Using perl for a high performance mailer daemon ?

2001-06-19 Thread Greg Cope

Dear All

Sorry to drag the tone back down to perl, but, I've a question that is
ripe for the lists collective expertise.

I want to design a mailer for sending large numbers of individual
messages to a large list.  This is for a client whom manages companies
customers CRM lists.  This is more of a prototype / proof of concept,
and as such I thought perl would be the best.

We are already using qmail, but the expense of queuing a message mean
that performance is limited by disc speed and qmail-send the program
that manages the queue and sending outbound emails.

Hence I want to write is a thing that:

a) Looks up and caches MX records in a shared area (shared mem) - easy.

b) Load the message template into shared mem - easy.

c) Gets message from shared mem, and given a list uses qmail-remote to
actual do the smtp conversation (by reading info on different
filehandles), if the initial send fails drop back to an smtp relay that
will queue the message or bounce it somewhere else. Could this done even
quicker with a perl client that does simple checks ?

d) Log to a central file - success for failure.

I just know there must be a way to do this in perl that is quick (rather
than writing it in C).

So whats the way the write this so that its execution speed is the
fastest (given enougth memory and network bandwidth).

Part C is the sticker, i.e. the quickest way to spawn and control alot
of other process that communicate over filehandles.

Clues on a postcard, ta.

Greg

normal vaguely perl service can be resumed





SQL statements to DB Schema (dia ?)

2001-05-30 Thread Greg Cope

Dear All

This is not perl related, but I hope to tap your collective knowledge.

I'm involved with taking on a project started (and nearly finished) by
an Agency writen mostly in PHP and Delphi. No statements that I'm
already in trouble - thanks.

I have no DB schema, and as such could dump the SQL schema (via
mysqldump) - and I was wondering if there was a super thing that could
translate the create table stuff into a diagram I could print, and then
look at  If this worked on Linux and involved perl and Dia then it
would be fab.

Thanks for your time.

Greg





Re: Good Accountants

2001-04-26 Thread Greg Cope

Robin Szemeti wrote:
 
 On Thu, 26 Apr 2001, you wrote:
  Where do you live?
 
  DJ Adams recommended Menzies (www.menzies.co.uk) to me, and I went to see
  them last night for the first time. They are going to set up my new company
  for me too. They like IT contractors, and the partner I met with talked to
  me for about 30 minutes on ways to avoid IR35 :-)
 
 sound like a 'contractors accountant' .. mine (Lowson Ward in Birmingham)
 do nothing other than accounting for contractors and know all the
 relevant bits. Very often a 'general' accountant doesn't seem to know all
 the little wrinkles that one who specialises in contractors does. Well
 worth getting the right sort.
 
  Very professional, I like them so far. Based in Kingston and have other
  offices around Surrey.
 
  On a similar point, can anyone recommend a good business bank account?
 
 Flemings Premier Banking
 01708 713317
 
 basically free for contractors (up to 20 cheques a month) and pay
 interest. I got several hundred quid in intrest last year. Telephone
 service and all that stuff.
 most impressed .. and I do have other business acounts to comapre it to.
 I would heartily recommend them. They are widely used by contractors.
 

+1

the service I've found to be excellent, they call you sir on the phone
and sound like they mean it, quite shocking these day's.

Greg


 
  --
  Robert
 
 
  - Original Message -
  From: Gareth Harper [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  Sent: 26 April 2001 09:09
  Subject: Good Accountants
 
 
   Can any of you contractor types recoomend a good accountant, as the one I
   was using (a friend of the family) suggested that I use an accountant who
   was more familiar with the IT contracting business, as he was more suited
  to
   much larger companies.
  
   Thanks
   Gareth Harper
  
  
  
 --
 Robin Szemeti
 
 The box said requires windows 95 or better
 So I installed Linux!



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-29 Thread Greg Cope

Robin Szemeti wrote:
 
 On Wed, 28 Mar 2001, you wrote:
  On Wed, Mar 28, 2001 at 01:10:00PM +0100, Aaron Trevena wrote:
   Plain and simply I don't think java is the right technology for
   e-commerce, plain and simple.

gartuitous snippage
 
 no .. it _does_ have its strong points .. I wouldn't have even
 bought a  book if i thought it was really bad .. but it just seems to
 make some things so hard to do.  Mybe its just me being crap. I'd be
 intrested to set a good perl programmer and a Java guy head to head ..
 get em to build an app to the same spec and see how long they took, and
 then get them to extend it in some way and time that ..


I once read a report (18 months ago) where the same projects where given
to lots of programmers, the usualy results were show i.e algorythm
design was the most important factor, although on the whole scripting
langauges were faster to develope in, and had faster execuion speeds and
lower memory footprints.  I should try and find it again as I've lost
the URL.

Greg
 
 don't get me wrong .. I'm not just Java bashing .. but really, the hype
 it gets would have you believe its all tings to all men .. in reallity
 its got good points, but some big holes too ...
 
 --
 Robin Szemeti
 
 The box said "requires windows 95 or better"
 So I installed Linux!



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-29 Thread Greg Cope

James Powell wrote:
 
 On Thu, Mar 29, 2001 at 09:59:35AM +0100, Dominic Mitchell wrote:
  On Thu, Mar 29, 2001 at 08:56:36AM +0100, James Powell wrote:
   Course, mysql does support transactions now... I believe with two
   different types of table for some reason.
 
  It's because the underlying table type is implemented using Berkeley
  DB3, which does support transactions.  And that has several modes of
  operation, hash, btree and recno.
 
  I haven't looked into it, but I would imagine that it makes transactions
  across different tables kind of tricky.  In fact, I'd class it as a bit
  of a hack.  But don't take my opinion for it, because this is all based
  on 2nd hand evidence.
 
  -Dom
 
 But as well as Berkeley there's innobase and gemini (not in yet?)
 table types that support transactions.
 http://www.mysql.com/documentation/mysql/bychapter/manual_Table_types.html
 
 I can't say I've used any of them or would trust any of them...

I've tested innobase and it appears to be fine.  It very Oracle like in
the way it works (it needs loasd of resources to run quickly).  MyISAM
table handlers for speed and Innobase table handlers for transaction
based tables (also with row locking) and you should be away.  (The
Innobase code is apparently not new, and has been taken from another
project and bolted on, which sounds bad but actually appears to work
quite well).

Greg

 
 And MySQL has got full-text indexing now - didn't notice that one
 
 http://www.mysql.com/news/article-54.html
 "MySQL 3.23 now has full-text indexing and searching capabilities. This
 allows you to search your vast databases of
 textual information, with queries returning search string
 occurrence/relevance."
 
 Incidentally, saw your ssh letter in the new LJ...
 
 jp



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-29 Thread Greg Cope

Philip Newton wrote:
 
 Greg Cope wrote:
  I once read a report (18 months ago) where the same projects
  where given to lots of programmers, the usualy results were
  show i.e algorythm design was the most important factor,
  although on the whole scripting langauges were faster to
  develope in, and had faster execuion speeds and lower memory
  footprints.  I should try and find it again as I've lost
  the URL.
 
 You may be looking for this:
 
 http://wwwipd.ira.uka.de/~prechelt/Biblio/jccpprtTR.pdf
 An empirical comparison of C, C++, Java, Perl, Python, Rexx, and Tcl for a
 search/string-processing program
 

That looks the ticket

ta.

Greg

 Or google for "empirical comparison Python Rexx program" for a few
 references.
 
 Cheers,
 Philip
 --
 Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
 If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-28 Thread Greg Cope

Robin Houston wrote:
 
 On Wed, Mar 28, 2001 at 01:23:01PM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 
  I concur.  There is simply too much of the important stuff missing from
  Java to make it useable for web content delivery as far as I can tell.
 
  I just couldn't do half of what I do without regexes
 
 Since excellent regex libraries are freely available, this
 is akin to claiming that Perl is useless for writing HTTP
 clients because LWP isn't in the core ;-)

blatantly off topic

I was thinking about this the otherday - can you recommend some (pref
open source) Java regex libs ?

going back to the perl topics 

Greg


 
  .robin.
 
 --
 A man, a plan, a cat, a ham, a yak, a yam, a hat, a canal--Panama!
 --Guy Jacobson



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-28 Thread Greg Cope

Robin Houston wrote:
 
 On Wed, Mar 28, 2001 at 01:59:40PM +, Greg Cope wrote:
  I was thinking about this the otherday - can you recommend some (pref
  open source) Java regex libs ?
 
 OROMatcher.
 http://jakarta.apache.org/oro/index.html
 
 There's also gnu.regexp, for LGPL fans:
 http://www.cacas.org/~wes/java/
 
 Both support perl5 syntax, more or less.
 
  .robin.

Ta.

Greg

 
 --
 "Sometimes I sit in front of my washing machine and contemplate the
  worthlessness of life.  My washing machine isn't even plugged in."
 --alex



perl (compling) optiziations

2001-03-05 Thread Greg Cope

Dear All

I know this is best asked elsewhere but 

I'm looking at perl-5.6.1-TRAIL2 as I am thinking of moving to this for
some production platforms (or 5.6.1 when that comes out)

Is anyone using any funky optimizations for the CFLAGS beyond
-Doptimize=-O3 -march=pentiumpro ?

This is for Linux  using pcgg 2.95.2.1

Ta

Greg



Re: perl (compling) optiziations

2001-03-05 Thread Greg Cope

Philip Newton wrote:
 
 Greg Cope wrote:
  I know this is best asked elsewhere but 
 
  I'm looking at perl-5.6.1-TRAIL2 as I am thinking of moving
  to this for some production platforms (or 5.6.1 when that
  comes out)
 
  Is anyone using any funky optimizations for the CFLAGS beyond
  -Doptimize=-O3 -march=pentiumpro ?
 
  This is for Linux  using pcgg 2.95.2.1
 
 Any specific reason why you want to fiddle around with optimizations?

just a boyish go faster urge.

I used things like this in the past with some good results (10% to 20%
improvements) on other apps.  Plus I am likely to install this on quite
a few boxes, so a little effort now is worth it.

 
 In any event,
 http://www.mail-archive.com/perl5-porters@perl.org/msg23098.html and the
 ensuing thread may be of interest -- Tim Bunce asked about the "best GCC
 compiler options for Intel (perl  apache)" and got some answers.
 http://www.mail-archive.com/perl5-porters@perl.org/msg23387.html is a
 summary of some of his findings, with a sample gcc and a sample pgcc command
 line at the end.
 http://www.mail-archive.com/perl5-porters@perl.org/thrd7.html#23098 is
 (currently) the thread overview.

Ta - just what I was looking for.

Greg

 
 Cheers,
 Philip



[JOB] Passing on a permi web developer add from an old client

2001-02-28 Thread Greg Cope


Dear All

An old client I used to contract for needs a permie web developer -
London, W2 based.

This role has nothing to do with me, and I am not an agent, just
spreading the word for an old client - I thought the people here may be
interested.  i.e if it all goes pear shaped don't come running to me ;-)

Quote from the job spec they sent me:

quote
looking for a full-time, permanent Web Developer to maintain current
systems and develop new tools for the site. Working for the Technical
Development Manager, the candidate should have an excellent track record
in MySQL and Perl on a Unix (Linux) platform (min 2 years) and have
experience developing web applications in PHP4. Some knowledge of
SendMail,Qmail, HTML and JavaScript would be an asset.
/quote

If anyone is interested then contact eleanor.thompson at
bluecarrots.com.

Greg

insert massive disclaimer here 



Re: The Conway Lecture

2001-02-16 Thread Greg Cope

Neil Ford wrote:
 
 Neil Ford wrote:
 
   (please circulate this to any interested parties)
   
   Forwarded to the UK FreeBSD User Group and the Brighton Linux User Group.
 
 Brighton LUG - Where ?
 
 http://www.brighton.lug.org.uk
 
 It's a fairly dorment group but it does exist. The web page has
 details on how to join the mailing list.

Ah the LUG that I belong to 

Greg (nice but dim!)


 
 Neil.
 --
 Neil C. Ford
 Yet Another Computer Solutions Company
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]



Re: The Conway Lecture

2001-02-15 Thread Greg Cope

Neil Ford wrote:
 
 (please circulate this to any interested parties)
 
 Forwarded to the UK FreeBSD User Group and the Brighton Linux User Group.

Brighton LUG - Where ?

Greg

 
 Neil.
 --
 Neil C. Ford
 Yet Another Computer Solutions Company
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]



Re: Midgard Content Management

2001-02-07 Thread Greg Cope

Dean S Wilson wrote:
 
 I've seen lots of Content management systems get shredded and left on
 the floor of this list and I'm after opinions from anyone whos used
 Midgard, basically is it any good? (http://www.midgard-project.org)

php - nasty 

Have you looked at openinteract  (.org) ? A new perl App server. 

 
 From the talks I was in I discovered the following:
 
 Perl got a few mentions at the Open Source Dev meeting, CPAN's
 location mirroring algorithm was mentioned a couple of times in a
 presentation about BGP by VA Linux.
 

VA are making a geographical redirector that will does dynamic DNS and
points a client to thier nearest (network wise) node.

 Zope is now supporting Perl at a much level than previously
 (Apparently, I don't use Zope so I have no idea...)
 
 Smoothwall has had over 375,000 downloads from Sourceforge and they
 use perl for all the firewall admin stuff. Has to be a good thing,
 also Smoothwall are in discussion with getting Smoothwall boxsets
 distributed so I'm assuming that perl will be shipped out with every
 copy of those. Not major stuff but nice none the less.
 
 Rasmus of PHP said that he, Larry and Guido were in the planning
 stages of getting a meeting together to discuss backends to scripting
 languages... Not sure exactly how far into planning and this answer
 was prompted by someone asking why not use the perl or python backend
 instead of Zend.

Zend is nasty - they had to change the licence in PHP4 from gpl to a BSD
free-ish one because zend was originally under the qpl (I think).  Zend
have decided to release thier caching / complier stuff commerically for
loads of money.  Another company has released a GPL cacher 

I feel that zend rewrote the underlying script engine for php, so that
they could then "sell" it or sell the add ons.

Greg

 
 Dean
 PS Brussels was nice but I think it closes for the weekend.
 
 --
 Profanity is the one language all programmers understand.
---  Anon



Re: Perl Books

2001-02-02 Thread Greg Cope

Aaron Trevena wrote:
 
 On Thu, 1 Feb 2001, Elaine -HFB- Ashton wrote:
  No, there wasn't even something I could buy for it sadly. It's a simple
  CGI, I would have paid $15 for a quickie 'here's your simple cgi just plug
  in your variables here' code.
 
 Been there - more often than not, the cookbook fills any holes. I had a
 particular problem with web forums - slashcode being a bit OTT and
 wwwthreads cotsing money and then hundreds of PHP and java and asp forums,
 then I found mwforum and now I am rewriting it big time to get back into
 coding after sitting on my arse for weeks waiting for work or chasing
 people up or editing html. If anybody is interested I hope to have a TT'd
 version of mwforum on the web some time next week. After that I will
 totally hack it apart and rework it to fit my own twisted needs.


Are you going to send the patches back to the authors ?

Greg

snippage
 
 A.
 
 --
 A HREF = "http://termisoc.org/~betty" Betty @ termisoc.org /A
 "As a youngster Fred fought sea battles on the village pond using a
 complex system of signals he devised that was later adopted by the Royal
 Navy. " (this email has nothing to do with any organisation except me)



Re: Mark Thomas

2001-02-01 Thread Greg Cope

Dave Cross wrote:
 
 (Even more off-topic than usual)
 
 I've got four tickets for the filming of the Mark Thomas Product this
 Sunday. It's filmed in the pub at the end of my road, but I don't think
 I'll be around in time to go. You'd need to be in the pub for about
 7:15pm to get decent seats, but the filming doesn't actually start until
 9pm.
 
 I'll have them with me tonight if anyone wants to claim them.
 
 Dave...

Does MT have a special T shirt vendor ?

Yesterdays was a monopoply joke that I did not get 


Greg



Re: Sun's Perl was Re: Application servers and e-commerce platforms

2001-01-26 Thread Greg Cope

Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 
 Robin Houston [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
  (Sadly I no longer have shell access to any four-processor Sun
  machines to confirm this.)
 
 Which reminds me.
 
 How in gods name do Sun get away with charging so much for stuff?
 We've erm, "acquired" an enterprise 420. this box has 2 CPUs, 4G or
 RAM and about 80G of disk. For the same money I could build a clutster
 of what, 30 linux boxes? Don't tell me programmer time has got that
 expensive? Or that thinking about what you're doing stopped happening?
 If it's good enough for Google...
 
 Help me out here!

It is good kit (and alot of it is rebadged stuff - with nice blue / gray
boxes and Sun stickers).

But it's also a marketing thing  I know tow clients whom purchased
15k of sun kit each, and in either case a good Linux / Free|OpenBSD box
would have done the same.

The only time I recommend sun is when you need a bigger box than a twin
Pentium machine - and even then I mentions Alpha's (as I think they as
just as good a Sun's for the_just_above_intel market).

Also a a final Sun rant, sometime's it hard to scale / cluster stuff i.e
a RDBMS system is not a simple thing to cluster - and buying a bigger
box is the less of two evils.

Well that's a rant over first thing on Friday !

Greg


 
 --
 Dave Hodgkinson, http://www.hodgkinson.org
 Editor-in-chief, The Highway Star   http://www.deep-purple.com
   Apache, mod_perl, MySQL, Sybase hired gun for, well, hire
   -



Re: Sun's Perl was Re: Application servers and e-commerce platforms

2001-01-26 Thread Greg Cope

Steve Mynott wrote:
 
 Dave Hodgkinson [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
 [..]
 
  How in gods name do Sun get away with charging so much for stuff?
 
 Because they can and they have a brand people trust like IBM or
 Microsoft.  In fact you can buy far cheaper Sun clones from companies
 like Transtec but the Sun name tends (rather irrationally) to carry
 more weight in some circles (eg. telcos, ISP and City).  Many people
 use clones internally but Sun kit for the stuff customers see.
 
  We've erm, "acquired" an enterprise 420. this box has 2 CPUs, 4G or
  RAM and about 80G of disk. For the same money I could build a
  clutster of what, 30 linux boxes? Don't tell me programmer time has
  got that expensive? Or that thinking about what you're doing stopped
  happening?  If it's good enough for Google...
 
 You can't really compare Suns with standard PCs because they have
 numerous advantages still -- 64 bit archecture, faster bus, SCSI
 (although some use IDE now).  It's still expensive to get PCs in 1U
 cases and you can fit a lot of Netra T1s in a 19" rack.  Although for
 desktop use the framebuffers rarely have enough colours to be useable.
 
 I suspect things like SMP probably still work better.  And if I were
 on call supporting a server I would probably still trust a Sparc
 running Solaris over some dodgy PC desktop with Redhat stuck on it by
 a hobbyist who has never used another UNIX.


Cutting - 

Althought I agree with the sentiment that a Sparc box will probably be
more reliable than a generic PC.  However

s /some dodgy PC desktop with Redhat stuck on it by a hobbyist who has
never used another UNIX/inexperienced/;

Lets not compare inexperience with anyparticular flavour of *nix.

Greg

Who started on Redhat along time ago, and has since used and initially
disliked Solaris/Sun OS, but has since softened as is happy to work on
any *nix.


 
 Having said that I think they are probably doomed to occupy an
 increasingly small niche and things like clustered Free UNIX clones
 (PVM on BSD or Beowolf on Linux) certainly offer more bang per buck.
 
 --
 1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 
 if you have any trouble sounding condescending,
 find a unix user to show you how it's done.
  --scott adams



Re: Sun's Perl was Re: Application servers and e-commerce platforms

2001-01-26 Thread Greg Cope

Michael Stevens wrote:
 
 On Fri, Jan 26, 2001 at 10:35:45AM +, Steve Mynott wrote:
  I suspect things like SMP probably still work better.  And if I were
  on call supporting a server I would probably still trust a Sparc
  running Solaris over some dodgy PC desktop with Redhat stuck on it by
  a hobbyist who has never used another UNIX.
 
 Can't we compare something vaguely equivalent here instead?
 
 I personally would have just as little faith in Solaris run by someone
 who didn't know what they were doing as I would in Redhat run by
 someone who didn't know what they were doing.

Here, here !

 
 How about a decently built rack mount PC running Debian[1], by
 someone who actually knows how to setup that particular OS decently,
 as compared with a Sun box running Solaris setup by someone good
 with solaris?
 
 (And, myself, I'd recommend the PC for some situations, and the Solaris box
 for others).
 
 My main problem with the PC architecture is that you can do a lot by carefully
 picking a good manufacturer, but it's still fundamentally not as solid and
 consistent as sun stuff, IMHO.
 
 I imagine you could get a pc service contract on the same level as
 Sun do, but I have no experience in the area. Has anyone got any experience
 paying vast amounts of money for PC support? did you get much for your
 money?
 
 Michael
 
 [1] OS changed on the grounds I feel that Redhat ships something more
 optimised towards desktop use, whereas I feel Debian and Solaris are both
 more suited for servers.


Would this still hold for a RedDrat system with all the X stuff and
other unncessary stuff removed ?

And if not - what else do you you think is different ?

I've a small shell script that does quite a bit of rpm -e (remove) on X
stuff / other druff that redhat installs by default - it would be nice
if they included a stripped down install class in their default install
- which left you with a basic machine 

Greg



Re: Sun's Perl was Re: Application servers and e-commerce platforms

2001-01-26 Thread Greg Cope

Redvers Davies wrote:
 
  Would this still hold for a RedDrat system with all the X stuff and
  other unncessary stuff removed ?
 
 Nah, ou want slackware A, N and D... No more. 10 meg for your base
 OS, compile what you need.

Stop IT ... I am not using slackware !

Greg



Re: Sun's Perl was Re: Application servers and e-commerce platforms

2001-01-26 Thread Greg Cope

Redvers Davies wrote:
 
  Stop IT ... I am not using slackware !
 
 Ans why not??  For a server it is perfect.  Very small, very compact.
 Perfect for a secure environment.

Only joking - I'm used to redhat - I might move to Debian  who knows
?

I am quite happy with redhat / debian as I know what I am getting - I
hate solaris's lame install that means you have to install all the GNU
stuff, adjust your path, man path etc   Slackware is a middle
ground.

Greg



XP, testing and perl

2001-01-24 Thread Greg Cope

Dear All

All the posts about XP and a Slashdot article about it got me thinking
and I have a generic question for the virtual floor.

Does Anyone know of any good perl test tutorials - i.e how to make
various test suites for a perl modules "make test" target ?

I've seen the Test::Harness stuff - but am after a guide - or a few
simple examples.  All the code I read in CPAN modules t/ dir appears to
be written in any old fasion.

Clues please, otherwise I'll continue to add to the t/ dir code pool in
any old way.. ;-)

Greg



Re: Consultancy company- Where do you want to go?

2001-01-22 Thread Greg Cope

Neil Ford wrote:
 
 
 The "A-Team" - scenario is one in which a team goes in to rescue a failing
 project, or go in and retune/redesign an existing project that works but has
 become a victim of its own success.  Think of this work as bespoke
 enhancements.
 
 That just has me conjering up images of turning up at a client site
 in a big black van (screeching tyres obligatory) and either leaping
 out laptops in hand or just unrollong some CAT5 and plugging into
 their network :-)
 
 So who's bankrolling the van and who wants to be BA?

lol - monday's been c*** so far (Linx rooter down apparently - sounds
like something off an excuse sheet).

Men in black theme - we must all have black suits - dark glasses
avliable from Macy D's soon, and we can get a clapped out van from BT
for next to nothing 

Greg 


 
 Neil.
 (whose tounge is ever so slightly on his cheek!)
 --
 Neil C. Ford
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 http://www.binky.ourshack.org



Re: Perl/MySQL based forums

2001-01-21 Thread Greg Cope

Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 
 Michael Stevens [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
  On Sun, Jan 21, 2001 at 01:33:09PM +, Greg McCarroll wrote:
   * Dave Hodgkinson ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
No, I'm not going to code a forum package by hand.
   go on dave, it cant be that hard 
 
  Having done it a few times, it *isn't* that hard...
 
 I'm playing with mwforum right now. Seems OK.

I've a site in production that uses this - works fine.

Greg


 
 --
 Dave Hodgkinson, http://www.hodgkinson.org
 Editor-in-chief, The Highway Star   http://www.deep-purple.com
   Apache, mod_perl, MySQL, Sybase hired gun for, well, hire
   -



Re: TPC5

2001-01-21 Thread Greg Cope

Jonathan Stowe wrote:
 
 On Sun, 21 Jan 2001, Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 
If you're prepared to consider locations a little out of
   central London
there are lots of large hotels around Heathrow that have
   sizeable conference
type facilities (also handy for the airport!).
  
   FWIW, I know my mother has booked some largish meetings outside of
   London.  Of course, I don't remember offhand how large, or, for that
   matter, what kind of numbers you're looking at.
 
  Go to Brighton. It's nicer than London, on the sea, easy to get to from
  Gatwick, and has more pubs per head of population than any other town in
  Britain (I think, or maybe it was more pubs per square mile). It has
  conference facilities for all sizes (although I've no idea how booked up
  they get). And it's 55 minutes from London by train.
 
 
 And its handy for me.
 

And me ;-)

Greg


 /J\
 --
 Jonathan Stowe   |
 http://www.gellyfish.com |   I'm with Grep on this one
 http://www.tackleway.co.uk   |



Re: TPC5

2001-01-21 Thread Greg Cope

Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 
 Greg Cope [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
  The Beach.
 
 For some values of beach not including sand.
 

Don't start that argument.

I spend many an hour - recently opcodes clicked whilst on the beach  -
and watching three nutters go for a swim !

Greg


 --
 Dave Hodgkinson, http://www.hodgkinson.org
 Editor-in-chief, The Highway Star   http://www.deep-purple.com
   Apache, mod_perl, MySQL, Sybase hired gun for, well, hire
   -



Re: TPC5

2001-01-21 Thread Greg Cope

Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 
   If you're prepared to consider locations a little out of
  central London
   there are lots of large hotels around Heathrow that have
  sizeable conference
   type facilities (also handy for the airport!).
 
  FWIW, I know my mother has booked some largish meetings outside of
  London.  Of course, I don't remember offhand how large, or, for that
  matter, what kind of numbers you're looking at.
 
 Go to Brighton. It's nicer than London, on the sea, easy to get to from
 Gatwick, and has more pubs per head of population than any other town in
 Britain (I think, or maybe it was more pubs per square mile). It has
 conference facilities for all sizes (although I've no idea how booked up
 they get). And it's 55 minutes from London by train.

47 mins actually - although this time is now theoretical due to the
train problems.

Also brighton has a very / extremely high number of places to eat
(cafe||restaurants).

Only 25 mins from the secound biggest airport in the UK, which is nearer
than London.

Greg



Re: TPC5

2001-01-21 Thread Greg Cope

Greg McCarroll wrote:
 
 * Greg Cope ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
  Andrew Bowman wrote:
  
   From: "Nathan Torkington" [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Timing in London is hard, because there aren't very many hotels
capable of supporting such an event.  It's quite amazing to us, in
fact, how difficult it has been to find a place to hold it in London.
  
   What sort of numbers are we talking about then?
  
   If you're prepared to consider locations a little out of central London
   there are lots of large hotels around Heathrow that have sizeable conference
   type facilities (also handy for the airport!).
 
  What about Brighton ;-)
 
 
 potential london clients will be put off dealing with a company not in london
 

Have you heard of Victoria Real - the people behind amonst other things
big browers website ?

I think Location in this day an age is a little irrelivant.  The choice
will be made on quality of service - not where the office is based. 
Although I agree that some people may be a little biased.

The south coast has a very high number of nu media companies - and
apparently Worthing is the most profitable town / area in the UK.

It is often easier to get to some London Locations from Brighton than it
is from London.

 i was thinking about consultancies, and there are really two types and
 two types of person who want to be create each type. and those two types
 can be summarised as the two Steves, the question is what are people trying
 to do - create a Jobs or a Wozniak consultancy?

You've lost me there ?

 
 --
 Greg McCarroll  http://www.mccarroll.uklinux.net



Re: Consultancy company

2001-01-20 Thread Greg Cope

Piers Cawley wrote:
 
 Greg Cope [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
  David Cantrell wrote:
  
 
  That should read there's too many distractions at home for me  (or
  you as the case may be).
 
  I am about 150% more productive at home - 25 % because I save the
  journey, and the other 25% due to not having to go to meetings /
  going for long lunches / the chat that turns into a tangenical
  discussion on XZY / some Luser or PBH asking a stupid question that
  they could have worked out themselves if I was not there / insert
  any other activity that takes me away from the task in hand.
 
 The vision I have is of a team (or teams) working in *our* premises,
 with customers working with us. We avoid pointless meetings. The
 customer is there because they know what we're supposed to be doing
 for them, and they know what's important. When you're only working a
 35 hour week (40 tops...) then you should have enough free time
 outside work that there's less inclination to piss off for a long
 lunch. And the whole point about setting this up is to get rid of the
 PHB.
 
  Sorry the above turned into a rant, I just get a bit pissed off with
  closed minds that assume that having people in an office =
  productivity.
 
 *Ahem*. Were I to be the sort of person who takes things personally,
 I'd take that personally. Or something.
 
 Seriously, I tried working from home when the trains were up the
 spout, and for a couple or three days it was great. However, one or
 two points.
 
 1. As a sole developer, working from home is/can be good, especially
when your head is down and you're turning out the code for a
particular bit. But working from home means you're away from the
customer, and the customer is the only person who can make business
decisions about what your code is supposed to be doing.

I've never said that I do not meet customers on a face to face basis
arround once a week.

Working as I do means that the customer and I focus on the specs, and
iterative developement - as they need to be clear that I know what I am
supposed to do.

 
 2. You are away from the team. Again, sole developer, this is not a
problem. Consultancy where we're supposed to be doing the synergy
thing, not quite so good. Time you spend away is time in which you
aren't plugged into what's happening and (and this is *really*
important), time spent away is time in which you aren't doing the
mentor thing. I strongly believe that, in a joint consultancy deal,
it is *really* important that gurus help to enlighten students,
otherwise how do we get our partners up to speed so we can go out
and get more fun work and make more fun money?

Agreed that if you need to teach - guru and student need to be in the
same place.

 
 3. Every time I need to ask you something and you're not there and I
have to phone you, there's a chance I'll think 'ah fuck it' and not
bother. And there's a chance that that will be a *really* bad idea.

But if you are confortable phoneing (|emailing|irc) me then you would -
as that is how we would need to comunicate.  I've wasted so much time
being in an office being asked and asking lame questions just because I
am next to someone. 

I have much less distractions at home.

 
 I'm not saying that offices (especially client offices) don't suck.
 But they don't have to. If we're going to do this, lets do it right.
 
 Now, I freely admit that I have partaken of the Extreme Programming
 Kool-Aid, and dammit I want to do it. But dammit again, it makes
 *sense*. Also bear in mind that when I made the decision (having tried
 it) that I'd rather commute in and be near the customer rather than
 work from home (in my *very* comfortable home office...) that meant
 adding another 4 hours (count 'em) of travelling time to my day. If
 I work from home I work too long. If work too long my code starts to
 suck. If my code starts to suck I get embarrassed and my reputation
 starts to slip. I want to work with copilots. I want to be able to
 *have* that tangential conversation that'll turn out to be useful in
 six months time. And table football's no fun if you're playing with
 yourself.
 
  Yes there are advantages to working in an office - i.e the team can
  be greater than the sum of its parts.
 
 This is *so* important.
 
  But working from elsewhere also allows idividuals to be productive -
  often alot more.
 
 How are you measuring productivity?
 

An assumption on real hours worked - i.e when I was in London I was ever
working more than about 6 hours a day (on a long day) due to lost time
... At home I regualarly hit 6 hours on a day that is 4 hours shorter. 
I have not measured this as their is no use benchmark qw(:gregs_time);

  Why not combine the two - i.e have a day a week where everyone meets to
  brainstorm / ask questions / do what needs to be done to take advantage
  of a group.
 
 Because groups don't work like that. All of a sudden I'm taking notes.
 And trying

Re: Consultancy company was [Job] BOFH wanted was: Re: Red Hat worm discovered

2001-01-19 Thread Greg Cope

Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 
 Greg Cope [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
  Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
  
   "Paul Makepeace" [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
  
The US has much more to worry about than the UK, like high water tables,
vicious weather and earthquakes. The smart money goes on hosting in Texas
(San Antonio) not California though -- relatively
earthquake/tornado/storm/etc-free!
  
   You're talking rackspace.com, I take it? ;-)
 
  Are they not in New York ?
 
 No. San Antonio if traceroutes are to be believed.

I'll shut up then ;-0

 
 
  Dellhost are in texas - which I destest due to its attitude to capital
  P.
 
 You not been following the Confederacy conspiracy?
 

No - just dont like the gun ho lets fry anyone on deathrow - and now a a
great chestnut one of them got to be president ...

  What like americans ?
 
  (present american company excluded)
 
 No, cable installation "engineers". All cable company phone
 support/accounts.
 

Luckily I've not suffered from those.

Greg

 --
 Dave Hodgkinson, http://www.hodgkinson.org
 Editor-in-chief, The Highway Star   http://www.deep-purple.com
   Apache, mod_perl, MySQL, Sybase hired gun for, well, hire
   -



Re: What's a perl person then?

2001-01-19 Thread Greg Cope

Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 
 Got this through the email. Where do Perl people fit in?
 
 Unix person:  So then he tried to su to chroot, but of course the crontab
 wasn't even mounted because there were four spaces instead of a tab in the
 getty sed awk ^] sh ksh zsh   | and that's why we're getting another
 three E45000s to run it on.
 Other unix person:  haw haw haw!  Computing is truly an art.
 
 Windows Person:  We spent 50 hours optimizing the drawing routine so as to
 produce proper antialiasing even on strange hardware, but in the end we
 couldn't roll it out because none of the sysadmins knows how to.
 Other windows person:  oh well.
 
 Java person:  We spent 3000 hours optimizing the drawing until finally it
 could run on a pentium II.  Now we just have to make sure the users have
 I.E.4.8 with the JDK1.3.1 plugin, J3D 2.x, and at least DBTools 2.2 or
 above, and the correct classpath, and odbc settings, and one of the default
 fonts that actually works.  If not, our six months of work will be
 completely wasted.
 Other java person:  Failure is impossible.  We will prevail.  Setbacks are
 irrelevant.  The fools just don't understand that this is JAVA.

perl person:  Hacked a drawing program in 2 hours.
other person:  That long, oh dear ..

Greg

 
 
 Jonathan PetersonIdeas Hub Ltd
 (t) +44 (0)20 7487 1310
 www.ideashub.com



Re: Consultancy company

2001-01-19 Thread Greg Cope

Andy Wardley wrote:
 
 On Jan 18,  4:28pm, Leo Lapworth wrote:
  Ok, it's all a pipedream.. but what a nice one.
 
 It sounds like an excellent idea.  In fact, I've even got as far as
 writing a (fledgling) business plan for such a venture based around
 Template Toolkit-ish web development, support and consultancy.  It's
 something that Simon Matthews and I have been talking about for a couple
 of years, but never really quite got around to taking the plunge.  I
 was about to jump but work related improvments of the last few
 weeks have pushed it back onto the back burner.
 
 Now, what would it take to convince you that there are nicer places to
 work than central London?  Guildford, for example, is quite wonderful
 and only a train ride away from the smoke... :-)=

Agreed - why work in London - what about telecommuters ?

i.e I want to stay communtin to my desk - all 3 meters of it (the
commute - I live in a small flat)

 
 On the matter of funding, I have a friend who works for Goldman Sachs
 who offered to put me in touch with VC somewhere in the range of 2 - 10m.
 No favours, no guarantees, but at least a foot in the door and the offer
 of waving a business plan under the noses of the right kind of people.
 Of course, you might argue that GS != Right Kind of People  :-)
 
 But like others, I'm not convinced that VC is the way to go unless you
 really have to.  Having said that, if you want to start big and grow
 big quickly, I can't see a way to do that without significant moolah up
 front.  Maybe that means "really have to"?

Why need a VC's money for a consultancy - shurely most people involved
will have all the required kit (PC's / laptops) and all that may be
required is a small office.

A Consultantcy can raise cash quick via charging monthly like anyone
else - ok not everyone pays on time, but if a few do then thats cash in
the bank (especially as you pay everyone else at the end of the month.)

 
 One consideration worth playing on is that good Perl people are hard
 to come by.  As a scarce resource, we might be able to convince backers
 that a solid collection of guru and demi-guru level Perl people represents
 a mighty design/development/consultancy force which could quickly corner
 a large chunk of the market.
 
 I'd love to come to the meeting and hear the ideas, but I've done my
 trip to London for this month :-)

I've been 5 times this week - that's nearly my years quota !

Greg

 
 A
 
 Pipe dreamer.
 
 --
 Andy Wardley [EMAIL PROTECTED]   Signature regenerating.  Please remain seated.
  [EMAIL PROTECTED]   For a good time: http://www.kfs.org/~abw/



Re: Consultancy company

2001-01-19 Thread Greg Cope

Piers Cawley wrote:
 
 Greg Cope [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
  Andy Wardley wrote:
  
   On Jan 18,  4:28pm, Leo Lapworth wrote:
Ok, it's all a pipedream.. but what a nice one.
  
   It sounds like an excellent idea.  In fact, I've even got as far as
   writing a (fledgling) business plan for such a venture based around
   Template Toolkit-ish web development, support and consultancy.  It's
   something that Simon Matthews and I have been talking about for a couple
   of years, but never really quite got around to taking the plunge.  I
   was about to jump but work related improvments of the last few
   weeks have pushed it back onto the back burner.
  
   Now, what would it take to convince you that there are nicer places to
   work than central London?  Guildford, for example, is quite wonderful
   and only a train ride away from the smoke... :-)=
 
  Agreed - why work in London - what about telecommuters ?
 
  i.e I want to stay communtin to my desk - all 3 meters of it (the
  commute - I live in a small flat)
 
 I'm *really* unsure about telecommuting. Seems to me that the way to
 really build a team (especially when doing serious development) is to
 have people in the same room; that way you get people who know the
 answers immediately on tap and able to overhear other discussions and
 contribute as appropriate. Whilst I love the journey to work in the
 home office I don't like the rest of the office conditions. Having
 people there is important.

I can understand the idea of building a team, but I think I am more
productive here, than in an office where I am nearly constantly
interupted.  Also not being able to ask a question of the person next
door, means I go look for the answer - and the person next door can get
on with it.

MySQL AB is a example of a company that is developeing a "product" in a
virtual sense - why not try and develope a virtual company ?

 
 And I like central London because (whatever else is wrong with it)
 it's relatively easy for everyone to get to by train no matter where
 they live. Trekking out to (for example) Guildford wouldn't be good
 for me.

But is treking into insert that good to working from home ?  ADSL is
cheap and working from home can be supprisingly productive.

Greg

who has so little work may have to commute to London every day ;-(

 
 --
 Piers



Re: Consultancy company

2001-01-19 Thread Greg Cope

Piers Cawley wrote:
 
 Greg Cope [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
  Piers Cawley wrote:
  
   Greg Cope [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
  
Andy Wardley wrote:

 On Jan 18,  4:28pm, Leo Lapworth wrote:
  Ok, it's all a pipedream.. but what a nice one.

 It sounds like an excellent idea.  In fact, I've even got as far as
 writing a (fledgling) business plan for such a venture based around
 Template Toolkit-ish web development, support and consultancy.  It's
 something that Simon Matthews and I have been talking about for a couple
 of years, but never really quite got around to taking the plunge.  I
 was about to jump but work related improvments of the last few
 weeks have pushed it back onto the back burner.

 Now, what would it take to convince you that there are nicer places to
 work than central London?  Guildford, for example, is quite wonderful
 and only a train ride away from the smoke... :-)=
   
Agreed - why work in London - what about telecommuters ?
   
i.e I want to stay communtin to my desk - all 3 meters of it (the
commute - I live in a small flat)
  
   I'm *really* unsure about telecommuting. Seems to me that the way to
   really build a team (especially when doing serious development) is to
   have people in the same room; that way you get people who know the
   answers immediately on tap and able to overhear other discussions and
   contribute as appropriate. Whilst I love the journey to work in the
   home office I don't like the rest of the office conditions. Having
   people there is important.
 
  I can understand the idea of building a team, but I think I am more
  productive here, than in an office where I am nearly constantly
  interupted. Also not being able to ask a question of the person next
  door, means I go look for the answer - and the person next door can
  get on with it.
 
 Hmm... Have you looked at the XP books?
 

XP ?

  MySQL AB is a example of a company that is developeing a "product" in a
  virtual sense - why not try and develope a virtual company ?
 
 Well, clients probably like offices. Admittedly not necessarily a
 *good* argument.
 

Ah well there I agree - a posh office creates an impression that alot of
big clients (read high revenue clients), find appealing. 

I've not argued against an office - just the idea that everyone has to
be in it all the time !

 
  
   And I like central London because (whatever else is wrong with it)
   it's relatively easy for everyone to get to by train no matter where
   they live. Trekking out to (for example) Guildford wouldn't be good
   for me.
 
  But is treking into insert that good to working from home ?  ADSL is
  cheap and working from home can be supprisingly productive.
 
 Where it's available. That would be 'not from my exchange in the
 forseeable future...'

Ah well, I want to move to Cornwall which will not get adsl for another
few years ;-(

Greg



Re: Consultancy company

2001-01-19 Thread Greg Cope

David Cantrell wrote:
 
 On Fri, Jan 19, 2001 at 05:04:54PM +, Piers Cawley wrote:
 
  I'm *really* unsure about telecommuting. Seems to me that the way to
  really build a team (especially when doing serious development) is to
  have people in the same room;
 
 Plus there's too many distractions at home.  Even if you live on your own.
 It's great to have the capability - for those evening brainwaves, or if
 you're ill - but doing it every day just doesn't work, at least for me.
 

That should read there's too many distractions at home for me  (or
you as the case may be).

I am about 150% more productive at home - 25 % because I save the
journey, and the other 25% due to not having to go to meetings / going
for long lunches / the chat that turns into a tangenical discussion on
XZY / some Luser or PBH asking a stupid question that they could have
worked out themselves if I was not there / insert any other activity
that takes me away from the task in hand.

Sorry the above turned into a rant, I just get a bit pissed off with
closed minds that assume that having people in an office = productivity.

Yes there are advantages to working in an office - i.e the team can be
greater than the sum of its parts.

But working from elsewhere also allows idividuals to be productive -
often alot more.

Why not combine the two - i.e have a day a week where everyone meets to
brainstorm / ask questions / do what needs to be done to take advantage
of a group.

Rant over.

Greg

  And I like central London because (whatever else is wrong with it)
  it's relatively easy for everyone to get to by train no matter where
  they live. Trekking out to (for example) Guildford wouldn't be good
  for me.
 
 Yeah.  What he said.
 
 --
 David Cantrell | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/
 
Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced



Re: Consultancy company was [Job] BOFH wanted was: Re: Red Hat worm discovered

2001-01-18 Thread Greg Cope

Leo Lapworth wrote:
 
 
 Location
 A big pub in central London.
 Top floors: development
 Ground floor Pub: with comedy stand and terminal points for laptops
 Basement: disco / conference room, big flat screens etc..

What about a bed / kip room and of course a play room - and I do not
mean some 70's swingers thing - a P2, etc ... 

Greg

a contractor in a "quite period"

 I've got a contact who says he can get hold of a million or
 so VC if this was an actually business plan, but then you
 have to pay them back with interest and stuff.
 
 Ok, it's all a pipedream.. but what a nice one.
 
 Leo



Re: Consultancy company was [Job] BOFH wanted was: Re: Red Hat worm discovered

2001-01-18 Thread Greg Cope

Greg McCarroll wrote:
 
 * Greg Cope ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
  Leo Lapworth wrote:
  
  
   Location
   A big pub in central London.
   Top floors: development
   Ground floor Pub: with comedy stand and terminal points for laptops
   Basement: disco / conference room, big flat screens etc..
 
  What about a bed / kip room and of course a play room - and I do not
  mean some 70's swingers thing - a P2, etc ...
 
 
 nope, they are rewards, rewards are for sucess ;-)

Thats were a few people have gone wrong lately then ;-)

 
 --
 Greg McCarroll  http://www.mccarroll.uklinux.net



Re: Consultancy company was [Job] BOFH wanted was: Re: Red Hat worm discovered

2001-01-18 Thread Greg Cope

David Cantrell wrote:
 
 On Thu, Jan 18, 2001 at 04:51:18PM +, Greg Cope wrote:
 
  What about a bed / kip room and of course a play room - and I do not
  mean some 70's swingers thing - a P2, etc ...
 
 Having something to crash on when pulling an all-nighter is, IMO, a bad
 idea as it encourages pulling all-nighters.  You just don't write good
 code at 2 in the morning, and end up spending just as much time untangling
 it as you did writing it in the first place.  And in any case, if you
 *need* to work all night, there's something wrong with the project
 management.  Oh yeah, we'd need to have project management skillz in the
 group too.  No need for a whole project mangler though to start with.

I was thinking of my mid afternoon kip, before going down stairs to the
pub!  I was only joking ;-)

Totaly agree with the all nighter bit above.

 
 As for toys - if they're not the *useful* sort of toy then they should be
 rewards*, as opposed to being there right from the start.  That way they
 become a motivational tool.  Although to be honest, I wouldn't be motivated
 by lots of the things numija companies think are motivating like PS2s.
 I'd be more for getting a bigger monitor on my workstation, or a punchbag
 for the office.  Or some clean jerrycans :-)
 
 * - eg, when the first big fat cheque arrives from a happy client, get
 a PS 2.  When we hit milestones *on time* in the next project, get another
 game for it.

Ah, now motivational thoery is totally different - a PS2 is not that
motivational for me, and I would imaging alot of people.  What _is_
probably motivational about a PS2 equiped office is the environment that
allows you to play with a PS2.

IMHO developers should be given the environment that is what makes them
confotable, an IBM research center was on the telly the other day that
had a big open plan style area, as well as individaul offices, as well
as Lego.  The environment was totally focused to nuturing developers so
that they create (hopefully good, bug-free(TM) code).

What people seem to be missing is that you need clients - once you've
got some doing the code is the easy bit.

Greg

Who could do the BOFH / security / perl bit  but does not want to
commute further than his home office

 
 --
 David Cantrell | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/
 
Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced



Re: Consultancy company was [Job] BOFH wanted was: Re: Red Hat worm discovered

2001-01-18 Thread Greg Cope

Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 
 "Paul Makepeace" [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
  The US has much more to worry about than the UK, like high water tables,
  vicious weather and earthquakes. The smart money goes on hosting in Texas
  (San Antonio) not California though -- relatively
  earthquake/tornado/storm/etc-free!
 
 You're talking rackspace.com, I take it? ;-)

Are they not in New York ?

Dellhost are in texas - which I destest due to its attitude to capital
P.

 
 
  On the upside, the US doesn't have BT "engineers" to deal with...
 
 Trust me, they have much, much worse...

What like americans ?

(present american company excluded)

Greg


 
 --
 Dave Hodgkinson, http://www.hodgkinson.org
 Editor-in-chief, The Highway Star   http://www.deep-purple.com
   Apache, mod_perl, MySQL, Sybase hired gun for, well, hire
   -



Re: Consultancy company was [Job] BOFH wanted was: Re: Red Hat worm discovered

2001-01-18 Thread Greg Cope

Robin Szemeti wrote:
 
 On Thu, 18 Jan 2001, you wrote:
 
  Having something to crash on when pulling an all-nighter is, IMO, a bad
  idea as it encourages pulling all-nighters.  You just don't write good
  code at 2 in the morning, and end up spending just as much time untangling
  it as you did writing it in the first place.
 
 yes and no. If you need to do an allnighter and its unavoidable (due to a
 client suddenly changing ther mind) then theres no problem doing it ..
 just charge em bigtime!
 
 Personally I have done (thinks) about 4 this year ... two of them due to
 sudden arrival of previously unannounced deadline .. (result: badly
 implemented crap code, stress, huge costs and a re write a week later)
 and 2 because I was just so tied up in it and it was going so well that I
 didn;t want to stop .. so I didn't ... the code from the latter is
 untouched to date and some of the better code I've written.
 
 There is nothing wrong per-se with working on into the night ... the lack
 of interruption and no pesky phones ringing can be the ideal time to
 engross yourself in the trickiest and most complex of problems ... but
 trying to hack something together whilst knackered is a recipie for
 disaster. My motto: if it feels good, do it.  Code when you feel at your
 most productive, if you don;t think your minds on the job bale out and
 play.  One of the reason I hated a 9 to 5 job was people asking me to do
 hard things before lunchtime and having to quit doing hard things because
 it was 5:00.
 
  And in any case, if you
  *need* to work all night, there's something wrong with the project
  management.
 
 no matter how well planned the project I have yet to find a client who
 hasn;t kept some small but deadly surprise as a secret to throw in just
 when they know its getting close. Some of these bombshells are smaller
 than others .. but they always seem to be there, waiting ... no problem
 .. just expect em an be prepared .. and charge em BigTime :)

Have you done much stuff under a DSDM style - ie. qrite a quick protype
and then iterate on that ? (massive internal rewrites are allowed under
this as it tries to stress the interface / functionality not the
internal implentation)

Greg

 
 I would be VERY interrested in working on a project managed by the XP
 method. It sounds to good to be true, (and I;ve done enough project
 managment to know that it probably is too good to be true) but I shure
 would like to give it a go.
 
 --
 Robin Szemeti
 
 The box said "requires windows 95 or better"
 So I installed Linux!



Re: XML::Schema, YAPC::Europe, mod_perl, Camel Visit, !RANT!

2001-01-12 Thread Greg Cope

David Hodgkinson wrote:
 
 David Cantrell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
   The Mod Perl Evangelist Site   - Dave Hodge..
 
 No. I'm writing a poor man's intro to stapling the TT into a mod_perl
 handler that will be superceded by Apache::Template when Andy finishes
 it.

What's this ?

or rather:

Is this for take23 ?
Is such a thing as Apache::Template being done or is it a pipedream [TM]
?
If Apache::Template is real - where can I find out more ?

Greg

 
 --
 Dave Hodgkinson, http://www.hodgkinson.org
 Editor-in-chief, The Highway Star   http://www.deep-purple.com
   Apache, mod_perl, MySQL, Sybase hired gun for, well, hire
   -



Re: XML::Schema, YAPC::Europe, mod_perl, Camel Visit, !RANT!

2001-01-12 Thread Greg Cope

Andy Wardley wrote:
 
 On Jan 12,  3:57pm, Greg Cope wrote:
  Is such a thing as Apache::Template being done or is it a pipedream [TM]
 
 No, it's real, just not officially finished or released.  Someone sent
 me some new code for it which I'll be intergrating and releasing in the
 next week or so.

Thanks

Look forward to it.

Greg

 
 A
 
 --
 Andy Wardley [EMAIL PROTECTED]   Signature regenerating.  Please remain seated.
  [EMAIL PROTECTED]   For a good time: http://www.kfs.org/~abw/



Re: the list is dead, long live the list

2001-01-11 Thread Greg Cope

Roger Burton West wrote:
 
 On Thu, Jan 11, 2001 at 01:11:45PM +, Peter Corlett wrote:
 
 Mmph, it's not that hard to install Majordomo is it? If need be, just give
 me the root password and I'll go and set it up...
 
 ...and once you've installed Majordomo, _everyone_ has the root
 password...
 
 (Supposedly Mjd 2 is going to be better, RSN.)
 
 Smartlist is good. Mailman is good.
 
 R

ezmlm is better

Greg



Re: me-commerce

2000-12-14 Thread Greg Cope

jo walsh wrote:
 
 desperately seeking open-source, perl ecommerce application.
 
 so far we are looking at:
 
 AllCommerce - http://www.zelerate.org (formerly OpenSales), which at a
 brief glance looks fairly complex and inflexible...
 
 InterChange (formerly MiniVend) http://developer.akopia.com, which is
 CPANned (Bundle::Interchange) and seems a little nicer...

IMHO this is the best - thou I trailed it for a project that never
happened (or rather it changed into a PHP project ...).

This is the most complex - and is quite nift - the developer support is
excellent (Mike Heims Minivend author is on their developer mailing list
quite a lot).

Possibly better for big projects - and possibly overkill for small ones
- depends on what you want ...
 
 also found Symphero http://www.symphero.net and Apache::iNcom
 http://indev.insu.com/iNcom/incom.html on freshmeat.
 
 if anyone's used any of these packages, and can recommend /
 ring alarm bells, i would be overjoyed to hear about it.
 
 our requirements:
 - clean, extensible API

you can code your own subroutines (in perl) - so you could in theor do
quite alot.

 - support for multiple vendors

From which POV - vendor as a catelogue of goods to sell then yes, you
can run many shops under interchange.

 - support for multiple transaction handlers (iPin, DataCash)

Again yes - although you may have to write your own interface.

 - all yer standard shopping basket type stuff

yup.

 - as little wheel-inventing as possible

The only things you need to do is get your head round it as its faily
complex (interchange that is).

Hence intergration may be an issue - but I think the time is worth it
due to its extensibility.

Like anything the more time you invest the more you are likely to get in
return.

 is all this just some pleasant fairyland dream?

Well crimbo is comeing and Father Christmass may help you along ;-).

Greg

ps I've no connection with Interchange / Akopia - just think Interchange
one of the better cart systems.

 
 hmm... are the blackstar boys gettign anywhere with CPANning their system,
 i wonder...?
 
 any advice apprec,
 
 jo