Re: [Possible Job] Perl, Linux

2001-06-13 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Jun 07, 2001 at 07:44:11AM +0100, Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 Are there any of you lot still looking for jobs? 

Still open? I think I might have someone for you.

-- 
If you give a man a fire, he'll be warm for a day. If you set a man on fire, 
he'll be warm for the rest of his life.





Re: www.gateway.gov.uk

2001-06-09 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, Jun 09, 2001 at 01:27:08PM +0100, Jonathan Stowe wrote:
 As a public service I would exhort all of you to go to this site and then
 complain when it tells you that you are using an 'Unsupported Browser'
 (which I guess will be more than half of you :)

Well done. The Reg picked this up ... last month.

-- 
When your hammer is C++, everything begins to look like a thumb. 
-- Steve Haflich, comp.lang.c++



Re: www.gateway.gov.uk

2001-06-09 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, Jun 09, 2001 at 02:06:24PM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
 So yes, the only reason for not allowing me to use it is incompetence on
 the part of whichever civil 'servants' were in charge of implementing it.

And nothing to do with the deal struck between Microsoft and the government.
No.

-- 
You want to read that stuff, fine. You want to create a network for such 
things, fine. You want to explore the theoretical boundaries of free speech, 
fine. But when it starts impacting *people* trying to *communicate*, then 
that is where I draw the line. - Russ Allbery, http://www.slacker.com/rant.html



Re: www.gateway.gov.uk

2001-06-09 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, Jun 09, 2001 at 02:26:40PM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
 I tend not to pay much attention to conspiracy theories.

Me neither.
http://linuxtoday.com/imgs/microsoft/gateway-microsoft-rationale-statement.pdf

-- 
This process can check if this value is zero, and if it is, it does
something child-like.
-- Forbes Burkowski, CS 454, University of Washington



Re: www.gateway.gov.uk

2001-06-09 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, Jun 09, 2001 at 02:59:48PM +0100, Nicholas Clark wrote:
 Are these e-mail addresses? If so, does it make it possible to forward all
 4 denials in 1 message To: all four and ask for one joined up government
 answer?

http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/4/19340.html says the man to talk to
is [EMAIL PROTECTED]

I've just asked him whether he thinks restricting access to IE and NS
only (hence cutting off speech browsers for the blind) constitutes
discrimination against the disabled. :)

-- 
Britain has football hooligans, Germany has neo-Nazis, and France has farmers. 
-The Times



Re: London.pm posting stats

2001-06-09 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, Jun 09, 2001 at 09:10:53PM +0100, Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 And how about a signal/noise bias? ;-)

The noise *is* signal.

-- 
I cannot and will not cut my conscience to fit this year's fashions.
-- Lillian Hellman



Re: crazy golf

2001-06-04 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, Jun 02, 2001 at 01:38:44AM +0100, Piers Cawley wrote:
 Assuming you're not a Masai tribesperson.

On this list, anything is possible.

-- 
I don't understand how people can think SCSI is anything more quirky
than a genius with peculiar dietary requirements in a world where the
creators of Notes, and their new owners, are allowed to walk the streets
without fearing for their very lives. - Graham Reed, asr



Re: crazy golf

2001-06-01 Thread Simon Cozens

On Fri, Jun 01, 2001 at 03:53:53PM +0100, Barbie wrote:
 the only surviving English/British religion, Paganism

Nice try.

-- 
diff: usage diff [whatever] etc.
- plan9 has a bad day



Re: bad greg

2001-05-31 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, May 31, 2001 at 10:00:22AM +0100, Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
  FreeBSD users, Debian committers, OpenSRS registry (can do .co.uk's too),
   ^
 are they??

Indeed they are. http://www.earth.li/~noodles/computers.html

-- 
The Second Law of Thermodynamics:
If you think things are in a mess now, just wait!



Re: bad greg

2001-05-30 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, May 30, 2001 at 05:55:39PM +0100, Neil Ford wrote:
 Mr Couzens

Die, alien slime!

-- 
When your hammer is C++, everything begins to look like a thumb. 
-- Steve Haflich, comp.lang.c++



Re: wantarray and Tied Hashed

2001-05-25 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, May 24, 2001 at 11:28:27AM +0100, Cross David - dcross wrote:
 my @array = $h{two};
  ^
In perl 5 at least, *this* is your scalar context.

-- 
Little else matters than to write good code.
-- Karl Lehenbauer



Re: Email Style (was: Re: Election Manifestos)

2001-05-24 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, May 24, 2001 at 09:21:08AM +1000, Damian Conway wrote:
 Well, I would if you'd just stop putting those evil thoughts in my head...

Evil Ideas BOF at TPC. ISAGN.

-- 
God Save the Queen!
And let Satan take the Prime Minister...
- Tanuki, in the monastery.



Re: Election Manifestos

2001-05-24 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, May 24, 2001 at 09:59:12AM +0100, Richard Clamp wrote:
 Ah, he'd be fine if it weren't for those fucking mood swings.

You mean I'm nice at times?

-- 
Ever wake up feeling like a null pointer? -Allan Pratt



Re: Election Manifestos

2001-05-23 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, May 23, 2001 at 09:43:23AM +0100, Leon Brocard wrote:
 It didn't hit critical mass. Discuss.

Yet Another Webmail Client; it wasn't exactly filling a gaping niche.
(And I say that as someone who may soon be maintaining one of the others...)

-- 
4.2BSD may not be a complete disaster, but it does a good job of emulating one.



Re: Election Manifestos

2001-05-23 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, May 23, 2001 at 11:04:19AM +0100, Simon Wistow wrote:
 that Mail::Cclient is powerful but complicated and can be a bitch to
 install,

And use. Ripping that fucker out would be my first act. :)
There's also http://www.horde.org/imp/ which is reasonably popular.

-- 
Jesus ate my mouse or some similar banality.
-- Megahal (trained on asr), 1998-11-06



Re: Election Manifestos

2001-05-23 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, May 23, 2001 at 11:17:14AM +0100, Simon Wistow wrote:
 But Mail::Cclient is also unbeleivably powerful. Lying round on my HD
 there's a Mail::Cclient::Simple which amkes everything much easier but
 it's one of many projects I've never got round to finishing. Why
 reinvent the wheel by rolling my own or using 5 or 6 different modules
 when one will do.
 
Because it doesn't exist? :) OTOH, Mail::Cclient does do NNTP as well, which
would be a boost, because WING is meant to be the Web IMAP and NNTP Gateway.

 Imp was crap when we started and it's also PHP based. I like PHP (/me
 gets coat) but I wouldn't do a large scale application in it (especially
 since I had just just done one then and hit some very large limitations)
 plus it doesn't have the community support that Perl does or CPAN and it
 was difficult to extract presentation from logic.

If I were to deploy Imp, I wouldn't care how much community support PHP had,
I'd care how much community support Imp had.

-- 
Don't worry about people stealing your ideas.   If your ideas are any good, 
you'll have to ram them down people's throats.
 -- Howard Aiken



Re: Election Manifestos

2001-05-23 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, May 23, 2001 at 09:50:47PM +0100, Leon Brocard wrote:
 @Mail (http://webbasedemail.com/) copied my code, my docs, and my
 images without telling me, added a configuration file, and sold it. I
 only found out about it by accident, which wasn't good. (it's changed
 a lot since).

This is 100% within their rights.

 They could have handled it better. They could have told me about it,

Yes, but they didn't have to.

 So either I break up and cry at how lax the Artistic License is and
 inflict viral GPL on all my code, or I just keep on going hacking
 code. Which do I do? ;-)

If you didn't want your code to be used under the license terms you
set, YOU SHOULD NOT HAVE SET THEM. Deal with it.

-- 
It's 106 miles from Birmingham, we've got an eighth of a tank of gas,
half a pack of Dorritos, it's dusk, and we're wearing contacts.
- Malcolm Ray



Re: Election Manifestos

2001-05-22 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, May 22, 2001 at 04:16:16PM +0100, Chris Heathcote wrote:
 From air-conditioned tubes, thru to RIPA, to cheap petrol, it's
 bandwagon-jumping.

Ah, congratulations! You seem to have been completely politically
brainwashed; it's become so de rigeur for parties to completely
disregard the will of the people that when one actually even *claims* to
be concerned about matters that people will get up and shout about,
they're immediately decried.

It's one of those irregular verbs, isn't it: Labour is interested in
what concerns the people; the LibDems are true democrats; the Tories are
jumping on bandwagons.

Not that I'm accusing anyone of hypocracy, of course.

Perhaps bandwagon-jumping is in fact the essence of democracy.

 I have yet to see a Conservative talk eloquently and knowledgably about the
 subjects they're making promises on. 

I've yet to hear a Labour MP talk eloquently about anything at all. Anyone
ever talked - sorry, tried talking - to their MP about RIP?

 Which is fucking scary.

This is even scarier, since, under Rule One, they're probably going to get
elected again.

-- 
\let\l\let\l\d\def\l\a\active\l~\catcode~`?\a~`;\a\d;{~`};!\a\d!{?;~}\l?\the;#
!;]!\l]\l;\.!;,!;\%!;=!]=\d],\expandafter;[!][{=%{\message[};\$!=${\uccode`'.
\uppercase{,=,%,{%'}}};*!=*{\advance.by}]#\number;/!=/{*-1}\newcount.=\-{*-};-
!]-\-;^!=^{*1};\ != {.`\ $};@!=@{,.,#`@^$}.`#*`'$.!0-!$//$^$ .``^$*!$^$.!0-!/
$!-!^$@*!$ *!*!*!*!$@-!$ .!0-!-!$.``^$^^$.`-!*`$@*!$%}\batchmode



Re: Election Manifestos

2001-05-22 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, May 22, 2001 at 04:44:25PM +0100, Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 We vote for the encumbent party until they screw up big time and then we
 switch and repeat the process.

Except we don't while they can arrange for elections to be when everyone's
forgotten about their big screwups. Also, in fact, most of the voters are too
oblivious to or closed-minded about or basically too damned stupid to
recognise their big screw-ups anyway. 

Besides, what do you call a big screw up? The Dome was a screw-up from start
to finish, but it hasn't made a scrap of difference. FM was handled amazingly
badly, but that hasn't made any difference either. Nor has the Hindujas, or
Mandelson or Robinson. The NHS? Health of the nation not quite a big enough
screw-up? Or the schools?

Deciding who should govern us is far too important to be left to the plebs.

 There's no point judging the parties on what they say they'll do, only on
 what they did last time they were in power.

Right, yes, which is why we - sorry, you plural, I was way out of the country
at the time - elected Labour based on their fantastic performance last time
which lead to the General Strike and the Winter of Discontent. Sorry, a
nanosecond of thought would show that that is complete bullshit.

-- 
In related wibbling, I can see an opening for the four lusers of the
Apocalypse... I didn't change anything, My e-mail doesn't work,
I can't print and Is the network broken?.
- Paul Mc Auley



Re: Election Manifestos

2001-05-22 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, May 22, 2001 at 05:16:41PM +0100, Jonathan Peterson wrote:
Labour were voted in on the basis of the Tories screw ups. 

Yes, so what you said about the party's previous record as, indeed,
irrelevant.

 Labour hasn't screwed up yet. 

Thanks, that's going in my sigfile.

Oh, and fix your bloody line length.

-- 
Thus spake the master programmer:
After three days without programming, life becomes meaningless.
-- Geoffrey James, The Tao of Programming



Re: Election Manifestos

2001-05-22 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, May 22, 2001 at 05:37:23PM +0100, Roger Burton West wrote:
 If you can't be bothered to take a few minutes to look, why the hell are
 you posting about it?

But I wanna type, I wanna type, I wanna type!

Roger, where we come from we have a word for people like that.

-- 
I did write and prove correct a 20-line program in January, but I made
the mistake of testing it on our VAX and it had an error, which two
weeks of searching didn't uncover, so there went one publication out the
window.  - David Gries, 1980



Re: O'Reilly Safari - anyone use it?

2001-05-20 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, May 19, 2001 at 09:10:02PM -0700, Paul Makepeace wrote:
 I'm curious what the perceived payback is on books: kudos on the one
 hand, benefit to humankind on the other, and then cash. How does it
 all stack up?

The kudos is fun but unless you write something completely
earth-shattering, you're quickly out of fashion. I see the cash as an
incentive to get books written that might not otherwise have been
written, because again, unless you're writing something
earth-shattering or coming out with something new every six months or
so, sales will dry up. Royalties are bonuses, they buy goodies: a
holiday here, a new computer there. And soon, I expect, I'll not be
getting so much in from Beg. Perl, and they'll be buying jewellery for
the other half or video games.

I do it for the benefit - Beg. Perl was written to help one single
individual learn Perl, and if other people have learnt Perl from it,
that's a bonus; the book I'm writing at the moment, I'm doing it because
I want there to be a really damned good book about XS out there, and
there isn't. If I'm going to write a book, it's because I *really
really* want to write it, so the money is in a sense immaterial.

So why don't I forego the cash and do it all under an open publication
license? Well, firstly, I do: I spent rather a lot of time helping fix
up the Perl documentation, and now I'm planning a bunch of books under
the OPL. But if a publisher's going to throw money at me for writing
something, I'm far more likely to sit down and get on with it, rather
than getting bored and hacking Perl instead. Well, that's the plan,
anyway. Sometimes it doesn't work like that, either. :)

-- 
The use of COBOL cripples the mind; its teaching should, therefore, be
regarded as a criminal offence.
-- Edsger W. Dijkstra, SIGPLAN Notices, Volume 17, Number 5



Re: O'Reilly Safari - anyone use it?

2001-05-20 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sun, May 20, 2001 at 11:23:05AM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 I have in the past had a pirate copy of O'Reillys Network Bookshelf ...
 but a) I would not have paid for the CD in the first place and b)  Iliked
 what I saw so much that I went on to buy a whole bookcase full of
 O'Reilly stuff. 

I'm *sure* at some level, the publishers know this, but they'd rather
not admit it. :) If you release a book as a computer file, *IT WILL GET
COPIED*. Don't think they're too stupid not to realise this.

But people like having nice bound paper copies of things. Having it on
line just isn't the same. That's why O'Reilly publishes copies of
things that *are* freely available, like the Linux Network
Administrator's Guide.

-- 
People who love sausages, respect the law, and work with IT standards
shouldn't watch any of them being made.
- Peter Gutmann  



Re: O'Reilly Safari - anyone use it?

2001-05-20 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sun, May 20, 2001 at 08:49:56AM +0100, Dave Cross wrote:
 I disagree. IMO, posting a link to site containing pirate copies of books 
 _is_ advocating piracy. YMMV.

Here is how to do it. Now *you* have a choice.

Have you read A treatise on the construction of locks?

-- 
The C Programming Language -- A language which combines the power of
assembly language with the flexibility of assembly language.



Re: London.pm List Weekly Summary 2001-05-14

2001-05-18 Thread Simon Cozens

On Fri, May 18, 2001 at 12:21:47PM +0100, Leon Brocard wrote:
 Now all I have to do is not volunteer for the p5p summary, Leon

You're a marked man, you realise?

-- 
If that makes any sense to you, you have a big problem.
-- C. Durance, Computer Science 234



Re: Enough!

2001-05-17 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, May 17, 2001 at 10:27:47AM +0100, Simon Wistow wrote:
 Fairly easy to write your own 'Wildfire'-esque system with this. Hook it
 into Mister House (open source home automation program,
 http://misterhouse.net/) and you could do some really funky things by
 just phoning up your house 

Mandrake has already done this, I think.

 [ring ring, ring ring]
 Dipsy : hello
  ^ YM Operator. :)
 Simon : I need an exit

-- 
Chomsky is COBOL
-- Sean Burke



Re: pc components

2001-05-17 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, May 17, 2001 at 11:03:35AM +0100, AEF wrote:
  When I last ordered a HDD from Dabs, they mailed me a couple of days
 later to say that it wasn't in stock (there website said it was).

My motherboard from Dabs has spent two days awaiting credit card clearance
and two days awaiting despatch. It *is* in stock, it's just taking them
four days - and counting - to get around to shipping it.

Simply aren't much better. Took them three weeks to get stuff in stock.

-- 
but I'm one guy working weekends - what the hell is MS's excuse?
We don't care, we don't have to, we're the phone company.
- Ben Jemmet, Paul Tomblin.



Re: pc components

2001-05-17 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, May 17, 2001 at 03:25:22PM +0100, Martin Ling wrote:
 I haven't seen a really good one for SOMEBODY SET UP US THE BOMB yet.
 apt-get install the-bomb doesn't qualify.

dpkg --configure ?

-- 
I don't think so, said Rene Descartes.  Just then, he vanished.



Re: More Questions

2001-05-17 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, May 17, 2001 at 05:15:56PM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
 Did you mean like this?

 tie my %scores, 'Tie::Hash::Rank';
 [overengineering snipped]

Or you could do it in two lines:

my $i;
my %rank = map { $_ = ++$i } sort {$scores{$a} = $scores{$b}} keys %scores;

-- 
teco  /dev/audio
- Ignatios Souvatzis



Re: pc components

2001-05-17 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, May 17, 2001 at 08:12:52PM +0100, Leon Brocard wrote:
 The same happened to me.  I've given up buying things on the
 Internet. I do all my research on the web, and then head down to
 Tottenham Court Road to actually buy it. The prices are generally
 comparable, and you get it *there and then*.

   They're calling it shops or `S-Commerce' and it's being rolled out in
   cities and towns nationwide.

   It's a real revelation, according to Malcolm Fosbury, a middleware
   engineer from Hillingdon. You just walk into one of these shops
   and they have all sorts of things for sale.

   Fosbury was particularly impressed by a clothes shop he discovered
   while browsing in central London. Shops seem to be the ideal medium
   for transactions of this type. I can actually try out a jacket and
   see if it fits me. Then I can visualize the way I would look if I
   was wearing the clothing. This is possible using a high definition
   2D viewing system, or mirror as it has become known.

   Shops, which are frequently aggregated into shopping portals or
   high streets, are becoming increasingly popular with the cash-rich
   time-poor generation of new consumers. Often located in densely
   populated areas people can find them extremely convenient.

   And Malcolm is not alone in being impressed by shops. Some days I
   just don't have the time to download huge Flash animations of
   rotating trainers and then wait five days for them to be delivered
   in the hope that they will actually fit, says Sandra Bailey, a
   systems analyst from Chelsea. This way I can actually complete the
   transaction in real time and walk away with the goods. Being able
   see whether or not shoes and clothing fit has been a real bonus for
   Bailey, I used to spend my evenings boxing up gear to return.
   Sometimes the clothes didn't fit, sometimes they just sent the
   wrong stuff.

   Shops have a compelling commercial story to tell too, according to
   Gartner Group retail analyst Carl Baker. There are massive
   efficiencies in the supply chain. By concentrating distribution to a
   series of high volume outlets in urban centres-typically close to
   where people live and work-businesses can make dramatic savings in
   fulfillment costs. Just compare this with the wasteful practise of
   delivering items piecemeal to people's homes.

   Furthermore, allowing consumers to receive goods when they actually
   want them could mean an end to the frustration of returning home to
   find a despatch notice telling you that your goods are waiting in a
   delivery depot the other side of town. But it's not just the
   convenience and time-saving that appeals to Fosbury, Visiting a
   shop is real relief for me. I mean as it is I spend all day in front
   of a bloody computer.

   from Benjamin Gill, Information  Research, P-Four Consultancy Ltd, TEL:
   (44) 0171 924 3233, FAX: (44) 0171 978 5304, E-Mail: [EMAIL PROTECTED]  

-- 
We *have* dirty minds. This is not news. - Kake Pugh



Re: Latest Perl Journal

2001-05-16 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, May 16, 2001 at 01:19:36PM +0100, Robin Houston wrote:
 What's the footnote on page 78, Dave?

IAND, but... I like the fact that the new name includes the word Symbol,
since it means that we can also call it
The::Module::Formerly::Known::as::Sub::Approx.

-- 
It's God.  No, not Richard Stallman, or Linus Torvalds, but God.
(By Matt Welsh)



Re: A look over the shoulder of an XP programmer (auf deutsch)

2001-05-16 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, May 16, 2001 at 02:37:25PM +0200, Philip Newton wrote:
  Well it isn't English, but it's *almost* comprehensible...
 Sounds a bit like dadadodo, only it makes more sense :)

Which does? :)

-- 
Irrigation of the land with seawater desalinated by fusion power is ancient.
It's called 'rain'.
-- Michael McClary, in alt.fusion



Re: A look over the shoulder of an XP programmer (auf deutsch)

2001-05-16 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, May 16, 2001 at 02:08:40PM +0100, Robert Thompson wrote:
 Having two people look at/develop a piece of code is better than one.
 Therefore having three people must be even better.
 But why stop there - why not four, five, six . . .
 Better yet - design/develop by committee!

You've hit the fundamental problem with XP. Getting anything done requires
two programmers to agree on something; this, as everyone knows, is impossible.

-- 
So remember when you're feeling very small and insecure
How amazingly unlikely is your birth,
And pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space,
'Cause there's bugger-all down here on Earth. (Monty Python)



Re: A look over the shoulder of an XP programmer (auf deutsch)

2001-05-16 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, May 16, 2001 at 04:31:18PM +0200, Philip Newton wrote:
 Simon Cozens wrote:
  That's not argument, it's just contradiction!
 I'm sorry; I'm not allowed to argue with you unless you've paid.

Ah, you going into consulting as well, eh?

-- 
The elder gods went to Suggoth and all I got was this lousy T-shirt.



Re: Enough!

2001-05-15 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 10:10:23AM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
 we are considering funding the development of a procmail-a-like for
 snail-mail.

I want a procphone.

-- 
VMS must die!



Re: Enough!

2001-05-15 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 12:15:32PM +0100, Martin Ling wrote:
 On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 12:04:24PM +0100, James Powell wrote:
  Heh, don't forget to have a RBL-like list of source telephone numbers.
 Definitely. A whitelist too, of course.

Now *this* is why I want programmable mobile phones.

-- 
Be not anxious about what you have, but about what you are.
-- Pope St. Gregory I



Re: Enough!

2001-05-15 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 12:30:59PM +0100, Martin Ling wrote:
 Ho hum. If I wasn't trying to get some work done, I'd grab sphinx and
 write some code.

One of the things I plan to do on my way around America after TPC is sit
down with Kevin and DHD and start writing some funky robots. sphinx +
infobot + reefknot + festival -- why hire a secretary when you can write
one? :)

-- 
An algorithm must be seen to be believed.
-- D.E. Knuth



Re: Enough!

2001-05-15 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 12:43:59PM +0100, James Powell wrote:
  No; many people withhold automatically, it a legitimate privacy concern. 
 That's what the terse message is for (reveal yourself, or bugger off).
 I suppose it could go to answerphone.

Caller detect doesn't work for international calls either.

-- 
but I'm one guy working weekends - what the hell is MS's excuse?
We don't care, we don't have to, we're the phone company.
- Ben Jemmet, Paul Tomblin.



Re: Enough!

2001-05-15 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 01:25:23PM +0100, Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 Simon Cozens [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
  Caller detect doesn't work for international calls either.
 
 Untrue. When I get calls from friends in Sweden I can see who they
 are.

And when I get calls from Japan, which happens about twice a week, I
can't.

-- 
Britain has football hooligans, Germany has neo-Nazis, and France has farmers. 
-The Times



Re: see attachment

2001-05-14 Thread Simon Cozens

On Mon, May 14, 2001 at 10:52:50AM +0100, Peter Haworth wrote:
 I keep meaning to ask, where do all these plan9 bad day quotes come from?

The plan9 fortune file. It's the mistakes they made while they were
developing it.

-- 
yes /dev/kmem  # Shutdown is broken. This'll have to do
- plan9 has a bad day



Re: Politics (was RE: BOFHs requiring license)

2001-05-14 Thread Simon Cozens

On Mon, May 14, 2001 at 11:58:42AM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
 I recall the previous government being impressively dishonest about a great
 many things.

When was the last government that was *not* impressively dishonest?
I think there might have been one around 1868, but I'm not sure.

 The previous government didn't appear to have much grasp of economics
 either.

Similar remarks apply.

 IIRC they did *not* promise to introduce PR, but to look in to it.

Ah, yes. That's like we're listening, isn't it, in response to the
fuel crisis? We're not going to do anything, but we're happy to listen.

 Oh, and that silly Tory claim that there have been nnn 'stealth' taxes is
 easily debunked when you notice that most of them were either announced
 in previous *TORY* budgets or are the usual tax escalators which, again,
 the previous government was happy to use.  If you ignore all of those, I
 wonder how many of those 'stealth' taxes would really exist.

There are some contractors here, I understand, who might have something
to say about government policy on taxation.

-- 
The FSF is not overly concerned about security.  - FSF



Re: BOFHs requiring license

2001-05-14 Thread Simon Cozens

On Mon, May 14, 2001 at 10:37:23AM +0100, Cross David - dcross wrote:
 Here's a pretty fundamental issue. Why do so many people seem to think that
 low taxes are good? 

Rule one, man, rule one.

-- 
TorgoX EFNet is like one big advertisement for lobotomies.



Re: Politics (was RE: BOFHs requiring license)

2001-05-14 Thread Simon Cozens

On Mon, May 14, 2001 at 12:16:27PM +0100, Matthew Jones wrote:
 It also irtritates me when the oil companies hike fuel prices and the dump
 the pump lobby respond by suggesting that the government drop tax. Why
 don't they ever have a go at BP or Shell?

You don't elect BP or Shell.

-- 
He was a modest, good-humored boy.  It was Oxford that made him insufferable.



Re: Politics (was RE: BOFHs requiring license)

2001-05-14 Thread Simon Cozens

On Mon, May 14, 2001 at 11:17:14AM +0100, Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 2. A teacher can't be alone in a room with a pupil unless the door is open.

I know it's one of those Zen koans, but I just can't work it out.

-- 
Feed me on TOASTIES! There's no HALL for PHILOSOPHERS ON FRIDAYS.
- Henry Braun is Oxford Zippy



Re: Politics (was RE: BOFHs requiring license)

2001-05-14 Thread Simon Cozens

On Mon, May 14, 2001 at 03:49:26PM +0100, Jonathan Peterson wrote:
 Unless the door to the pupil's mind is open then there is no teacher.
 And he was enlightened.

http://simon-cozens.org/hacks/grok

-- 
For detailed information on the info command, type man info.
- plan9 has a bad day



Re: see attachment

2001-05-14 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, May 12, 2001 at 04:08:27PM +0100, Greg McCarroll wrote:
 Of course we could make a cyberpunk movie instead, now let 
 me thing about it  

IN AD 1987, PERL WAS BEGINNING.

-- 
The PROPER way to handle HTML postings is to cancel the article, then hire a
hitman to kill the poster, his wife and kids, and fuck his dog and smash his
computer into little bits.  Anything more is just extremism.
- Paul Tomblin, in the monastery.



Re: JAMES DUNCAN

2001-05-14 Thread Simon Cozens

On Mon, May 14, 2001 at 04:45:13PM +0100, Dominic Mitchell wrote:
 Particularly with the lack of an Internet Driving License, anyway.

It's crap, but... http://www.ecdl.com/

-- 
emacs: Terminal type emacs is not powerful enough to run Emacs.



Re: JAMES DUNCAN

2001-05-14 Thread Simon Cozens

On Mon, May 14, 2001 at 05:54:26PM +0200, Niklas Nordebo wrote:
  It's crap, but... http://www.ecdl.com/
 Isn't that more of a Microsoft Driving License?

It may have escaped your notice but the people who need it tend to be the
people likely to use Microsoft software...

-- 
IT support will, from 1 October 2000, be provided by college and
departmental card locks. - J-P Stacey



Re: BOFHs requiring license

2001-05-14 Thread Simon Cozens

On Mon, May 14, 2001 at 01:58:41PM -0400, Piers Cawley wrote:
 Simon Cozens [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
  Rule one, man, rule one.
 What? Always be wary of smiling old men?

lathos purl, rule one?
purl it has been said that rule one is People Are Stupid

-- 
  They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the
   Wright brothers.  But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.
 -- Carl Sagan



Re: BOFHs requiring license

2001-05-13 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, May 12, 2001 at 03:30:31AM -0700, Paul Makepeace wrote:
 http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/7/18866.html
 Absurd, laughable and bizarre. What *is* wrong with the UK?

Don't ask me, you elected 'em. And it looks like you're all stupid enough
to do it *again*.

-- 
Pray to God, but keep rowing to shore.
 -- Russian Proverb



Re: BOFHs requiring license

2001-05-13 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sun, May 13, 2001 at 05:22:49PM +0100, Greg McCarroll wrote:
 How can any socialist not feel that when it came to the crunch socialism was
 rejected by intelligent people who understood its principals and benefits
 intimitadly because they could see it would not work for modern Britain?

Which intelligent people who understood it would that be, then?

-- 
Hi, this is Ken. What's the root password?



Re: BOFHs requiring license

2001-05-13 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sun, May 13, 2001 at 05:35:24PM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
 Do the Lib Dems think along these lines?  No-one knows cos the LDs have
 never seemed to have any policies ever.

Actually, I like the idea of parties which don't have any policies. They're
supposed to represent what we tell them to support, remember, not the other
way around.

-- 
Some people claim that the UNIX learning curve is steep, but at least you
only have to climb it once.



Re: BOFHs requiring license

2001-05-13 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sun, May 13, 2001 at 06:30:44PM +0100, Martin Ling wrote:
 Hey, what if we had a system where we just elected a *candidate* we
 liked, like one for each local area or something? Pretty crazy, huh?

Democracy? In this country? It wouldn't work.

Democracy is overrated. I think a meritocracy is needed. Perhaps measured by
Perl competence.

-- 
   User: In 1793 the french king was executed.
MegaHAL: HA HA HA! CORRECT. ALTHOUGH, EXECUTED HAS MULTIPLE MEANINGS. 



Re: see attachment

2001-05-12 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, May 12, 2001 at 04:08:27PM +0100, Greg McCarroll wrote:
 Aha - some dark evil force creates a website (BIG FONTS) that attracts young
 people from the world and has lots of flashy stuff on it (ok it would be
 flash, but this is a movie, so its just going to be BIG FONTS AND SWIRLING
 STUFF) that is actual fact brainwashing the teenagers to worship the website 

Snow Crash, essentially.

-- 
diff: usage diff [whatever] etc.
- plan9 has a bad day



Re: see attachment

2001-05-12 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, May 12, 2001 at 08:06:48PM +0100, Martin Ling wrote:
  Snow Crash, essentially.
 
 I was thinking recently about how well it would work as a film.

You're obviously not the only one:
http://www.corona.bc.ca/films/details/snowcrash.html

-- 
Intel engineering seem to have misheard Intel marketing strategy. The phrase
was Divide and conquer not Divide and cock up
(By [EMAIL PROTECTED], Alan Cox)



Re: Monitors

2001-05-11 Thread Simon Cozens

On Fri, May 11, 2001 at 04:22:04PM +0100, Dominic Mitchell wrote:
 How many things do you have on top of your monitor?

Nothing. If your monitor cost as much as mine, you'd keep it sacrosanct
too.

-- 
SM is fun.  ADSM is not.
Safe, Sane, Consensual... three words that cannot used to describe
ADSM.
- Graham Reed, sdm.



Re: Bah!

2001-05-10 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, May 10, 2001 at 11:22:45AM +0100, Cross David - dcross wrote:
 Do you write it in raw Tex/LaTeX, or do you generate that from some other
 format (like, perhaps, XML)? I'd be interested in seeing the intermediate
 stages.

For my writing these days, I do

SGML - tex  ( - pdf | - dvi - ps )
 - html
 - text

I suppose I should use XML instead, but I'm a dinosaur. No, I haven't tried
writing SGML with Perl yet, but I will. 

Simon

-- 
It's difficult to see the picture when you are inside the frame.



Re: Movies (was Re: Buffy musings ...)

2001-05-09 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, May 09, 2001 at 08:55:16AM -0600, Nathan Torkington wrote:
 On the subject of music (despite the Subject: of movies) ... anyone
 here into trad. Irish instrumental music?

Yes, very definitely. Unfortunately I don't play anything vaguely relevant,
apart from the guitar. I'd *really* love to be able to play the Uillean 
pipes. One day.

-- 
For true believers, LORD would be K\textsc{nuth} in TeX, and
L\textsc{amport} in LaTeX. Atheists prefer \phantom{LORD}. Agnostics
may need to use the ifthen package.
 - Chris Boyd, comp.text.tex



Re: Apocalypse Two

2001-05-04 Thread Simon Cozens

On Fri, May 04, 2001 at 08:14:47PM +1000, Damian Conway wrote:
   package DotsForArrows;
   use Filter::Simple;
   FILTER { s/\b\.(?=[a-z_\$({[])/-/gi };

That's BORING. Obviously the right way to do it is to allow lvalue
overloaded operators, and overload . for everything.

-- 
The man who sees, on New Year's day, Mount Fuji, a hawk, and an eggplant
is forever blessed.
-- Old Japanese proverb



Re: MySQL - Oracle wrapper/compat. libs

2001-04-27 Thread Simon Cozens

On Fri, Apr 27, 2001 at 06:50:18PM +0100, Leon Brocard wrote:
 OK, I give you Perl, the Perl debugger, and B::Generate. First one to
 optimise Perl code (maybe replacing bits of Perl with XS on the fly?)
 gets a pat on the back.

I think NI-S is working on it; see recent perl6-language discussion about
tying.

-- 
 I never thought I'd say this, but you're getting very strange.
Thank God: I thought it was everybody else.
- J-P Stacey



Re: Good Accountants

2001-04-27 Thread Simon Cozens

On Fri, Apr 27, 2001 at 05:55:06PM -0400, Alex Page wrote:
 Blimey, there's an Oxford perl mongers! You mean I'm not the
 only perl coder in this city?!?

No.

-- 
I find that anthropomorphism really doesn't help me with a place full 
of bugs. -- Megahal (trained on asr), 1998-11-06



Re: Good Accountants

2001-04-27 Thread Simon Cozens

On Fri, Apr 27, 2001 at 11:00:40PM +0100, Simon Cozens wrote:
 On Fri, Apr 27, 2001 at 05:55:06PM -0400, Alex Page wrote:
  Blimey, there's an Oxford perl mongers! You mean I'm not the
  only perl coder in this city?!?
 No.

By which I mean, yes, you're not. And, of course, we've got Malcolm
Beattie, who ranks as one of Perl's minor dieties.

-- 
Will your long-winded speeches never end?
What ails you that you keep on arguing?
-- Job 16:3



Re: Boozers in Dublin

2001-04-27 Thread Simon Cozens

On Fri, Apr 27, 2001 at 11:07:08PM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
 Can any of you boozy reprobates recommend a boozer in Dublin for a geeky
 piss-up?

My first recommendation would be the Messrs. Maguire on Burgh Key is a
nice place - very *big* pub (it's on three levels) and serves pretty
good food. It reminds me a lot of the place opposite London Bridge tube
station where we had the MJD Meet.

The Oliver St. John Gogarty is a bit smaller, and I'm not sure about the
food, but it's a good place to hang out, drink and listen to Irish folk. 
Possibly a good idea to move there after Messrs. Maguire, because it
Maguire's gets bloody packed.

As a last resort, anywhere in Temple Bar is worth looking at.

-- 
In this talk, I would like to speculate a little, on ... the development
of intelligent life. I shall take this to include the human race, even
though much of its behaviour throughout history has been pretty
stupid... - Stephen Hawking

 PGP signature


Re: DBD::*-bind_param() ?

2001-04-27 Thread Simon Cozens

On Fri, Apr 27, 2001 at 12:16:32PM -0700, Paul Makepeace wrote:
 Clearly says someone who's hasn't installed Oracle recently!

You can install Oracle now? Wow, they must have really been fixing it 
of late.

-- 
If the code and the comments disagree, then both are probably wrong.
-- Norm Schryer



Re: Company Name

2001-04-25 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 25, 2001 at 09:02:16AM +0100, Robert Shiels wrote:
 How did contractors here come up with the names for their companies

Your main choice is between sounding established, professional or
informal.

Established companies contain merely names, and give no indication of what
they do: Shiels and Company. 
(Examples from real life: Ede and Ravenscroft, Coutts.)

Professional companies possibly contain a name and give *some* indication of
what they do: Robert Shiels Consulting, Shiels IT Services.
(Examples: Merchant Ivory Productions, Barclay's Bank.)

Informal companies contain one or two words which *hint* at what they do,
and no names (and are much harder to come up with. :) : The SAP Workshop
(Examples: Microsoft, NetThink.)

-- 
The FSF is not overly concerned about security.  - FSF



Re: Company Name

2001-04-25 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 25, 2001 at 01:39:38PM +0100, Robert Shiels wrote:
 I thought of Shiels IT Services,
 but one potential acronym of this is not very pleasing :-)

Well, that might be a feature, you know. After all, it's what a lot of people
think of when they think of contractors.

-- 
Simon:  `hello kitty' douche. If you are getting some and you know what
hello kitty is... Well, you're an exceptionally lucky man.
  -- Megahal, trained on IRC.



Re: Komodo

2001-04-19 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Apr 19, 2001 at 11:02:03AM +0100, Piers Cawley wrote:
 Then you're missing half the fun. Seriously. M-x compile was the
 reason I started using emacs in the first place.

And I \N{WHITE HEART SUIT} M-x gdb

-- 
I respect faith, but doubt is what gives you an education.
-- Wilson Mizner



Re: JOB: Another one (Banking)

2001-04-19 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Apr 19, 2001 at 01:38:44PM +0100, Paul Mison wrote:
 There's a fairly long standing and, from what I remember, well
 respected habit of using JOB in the subject line- if it really annoys
 you, filtering on that should reduce the jobness of the list quite a
 lot.

Ah, bingo. Thanks.

 Of course, if anyone is doing this they'll be missing this thread too...

But if they're already doing it, they know about it, so it doesn't matter.

-- 
Within a computer, natural language is unnatural.



Re: (Don't Laugh) Buying PGP

2001-04-19 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Apr 19, 2001 at 05:12:57PM +0200, Philip Newton wrote:
 Can't you call it an "Enterprise cross-platform file sharing solution" or
 something like that?

So is Napster.

-- 
DEC diagnostics would run on a dead whale.
-- Mel Ferentz



Re: next social meeting vs tube strike

2001-04-19 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Apr 19, 2001 at 05:12:20PM +0100, Mike Wyer wrote:
 The okapi was much better (think giraffe crossed with zebra with a
 tongue any muff diver would kill for)

Do they have bonobo? I thought bonobo were the generic sexual zoo inhabitant.

-- 
"MSDOS didn't get as bad as it is overnight -- it took over ten years
of careful development."
(By [EMAIL PROTECTED])



Re: What did I miss?

2001-04-18 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 18, 2001 at 11:28:58AM +0100, Lucy McWilliam wrote:
 has anyone noticed much traffic on the perl-cert list or is my
 subscription just funted?

No. Greg was going to tell us Ze Master Plan. I think it involves
alcohol.

-- 
The best book on programming for the layman is "Alice in Wonderland";
but that's because it's the best book on anything for the layman. 
- Alan Perlis



Re: CPAN search from mozilla address bar

2001-04-18 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 18, 2001 at 01:35:25PM +0100, Struan Donald wrote:
 no idea if anyone will find this useful but:
 if you use mozilla (on linux/*nix at least) stick this:

To do something similar for Netscape, look at
http://bofh.concordia.ca/ns/ns-cli.txt
(Netscape can call out to a CGI program to parse "commands" in the location
bar)

-- 
Actually Perl *can* be a Bondage  Discipline language but it's unique
among such languages in that it lets you use safe words. 
-- Piers Cawley



Re: Komodo

2001-04-18 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 18, 2001 at 11:58:00AM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 umm ... since Linux accounts (at a guess) for 75% of Perl usauge, thats
 quite an 'afterthought'. 

That's irrelevant. ActiveState's business is 90% Windows, so they do Windows
first.

-- 
ZenHam heh, yeah, but Aretha could be reading out /etc/services and
kick just so much ass :)



Re: Mourning clothes for London.pm

2001-04-18 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 18, 2001 at 10:29:43AM -0500, Mike Jarvis wrote:
 CNN reports that BtVS's SMG will wed Freddie Prinz.

You know you've been core hacking too long when you read that as "SVtB's set
magic".

-- 
Um. There is no David conspiracy. Definitely not. No Kate conspiracy either.
No. No, there is definitely not any sort of David conspiracy, and we are
definitely *not* in league with the Kate conspiracy. Who doesn't exist. And
nor does the David conspiracy. No. No conspiracies here. - Thorfinn, ASR



Re: Komodo

2001-04-18 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 18, 2001 at 10:23:34PM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 I can not see however a place in linux for any perl IDE that doesnt use a
 standard perl install. simple as that.

Then don't buy one. Those who do, will. Isn't the free market great?

-- 
Doubt is a pain too lonely to know that faith is his twin brother.
- Kahlil Gibran



Re: Komodo

2001-04-18 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 18, 2001 at 10:34:30PM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 but I should also add that I see anyhting which looks like splintering
 the nice world of One Big [*nix] Perl [1] into several different
 incompatible

AS Perl on Unix isn't incompatible.

-- 
dngor Every little bit of seaweed kelps.



Re: Komodo

2001-04-17 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, Apr 17, 2001 at 05:57:17PM +0100, Dean wrote:
 Has anyone got an views on it or the Linux version?

The Linux version is broken; it won't install, claiming you need a new
license.

brev lathos: I just talked to the Komodo lead. He suggests a) don't evaluate
Komodo on the Linux version, yet. b) we changed licnese schemes recently. If
absolutely necessary we can send you a new license.

-- 
BEWARE!  People acting under the influence of human nature.



Re: re-release of autodial

2001-04-17 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Apr 12, 2001 at 01:54:56PM +0100, Aaron Trevena wrote:
 it no longer kills dia

This appears not to be the case, as of dia 0.86.

-- 
I did write and prove correct a 20-line program in January, but I made
the mistake of testing it on our VAX and it had an error, which two
weeks of searching didn't uncover, so there went one publication out the
window.  - David Gries, 1980



Re: Komodo

2001-04-17 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, Apr 17, 2001 at 07:12:32PM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
 Methinks Activestate are too much in the Windows world

I note that the Linux distribution of Kodomo contained complete distributions
of Mozilla, Perl and Python.

-- 
The sky already fell.  Now what?  -- Steven Wright



Re: The Most Boring Thread Ever on London.pm : Cool Letter Heads

2001-04-13 Thread Simon Cozens

On Sat, Apr 14, 2001 at 12:04:15AM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 ooh .. that reminds me .. the Census man has just dropped a form in .. I
 didn't reallise it was this year .. excellent .. now dont forget .. your
 religion is 'Jedi' ok ?

"Discordian". No, seriously. (Fnord)

-- 
It is now pitch dark.  If you proceed, you will likely fall into a pit.



Re: CiP value =1.5?

2001-04-06 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Apr 05, 2001 at 11:24:57PM +, Robin Szemeti wrote:
 @P=split//,".URRUU\c8R";@d=split//,"\n?neht krow siht seod woh oS";sub
 p{@p{"r$p","u$p"}=(P,P);pipe"r$p","u$p";++$p;($q*=2)+=$f=!fork;map{$P=
 $P[$f^ord ($p{$_})6];$p{$_}=/^$P/ix?$P:close$_}keys%p}p;p;p;p;p;map{$p
 {$_}=~/^[P.]/ close$_}%p;wait until$?;map{/^r/$_}%p;$_=$d[$q];
 sleep rand(2)if/\S/;print
 
 not mine, but amusing

It's probably worrying if I can look at the above and think "That looks like
MJD's code".

-- 
King's Law of Clues :  Common sense is inversely proportional to the
academic intelligence of the person concerned.



Re: Silly postings

2001-04-06 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Apr 05, 2001 at 05:27:57PM +0100, Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 No, best pizza is in NY or the hypehnated environs.
 You go to Italky for the wine and the antipasti.

It's a hell of a trip back for the main course, though.

-- 
People in a Position to Know, Inc.



Re: Test

2001-04-05 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Apr 05, 2001 at 10:41:56AM +0100, Simon Wistow wrote:
 There's also Mail::Cclient (by Malcolm Beattie) which can be tricky to
 install and the interface is a bit unfriendly

That's the fault of the underlying Cclient library. :(

-- 
Sendmail may be safely run set-user-id to root.
-- Eric Allman, "Sendmail Installation Guide"



Re: sub BEGIN {}

2001-04-05 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Apr 05, 2001 at 02:54:25PM +0100, Martin Ling wrote:
 Grr. I don't *want* to turn into an elitist wanker

I seem to solve this by being one all along...

-- 
VMS must die!



Re: Grammar (was: Re: Linux.com Online Chat)

2001-04-04 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 04, 2001 at 10:31:41AM +0100, Mark Fowler wrote:
 Perl is easier to parse simply because all the irregularities are known
 
 and documented.  They're not in English.  In addition to the above
  ^^
Uhm, where?

 "The British Left Waffles on Argentina"

Perl beginners look away now. You're not going to enjoy this. :)

sub four { $_[0]x4 };   print four things;
open four, "/dev/null"; print four things;
package four; use subs qw(print); sub print{die@_}; print four things;
# (Why doesn't that one work properly?)

(And that's even without playing with sub things{})

Perl requires a similar amount of knowledge to parse, although the
knowledge is rather more domain specific - what subs are defined, what globs
are available, what packages are defined, what filehandles are open, and so
on.

-- 
Sauvin Remember: amateurs built the Ark; _professionals_ built the
Titantic.



Re: sub BEGIN {}

2001-04-04 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, Apr 03, 2001 at 09:19:32PM -0700, Paul Makepeace wrote:
 Paul, whose uni got nicked in fscking cambridge. 

"*think* *think* Don't they have enough universities of their own?"

-- 
Britain has football hooligans, Germany has neo-Nazis, and France has farmers. 
-The Times



Re: Grammar (was: Re: Linux.com Online Chat)

2001-04-04 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 04, 2001 at 02:10:11PM +0100, Mark Fowler wrote:
 Ah, but with perl code there is a definite 'correct' parsing (whatever
 /usr/bin/perl does[1]) but with the English language that isn't true.

I'm afraid that's as silly as me declaring that there's only one correct
parsing of English, and that's how *I* parse it.

-- 
For true believers, LORD would be K\textsc{nuth} in TeX, and
L\textsc{amport} in LaTeX. Atheists prefer \phantom{LORD}. Agnostics
may need to use the ifthen package.
 - Chris Boyd, comp.text.tex



Re: Test

2001-04-04 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 04, 2001 at 09:19:15PM +0100, Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
 Feature request - IMAP client.

Mail::IMAPClient exists, so I guess it's a real possibility. When I get a
spare second. (Yeah, right.)

-- 
We *have* dirty minds. This is not news.
- Kake Pugh



Re: Mail archiving scripts?

2001-04-04 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Apr 04, 2001 at 10:50:34PM +0100, Neil Ford wrote:
 Following on from recent topics, can anyone point me at any scripts to help
 with breaking up mailbox files?

This is what I do:

Use Mail::Audit in a loop over the mailbox, doing something like this:

 my ($y, $m) = (localtime)[5,4];
 my $date = sprintf("%04d%02d", $y+1900, $m+1);
 
 my %lists = (
regexp = "listname",
...
 );

for my $what (keys %lists) {
  my $where = $lists{$what};
  if ($from =~ /$what/i or $to =~ /$what/i or $cc =~/$what/i) {
$item-accept($folder.$where."-$date");
return;
  }
}
 
This means your mail gets filed to boxes like "london.pm-200104".
If you're using Mail::Audit for your incoming mail, this solution will
mean that new mail automatically gets filed to month-stamped mailboxes
as it comes in. When mutt scans your mailbox directory for new mail, it'll
pick up the new mailbox at the beginning of the month. Neat, eh? :)

-- 
} /* the next line is indented funny to preserve old indentation */
- plan9 has a bad day



Re: when are we going to see the caaaamels

2001-04-03 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, Apr 03, 2001 at 05:29:58PM +0100, dcross - David Cross wrote:
 I anyone thinks they owe for a slice, plesae let me know.

I think they would get a little upset if you started slicing up the
camels.

-- 
There is no distinction between any AI program and some existent game.



Re: Crazy Idea

2001-04-03 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, Apr 03, 2001 at 05:21:48PM +0100, Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
 Is dave cross written in Perl?

"Dave Cross Munging with Perl"

ISAGN.

-- 
Only two things are infinite: the universe and human ignorance. -A. Einstein



Re: The Open Constitution Project (was Re: Crazy Idea)

2001-04-03 Thread Simon Cozens

On Tue, Apr 03, 2001 at 06:56:25PM +0100, Jonathan Stowe wrote:
 OK.  SO we persuade Mr Horne to blag us electronic copies of the entire UK
 law, upload it to the CVS server on SourceForge and then announce the
 project on slashdot 

Bizarrely enough, I'm involved a project to do something *similar* for the
Japanese code of laws...

-- 
I forgot that I was *that* smart!
-- Ilya Zakharevich



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-30 Thread Simon Cozens

On Fri, Mar 30, 2001 at 09:13:16PM +0100, Greg McCarroll wrote:
 yip and you build in, a little 10 or 20 quid donation to YAS for
 everyone done, however this would probably be voluntary or some
 such - i dont really know. but if you are doing a training course
 that cost 500+ to attend, 10 or 20 seems reasonable.

I like that. "10% of the fees from this course will be donated to
Yet Another Society." Hmph. I s'pose I'd better join Yet Another
Mailing List. :)

-- 
"Darkly hinting of head hitting desk" 
-- Megahal (trained on asr), 1998-11-05



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-29 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Mar 29, 2001 at 10:33:59AM +0100, Greg McCarroll wrote:
 * Robert Shiels ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
  Have you thought about charging structures, SAP charge about 300gbp to take
  a certification exam, and they offer courses that are specifically designed
 
 i had thought about a 20 quid fee to be sent to YAS

I think (although I'm not sure) Greg sees the plan working the same way as
I do: we (the various trainers involved) provide training courses at our
usual rates which *prepare* the student to take an exam for a nominal fee
to gain accreditation. (ie, training courses don't include or substitute
for the exam.)

-- 
FAILURE:
When Your Best Just Isn't Good Enough

http://www.despair.com



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-29 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Mar 29, 2001 at 10:30:26AM +0100, Greg McCarroll wrote:
 ok, but i wouldn't worry about b. anytime soon, you have to remember
 Larry has said, he'd rather be certified than see perl certification
 (or something similar)

Bzzt. That was to do with ANSI certification.

-- 
"You can have my Unix system when you pry it from my cold, dead fingers."



Re: Buffycode (was Re: That book)

2001-03-29 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Mar 29, 2001 at 10:45:23AM +0100, Aaron Trevena wrote:
proposes the creation of a Parse::Perl::Approx module :)
^^
   
   What does it do?
  
  It, er... parses Perl.

Strictly speaking it doesn't do anything, due to not currently existing.

 ooh! I though only perl parsed perl.. how exactly does it parse perl...

A man who needs to go to my Parsing Perl talk at TPC!

-- 
Doubt is a pain too lonely to know that faith is his twin brother.
- Kahlil Gibran



Re: Social Meeting (fwd)

2001-03-29 Thread Simon Cozens

On Thu, Mar 29, 2001 at 12:25:38AM +0100, Lucy McWilliam wrote:
 On Wed, Mar 28, 2001 at 08:48:05PM +0100, Greg McCarroll wrote:
  ok it looks like PO
   .. or the anchor!
 
 Do either do real ale?

PO has a Cask Marque and is listed in CAMRA's 2001 Good Beer Guide.

So, uh, yes.

Incidentally, I'm setting up a real ale review page. Send real ale reviews
to [EMAIL PROTECTED] (Spring Cascade today at the Orange Brewery brewpub
in Pimlico. Not a bad beer.)

-- 
"On a normal ascii line, the only safe condition to detect is a 'BREAK'
- everything else having been assigned functions by Gnu EMACS."
(By Tarl Neustaedter)



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-28 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Mar 28, 2001 at 12:02:48PM +0100, alex wrote:
 ps the big killer is that there is no large corporate generating tons of
 noise about Perl - whereas this is not the case for Java.

Wait until TPC.

-- 
Thus spake the master programmer:
"After three days without programming, life becomes meaningless."
-- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-28 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Mar 28, 2001 at 02:58:36PM +0100, Greg McCarroll wrote:
 It's not just that, if a software house wants to support a languages
 interaction with its product, where does it go for Perl? P5P? CLPM?

NetThink? :)

 Also i think the lack of Perl certification, is one of the biggest
 problems with Perl work in london, coming from the other side of
 things.

Hmm. I wonder how we could go about fixing that.

-- 
King's Law of Clues :  Common sense is inversely proportional to the
academic intelligence of the person concerned.



Re: Job: I'm looking for one..

2001-03-28 Thread Simon Cozens

On Wed, Mar 28, 2001 at 09:05:43PM +0100, Matthew Byng-Maddick wrote:
 If I see a sensible plan for certification, this sounds sensible, but
 consider what most people think of eg. MCSEs.

That's mainly due to the M rather than the C.

-- 
She said that she was working for the ABC News,
It was as much of the alphabet as she knew how to use
-- Elvis Costello



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