Re: Maths Problem

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

Chris Benson wrote:
 Mmmm, so if there are 3 water lilies with circular leaves, what
  is the largest they can grow on the surface of a sphere without
 overlap? On a circle it's easy to see it's just less than the
 radius of the circle.  Not so easy with a sphere.

Well, first off, the circles won't be circles as we know them since
they're not 2D circles but have a 3D component (or they wouldn't be on the
surface of the sphere but rather cutting a slice through it).

However, I'd imagine that with three such bulgy circles, the best you can do
is space them equally around the equator.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: early peek at a bit of fun

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

Dave Cross wrote:
 On Fri, Jun 15, 2001 at 11:53:30PM +0200, Paul Johnson 
 ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
  I'll have to be an honourary member since I'm in Switzerland
  at the moment
 
 That's just down the road in comparison to some of the people that 
 consider themselves members of london.pm :)

Who holds the distance record? dha, presumably?

(I suppose Simon Cozens had him beat while he was in Japan, but was he part
of London.pm then? I think he is now.)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: early peek at a bit of fun

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

Greg McCarroll wrote:
 I was just playing around and wrote 
 
   http://217.34.97.146/~gem/perl/lpm_cpan_lb.cgi

Internal Server Error

The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable
to complete your request.

Please contact the server administrator, [EMAIL PROTECTED] and inform
them of the time the error
occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.


Apache/1.3.14 Server at 217.34.97.146 Port 80


(Oh, and I don't think [EMAIL PROTECTED] is a valid address
according to RFC 2?822. Bad Apache.)

Cheers,
Phi I got a '500 Server Error'. What's wrong with my script? lip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: early peek at a bit of fun

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

Greg McCarroll wrote:
 I'll cleanup/optimize/add error checking tommorow. but 
 i thought i'd let you see it tonight for fun and 
 advance warning.

And remove the trailing comma? (Perhaps use 'join' rather than 'map $_,'
or whatever?)

 If i haven't got your CPAN id included in the list at the
 bottom please email me off list, i just skipped through
 the who's who very quickly getting a decent list of people
 who looked london.pm-ish to test it.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Government Websites

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

Leo Lapworth wrote:
 2) Oh, yea, make your designers code and your coders design, 
that'll make for a good site - honest.

Though if the designers have some idea of what is and what isn't
possible/easy to implement, maybe we wouldn't have so many image roll-overs,
blank one-pixel GIFs, tables within tables withing tables, etc.

 3) see the web through users' eyes - easy, they can't all 
see it - does that mean you don't have to do anything ?

Users will say: I don't have Flash and don't want to download it.
Therefore, I should leave out the Flash bits of the site. Users will say: I
read that JavaScript can expose security holes, so I'll turn it off.
Therefore, I will make all my navigation work without JavaScript turned on.

Sounds like a good idea to me so far.

Cheers,
philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: YAPC::Europe

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

Simon Wistow wrote:
[Rotterdam]
 There are flights to Amsterdam from there but they're about 
 120 quid :(

So take the train? Only takes an hour with the IC, and it's probably cheaper
than flying on such a short distance.

You can even go straight to Diemen Zuid if you're going to the conference
first (and it's closer to the hotel as well); change at Leiden Centraal or
at Schiphol(Airport). Still only 1:02 or 1:12, depending on your connection.
(Although you'd have to get to Rotterdam Centraal from the airport, I
admit.)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Government Websites

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

Roger Burton West wrote:
 Users will say: Ooh! Shiny!.

You need to get some better users.

Cheers,
philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: e-smith

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

David Cantrell wrote:
 On Mon, Jun 18, 2001 at 12:12:33PM +0100, Cross David - dcross wrote:
 
  Tangentially on-topic for this list because of skud's involvement...
 
 What is this 'topic' of which you speak?

Something matching /^[fyreub ]+\z/i, I think.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: early peek at a bit of fun

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

Paul Makepeace wrote:
 On Mon, Jun 18, 2001 at 08:33:11AM +0200, Philip Newton wrote:
  Who holds the distance record? dha, presumably?
 
 Me  Andy M. probably, living on the left coast.

You forgot Damian (as had I).

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Templating Solutions

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

Simon Wilcox wrote:
 I avoided HTML::Embperl, HTML::Mason  Apache::ASP because they all
 embed perl into the template which is a Bad Thing (tm).

Why is that so evil?

I'm willing to be enlightened here.

Cheers,
Philip
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Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Templating Solutions

2001-06-18 Thread Philip Newton

Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
 It is possible to write embedded perl templates well, but a
 lot more difficult than if they are separated out.

How does non-embedded Perl look like, then?

Is Perl the outside layer and basically does '#include navbar.html' at
certain points?

Or is HTML the outside layer and does something like % require
read-database.pl; read; %?

Or what does it look like if they're *not* in the same file?

I have next to no experience with separated code and data (yes, my SQL
statements are also in my Perl source files); I've written toy CGI scripts
(HTML embedded in Perl) and my day job at the moment includes StoryServer
(Tcl embedded in HTML), so I don't think I have much idea of how something
else would work.

Explanations welcome.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: checking your CPAN modules are up to date?

2001-06-17 Thread Philip Newton

Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 Nope. It was much easier than that. It just iterated down the
 installed modules and checked them.

ppm verify [--upgrade] :)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Tie::Hash::Transactional

2001-06-14 Thread Philip Newton

David Cantrell wrote:
 It was disgustingly easy to write

Yeah, awful language this Perl. Makes things much too easy.

I hope our bosses never find out that things take a fraction of the time
they would with other languages :-)

Cheers,
Philip
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Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: *Buffy's Not Included

2001-06-14 Thread Philip Newton

Roger Burton West wrote:
 DBD::CSV is your friend.

I second that. DBD::CSV is yum. Also handles escaping of double quotes or
commas when inserting strings, etc.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Y::E accomodation

2001-06-14 Thread Philip Newton

Redvers Davies wrote:
 The Bilderberg Garden Hotel.  lastmin.com do bookings for it.

Wow. Either you have more money than you know what to do with or your
company allows for higher expenses than mine. www.lastminute.com says GBP
82.90 - GBP 126.46; my company guidelines say (for German hotels) DEM 140 -
DEM170, or ca. GBP 40 - GBP 55 (guessed). And it seems to be a 5* hotel.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: www.gateway.gov.uk

2001-06-12 Thread Philip Newton

This in the Opera (browser) Newsletter I received yesterday:

 
 * Opera challenges UK govt to support standards *
 
 
 The British government's prestigious gateway 
 http://www.gateway.gov.uk/ security system only lets users 
 perform transactions when using IE. Opera challenges the 
 UK government to support World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
 standards and let British citizens enjoy full access to the
 Web from different browsers, platforms and devices.
 
 In the future, British users might even find that they 
 can't access the gateway, because wireless devices' 
 manufacturers increasingly are choosing other browsers than 
 IE. The British wireless consortium Symbian is an example 
 of a future leading platform not running IE.
 
 Opera's CTO, Håkon Lie, is currently in contact with the 
 assistant to UK's e-envoy, Andrew Pinder. Pinder's office 
 is responsible for the commissioning of the site, 
 gateway.gov.uk.
 
 Read the story in The Register:
 http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/4/19275.html

I don't know whether that link was the one quoted previously.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Obnoxious sigs (was Re: www.gateway.gov.uk)

2001-06-12 Thread Philip Newton

Robert Thompson wrote:
 I apologise profusely

Sorry, you'll have to give me a hardcopy version of that before I'll believe
you:

 E-mail transmission cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error-free
 as information could be intercepted, corrupted, lost, destroyed, 
 arrive late or incomplete, or contain viruses. The sender therefore
 does not accept liability for any errors or omissions in the contents
 of this message which arise as a result of e-mail transmission. If
 verification is required please request a hard-copy version. 

Your apology might otherwise be construed to be the figment of some
mailer-daemon's imagination :-)

(Oh, no! I just quoted Robert Thompson! Doesn't that contravene

 If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate,
 distribute or copy this e-mail.

since the message was addressed to '[EMAIL PROTECTED]' and not to
me?)

Hm, perhaps I'll use the company semi-official sig for a change. (The
official one specifies which fonts[1] and sizes to use, but I can't do that
in plain text email, so I don't bother.) No ugly disclaimers in that, thank
goodness, but no proper sig delimiter, either.

[1] That explains the long lines of dashes; they're supposed to align with
the longest line of text *on the print-out*, and are based on sending HTML
or Rich Text email in Arial, not a fixed-width font such as I use to compose
my messages.

Cheers,

Philip Newton

--
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a gedas company
Cuxhavener Straße 36, D-21149 Hamburg
Telefon/phone   +49-40-797 007-37
Telefax/telefax +49-40-797 007-10
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Re: [Possible Job] Perl, Linux

2001-06-11 Thread Philip Newton

Piers Cawley wrote:
 I don't know about you, but I'm *definitely* fat.

4XL, innit? (Remembering you at yapc::Europe:19100 at the T-shirt stand,
wondering whether even to bother looking at them.)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Religion (was Re: M$ SQueaLServer)

2001-06-11 Thread Philip Newton

Greg McCarroll wrote:
 * Philip Newton ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
  AFAIK Samba implements the SMB protocol, which is the
  native resource (file, printer, ...) sharing protocol of 
  Windows. So if you have Windows, you've already got an SMB
  client and server running.
 
 for the same reasons people install apache on windows when 
 they already have personal web server running ;-)

Well, PWS isn't part of the operating system. (Let's not talk about MSIE in
this context.) Compare it, maybe, to NFS under Unix which is sometimes in
the kernel -- why run usermode NFS ported from somewhere else if the kernel
speaks it already?

Cheers,
philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Some pretty pictures ...

2001-06-11 Thread Philip Newton

Piers Cawley wrote:
 http://www.iterative-software.com/~pdcawley/acme.png

For some reason, that reminded me of tchrist, especially the region around
the mouth and chin.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Upcoming technical meeting

2001-06-11 Thread Philip Newton

Leon Brocard wrote:
 Registration might happen pretty soon too.

Ooh, goody. People at work (who fortunately will be paying for me to go to
yapc::Europe again this year) have said they'll want to start to get down
details. Probably better to book hotel, travel, etc. *after* I register for
the conference, or I might end up travelling to AMS for nothing.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Some pretty pictures ...

2001-06-11 Thread Philip Newton

[Hey, where did your attributions go? Mailer-daemon ate them?]

Matthew Jones wrote:
  For some reason, that reminded me of tchrist, especially the 
 ---^^^
 
 Is that Northern for Jesus?

What's Northern? Northern English?

Anyway, it's Unix-login-ese for Tom Christiansen, whom you may have heard
of in the context of Perl ;-).

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Religion (was Re: M$ SQueaLServer)

2001-06-08 Thread Philip Newton

Greg McCarroll wrote on Freitag, 8. Juni 2001 11:11
   And some pieces of software just wont be able to be plugged
   in - why can't i run Samba on Windows?

Why would you want to? AFAIK Samba implements the SMB protocol, which is the
native resource (file, printer, ...) sharing protocol of Windows. So if you
have Windows, you've already got an SMB client and server running.

Sounds a bit like How can I port MKS's korn shell to Unix? Is it
possible?. Well, maybe the analogy is not so hot, but it's the best I can
think of.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Religion

2001-06-08 Thread Philip Newton

Robin Szemeti wrote:
[google]
 seems able to find the *right* thing .. many many times the thing
 I want is in the no1 spot

Yes. google++, definitely.

Its success is probably partly because it looks at how many links point to
the page. If lots of people link to site X, then site X is probably (a)
really great and trusted by lots of people, or (b) really bad but lots of
people think it's great (M*tt's Scr*pt *rch*v*), so it'll show up further
up.

Which reminds me of something I read in the PuTTY FAQ:

 Question: Would you like me to register you a snappier domain
 name? The PuTTY web page is hard to find.
 Answer: No, it isn't. You type putty into Google and it's the
 very first thing that comes back.

How true.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: London.pm posting stats

2001-06-08 Thread Philip Newton

Paul Makepeace wrote on Donnerstag, 7. Juni 2001 13:27:
   Greg McCarroll: 1546
**
   Dave Cross:  762 
   Jonathan Stowe:  729 ***
Robin Szemeti:  586 **
   David Cantrell:  563 **
   Paul Makepeace:  504 
 Leon Brocard:  459 **
 Piers Cawley:  378 
   David H. Adler:  365 ***
 Simon Wistow:  355 ***
Philip Newton:  331 **

Well, I just barely missed being in the Top 10... I didn't think I wrote
*that* much. Horrors.

Oh well, life goes on. And sometimes life includes coming into work on my
last day of holidays because I just *know* london-list will have tons of
messages waiting for me and I don't want to talk half a day on my first day
back to work to sort through them. Well, it was only 683 IIRC (after 2.5
weeks), but still.

 PS The ratty bit of code, should anyone wish to automate this, that
produces this is:
 
 cat $* | formail +1 -x From: -ds | perl -lne 
 's-\\?--g;s/(\w+), ([\w\s]+\w)/$2 $1/;/^ (\w.*) / and 
 $p{$1}++; END {printf %20s: %4d\n,$p,$n while ($p,$n) = 
 each %p}' | sort -t : -k 2,2rn | head -40 | perl -lpe 
 's-(\d+)$-$1 .*x($1*($s||=50/$1))-e'

Any chance of arm-wrestling Greg Bacon's News::Scan into producing stats
from an mbox?

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Inline::PERL

2001-06-08 Thread Philip Newton

Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 Oh, and I think the thing about readdir returning the first 
 entry of an array in scalar context is dumb. That isn't DWIM.
 Returning the number of entries in the directory would be
 about a million times more sensible (especially if it didn't
 count . and .. as entries).

Next you'll be saying that  in scalar context should return the number of
lines in the file.

Cheers,
Phi while($file = readdir BLA) { process($file) } lip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: new york

2001-05-23 Thread Philip Newton

Greg McCarroll wrote:
 Well back from sunny NY to good old London and what do i have
 waiting for me, thats right 200+ messages in London.pm! Hurrah!

That was an awfully quick flight if it got you there and back in under eight
hours (judging from the number of messages you say you had in your inbox
afterwards) :)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Election Manifestos

2001-05-23 Thread Philip Newton

Simon Wistow wrote:
 the DBI abstraction was, well, nonexistent.

As in, if your script has lots of calls to mysql_this and mysql_that, it
doesn't look very database independent.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: MIME stuff - Am I missing something?

2001-05-22 Thread Philip Newton

Robert Thompson wrote:
 This site contains info about the raw file formats of numerous graphic
 types, including sig/header block formats.

And there's always http://www.wotsit.org/ The Programmer's File Format
Collection.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Happy Happy Joy Joy!

2001-05-22 Thread Philip Newton

David H. Adler wrote:
 dha, who thinks the overseas copies got somehow shipped before the
 domestic ones...

I *think* I read once that that's their policy. It's a nice move, since
overseas people have to wait longer anyway -- so if their copies are shipped
earlier, they might just get them no more than a couple of months after
Americans start crowing about the latest issue of TPJ on IRC or mailing
lists.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: TPC Quiz Team

2001-05-18 Thread Philip Newton

Dave Cross wrote:
 It was a beginners guide to Arrays. Complete with examples 
 drawing heavily on the world of Buffy.

Now you made me look; I had only read through the first column of the
article by the time I got to work this morning, and that was all about red,
green, and blue, with a dash of pink here and there.

But a bit further on, I saw you're right! Yum.

Yes, we should get a trademark of BtVS in connection with Perl :)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: test

2001-05-17 Thread Philip Newton

Greg McCarroll wrote:
 just a test

Sorry, didn't arrive in Germany. You have some kind of UK only filter on
these things?

Please sent it again, with the filter turned off.

Cheers,
Philip (feeling testy)
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: e-mail

2001-05-17 Thread Philip Newton

Greg McCarroll wrote:
 talking of old money did you know that about 92%[1] of used 
 fifty pound notes have traces of cocaine on them?

Probably from the crack-snorting scientists who test them.

 [1] i couldnt remember the exact figure, but it was high, so 
 92% sounded good.

Did you know that 18% of all statistics are completely made up out of raw
cloth, and 57.384% of all statistics claim unwarranted precision in their
figures?

Cheers,
Philip
(who notes that there's a German saying don't trust any statistic that you
didn't forge yourself)
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Buffy ...

2001-05-17 Thread Philip Newton

Robin Szemeti wrote:
 http://page.auctions.yahoo.com/uk/auction/51586918

Yum. Pricey, though.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: [gnat@frii.com: Damian Conway's Exegesis 2]

2001-05-17 Thread Philip Newton

Paul Makepeace wrote:
 The - to .  conversion [...] will be a wonderful thing.

To be honest, I never understood the point of that conversion. Is it an
attempt to make Perl look more like VB? Or like Java? Or trying to save
keystrokes? Simplify the lexer?

The array seemed fine to me the way it was.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Buffy ...

2001-05-17 Thread Philip Newton

Cross David - dcross wrote:
 Oh, and there's a picture of the whole cast, just signed by 
 SMG tho' at http://page.auctions.yahoo.com/uk/auction/51612812.

I suppose at this point, grep will wonder why the Bufster uses her fake name
when signing pictures.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: pc components

2001-05-17 Thread Philip Newton

will wrote:
 rm -f zig

mv zig/* CATS/ , surely?

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: TPC Quiz Team

2001-05-17 Thread Philip Newton

Peter Haworth wrote:
 Come to think of it, if Buddy was the password, how come we 
 all know what it is (now, at least). Aren't passwords 
 supposed to be secret?

I believe there was a news story about the first law to be signed into,
well, law electronically by the POTUS by typing in his dog's name, Buddy,
as the password, or verbage to that effect.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Happy Happy Joy Joy!

2001-05-17 Thread Philip Newton

I finally received my copy of TPJ in the mail yesterday. And there was much
rejoicing :)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



A look over the shoulder of an XP programmer (auf deutsch)

2001-05-16 Thread Philip Newton

Seen in news:de.alt.sysadmin.recovery :

http://www.frankwestphal.de/XPueberdieSchultergeschaut.html

The poster thought it was satire; I'm not so sure. Anyway, if you understand
German (or trust Babelfish), have a look at it.

Enjoy!

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: streaming output

2001-05-16 Thread Philip Newton

Robert Thompson wrote:
 print Content-Type: application/octet-stream\n;
 print Content-Transfer-Encoding: x-gzip\n\n;

At a guess: Content-Encoding: gzip instead.

 I've had a look at the relevant rfc's.

Which ones? RFC 2616 (HTTP/1.1) mentions gzip not x-gzip under 3.5
Content Codings and 3.6 Transfer Codings.

 The main thing I'm unsure about is the
 content-transfer-encoding type. Anyone know where there's 
 a list of them?

RFC 2616 says (section 3.5, Content Codings): 

3.5 Content Codings

   Content coding values indicate an encoding transformation that has
   been or can be applied to an entity. Content codings are primarily
   used to allow a document to be compressed or otherwise usefully
   transformed without losing the identity of its underlying media type
   and without loss of information. Frequently, the entity is stored in
   coded form, transmitted directly, and only decoded by the recipient.

   content-coding   = token

   All content-coding values are case-insensitive. HTTP/1.1 uses
   content-coding values in the Accept-Encoding (section 14.3) and
   Content-Encoding (section 14.11) header fields. Although the value
   describes the content-coding, what is more important is that it
   indicates what decoding mechanism will be required to remove the
   encoding.

   The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) acts as a registry for
   content-coding value tokens. Initially, the registry contains the
   following tokens:

   gzip An encoding format produced by the file compression program
gzip (GNU zip) as described in RFC 1952 [25]. This format is a
Lempel-Ziv coding (LZ77) with a 32 bit CRC.
[snip]

There's also a transfer encoding of gzip, which must also have chunked,
but that seems to be something different.

See also sections 14.11 Content-Encoding (HTTP response header) and 14.41
Transfer-Encoding (HTTP response header). Transfer encoding differs from
the content-coding in that the transfer-coding is a property of the message,
not of the entity, whatever that means. There doesn't seem to be a
Content-Transfer-Encoding, as in MIME[1]. The RFC also notes that Many
older HTTP/1.0 applications do not understand the Transfer-Encoding header.

[1] though section 3.6 notes that:
   Transfer-codings are analogous to the Content-Transfer-Encoding
   values of MIME [7], which were designed to enable safe transport of
   binary data over a 7-bit transport service. However, safe transport
   has a different focus for an 8bit-clean transfer protocol. In HTTP,
   the only unsafe characteristic of message-bodies is the difficulty in
   determining the exact body length (section 7.2.2), or the desire to
   encrypt data over a shared transport.

I would have expected there to be a list somewhere under
ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/iana/assignments , but the file
transfer-encodings there just points to
http://www.iana.org/assignments/transfer-encodings , which only has 7bit,
8bit, binary, quoted-printable, base64 as possible values.

 Any help, pointers much appreciated.

Hope this helps some.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Caller ID (was Re: Enough!)

2001-05-16 Thread Philip Newton

Steve Mynott wrote:
 I have heard of people using the D channel signalling to communicate
 for free.

I've also heard of phone companies cursing such users and trying to ban
programs that support that.

At least in Germany, there was a program (or several?) that took advantage
of the fact that when you initiate a connection, you can also transfer a
small data packet. So they would initiate a connection and include a small
data packet, then immediately tear down the connection before it was
answered, and initiate another connection with the next few bytes. All this
stuff was free (since no connection was established completely), but
apparently a lot of load on the switching network.

However, German Telecom used to have a service (don't know whether they
still do) whereby you could have an always-on connection using the D channel
with a type of Datex-P-over-ISDN (a packet-switched(?) network in Germany
where you pay by the packet rather than by the minute, and where no
permanent connections are established: a bit like UDP). So you could have
your email delivered to you, or stock ticks, or other stuff that didn't need
high bandwidth.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: A look over the shoulder of an XP programmer (auf deutsch)

2001-05-16 Thread Philip Newton

Simon Cozens wrote:
 That's not argument, it's just contradiction!

I'm sorry; I'm not allowed to argue with you unless you've paid.

Cheers,
Philip
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Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: A look over the shoulder of an XP programmer (auf deutsch)

2001-05-16 Thread Philip Newton

Robert Shiels wrote:
  Leon
  
  ... 640K ought to be enough for anybody
  
 ...is that dollars or pounds...

Turkish lire?

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Enough!

2001-05-15 Thread Philip Newton

Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
 and before simon gets there:
 
 use Mail::Audit;

To which Johan Vromans would probably reply:

use Mail::Procmail;

Chacun à son goût.

Cheers,
Philip
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All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Enough!

2001-05-15 Thread Philip Newton

David Cantrell wrote:
 a delightfully Heath-Robinson mechanical whatsit which will clip on to
 the inside of your letter box, and will reject spam with 
 GREAT VENGEANCE and FURY.

For GREAT JUSTICE.

Cheers,
Phi how do smurfs make little smurfs? lip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Monitors

2001-05-14 Thread Philip Newton

Lucy McWilliam wrote:
 On Fri, 11 May 2001, Philip Newton wrote:
 
  Dominic Mitchell wrote:
   How many things do you have on top of your monitor?
 
  Depends on the day. Today, two things: a goose called Lucy[1]
 
 !

:) It did cross my mind while posting the message that you were also on the
list.

(Today, it's my cheeky green duck Martin on the monitor.)

Cheers,
Philip
Philip Newton

--
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a gedas company
Cuxhavener Straße 36, D-21149 Hamburg
Telefon/phone   +49-40-797 007-37
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Re: Politics (was RE: BOFHs requiring license)

2001-05-14 Thread Philip Newton

Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 2. A teacher can't be alone in a room with a pupil unless the 
 door is open.

Things were obviously different back when I spent the occasional lunch break
(or after school) in detention :)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
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All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: putting escape characters in files

2001-05-11 Thread Philip Newton

Dominic Mitchell wrote:
 On Thu, May 10, 2001 at 10:25:00PM +0100, Nicholas Clark wrote:
  If your terminal has flow control enabled it will eat ^Q 
  and ^S for you.
  stty -ixon
  removes this problem.
 
 But then how do you pause that long ls listing when your
 less,more,pg,sed,awkperl binaries are all fscked?  :-)

Use dd with the count= option for the first page, and with count= and skip=
for subsequent pages :)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: putting escape characters in files

2001-05-11 Thread Philip Newton

Dominic Mitchell wrote:
 assuming you can get into a bourne shell, you can
 still do things like write cat(1) in sh, as well.

This is not going to help you pause output.

 Although it'd be hard to control without ^S and ^Q,

...which was what the original post was all about.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: putting escape characters in files

2001-05-11 Thread Philip Newton

Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
 That breaks if the line is longer than the width of your screen.

So do a lot of cheap pager routines.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: (OT) constrained walk

2001-05-11 Thread Philip Newton

Paul Mison wrote:
 email [EMAIL PROTECTED]

A message that you sent could not be delivered to all of its recipients. The
following address(es) failed:

  [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
all relevant MX records point to non-existent hosts:
it appears that the DNS operator for this domain has installed an
invalid MX record with an IP address instead of a domain name on the right
hand side

Looks like it:

$ dig @ns.stub.org husk.org axfr

;  DiG 8.2  @ns.stub.org husk.org axfr
; (1 server found)
$ORIGIN husk.org.
@   1D IN SOA   @ root.vx-labs.org. (
2001020100  ; serial
8H  ; refresh
4H  ; retry
10H ; expiry
1D ); minimum

1D IN NSns.vx-labs.org.
1D IN NSns.stub.org.
1D IN A 195.149.50.61
1D IN MX5 195.149.50.61.
*   1D IN A 195.149.50.61
@   1D IN SOA   @ root.vx-labs.org. (
2001020100  ; serial
8H  ; refresh
4H  ; retry
10H ; expiry
1D ); minimum

;; Received 7 answers (7 records).
;; FROM: penderel to SERVER: 193.243.252.29
;; WHEN: Fri May 11 15:47:41 2001

I suggest you shoot the DNS operator for this domain and hire a new one :)

I suppose that in the meantime I'll have to forge a subscription with
`telnet husk.org smtp` if my MUA won't send to it.

Cheers,
Philip



Re: (OT) constrained walk

2001-05-11 Thread Philip Newton

Paul Mison wrote:
 there may be a second constrained walk

What's a constrained walk?

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: (OT) constrained walk

2001-05-11 Thread Philip Newton

Paul Mison wrote:
 I see you managed to subscribe anyway; I ph34r y0ur l33t 5M7P sk1llz.

Thanks. They do come in handy quite often. (For example, when verifying an
open relay or seeing whether it anonymises or not.)

I remember the person who taught me SMTP; I'm grateful to him. (Though I
suppose I could have taught myself from the RFC without too much pain; after
all, that's how I learned to speak POP3.)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Monitors

2001-05-11 Thread Philip Newton

Dominic Mitchell wrote:
 How many things do you have on top of your monitor?

Depends on the day. Today, two things: a goose called Lucy[1] (a Ty Beanie
Baby) and a green duck called Martin. Both are plush toys.

I generally bring one of my small stuffed toys to work, but sometimes I
forget to take it out of my coat pocket, or forget to bring it along in the
first place. And occasionally, I bring two at once. For example, the day
before yesterday I had two Beanie Baby stuffed geese (of a different design
than Lucy) called Wendy and Henry[2] who are married to one another. (Lucy
and Martin are just friends. Maybe not even that; they're still a bit
cautious about the relationship.)

Cheers,
Philip

[1] Though her tag spells her name Loosy.
[2] Their name tags say Honks; we decided that's their last name. Wendy,
by the way, was bought in London while I was at yapc::Europe::19100, as a
present for my wife.
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Monitors

2001-05-11 Thread Philip Newton

Dominic Mitchell wrote:
 For reference, I have 8 Kinder egg toys, 4 of which are Giraffes.

Ah. At home I also have Kinder egg toys on my monitor. Three of them to be
precise. I think they're all cars.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Monitors

2001-05-11 Thread Philip Newton

Philip Newton wrote:
 I generally bring one of my small stuffed toys to work
 ^
 or my wife's. She has me than I.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Bah!

2001-05-10 Thread Philip Newton

David Cantrell wrote:
 http://www.cantrell.org.uk/david/cv

I was going to post I can't open that in Microsoft Word; please re-send it
as a joke, but when I tried to open the PDF version using the Acrobat
plug-in in Netscape, I got an internal error occurred and some of the
letters were missing.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Native Code Experts

2001-05-07 Thread Philip Newton

Piers Cawley wrote:
 I haven't laughed so much since Date::MMDDYY...

Which, incidentally, appears to have disappeared from CPAN. At least,
CPAN.pm doesn't know about it any more. And
http://search.cpan.org/search?mode=modulequery=Date%3A%3AMMDDYY also says
No modules found matching Date::MMDDYY. Pity :)

Cheers,
Philip, who was looking forward to v2 of the module, incorporating
london.pm's suggestions
-- 
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All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: US$ bank account

2001-05-02 Thread Philip Newton

Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 Barclays charge between £5 and £10 to bank a check. Which for a
 month's work is fine, but for an Amazon affiliates payment is in the
 realm of ouchie.

AllAdvantage, while it was still alive, sent me DEM cheques drawn on a
German bank (which had been prepared by a service in England). If they can
do it, why can't a global e-commerce leading-edge pioneer-type place like
Amazon? The mind boggles.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: require Module; and filehandles

2001-04-27 Thread Philip Newton

Jonathan Stowe wrote:
 And hide the test failures if you are running on SCO OpenServer or
 Unixware  (see p5p passim) :)

Does anyone still run SCO? Thought they'd all died.

Cheers,
Phi OpenSewer lip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: require Module; and filehandles

2001-04-27 Thread Philip Newton

Ian Brayshaw wrote:
 it's the internal workings of require that stop the tie 
 from being honoured. I presume that the require burrows
 down into the internals and isn't aware that it's a tie'd
 handle. As far as I can tell the code within the require
 call is unaware that this handle is an object. If you place
 an AUTOLOAD method in TrueHandle instead of the READ and 
 READLINE methods, only DESTROY is called.

Did you tell p5p about this? Perhaps they can do something about it, if they
consider this a bug.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Good Accountants

2001-04-27 Thread Philip Newton

Chris Ball wrote:
   Are postings subscriber only ..? ]

As far as I know, yes; Jonathan Stowe has to hand-approve non-subscriber
postings for them to make it to the list.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Good Accountants

2001-04-27 Thread Philip Newton

Dominic Mitchell wrote:
 On Fri, Apr 27, 2001 at 02:30:20PM +0100, Jonathan Peterson wrote:
  I blame majordomo, when's that mailman thing getting here?
 
 Well, it is based on Python, which might cause a few stirrings around
 here...

You think the Perl community is proud of the majordomo code?

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: require Module; and filehandles

2001-04-26 Thread Philip Newton

Ian Brayshaw wrote:
 Sorry to pollute this list with a question about Perl...

Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy
Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy
Buffy Buffy Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Buffy Buffy
Buffy Buffy Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Buffy Buffy
Buffy Buffy Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Buffy Buffy
Buffy Buffy Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Buffy Buffy
Buffy Buffy Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Buffy Buffy
Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy
Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy Buffy

La la la, I can't hear you

Buffy Buffy Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Willow Buffy Buffy

We now return you to your regularly scheduled london-list.

Cheers,
Philip
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All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Company Name

2001-04-25 Thread Philip Newton

Chris Heathcote wrote:
 Mega-Shiels 2001 Ltd.

Shiels-Up! PLC

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: BtVS : Best Male

2001-04-20 Thread Philip Newton

Robin Szemeti wrote:
 On Thu, 19 Apr 2001, you wrote:

Hey, Robin -- remember the "reply to list" feature is on; "you wrote" is not
particularly clear :). (In this case, it's Jonathan Stowe, which is
significant.)

  I had bleached hair once and I looked gorgeous - mind I had 
  pink hair once as well ... :)
 
 another twenty years matey and you'll be posting :
 " i had hair once ... " :))

From what I remember of how jns looked, I'd give him more like two years :)

Cheers,
Philip
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Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Server Upgrade

2001-04-20 Thread Philip Newton

Robert Shiels wrote:
 As expected, the DIMMs are PC100 and not PC133. I strongly expect
 the motherboard will not be able to use the PC133s so either we
 need to upgrade the mobo, or change the order to purchase slower
 RAM.

Er, do you mean "will not be able to use the PC133s" or "will not be able to
use the PC100s and we'll need to get even slower RAM"?

And AFAIK, if it takes SDRAM at all, you can put in whatever you want; the
speed is determined by min(mobo bus speed, memory spec speed). I've got
PC133 memory in my Celeron board (66 MHz bus) and it works fine; the memory
doesn't seem to care that it's accessed more slowly than it's capable of.
(And another bank has, I think, PC100 memory in it -- the mix-n-match
doesn't seem to be deleterious, either.)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: [OT] Flecktones in London next month

2001-04-20 Thread Philip Newton

Nathan Torkington wrote:
 5/1/2001  Dingwalls   London, England
 5/2/2001  Pizza Express   London, England
 5/3/2001  Borderline  London, England
 5/4/2001  Ocean   London, England

Hey! All of those dates are already past! (And why do they only give one
concert a month?)

Cheers,
Phi ISO-8601 rules lip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Komodo

2001-04-19 Thread Philip Newton

Robin Szemeti wrote:
 in the *nix variant can you load stuff from CPAN straight in ?

Lemme check... yep, you can. (Using the Solaris version of ActivePerl 618.)
I used a non-XS module, but I believe I've done it with XS modules as well.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: (Don't Laugh) Buying PGP

2001-04-19 Thread Philip Newton

dcross - David Cross wrote:
 Hah! If I can't get them to use GPG, I have _no_ chance with 
 Samba.

Why? Because it's open software (or whatever they call themselves)?

Can't you call it an "Enterprise cross-platform file sharing solution" or
something like that? And get a company to support it?

Cheers,
Philip
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Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Komodo

2001-04-18 Thread Philip Newton

Barbie wrote:
 The good thing about PPM is that it does all the installation 
 for you. the bad thing is that it doesn't run any tests. Then
 again seeing as they've done the job of porting the package
 you'd hope it was tested at their end. At least that's what
 _I'm_ hoping.

Yes. The PPM used to be really meagre with builds 5xx (5.005_**) but with
6xx (5.6.*) the situation has improved. I believe they have some kind of
semi-automated way of making PPMs from CPAN modules.

They have stated that they'll only PPM modules (or versions of modules) that
pass their own tests on Windows. I believe the PPM version of Compress::Zlib
or Archive::Tar or some such was lagging behind the CPAN release by a couple
of versions because the newer versions didn't pass their own tests. So if
it's PPMable, it's supposedly been tested by ActiveState (perhaps not by a
person, but at least automatically).

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Mourning clothes for London.pm

2001-04-18 Thread Philip Newton

Mike Jarvis wrote:
 CNN reports that BtVS's SMG will wed Freddie Prinz.

Who's he? Is he that Wesley bloke that I haven't seen yet?

(Note to self: must get around to watching all those Buffy episodes I have
on CD.)

Cheers,
Philip

PS: $willow++;
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: sub BEGIN {}

2001-04-17 Thread Philip Newton

David H. Adler wrote:
 On Wed, Apr 04, 2001 at 10:03:43AM +0200, Philip Newton wrote:
  
  dha, how's your "last read" mark?
 
 Eh?

An obscure reference to a remark you made in Penderel's Oak after
yapc::Europe 19100. Something to the effect that you have a mark which
indicates, in your MUA, the boundary between "read" and "unread" messages in
a mail folder, and that this mark is never on the first page of messages in
your london-list folder.

Had to do, apparently, not only with the traffic a mailing list gets but
also with whether you keep messages around or delete them after reading
them.

Unfortunately, I don't recall the comment exactly.

Cheers,
Philip
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Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Perl on HPUX

2001-04-12 Thread Philip Newton

Dean wrote:
 DOH! Its running 4.0.1.8

Well, perl4.0 patchlevel 36 -- usually called 4.036, I think.

And AFAIK it's only supported in the context of the kernel debugger q4, not
for developing (sort-of like the cc shipped with HPUX is only to be used to
re-build the kernel and hence is still KR; you have to pay money to get a
"real" cc).

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Perl on HPUX

2001-04-12 Thread Philip Newton

Robert Shiels wrote:
 From: "Dean" [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  Question for the list, i'm currently writing some scripts 
  for a HP box running HPUX 11 and i keep hitting the same
  error when ever i try and use
 
 Last time I used the default perl on HP-UX, it turned out to 
 be perl 4. You may need a more recent distribution.

I don't think HPUX comes any newer than 11. He just needs a recent Perl; you
don't get decent Perl (nor decent cc) shipped with HPUX.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Perl on HPUX

2001-04-12 Thread Philip Newton

Elaine -HFB- Ashton wrote:
 http://cpan.valueclick.com/ports/#hpux
 
 There is also a 5.something version for the 10.20 and the 9.x crowd
 mentioned in the HP-UX FAQ

Perl appears to build quite well from source, as well, even on 10.20 -- err,
that's assuming you have a real cc, however (either HP's for-pay ANSI C
compiler or gcc, for example).

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re:

2001-04-05 Thread Philip Newton

Paul Makepeace wrote:
 Do you (whoever) in all seriousness think someone would *choose* to
 post in base64? Or even imagine that without extensive spelunking in
 the config files/menus their email client would do that by default?
 No, of course not -- so give 'em a fscking break! Be nice, point out
 how to fix it, and if they *still* keep doing it say, after the 3rd
 time, *then* fire up the cannons.
 
 Hopefully these links are useful:
 http://helpdesk.rootsweb.com/help/html-off.html
 http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/1236/nomime.html

Thanks; they were interesting. However, I believe that it's not even my
email client's fault. The options for MS Outlook were not available because
I don't use the Internet Email service to send mail but the MS Exchange
Server service -- so the "Internet Email options" window or tab is not
available to me. It's the server that does the mangling.

I found a workaround which I can live with; if I hadn't, I would probably be
using Pegasus, which I also have installed on this machine.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Grammar (was: Re: Linux.com Online Chat)

2001-04-05 Thread Philip Newton

Alex Page wrote:
 On Wed, Apr 04, 2001 at 02:17:24AM -0700, Paul Makepeace wrote:
 
  Me too, ('74 vintage) but I got learnt grammar. I think mostly by my
  mother if truth be told. The rest I picked up from Latin :-/
 
 AOL. A strongly grammatical language like Latin really makes 
 you think about your grammar in English. I did Latin to 
 A-level, and remembering which form of qui to use in a given 
 situation really helps you work out that whole who / whom issue.

In my case, German helps there, with wer/wessen/wem/wen distinctions. German
speakers also tend not to make mistakes of the "give it to either Paul or I"
type, probably because case is still pretty visible in German. (That being
said, my wife does tend to mix up accusative [often -n] and dative [often
-m] endings, so not every native speaker has an innate grasp of grammar.)

 Similarly, I'm pretty good at using the subjunctive properly 
 and stuff like that. German helped a lot too...

I can imagine. Greek would also help you, at least with the
nominative/accusative distinction (dative died hundreds of years ago and was
replaced by preposition + accusative, or sometimes by genitive). I remember
my German grammar helped me when learning Greek, since of the four surviving
cases, three also existed in German, and vocative is pretty simple to use
:). The English speakers in my class had a harder time of it, and when I was
in Greece, I met one American who told me he got a text on English grammar
because he said he felt he needed to understand his own grammar before he
could understand another language's.

 When I was at prep school, my English teacher had lots of 
 little signs over the classroom walls saying things like 
 "It's not all right to say 'alright'", to drum little things 
 like that in.

I hope it had s/say/write/ , since I don't hear any difference when someone
*says* "all right" or "alright".

A German example is "gar nicht wird gar nicht zusammengeschrieben" (new
spelling, I believe, would use "zusammen geschrieben").

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Mmm... Perl 5+i

2001-04-05 Thread Philip Newton

Piers Cawley wrote:
 I'm really liking Damian's work on this. Favourite so far:
 
 %new_hash = map {yield munge_key($_); munge_value($_)} %a_hash
   ^

Looks like someone's been doing too much Ruby to me

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: going extreme

2001-04-04 Thread Philip Newton

James Powell wrote:
 http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1006-200-5424853.html?tag=lh

Cool. Where can I get me some Extreme Programming?

Cheers,
Philip, whose project[1] has a deadline today

[1] that's been running for at least six months and was supposed to be done
in November
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: sub BEGIN {}

2001-04-04 Thread Philip Newton

Paul Makepeace wrote:
 On Tue, Apr 03, 2001 at 09:31:12PM +0100, Martin Ling wrote:
  Indeed, that was just my observation on a few posts' worth. 
  Who *knows* what I might conclude about a whole day's traffic..
 
 ..that you need to put your London.pm folder on its own spanning
 compressed partition.

Heck yeah. Leon++, Leon++ for having taken on the daunting task of
summarising each week's 2GB or so of traffic.

dha, how's your "last read" mark?

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: The Open Constitution Project (was Re: Crazy Idea)

2001-04-04 Thread Philip Newton

Jonathan Stowe wrote:
 OK.  SO we persuade Mr Horne to blag us electronic copies of 
 the entire UK law, upload it to the CVS server on SourceForge
 and then announce the project on slashdot 

Hm, checkout the US Bill of Rights, edit the First Amendment to include
"free speech but no permission to send spam" and cvs update -- and spammers
will have to think of a different disclaimer.

This has potential.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Grammar (was: Re: Linux.com Online Chat)

2001-04-04 Thread Philip Newton

Simon Cozens wrpte_
 package four; use subs qw(print); sub print{die@_}; print four things;
 # (Why doesn't that one work properly?)

Answer one: see toke.c (I guess)
Answer two: because print is special. Even without a package, you can't call
a subroutine of yours that you've named print just with "print" ("print"
works, however; see one of Abigail's sigs, which also plays with
__PACKAGE__).

I think.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re:

2001-04-04 Thread Philip Newton

james_h wrote:
 The Totalise Email system, probably the most flexible email 
 system in the world. To register for an account goto
 http://www.totalise.net

But it apparently can't automatically unsubscribe you from mailing lists.
Perhaps they'll fix that in the next release.

(Jonathan, would you do the honours, please?)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re:

2001-04-04 Thread Philip Newton

[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Visit our website at http://www.ubswarburg.com

This looks familiar. Did Tom Christiansen provide Perl training for your
last summer?

 This message contains confidential information and is intended only 
 for the individual named.  If you are not the named addressee you 
 should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail.  Please 
 notify the sender immediately by e-mail if you have received this 
 e-mail by mistake and delete this e-mail from your system.
 
 E-mail transmission cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error-free 
 as information could be intercepted, corrupted, lost, destroyed, 
 arrive late or incomplete, or contain viruses.  The sender therefore 
 does not accept liability for any errors or omissions in the contents 
 of this message which arise as a result of e-mail transmission.  If 
 verification is required please request a hard-copy version.  This 
 message is provided for informational purposes and should not be 
 construed as a solicitation or offer to buy or sell any securities or 
 related financial instruments.

Unfortunately, while the disclaimer came out fine, my mailer (MS Outlook)
displayed the real "body" (with your message) as an attachment.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re:

2001-04-04 Thread Philip Newton

Greg McCarroll wrote:
 ok, was i the only one who had to ueedecode this

No; Outlook did it for me and presented the message as an attachment. (I
though something like this must be happening since the "Internet Headers"
box didn't show any MIME headers typical of MIME attachments -- so it was
probably uuencoded.)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Test

2001-04-04 Thread Philip Newton

Clarke, Darren wrote:
 Bloomin' Outlook  HTML ... *grumble* 

I agree. Your mail server lost again.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re:

2001-04-04 Thread Philip Newton

Clarke, Darren wrote:
 It appears I have been remiss with the HTML/text thing - I
 can only blame Outlook for this since I have set it to text
 but didn't check the 'format switch' on each mail.

I blame MSexChange instead. At least for our setup. And because Outlook
*used* to send out plain text emails as plain text just fine, until someone
fiddled with the MSexChange configuration.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re:

2001-04-04 Thread Philip Newton

Robin Szemeti wrote:
 hmmm does that mean if I type :
 
 begin 777 wibble
 Mhere is some really interesting stuff that outlook wont see
 
 end

Apparently not, at least, not in my version of Outlook. (However, is the 'M'
correct? The line looks a bit short. And I believe the line before the end
should contain either a space or a backtick, to show "no more characters".

However, apparently Outlook Express is not so finicky, and there are a few
people on German-speaking Usenet who take advantage of that, by beginning
their posts (or signatures) with

begin  virus.exe

and ending them with "end" and enjoying the wails of OE users "I can't see
your posting! There's just an attachment that won't decode!" or something
like that.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-04-02 Thread Philip Newton

Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
 On Sun, 1 Apr 2001, Robin Szemeti wrote:
  agreed it is a dumb thing, especially if your nameserver 
  doesnt have a name to lookup 
 
 Erm!!?!? How exactly were you planning to point anything at it? an NS
 RR requires an authoritative name as it's RHS.

Note what Robin replied to:

 nslookup does a rather dumb thing:  it tries to lookup the reverse DNS
 for the nameserver it's about to use.  Apart from being a waste of
 time, failure to find the name means it will refuse to query that
 nameserver.

Having a name is one thing; being able to find out that name with reverse
DNS is another. So if ns.example.com is 192.168.47.11 but there's no PTR
record for 11.47.168.192.in-addr.arpa, you have a name server with a name
but one that you can't use reverse DNS to look up the name for.

Or what do you mean with "an authoritative name" -- does that mean a name
that reverses to itself?

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-03-30 Thread Philip Newton

Robin Szemeti wrote:
 On Thu, 29 Mar 2001, you wrote:

Hey, check your attributions -- "you" is not very useful when you're sending
stuff to a mailing list :)

  or nslookup will have to be smart enough[1] to translate
  "randomkanji" to "bq--buffy" before asking the resolver
  library.
 
 err [1] unlikely to happen because its deprecated as of 
 BIND-tools version 9.1

nslookup deprecated? Rats.

 you are apparently supposed to use dig or host .. my feeling is that
 nslookup is too easy to use and useful so they decided to 
 deprecate it to make it harder for non BIND gurus to be able to
 tell wahts going on ...

Yes, it's useful. I like nslookup. (Plus I feel that dig is pretty verbose,
but maybe there's a flag to control that that I've been too lazy to look
for.)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Hello?

2001-03-29 Thread Philip Newton

On 28 Mar 01, at 20:52, Jonathan Stowe wrote:

 Well london-pm and yapc-europe are on the same server so I dont think that
 its going to break the internet if you post to both :)

Except that it's going to be confusing if you haven't got your sorry 
excuse for procmail wired up right. Happened to me last year at work, 
where we have Outlook -- everything cross-posted to london-list and 
yapc-europe I got four times: twice in the london-list folder and twice 
in yapc-europe. See, I got two messages (one from each list), and each 
message triggered both rules since both "To:" address were present. I 
think I later changed it so that it looked at a custom list header 
(once someone pointed out to me that Outlook can do that).

Then the only confusing thing was that hitting "Reply" sent the reply 
to the list if I used the copy in the london-list folder, and to the 
author if I used the copy in the yapc-europe folder... :)

But I think last year, far too much got cross-posted between the two 
lists, and other things were not cross-posted enough so one list 
(generally yapc-europe) only got snippets of conversations which didn't 
really make sense unless you were also subscribed to london-list.

Truth be told, that's when I first signed up to london-list... and for 
a while, I got close to subscribing to (void) as well, as they seemed 
to get dragged into the fray quite a bit as well. (Fortunately, I 
resisted the temptation. I get quite enough mail as it is.)

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]





Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-29 Thread Philip Newton

Greg Cope wrote:
 I once read a report (18 months ago) where the same projects 
 where given to lots of programmers, the usualy results were
 show i.e algorythm design was the most important factor,
 although on the whole scripting langauges were faster to
 develope in, and had faster execuion speeds and lower memory
 footprints.  I should try and find it again as I've lost
 the URL.

You may be looking for this:

http://wwwipd.ira.uka.de/~prechelt/Biblio/jccpprtTR.pdf
An empirical comparison of C, C++, Java, Perl, Python, Rexx, and Tcl for a
search/string-processing program

Or google for "empirical comparison Python Rexx program" for a few
references.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-29 Thread Philip Newton

Paul Makepeace wrote:
 Can you trivially embed a perl network application in a browser?
[snip]
 Java's favour is not *entirely* due to massive marketing pimpery.

Java support in browsers didn't magically come because Microsoft and
Netscape said "Hey, let's develop a Java plug-in for our browser".

Try doing Java in Lynx. Or Mosaic. Is there even a plugin for Netscape 
3.0?

I'd say that's marketing and not something built-in. You want client-side
Perl, you have ActiveState's PerlScript. What, nobody has a client for it?
Well, lack of marketing.

I think there was even a Tcl plugin for Netscape that nobody used. Probably
not because of merit or lack thereof, but just because it wasn't hyped
enough, and/or didn't ship as standard with a major browser.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-03-29 Thread Philip Newton

Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 Given we can now have kanji URLs, [...]

Can we now? I thought there were several different proposed schemes, but
none has been officially accepted as standard.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-03-29 Thread Philip Newton

Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
 On Thu, 29 Mar 2001, Philip Newton wrote:
  Unless you translate them to an acceptable set, which is, I 
  believe, where domain i18n is heading. The question is in
  which algorithm to choose for translation.
 
 Right. Which is evil and horrid.
 
 nslookup randomkanji.com
 
 euch.

Yes. Either you have to translate "randomkanji" to "bq--buffy"[2] in your
head or with an appropriate tool, or nslookup will have to be smart
enough[1] to translate "randomkanji" to "bq--buffy" before asking the
resolver library.

Cheers,
Philip

[1] This includes knowing whether you fed it "randomkanji" in EUC-JP, or
ISO-2022-JP, or UTF-8, or KSC-5601, or Yum.
[2] which, incidentally, translates to U+0D0A U+0D5C, or MALAYALAM LETTER
UU UNASSIGNED.
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-03-28 Thread Philip Newton

Chris Devers wrote:
 In any event, the leading 1 is never part of the phone 
 number, but you always have to dial it whenever making a 
 "long distance" call.

Well, I would have thought that's just splitting hairs -- is the '0' part of
the number 0207 xxx  is the number 207 xxx  "but you have to dial a
0 before that"? Comes out to the same thing. Except for...

 This used to mean anything beyond a 
 certain distance from your local calling area /or anything 
 outside of your area code,

Where you can have 713 555 1212 without a leading 1, and 1 555 3434 with a
leading 1 but without an area code (in big area codes such as maybe 801 =
Utah). Hm, so I guess the 1 is not part of the area code.

 but with 10 digit numbers you'll 
 probably just have to put it in front of about every number 
 dialled, thus giving everyone in the country an 11 digit 
 phone number. 

But maybe this'll change in the future -- with 1 being always/never present.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-03-28 Thread Philip Newton

Neil Ford wrote:
 I suppose I'd be splitting hairs if I pointed out that the 
 dialing code for London is 020, meaning numbers should be
 shown as 020  .

Oh, all right. Thanks to Neil and Simon for the correction. I suppose this
misapprehension comes partly because it *used* to be two dialing codes (071,
081 -- or was it 0171, 0181? Or both, one after the other? I forget).

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



Re: ISO8601 [was] Re: Pointless, Badly-Written Module.

2001-03-28 Thread Philip Newton

Simon Wistow wrote:
 It was origially 01 ne c'est pas?

(ITYM "n'est-ce pas?") Yes, it was. I remember that time.

Cheers,
Philip
-- 
Philip Newton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
All opinions are my own, not my employer's.
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.



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