularity
   -- Tom Christiansen



Re: (Chief) Wizard for hire...

2001-05-29 Thread Dave Hodgkinson

James Powell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Ooh that would have been very useful for me at one time.

I've got bells ringing in my head about how hard it was to get a C
library out of them in the early days.

 
 Illustra - Nice ideas, shame about the locking approach
 (and lack of outer joins, etc etc)!

Ah, but Blades and time series stuff.

-- 
Dave Hodgkinson, http://www.hodgkinson.org
Editor-in-chief, The Highway Star   http://www.deep-purple.com
  Interim CTO, web server farms, technical strategy
   



Re: (Chief) Wizard for hire...

2001-05-29 Thread Paul Sharpe



Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 
 James Powell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
  Ooh that would have been very useful for me at one time.
 
 I've got bells ringing in my head about how hard it was to get a C
 library out of them in the early days.
 
 
  Illustra - Nice ideas, shame about the locking approach
  (and lack of outer joins, etc etc)!
 
 Ah, but Blades and time series stuff.

Doesn't PostgreSQL carry on the Illustra tradition?

paul



Re: (Chief) Wizard for hire...

2001-05-29 Thread Jonathan Stowe

On Tue, 29 May 2001, Paul Sharpe wrote:

 Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 
  James Powell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
   Ooh that would have been very useful for me at one time.
 
  I've got bells ringing in my head about how hard it was to get a C
  library out of them in the early days.
 
  
   Illustra - Nice ideas, shame about the locking approach
   (and lack of outer joins, etc etc)!
 
  Ah, but Blades and time series stuff.

 Doesn't PostgreSQL carry on the Illustra tradition?


It went to Informix most recently and then of course to IBM.


/J\




Re: (Chief) Wizard for hire...

2001-05-29 Thread Paul Sharpe



Jonathan Stowe wrote:
 
 On Tue, 29 May 2001, Paul Sharpe wrote:
 
  Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
  
   James Powell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
  
Ooh that would have been very useful for me at one time.
  
   I've got bells ringing in my head about how hard it was to get a C
   library out of them in the early days.
  
   
Illustra - Nice ideas, shame about the locking approach
(and lack of outer joins, etc etc)!
  
   Ah, but Blades and time series stuff.
 
  Doesn't PostgreSQL carry on the Illustra tradition?
 
 
 It went to Informix most recently and then of course to IBM.
 
 /J\

But didn't it come *from* Postgres?

paul



Re: XML

2001-05-29 Thread Chris Benson

On Tue, May 29, 2001 at 09:48:28AM +0100, Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 
 Anyway, does anyone know of any XML authoring tools (any platform) that let you 
compose XML against a Schema (latest spec), enforcing validation as you go?
 
 XML-Spy seems great in most respects but appears to have bugs in this last one.

We've been using 0.9x versions of epcEdit for the last few months 
(http://www.tksgml.de/ maybe moved to http://www.epcedit.de/)  but the
recently released v1.0 only gives 60?90? days use before requiring
payment.  It has crashed a few times (usually on Widnos) but we've
used it to create a 300+ page book and will do a second next month.

Win32, Linux/i386 and Solaris versions available.  Uses Tcl/Tk and a
custom library.  Some niggles with the user interface (cursor moving
off-screen during a large paste, ...) but it absolutely enforces the
schema and can show list the valid tags at each point.

We'll be buying it before the end of June for I think c. us$400
-- 
Chris Benson



Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Nicholas Clark

On Tue, May 29, 2001 at 11:59:48AM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 On Tue, 29 May 2001, Leon Brocard wrote:
 
  Other programming languages need code generators to spit out
  libraries. Perl doesn't need to do this as it's dynamic, baby. This is
  why Parse::RecDescent / Template Toolkit are so groovy, yeah.
 
 I propose a new convention : we all shout 'CAMEL' if Leon uses the words
 qw/ baby groovy yeah/ in the same mail. ..  this could be quite often.

There doesn't appear to be any drinking involved in this new convention.
Is this the new bit? Not sure if it will catch on.

Nicholas Clark



Re: Grammar - Class creation

2001-05-29 Thread Robin Szemeti

On Tue, 29 May 2001, Nicholas Clark wrote:
 On Tue, May 29, 2001 at 11:59:48AM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
  On Tue, 29 May 2001, Leon Brocard wrote:
  
   Other programming languages need code generators to spit out
   libraries. Perl doesn't need to do this as it's dynamic, baby. This is
   why Parse::RecDescent / Template Toolkit are so groovy, yeah.
  
  I propose a new convention : we all shout 'CAMEL' if Leon uses the words
  qw/ baby groovy yeah/ in the same mail. ..  this could be quite often.
 
 There doesn't appear to be any drinking involved in this new convention.
 Is this the new bit? Not sure if it will catch on.

uhh .. you're *so* right .. I really must remember to compile my mails
with a -w option .. I'd probably have got a :

'Buffy' not declared or used in this mail,
Useless use of 'CAMEL' in a void context, did you mean 'Drink!' instead?


note: Drink! is to be pronounced loudly and in a southern Irish accent as
per Father Jack  [ see 'Father Ted'-{'Optician'}  passim ]

-- 
Robin Szemeti   

Redpoint Consulting Limited
Real Solutions For A Virtual World 



Re: I have my life back!

2001-05-29 Thread Lucy McWilliam


On Tue, 29 May 2001, Tony Kennick wrote:

 recruitment mode

 Sorry to just randomly attack you like this after reading your mail to
 London.pm's list. But a) are you a Camra member and b) are you going to
 work the great British beer festival in London this summer and/or you
 interested in working/going to beer festivals in general?

 /recruitment mode

* Yes, joined last Monday
* Probably, trying to decide between that and Yapc
* Why not?  I'll do anything for cheap beer ;-)


L.