RE: Feelers for London Open Source Convention

2001-01-17 Thread Kieran Barry

On Wed, 17 Jan 2001, Dave Cross wrote:

 At Wed, 17 Jan 2001 12:18:12 -, Mark Kitching [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 
 [Joe Dolce]
 
  Do any others watch those Top Ten blah programs on Ch4? I think I 
  knew this due to watching the Top Ten Comedy records! Wow, I really 
  must get out more.
 
 And there's me thinking that you must be an old git like me who 
 remembers it happening :)
 
 Everyone else was, of course, correct too. But Mark was fastest. I guess
 this is an advantage of working somewhere where there's bugger all
 work going on...
 
I thought Joe Dolce was only number 1 for a week or so, to be knocked
off the top by Jealous Guy from Roxy Music. And poor old Vienna hung
about at number 2 for yonks.

Anyone remember what kept Sweet Dreams off number 1 in the States? Hint:
trick question.

Regards

Kieran




RE: Feelers for London Open Source Convention

2001-01-17 Thread Kieran Barry

On Wed, 17 Jan 2001, Dave Cross wrote:

 At Wed, 17 Jan 2001 14:15:01 + (GMT), Kieran Barry [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
wrote:
 
  I thought Joe Dolce was only number 1 for a week or so, to be knocked
  off the top by Jealous Guy from Roxy Music. And poor old Vienna hung
  about at number 2 for yonks.
 
 Hmm... you may be right. Anyone know a site that lists UK top tens
 for the 1980s?
 
  Anyone remember what kept Sweet Dreams off number 1 in the States? 
  Hint: trick question.
 
 Well, according to http://80s.koreamusic.net/billboard/1983.html
 it made number one for one week on 3rd Sept 1983.
 
Hmm. I seem to recall that Sweet Dreams got to number two while the
Police (Every Breath You Take) was at the top, then another mega-hit
(Beat It? C'mon Eileen?) came along as well. I obviouly blinked and
missed the week at the top.

Regards

Kieran




Re: ArsDigita working practices (was: Big Macs v The Naked Chef --)

2001-01-21 Thread Kieran Barry

On Sat, 20 Jan 2001, Chris Benson wrote:
 On Sat, Jan 20, 2001 at 09:04:24PM +, Robin Houston wrote:
  On Sat, Jan 20, 2001 at 08:01:51PM +, Chris Benson wrote:
  
   Another link is 
   
   http://www.arsdigita.com/careers/
   
   They seem to be a very good model for a consultancy business 
  
  Personally I wouldn't like to work anywhere that thinks like this:
http://www.arsdigita.com/asj/managing-software-engineers/
  
  Even if that article is slightly tongue-in-cheek, it disturbs me :-)
 
I get the feeling that some of Greenspun's writings are written as
advertising. One theme running through his writings seems to me is to
explain his architecture to the audience. He keeps things really simple,
so that even a manager should be able to understand him.

But it remains advertising. He goes just slightly over the top about how
great ArsDigita is.

 I suspect it is *not* tongue-in-cheek -- he wants only the best and does
 expect 70-80 hour weeks ... during a project.  In some discussion I saw
 about this he justified it two ways that I remember: (1) not everyone
 worked on projects all the time and (2) if people did work full time on
 projects they'd be getting about ~us$500k / year.  (Having spent the
 entire 80's doing 70-80 hour weeks for less than gbp10k I'd liked to
 have had the chance!).
 
Hmm. My experience says that on many projects, there are people you
don't want to work overtime. This is because they created many of the
reasons why overtime is necessary.

Greenspun believes that everyone should be potentially great (or great
already.) He suggests that when a project needs work, people work
harder. And an interesting point is that he is in a small town
(Cambridge, Masse-however you spell the damn thing), so that commuting
is much quicker. On a typical day, I leave for work at 7.25, get to work
at about 9.10, leave at 6.30 and arrive home around 8.15. (This is since
Hatfield. Total work time 8.30 after lunch. If my commute was 10 minutes
each way, I'd have 3hours and 10 minutes of extra work time a day. (Not
that I'd necessarily want to work it...)

Look at the consultancy thread, where despite the project being composed
of a group of friends, a lot of people wanted to work from home. 

 There are also good bits there which have been mentioned in other threads:
 quote
  The average home cannot accomodate a pinball machine. An office  
  can. The average home can have video games, which are very popular
  with young programmers, but not people with whom to play. The
  average home cannot have a grand piano but almost any office can.
 
For the time being, the techy is "talent". We should be treated well,
until they find a way to clone us. At the very least, if we aren't being
treated well, it implies that the project isn't valued. 


 I don't think I'd like to work for them though ... I'm getting old'n'soft
 :-( and I find the attitude that comes over in Phil Greenspun's writing
 rather (very!) arrogant.  And of course they use shudder TCL.
 
I think that Greenspun needs to be outspoken to pay for the techies
toys.

TCL is used because its multithreaded. Perl 6 is going to be
multithreaded. It should be able to wipe TCL out.

 But the organisational structure and strategy/vision *is* interesting.

Yup. There isn't enough talent around, so people get promoted beyond
their competence. If you train your people they'll only leave.

The only way out of that cycle is to train in-house,
and treat people so well that they stay.

Discuss.

Kieran




Re: ArsDigita working practices (was: Big Macs v The Naked Chef --)

2001-01-21 Thread Kieran Barry

On Sun, 21 Jan 2001, Michael Stevens wrote:

 On Sun, Jan 21, 2001 at 08:37:02PM +, Kieran Barry wrote:
  TCL is used because its multithreaded. Perl 6 is going to be
  multithreaded. It should be able to wipe TCL out.
 
 I've never actually understood the appeal of threads. Why do
 people like them?
 
The concept of execution threads within a process makes it easy to share
resources like database connections. As I understand it, that's it. The
pre-forked model that Apache uses has a problem because it's tough to
share resources.

Incidentally, I think this is the reason servlets are used.

Regards

Kieran




Re: Mailing List Archive

2001-01-25 Thread Kieran Barry

On Thu, 25 Jan 2001, Leon Brocard wrote:

 Robin Houston sent the following bits through the ether:
 
  - This is a public list. Anyone can subscribe using an advertised
address.
 
 This is the key point. It is a public list. If you don't like the idea
 that your potential employers or employees could read everything you
 write then:
   o grow up
   o conversations in the pub are not the same as a mailing list
   o people are leaky in real life - it pays to be honest all the time
 
 I'm proud of everything google finds out about me. Why shouldn't you
 be?
 
I go trawling search engines to see what they turn up about me also.
It's fun.

But

It isn't a question of google finding out about you: it is about how
much information you want made available to complete strangers. How
would you feel if a member of this list was sacked because someone
accessed an archive and noticed a post during work hours?

Bear in mind, we are living with Big Brother now.

Regards

Kieran