arccot?

2010-09-24 Thread xPol
How to type the arccot function?

It seems strange it is not included in the lyx functions list. Isn't a latex 
function?


thank you 

---p
 



Re: arccot?

2010-09-24 Thread Daniel CLEMENT
xPol wrote:
 How to type the arccot function?
 
 It seems strange it is not included in the lyx functions list. Isn't a latex 
 function?

No, LaTeX stops at arctan...

If you use it often, just put in your document preamble:

\DeclareMathOperator{\arccot}{arccot}

and then you can typeset just as a builtin function.

But for functions that happen only once or twice, I usually find it
sufficient to type it as normal (math) text, then select it and apply
Roman font style.
 
 
 thank you 
 
 ---p
  
 
 
HTH,
-- 
Daniel CLEMENT




Re: IEEEtran file Inserting photo help please..............

2010-09-24 Thread Sachin Garg
On Tuesday 14 September 2010 08:05 AM, Uwe Stöhr wrote:
 Am 13.09.2010 07:20, schrieb step...@vinvish.com:
 
 In the end of the IEEE trans template there is an option to insert the
 authors photo in the Biography section
 If we do nothing a BOX printed with PLACE YOUR PHOTO HERE  appears
   I want to remove that and insert a photos there
 Can somebody help me out??
 
 What exactly is the problem? In the IEEEtran template there is an image
 named CV-image.png as example. Simply left-click on that image and
 select an image file you like.

I am also unable to add a photo. I can't also see this CV-image.png
file. I am on Ubuntu 10.04, LyX 1.6.5

Thanks,
Sachin



Re: IEEEtran file Inserting photo help please..............

2010-09-24 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Am 24.09.2010 14:39, schrieb Sachin Garg:


What exactly is the problem? In the IEEEtran template there is an image
named CV-image.png as example. Simply left-click on that image and
select an image file you like.


I am also unable to add a photo. I can't also see this CV-image.png
file. I am on Ubuntu 10.04, LyX 1.6.5


You need LyX 1.6.7 to get this. If you cannot update to that version, 
replace the files IEEEtran.lyx and IEEEtran.layout in your installation 
with these ones:


http://www.lyx.org/trac/export/35491/lyx-devel/branches/BRANCH_1_6_X/lib/layouts/IEEEtran.layout

and

http://www.lyx.org/trac/export/35491/lyx-devel/branches/BRANCH_1_6_X/lib/templates/IEEEtran.lyx

and afterwards reconfigure LyX (menu Tools-Reconfigure).

regards Uwe


more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Jose Quesada
Hi,
We've had previous discussions on whether or not it's useful to have some
kind of real-time collaboration in LyX.
The death of wave seemed to reinforce the idea that this is not a killer
feature, and people don't need it. Collaboration using a VCS is sufficient.

Well, recently I found two counterexamples.
One is http://docs.latexlab.org
A decent latex editor built on top of google docs.
The other one is... abiword. surprised :) ?
While being a crappy word processor, it's actually better than anything
built within a browser:
http://msevior.livejournal.com/28805.html
http://www.abisource.com/wiki/AbiCollab

I still think LyX would benefit from such functionality.
Thoughts?

Best,
-Jose

Jose Quesada, PhD.
Research scientist,
Max Planck Institute,
Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition,
Berlin
http://www.josequesada.name/
http://twitter.com/Quesada


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Kevin Brubeck Unhammer
2010/9/24 Jose Quesada ques...@gmail.com:
 Hi,
 We've had previous discussions on whether or not it's useful to have some
 kind of real-time collaboration in LyX.
 The death of wave seemed to reinforce the idea that this is not a killer
 feature, and people don't need it. Collaboration using a VCS is sufficient.

I think the problem with Wave is that... well... what's it for really?
It's not an editor, not a chat program, not...anything...except a tech
demonstration. Not likely to win the public over.

 Well, recently I found two counterexamples.
 One is http://docs.latexlab.org
 A decent latex editor built on top of google docs.
 The other one is... abiword. surprised :) ?
 While being a crappy word processor, it's actually better than anything
 built within a browser:
 http://msevior.livejournal.com/28805.html
 http://www.abisource.com/wiki/AbiCollab

 I still think LyX would benefit from such functionality.
 Thoughts?

For myself, I doubt I would use it much, however: I'm a geek and I
love version control. For other users, I think collaborative editing
would be a killer feature.

Not long ago I held a little demonstration of Zotero for some rather
non-geekier people, and the thing that really sold them (and got them
off Endnote) was the collaborative features. They thought the plugins
for OpenOffice and LyX sounded convenient, but were really
disappointed that there was no true Google Docs integration, as all of
them were mainly using Google Docs to write their master's theses...
again because they could edit the same document at the same time as
the rest of their group. Even the ones who plan on eventually getting
a LyX document in the end insist on copy-pasting back and forth
between Google Docs and LyX, just because it's supposedly so much more
convenient (yes, they lose formatting and have to re-add references;
they still do it).

Even from the slightly geekier camp I've had lots of requests to
install SubEthaEdit back when I ran OS X, so it's not just the
non-geeks who get hooked on that stuff.



best regards,

Kevin Brubeck Unhammer


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Gregory Jefferis
Hi Kevin, Jose et al,

We use version control (git) + to write papers in the lab.  It works fine
but handling merge conflicts is still difficult; the chaps in the lab are
all very computer literate but I regularly have to help out with a broken
merge. It's certainly too complicated for me to insist on with external
collaborators. For them I initially suggested LyX + track changes. However
LyX's track changes plays very poorly with VCS in LyX 1.6.X and this is only
partly solved in 2.0.

The beauty of real time editing is that it handles merge conflicts in a way
that is easy to understand and really pretty transparent.  Of course for it
to be transparent, there has to be a clear way to see who (and ideally when)
last edited any piece of text.  For my group and colleagues beyond the lab,
collaborative editing (a la SubEthaEdit) would be the killer feature that
would really expand the audience for LyX.  I hope that at some point this
will resonate with one of the developers with the skills to implement this
kind of feature.

Best,

Greg.

-- 
Gregory Jefferis, PhD
Division of Neurobiology
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology,
Hills Road,
Cambridge, CB2 0QH, UK.

http://www2.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/group-leaders/h-to-m/g-jefferis
http://www.neuroscience.cam.ac.uk/directory/profile.php?gsxej2
http://flybrain.stanford.edu






Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Rob Oakes
Hi Jose and other LyX-Users,

Very interesting articles, thanks for sending them.

While trying to digest the ideas, though, I found myself asking two questions 
and I'd be interested in your feedback.  The first question, of course is 
spurred by pure skepticism.

In what instances do you think this feature would be useful?

For my part, I'm not a collaborative writer.  I don't think well in the 
presence of others and I hate writing with an audience.  My one and only 
experience with Google Wave was a nightmare.  People could see just how much 
backspacing was involved in my replies!  It was deeply humiliating and I'm 
quite glad that Wave died.  

(Unfortunately, this whole real time collaboration thing is the next major 
front in online communication, and I'm 
sure others will take up the mantle.  Pity.)

But I'm probably not representative of the general population.  Even VCS 
collaboration often feels too real time for me (though I use it and heartily 
recommend it to others).  I much prefer distinct drafts (PDF) sent via email.  
Even better is paper sent via post.   This allows for me to organize my 
commentary and deliver an overall impression and specific recommendations

(To be clear, I prefer this arrangement when editing and when receiving 
feedback.)

However, with all that said, real time collaboration is becoming an expected 
feature.  AbiWord and Google Docs have it, OpenOffice is talking about it, and 
MS Word even has a rudimentary option.  I have several colleagues that have 
moved to Google Docs specifically because of the real time collaboration 
options.  Even though they've never actually used them, at least to the best of 
my knowledge and the editing experience is hideous in every other respect.

The people I've talked to take solace in knowing that they are present and 
would never move to a platform that didn't have them.  I've even heard this 
from the small cadre of users I've converted to LyX.

In effect, real time document collaboration is a marketing feature.

Unfortunately, marketing features matter.  They differentiate program A from 
program B and providing a talking point.  And because they're talked about, 
such features become part of the criteria by which a program is judged.

If you need an example, look at what Google Docs has done for real time 
collaboration.  The presence/lack of a collaboration feature has become a 
standard review of any word processor.  Microsoft Word 2007 was knocked on 
ZdNet because it wasn't present.  MS Word 2010 was lauded because it was (even 
though it sucks).

Yet, I've never actually met anyone who writes with others in real time.  The 
only counterexample I can think of was an exchange with Michael Foord, who uses 
it to start program documentation.  But when I pressed him, what Michael 
described was more of an outlining tool and could easily be created via an 
interactive whiteboard rather than a full-featured real-time editing 
environment.

Which leads to my second question.  What should real time collaboration look 
like in order to be helpful?  Should it be built into an IM client (ala 
screensharing) with voice and video? Or would it be better as an online 
service?  Is integration into a desktop writing program necessary? Or would an 
implementation similar to the MS Word 2010 version be more appropriate, which 
is a hybrid approach?

You have advocated for this strongly and I would love to hear your opinions on 
the above questions.  What would be most helpful for your work?  Based on other 
implementations, what doesn't work quite so well?

As more tools release similar real time solutions, I think calls for something 
similar in LyX will increase.  Not necessarily because it's useful, but because 
it's expected.  And yes, I know that this is a terrible reason to add new 
features.  Which is actually my general point.

Current implementations of real-time editing are generally terrible.  A desktop 
level approach would be infinitely superior to the approach we are seeing now 
where each word processor does its own thing.  So, if the feature doesn't fit 
within LyX, perhaps we could send the use case scenarios and discussion to 
another project where it did fit?  The natural fit, at least to my mind, would 
be one of the IM clients.  Perhaps Empathy?

Anyone else have any thoughts?

Cheers,

Rob Oakes

Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Les Denham
On Friday 24 September 2010 10:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
 Anyone else have any thoughts?
 
Rob,

I had no idea people were asking for this kind of feature.  Real-time 
collaboration on a document seems to me to be a formula for a colossal waste 
of time, extending the concept of endless meetings to an online equivalent.

In the organizations I'm involved in, written documents of all kinds seem to 
be actively discouraged by most managers.  The most common kind of report is 
an incoherent PowerPoint presentation put together with thought processes and 
artistic taste worthy of a four-year-old.

Writing of any kind is so rare I can't imagine there being any demand for 
collaborative writing.
-- 
..
Les Denham


References not exporting

2010-09-24 Thread Lars Olesen
I tried to export my lyx document. It has a lot of bibtex references.
The references shows up correctly in the document when editing it.
However, they appear just as question marks when I export the file.
The only way I can export it where the reference name (but not the
entire reference list) appears is in plain text. Can any of give me a
solution to this problem. I am on Ubuntu 10.04 with Lyx 1.6.5. Thanks.

-- 
Lars Olesen


Spacing Around Quote Environment

2010-09-24 Thread Bruce Pourciau
In the article class, the quote environment puts some extra space  
above and below the quotation to help separate it from the body text.  
In the article (AMS) class, though, the quote environment inserts no  
extra space, which would seem in conflict with normal typographic  
practice. What would be the right way to insert the extra vertical  
space?


Bruce


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 11:43 AM, Les Denham wrote:

On Friday 24 September 2010 10:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
   

Anyone else have any thoughts?

 

Rob,

I had no idea people were asking for this kind of feature.  Real-time
collaboration on a document seems to me to be a formula for a colossal waste
of time, extending the concept of endless meetings to an online equivalent.

In the organizations I'm involved in, written documents of all kinds seem to
be actively discouraged by most managers.  The most common kind of report is
an incoherent PowerPoint presentation put together with thought processes and
artistic taste worthy of a four-year-old.

Writing of any kind is so rare I can't imagine there being any demand for
collaborative writing.

   
I have to confess that I too am somewhat puzzled by this, but I can see 
a use case that would be good for me. Say I've written a paper with a 
collaborator. We are now at a pretty late stage in the process. It might 
be useful to be able to read through the document together and make 
changes we can both see in real time. I'm not saying this really would 
be all that great, but I can see using it.


Still, I have to agree with Rob that doing this at the level of each 
program just seems wrong in principle. Having some very generic 
client-server model, where the program's display could show up here 
there and everywhere, and the program could take its input too from 
various sources, that would be much more general and much more useful.


That said, if we're talking *nix, I wonder how hard it would be to use 
LyX's multiple windows feature to implement some kind of collaborative 
editing. You only need to get that second window onto your 
collaborator's screen somehow.


Richard




spellchecker

2010-09-24 Thread goncalo.b.santos

Hi!

I'm using Lyx on a mac (OSX) but am not being able to get the spellchecker
to work.

I've downloaded the latest version of cocoaspell, installed it, went to
system preferences/spelling/dictionaries and put all the dictionaries in the
list on.
In Lyx I did preferences/language settings/spellchecker/alternative language
and added /Library/Application
Support/cocoAspell/aspell6-en-6.0-0/english.alias
I then did Lyx/Reconfigure and restarted.

After doing all this, when I do tools/spellchecker the following message
appears:

The spellchecker could not be started
Error: The file /Library/Application
Support/cocoAspell/aspell6-en-6.0-0/english.alias  can not be opened for
reading.

Did I do something wrong during the installation process or still need to do
something else?

Many thanks.
Regards,

Gonçalo


-- 
View this message in context: 
http://lyx.475766.n2.nabble.com/spellchecker-tp5567511p5567511.html
Sent from the LyX - Users mailing list archive at Nabble.com.


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Tennessee Carmel-Veilleux
On 24 September 2010 12:41, Richard Heck rgh...@comcast.net wrote:


 Still, I have to agree with Rob that doing this at the level of each
 program just seems wrong in principle. Having some very generic
 client-server model, where the program's display could show up here there
 and everywhere, and the program could take its input too from various
 sources, that would be much more general and much more useful.


I think TeamViewer and similar products (DimDim, Webex) allow this use case
without any change.

TeamViewer is even available for MacOS and Linux, and there is a free
version.

Basically, they are all screen-sharing applications, with some kind of
communication features (phone-in, IM, VoIP, webcam chat). Control can be
given to any participant, in a format similar to VNC. Setup is usually
trivial (starting a program and giving-out your IP address).

I have used Webex and TeamViewer for this and other collaboration tasks and
it is truly useful.

Best regards,

Tennessee Carmel-Veilleux, ing. jr (OIQ)
Electrical engineering masters student, ETS (http://www.etsmtl.ca)
Project AREXIMAS (http://areximas.etsmtl.ca)


Re: Spacing Around Quote Environment

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 12:31 PM, Bruce Pourciau wrote:
In the article class, the quote environment puts some extra space 
above and below the quotation to help separate it from the body text. 
In the article (AMS) class, though, the quote environment inserts no 
extra space, which would seem in conflict with normal typographic 
practice. What would be the right way to insert the extra vertical space?


If that's how it looks in that class, then that is now the designers of 
the class wanted it to look. You can change it by redefining the quote 
environment, e.g.:


\renewenvironment{quote}{%

\list{}{\setlength{\topsep}{10ex}\rightmargin\leftmargin}\item[]%

}{%

\endlist

}

Adjust as needed.

rh



Re: References not exporting

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 11:58 AM, Lars Olesen wrote:

I tried to export my lyx document. It has a lot of bibtex references.
The references shows up correctly in the document when editing it.
However, they appear just as question marks when I export the file.
The only way I can export it where the reference name (but not the
entire reference list) appears is in plain text. Can any of give me a
solution to this problem. I am on Ubuntu 10.04 with Lyx 1.6.5. Thanks.

   
We need more information. Where is the LyX file? Where is the BibTeX 
file? And
here is the really crucial question: Does the BibTeX file have Unicode 
in it? If so,

then that is the problem: BibTeX does NOT handle Unicode.

Richard



Re: Printing a beamer outline

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
I guess this is impossible.

Unless someone has had a brainwave since my original post.

I've had no reply to this on the Beamer forum or on the comp.text.tex group.

 I was hoping that someone might have known of a simple Latex switch
to switch off the graphics and the article only text, but obviously
not.

I'm not sure how I get round this, certainly don't want to go back to
PowerPoint, but nor do I fancy manually creating and keeping an
outline in sync with the main presentation and article.

Thanks,

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Rob Oakes
Hi Les,

 I had no idea people were asking for this kind of feature.  Real-time 
 collaboration on a document seems to me to be a formula for a colossal waste 
 of time, extending the concept of endless meetings to an online equivalent.

I'm not sure if ti's people in general or just people that I know.  But I've 
seen it come up quite frequently in the past few months.  Particularly on blogs 
and in discussion of software tools.  When it arises in face to face 
communication, as it did during a meeting a month ago, I really try to sit up 
and pay attention.

In the meeting, people were bitching about long-distance collaboration and the 
slow turn around of document exchange.  Several options were suggested: VCS, 
Google Docs, chat, phone conferences, WebEx, etc.  It was a very good 
discussion and even got a little heated.  But then, I'm on the fringes of 
academics and written documents (particularly reports) are extremely important. 
 It's how we get money and share the results of our work.

 In the organizations I'm involved in, written documents of all kinds seem to 
 be actively discouraged by most managers.  The most common kind of report 
 is 
 an incoherent PowerPoint presentation put together with thought processes and 
 artistic taste worthy of a four-year-old.
 
 Writing of any kind is so rare I can't imagine there being any demand for 
 collaborative writing.

Since I've been trying to move toward industry and private consulting, I've 
also noticed this as well.  For that reason, I might be experiencing the 
effects of an echo chamber.

To reiterate my other email, I'm extremely skeptical of the real time collab 
solutions in general.  But if there is a clear use-case where it can be 
helpful, count me interested.  I'd just like to see it done right.

Cheers,

Rob

Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Gregory Jefferis
Hi all,

I would distinguish two kinds of collaborative editing.

* interactive collaborative editing - 2 or more people working
simultaneously on a document

* non-interactive collaborative editing - only one person actually modifying
the document at any one time BUT others always having live access to the
latest version if required.

I think typically you would spend 5% of writing time in the first mode but
that implementing it solves nasty problems with collaborating in the second
mode.

More specifically: 

On 2010-09-24 17:41, Richard Heck rgh...@comcast.net wrote:

 On 09/24/2010 11:43 AM, Les Denham wrote:
 On Friday 24 September 2010 10:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
 I have to confess that I too am somewhat puzzled by this, but I can see
 a use case that would be good for me. Say I've written a paper with a
 collaborator. We are now at a pretty late stage in the process. It might
 be useful to be able to read through the document together and make
 changes we can both see in real time. I'm not saying this really would
 be all that great, but I can see using it.

This is the kind of situation where actively using real time editing is
really useful and for me it crops up whenever I am writing something with a
colleague for another institution.  It is incredibly motivating and leads to
better writing if you can skype and write in an _interactive_ and
collaborative fashion. There are potential low tech ways to do this using
screen sharing, but they do lose the significant benefit of attaching edits.
Furthermore since you don't usually want to have a permanent share of your
desktop you can't leave them on the whole time and that for me is the
problem - in my view the real benefit of a rich collaborative editing
implementation is that allows much easier and more consistent -
non-interactive collaborative editing.

Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that you
are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

Does this seem reasonable to others?  Or have other people found ways to
solve the non-interactive collaborative writing situation when people end up
modifying the same document.  In my experience this happens often enough
that it's a problem and existing software that I am aware of makes it too
hard to solve for most researchers.

Greg.




Re: change pdf save location

2010-09-24 Thread Gwen Barnes
Thank you all for your responses.  I will just leave it with the comment
that this is a functionality that I would definitely be interested in, if it
were to be incorporated in some future version of lyx.

-Gwen


On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 10:21 AM, Murat Yildizoglu 
murat.yildizo...@univ-cezanne.fr wrote:

 You can use File/Export/PdfLatex (or another format, if you prefer).
 The PDF file will be generated and saved in the same folder es the LyX
 file.

 Murat

 2010/9/21 Gwen Barnes gwen.bar...@gmail.com:
  Hi,
 
  When I hit the button on the lyx toolbar to either view or update the
 pdf,
  the pdf gets created in a temporary location.  Is there a way to get it
 to
  automatically save the pdf to my current working directory?  I'd hate to
  accidentally submit an old version of my document because I forgot to do
  save as from my pdf viewer or export from lyx after my last edit; I
  certainly don't want to be doing that constantly as I am working.  I
 haven't
  been able to find any settings that will let me change the pdf location.
  Have I just missed them, or is there some work-around way to do this?
 
  -Gwen
 




Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Steve Litt
On Friday 24 September 2010 10:18:30 Kevin Brubeck Unhammer wrote:
 2010/9/24 Jose Quesada ques...@gmail.com:
  Hi,
  We've had previous discussions on whether or not it's useful to have some
  kind of real-time collaboration in LyX.
  The death of wave seemed to reinforce the idea that this is not a killer
  feature, and people don't need it. Collaboration using a VCS is
  sufficient.
 
 I think the problem with Wave is that... well... what's it for really?
 It's not an editor, not a chat program, not...anything...except a tech
 demonstration. 

Aw contrair. Google Wave was techs greatest status symbol. Who got it first? 
How many invitations did you get? This was the first time since the IPO of VA 
Linux that you could be a true tech snob.

:-)

SteveT

Steve Litt
Recession Relief Package
http://www.recession-relief.US
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/stevelitt



Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Steve Litt
On Friday 24 September 2010 11:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
 Hi Jose and other LyX-Users,
 
 Very interesting articles, thanks for sending them.
 
 While trying to digest the ideas, though, I found myself asking two
  questions and I'd be interested in your feedback.  The first question, of
  course is spurred by pure skepticism.
 
 In what instances do you think this feature would be useful?
 
 For my part, I'm not a collaborative writer.  I don't think well in the
  presence of others and I hate writing with an audience.  

All Unleashed books are written by a main author and lots of contributing 
authors. However, it's carved up by chapter, so no chapter is collaborative.

I see collaborative situations as a meeting where everyone's trying to design 
something. For years the VimOutliner project has tried to build in 
collaboration, but it's very difficult.

You can always do poor man's collaboration. Have ten people in a room, each 
with their own VNC client, and have them all work on a single instance of a 
single program.

I can't for the life of me see why a document writing software like LyX should 
be collaborative above and beyond being able to farm out chapters to different 
people, which it can already do.

SteveT

Steve Litt
Recession Relief Package
http://www.recession-relief.US
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/stevelitt



Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Kevin Brubeck Unhammer
2010/9/24 Gregory Jefferis jeffe...@gmail.com:
 Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
 live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
 versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
 conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that you
 are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
 changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
 arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
 designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

And this is the reason why most users love Google Docs and will never
use git (even though as we all know, merging with git is Fun and
Easy).


I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)


-Kevin


[1] http://gobby.0x539.de


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Jacob Bishop
I would simply like to say that I think going too far down this road could
lead to a lot of effort, and only a marginal return. I think we do need to
make LyX better, but I don't think it needs to be too multi-purpose. You
know the whole Swiss-Army knife versus a tool that does one thing, but does
it well debate. I think we would be best to improve how well LyX does its
primary job: document processing. We can leave other jobs to other tools.
That said, as soon as there's a good tool to say, track versions of a file
(like subversion), we can provide meaningful integration with that tool (and
have).

I have used Google docs collaboratively, but would personally be very
unlikely to use LyX in such a way. I can get up-to-date copies of my
document out to people with Subversion or dropbox well enough.

Just my two bits.

-Jacob

On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 12:21 PM, Kevin Brubeck Unhammer 
kun...@student.uib.no wrote:

 2010/9/24 Gregory Jefferis jeffe...@gmail.com:
  Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
  live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
  versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
  conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that
 you
  are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
  changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
  arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
  designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

 And this is the reason why most users love Google Docs and will never
 use git (even though as we all know, merging with git is Fun and
 Easy).


 I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
 LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
 the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
 lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)


 -Kevin


 [1] http://gobby.0x539.de



Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
Steve,

 All Unleashed books are written by a main author and lots of contributing
 authors. However, it's carved up by chapter, so no chapter is collaborative.

While this may well be true in general, the two books I have
collaborated on (my only book experience)  I contributed to every
chapter, writing some sections as well as heavy editing of the content
written by the main author (or the other authors).

Certainly this wasn't live collaboration, and relied on the track
changes features of Word.

I have done the same thing with Lyx and co-authoring Technical reports.

We also tried a Skype/Google Apps approach for live editing, but it
didn't work very well because of how slow the Skype connection was.
But this was more of brainstorming exercise trying to flesh out a
Report outline.

The books are:

http://www.amazon.com/Effects-Extensions-Ecology-Statistics-Biology/dp/0387874577/ref=sr_1_1?s=booksie=UTF8qid=1285353221sr=1-1

and

http://www.amazon.com/Analysing-Ecological-Statistics-Biology-Health/dp/0387459677/ref=sr_1_2?s=booksie=UTF8qid=1285353262sr=1-2

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 02:21 PM, Kevin Brubeck Unhammer wrote:


I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)

   
I see that there is also a Kobby (KDE, of course), which gets you closer 
to something LyX could handle. Both of these are built on libinfinity, 
libqinfinity in Kobby's case, which again is something that could 
conceivably be integrated into LyX.


That's the interactive collaborative editing version, of course.

Richard



Re: Printing a beamer outline

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
Richard


 I guess this is impossible.

 Unless someone has had a brainwave since my original post.



 I just haven't had time to think about it. LyX time is spent chasing other
 bugs right now.

I still appreciate you thinking about it, if you do have a sudden
eureka moment, then I would still appreciate you getting back to me.

I am already viewed with some suspicion, as I don't use PowerPoint,
and as its now department policy to hand out outlines, not being able
to produce them in Lyx/Beamer, gives me a bit of a problem.

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 01:34 PM, Gregory Jefferis wrote:


Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that you
are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

   
Surely the way this works could be mimicked with VC. What you need to 
have is some kind of push going on, so that, whenever a document is 
saved, it is /automatically/ VC'd. And then you need to have some kind 
of system for signalling when a new version has been committed. An even 
lower-tech solution would involve some kind of polling.


I think this would actually be relatively /easy/ to integrate into LyX. 
Here's the idea. When we have a version controlled file and 
collaborative editing is enabled, we run svn up filename.lyx in the 
background from time to time and see if we get anything back. This is 
not wholly trivial because we don't want to lose our local edits. But 
this could be handled by covertly saving the Buffer before doing svn up; 
we can backup the original and restore it if need be. Maybe the best way 
to do this would be to clone the local repository into LyX's temporary 
directory and do all the work there, only touching the real directory 
when the user saves the file. Anyway, something like that will work. 
What do we do, though, if there is a conflict between the newly saved 
file and the local edits? I guess we report the issue and give the user 
options, e.g., open both documents. In LyX 2.0, we could even use the 
new comparison feature to show the user the differences between them. 
Going the other way, we could commit all changes whenever they are 
saved, again reporting any issues we might run into. Then the most 
current version is always on the server.


This could almost be done without any changes to LyX. Here's how.
1. Set up a cron job that does svn up filename.lyx every two minutes.
2. Set up another cron job that watches filename.lyx and, if it changes, 
does svn ci filename.lyx.
If people aren't often editing the very same part of the document at the 
very same time, then this will work fine.


Richard



Re: Printing a beamer outline

2010-09-24 Thread Paul Rubin
First off, unless you have a specific reason to put the article-only text in
child documents, I'd probably advocate including it in the original text file in
branches (just to keep things together).  If you have a particular reason to use
child documents, then maybe put the child include statements in a branch (so you
can turn them on and off easily).

I assume you only need to generate the outline thingy for the final
presentation.  Does the following produce what you want?

1. Once the presentation is done, save a copy of the LyX file with a new name
(so as not to molest the original).

2. Change the document class from presentation (beamer) to article (beamer).

3. If necessary, delete the inclusion of the child documents from the copy
(easily done if they're in a branch -- just turn the branch off).

4. Compile/print/distribute.

This gets rid of the background stuff and cosmetic graphics.  I'm not 100% sure
it's what you're looking for, but it's easy enough to try.

/Paul




Re: Printing a beamer outline

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
Paul,

 First off, unless you have a specific reason to put the article-only text in
 child documents, I'd probably advocate including it in the original text file 
 in
 branches (just to keep things together).  If you have a particular reason to 
 use
 child documents, then maybe put the child include statements in a branch (so 
 you
 can turn them on and off easily).

I used to do it all in one doc and switch document class as you
suggest.  However, I found the presentation often  needs tweaked to
get the article to look right and the child document approach allows
easier regular compilation to check that it looks OK. But I agree
using branches looks a promising approach

Certainly its going to be better than PowerPoint, I will give it a go.

Thanks,

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Julien Rioux

On 24/09/2010 3:01 PM, Richard Heck wrote:

This could almost be done without any changes to LyX. Here's how.
1. Set up a cron job that does svn up filename.lyx every two minutes.
2. Set up another cron job that watches filename.lyx and, if it changes,
does svn ci filename.lyx.


If I was crazy about such a feature, this is exactly how I would set it 
up. Or I would use dropbox, which essentially does the file watching 
itself.


But, once your file has been updated on disk by svn up, how do you 
automatically update the displayed document within lyx? Is it currently 
possible?


Julien



Spell checker

2010-09-24 Thread Alberto Sanchez
Hi 

I have installed Lyx 1.6.7 for windows, and noticed that there is no spell 
checker. Downloaded Aspell and reconfigured Lyx. However, I have not been able 
to make it work.Everything else works just fine.

Will appreciate your help

Regards


Alberto





Re: spellchecker

2010-09-24 Thread Stephan Witt
Am 24.09.2010 um 18:47 schrieb goncalo.b.santos:

 
 Hi!
 
 I'm using Lyx on a mac (OSX) but am not being able to get the spellchecker
 to work.

You're using which version?

 I've downloaded the latest version of cocoaspell, installed it, went to
 system preferences/spelling/dictionaries and put all the dictionaries in the
 list on.
 In Lyx I did preferences/language settings/spellchecker/alternative language
 and added /Library/Application
 Support/cocoAspell/aspell6-en-6.0-0/english.alias

I did some work on spellchecking for mac in 2.0.0. There it works out of the 
box.
But LyX-2.0.0 not recommended for production.

For 1.6.x I'm not sure how to get it work with cocoAspell.
You're following the description on the wiki closely?

 I then did Lyx/Reconfigure and restarted.
 
 After doing all this, when I do tools/spellchecker the following message
 appears:
 
 The spellchecker could not be started
 Error: The file /Library/Application
 Support/cocoAspell/aspell6-en-6.0-0/english.alias  can not be opened for
 reading.
 
 Did I do something wrong during the installation process or still need to do
 something else?

Sorry, I have no time to reproduce this for today.

Stephan

Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 05:34 PM, Julien Rioux wrote:

On 24/09/2010 3:01 PM, Richard Heck wrote:

This could almost be done without any changes to LyX. Here's how.
1. Set up a cron job that does svn up filename.lyx every two minutes.
2. Set up another cron job that watches filename.lyx and, if it changes,
does svn ci filename.lyx.


If I was crazy about such a feature, this is exactly how I would set 
it up. Or I would use dropbox, which essentially does the file 
watching itself.


But, once your file has been updated on disk by svn up, how do you 
automatically update the displayed document within lyx? Is it 
currently possible?


No, it's not. That's why it's almost. LyX will warn you when you try 
to save it, but that's all.


rh



Re: Spell checker

2010-09-24 Thread Jacob Bishop
Alberto,

I am also using LyX 1.6.7 on Windows, and have no trouble with the spell
checker. Can you provide a bit more information? What installer did you use?
What os (Vista, XP, W7)? Do you know how to start a spell-check, and you get
a message? What exactly? Please explain.

Jacob

On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 3:38 PM, Alberto Sanchez albertst...@yahoo.comwrote:

 Hi

 I have installed Lyx 1.6.7 for windows, and noticed that there is no spell
 checker. Downloaded Aspell and reconfigured Lyx. However, I have not been
 able
 to make it work.Everything else works just fine.

 Will appreciate your help

 Regards


 Alberto






Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Jose Quesada
Hi Kevin,
I tried Gobby. it's as simple as notepad, so for serious programming/writing
it'd feel a bit limited. But the deal breaker is no undo. Yes, you hear that
right. I think Gobby is actually feature-wise worse than in-browser
alternatives.
Best,
-Jose

Jose Quesada, PhD.
Research scientist,
Max Planck Institute,
Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition,
Berlin
http://www.josequesada.name/
http://twitter.com/Quesada


On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 8:21 PM, Kevin Brubeck Unhammer 
kun...@student.uib.no wrote:

 2010/9/24 Gregory Jefferis jeffe...@gmail.com:
  Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
  live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
  versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
  conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that
 you
  are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
  changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
  arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
  designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

 And this is the reason why most users love Google Docs and will never
 use git (even though as we all know, merging with git is Fun and
 Easy).


 I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
 LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
 the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
 lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)


 -Kevin


 [1] http://gobby.0x539.de



arccot?

2010-09-24 Thread xPol
How to type the arccot function?

It seems strange it is not included in the lyx functions list. Isn't a latex 
function?


thank you 

---p
 



Re: arccot?

2010-09-24 Thread Daniel CLEMENT
xPol wrote:
 How to type the arccot function?
 
 It seems strange it is not included in the lyx functions list. Isn't a latex 
 function?

No, LaTeX stops at arctan...

If you use it often, just put in your document preamble:

\DeclareMathOperator{\arccot}{arccot}

and then you can typeset just as a builtin function.

But for functions that happen only once or twice, I usually find it
sufficient to type it as normal (math) text, then select it and apply
Roman font style.
 
 
 thank you 
 
 ---p
  
 
 
HTH,
-- 
Daniel CLEMENT




Re: IEEEtran file Inserting photo help please..............

2010-09-24 Thread Sachin Garg
On Tuesday 14 September 2010 08:05 AM, Uwe Stöhr wrote:
 Am 13.09.2010 07:20, schrieb step...@vinvish.com:
 
 In the end of the IEEE trans template there is an option to insert the
 authors photo in the Biography section
 If we do nothing a BOX printed with PLACE YOUR PHOTO HERE  appears
   I want to remove that and insert a photos there
 Can somebody help me out??
 
 What exactly is the problem? In the IEEEtran template there is an image
 named CV-image.png as example. Simply left-click on that image and
 select an image file you like.

I am also unable to add a photo. I can't also see this CV-image.png
file. I am on Ubuntu 10.04, LyX 1.6.5

Thanks,
Sachin



Re: IEEEtran file Inserting photo help please..............

2010-09-24 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Am 24.09.2010 14:39, schrieb Sachin Garg:


What exactly is the problem? In the IEEEtran template there is an image
named CV-image.png as example. Simply left-click on that image and
select an image file you like.


I am also unable to add a photo. I can't also see this CV-image.png
file. I am on Ubuntu 10.04, LyX 1.6.5


You need LyX 1.6.7 to get this. If you cannot update to that version, 
replace the files IEEEtran.lyx and IEEEtran.layout in your installation 
with these ones:


http://www.lyx.org/trac/export/35491/lyx-devel/branches/BRANCH_1_6_X/lib/layouts/IEEEtran.layout

and

http://www.lyx.org/trac/export/35491/lyx-devel/branches/BRANCH_1_6_X/lib/templates/IEEEtran.lyx

and afterwards reconfigure LyX (menu Tools-Reconfigure).

regards Uwe


more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Jose Quesada
Hi,
We've had previous discussions on whether or not it's useful to have some
kind of real-time collaboration in LyX.
The death of wave seemed to reinforce the idea that this is not a killer
feature, and people don't need it. Collaboration using a VCS is sufficient.

Well, recently I found two counterexamples.
One is http://docs.latexlab.org
A decent latex editor built on top of google docs.
The other one is... abiword. surprised :) ?
While being a crappy word processor, it's actually better than anything
built within a browser:
http://msevior.livejournal.com/28805.html
http://www.abisource.com/wiki/AbiCollab

I still think LyX would benefit from such functionality.
Thoughts?

Best,
-Jose

Jose Quesada, PhD.
Research scientist,
Max Planck Institute,
Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition,
Berlin
http://www.josequesada.name/
http://twitter.com/Quesada


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Kevin Brubeck Unhammer
2010/9/24 Jose Quesada ques...@gmail.com:
 Hi,
 We've had previous discussions on whether or not it's useful to have some
 kind of real-time collaboration in LyX.
 The death of wave seemed to reinforce the idea that this is not a killer
 feature, and people don't need it. Collaboration using a VCS is sufficient.

I think the problem with Wave is that... well... what's it for really?
It's not an editor, not a chat program, not...anything...except a tech
demonstration. Not likely to win the public over.

 Well, recently I found two counterexamples.
 One is http://docs.latexlab.org
 A decent latex editor built on top of google docs.
 The other one is... abiword. surprised :) ?
 While being a crappy word processor, it's actually better than anything
 built within a browser:
 http://msevior.livejournal.com/28805.html
 http://www.abisource.com/wiki/AbiCollab

 I still think LyX would benefit from such functionality.
 Thoughts?

For myself, I doubt I would use it much, however: I'm a geek and I
love version control. For other users, I think collaborative editing
would be a killer feature.

Not long ago I held a little demonstration of Zotero for some rather
non-geekier people, and the thing that really sold them (and got them
off Endnote) was the collaborative features. They thought the plugins
for OpenOffice and LyX sounded convenient, but were really
disappointed that there was no true Google Docs integration, as all of
them were mainly using Google Docs to write their master's theses...
again because they could edit the same document at the same time as
the rest of their group. Even the ones who plan on eventually getting
a LyX document in the end insist on copy-pasting back and forth
between Google Docs and LyX, just because it's supposedly so much more
convenient (yes, they lose formatting and have to re-add references;
they still do it).

Even from the slightly geekier camp I've had lots of requests to
install SubEthaEdit back when I ran OS X, so it's not just the
non-geeks who get hooked on that stuff.



best regards,

Kevin Brubeck Unhammer


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Gregory Jefferis
Hi Kevin, Jose et al,

We use version control (git) + to write papers in the lab.  It works fine
but handling merge conflicts is still difficult; the chaps in the lab are
all very computer literate but I regularly have to help out with a broken
merge. It's certainly too complicated for me to insist on with external
collaborators. For them I initially suggested LyX + track changes. However
LyX's track changes plays very poorly with VCS in LyX 1.6.X and this is only
partly solved in 2.0.

The beauty of real time editing is that it handles merge conflicts in a way
that is easy to understand and really pretty transparent.  Of course for it
to be transparent, there has to be a clear way to see who (and ideally when)
last edited any piece of text.  For my group and colleagues beyond the lab,
collaborative editing (a la SubEthaEdit) would be the killer feature that
would really expand the audience for LyX.  I hope that at some point this
will resonate with one of the developers with the skills to implement this
kind of feature.

Best,

Greg.

-- 
Gregory Jefferis, PhD
Division of Neurobiology
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology,
Hills Road,
Cambridge, CB2 0QH, UK.

http://www2.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/group-leaders/h-to-m/g-jefferis
http://www.neuroscience.cam.ac.uk/directory/profile.php?gsxej2
http://flybrain.stanford.edu






Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Rob Oakes
Hi Jose and other LyX-Users,

Very interesting articles, thanks for sending them.

While trying to digest the ideas, though, I found myself asking two questions 
and I'd be interested in your feedback.  The first question, of course is 
spurred by pure skepticism.

In what instances do you think this feature would be useful?

For my part, I'm not a collaborative writer.  I don't think well in the 
presence of others and I hate writing with an audience.  My one and only 
experience with Google Wave was a nightmare.  People could see just how much 
backspacing was involved in my replies!  It was deeply humiliating and I'm 
quite glad that Wave died.  

(Unfortunately, this whole real time collaboration thing is the next major 
front in online communication, and I'm 
sure others will take up the mantle.  Pity.)

But I'm probably not representative of the general population.  Even VCS 
collaboration often feels too real time for me (though I use it and heartily 
recommend it to others).  I much prefer distinct drafts (PDF) sent via email.  
Even better is paper sent via post.   This allows for me to organize my 
commentary and deliver an overall impression and specific recommendations

(To be clear, I prefer this arrangement when editing and when receiving 
feedback.)

However, with all that said, real time collaboration is becoming an expected 
feature.  AbiWord and Google Docs have it, OpenOffice is talking about it, and 
MS Word even has a rudimentary option.  I have several colleagues that have 
moved to Google Docs specifically because of the real time collaboration 
options.  Even though they've never actually used them, at least to the best of 
my knowledge and the editing experience is hideous in every other respect.

The people I've talked to take solace in knowing that they are present and 
would never move to a platform that didn't have them.  I've even heard this 
from the small cadre of users I've converted to LyX.

In effect, real time document collaboration is a marketing feature.

Unfortunately, marketing features matter.  They differentiate program A from 
program B and providing a talking point.  And because they're talked about, 
such features become part of the criteria by which a program is judged.

If you need an example, look at what Google Docs has done for real time 
collaboration.  The presence/lack of a collaboration feature has become a 
standard review of any word processor.  Microsoft Word 2007 was knocked on 
ZdNet because it wasn't present.  MS Word 2010 was lauded because it was (even 
though it sucks).

Yet, I've never actually met anyone who writes with others in real time.  The 
only counterexample I can think of was an exchange with Michael Foord, who uses 
it to start program documentation.  But when I pressed him, what Michael 
described was more of an outlining tool and could easily be created via an 
interactive whiteboard rather than a full-featured real-time editing 
environment.

Which leads to my second question.  What should real time collaboration look 
like in order to be helpful?  Should it be built into an IM client (ala 
screensharing) with voice and video? Or would it be better as an online 
service?  Is integration into a desktop writing program necessary? Or would an 
implementation similar to the MS Word 2010 version be more appropriate, which 
is a hybrid approach?

You have advocated for this strongly and I would love to hear your opinions on 
the above questions.  What would be most helpful for your work?  Based on other 
implementations, what doesn't work quite so well?

As more tools release similar real time solutions, I think calls for something 
similar in LyX will increase.  Not necessarily because it's useful, but because 
it's expected.  And yes, I know that this is a terrible reason to add new 
features.  Which is actually my general point.

Current implementations of real-time editing are generally terrible.  A desktop 
level approach would be infinitely superior to the approach we are seeing now 
where each word processor does its own thing.  So, if the feature doesn't fit 
within LyX, perhaps we could send the use case scenarios and discussion to 
another project where it did fit?  The natural fit, at least to my mind, would 
be one of the IM clients.  Perhaps Empathy?

Anyone else have any thoughts?

Cheers,

Rob Oakes

Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Les Denham
On Friday 24 September 2010 10:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
 Anyone else have any thoughts?
 
Rob,

I had no idea people were asking for this kind of feature.  Real-time 
collaboration on a document seems to me to be a formula for a colossal waste 
of time, extending the concept of endless meetings to an online equivalent.

In the organizations I'm involved in, written documents of all kinds seem to 
be actively discouraged by most managers.  The most common kind of report is 
an incoherent PowerPoint presentation put together with thought processes and 
artistic taste worthy of a four-year-old.

Writing of any kind is so rare I can't imagine there being any demand for 
collaborative writing.
-- 
..
Les Denham


References not exporting

2010-09-24 Thread Lars Olesen
I tried to export my lyx document. It has a lot of bibtex references.
The references shows up correctly in the document when editing it.
However, they appear just as question marks when I export the file.
The only way I can export it where the reference name (but not the
entire reference list) appears is in plain text. Can any of give me a
solution to this problem. I am on Ubuntu 10.04 with Lyx 1.6.5. Thanks.

-- 
Lars Olesen


Spacing Around Quote Environment

2010-09-24 Thread Bruce Pourciau
In the article class, the quote environment puts some extra space  
above and below the quotation to help separate it from the body text.  
In the article (AMS) class, though, the quote environment inserts no  
extra space, which would seem in conflict with normal typographic  
practice. What would be the right way to insert the extra vertical  
space?


Bruce


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 11:43 AM, Les Denham wrote:

On Friday 24 September 2010 10:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
   

Anyone else have any thoughts?

 

Rob,

I had no idea people were asking for this kind of feature.  Real-time
collaboration on a document seems to me to be a formula for a colossal waste
of time, extending the concept of endless meetings to an online equivalent.

In the organizations I'm involved in, written documents of all kinds seem to
be actively discouraged by most managers.  The most common kind of report is
an incoherent PowerPoint presentation put together with thought processes and
artistic taste worthy of a four-year-old.

Writing of any kind is so rare I can't imagine there being any demand for
collaborative writing.

   
I have to confess that I too am somewhat puzzled by this, but I can see 
a use case that would be good for me. Say I've written a paper with a 
collaborator. We are now at a pretty late stage in the process. It might 
be useful to be able to read through the document together and make 
changes we can both see in real time. I'm not saying this really would 
be all that great, but I can see using it.


Still, I have to agree with Rob that doing this at the level of each 
program just seems wrong in principle. Having some very generic 
client-server model, where the program's display could show up here 
there and everywhere, and the program could take its input too from 
various sources, that would be much more general and much more useful.


That said, if we're talking *nix, I wonder how hard it would be to use 
LyX's multiple windows feature to implement some kind of collaborative 
editing. You only need to get that second window onto your 
collaborator's screen somehow.


Richard




spellchecker

2010-09-24 Thread goncalo.b.santos

Hi!

I'm using Lyx on a mac (OSX) but am not being able to get the spellchecker
to work.

I've downloaded the latest version of cocoaspell, installed it, went to
system preferences/spelling/dictionaries and put all the dictionaries in the
list on.
In Lyx I did preferences/language settings/spellchecker/alternative language
and added /Library/Application
Support/cocoAspell/aspell6-en-6.0-0/english.alias
I then did Lyx/Reconfigure and restarted.

After doing all this, when I do tools/spellchecker the following message
appears:

The spellchecker could not be started
Error: The file /Library/Application
Support/cocoAspell/aspell6-en-6.0-0/english.alias  can not be opened for
reading.

Did I do something wrong during the installation process or still need to do
something else?

Many thanks.
Regards,

Gonçalo


-- 
View this message in context: 
http://lyx.475766.n2.nabble.com/spellchecker-tp5567511p5567511.html
Sent from the LyX - Users mailing list archive at Nabble.com.


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Tennessee Carmel-Veilleux
On 24 September 2010 12:41, Richard Heck rgh...@comcast.net wrote:


 Still, I have to agree with Rob that doing this at the level of each
 program just seems wrong in principle. Having some very generic
 client-server model, where the program's display could show up here there
 and everywhere, and the program could take its input too from various
 sources, that would be much more general and much more useful.


I think TeamViewer and similar products (DimDim, Webex) allow this use case
without any change.

TeamViewer is even available for MacOS and Linux, and there is a free
version.

Basically, they are all screen-sharing applications, with some kind of
communication features (phone-in, IM, VoIP, webcam chat). Control can be
given to any participant, in a format similar to VNC. Setup is usually
trivial (starting a program and giving-out your IP address).

I have used Webex and TeamViewer for this and other collaboration tasks and
it is truly useful.

Best regards,

Tennessee Carmel-Veilleux, ing. jr (OIQ)
Electrical engineering masters student, ETS (http://www.etsmtl.ca)
Project AREXIMAS (http://areximas.etsmtl.ca)


Re: Spacing Around Quote Environment

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 12:31 PM, Bruce Pourciau wrote:
In the article class, the quote environment puts some extra space 
above and below the quotation to help separate it from the body text. 
In the article (AMS) class, though, the quote environment inserts no 
extra space, which would seem in conflict with normal typographic 
practice. What would be the right way to insert the extra vertical space?


If that's how it looks in that class, then that is now the designers of 
the class wanted it to look. You can change it by redefining the quote 
environment, e.g.:


\renewenvironment{quote}{%

\list{}{\setlength{\topsep}{10ex}\rightmargin\leftmargin}\item[]%

}{%

\endlist

}

Adjust as needed.

rh



Re: References not exporting

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 11:58 AM, Lars Olesen wrote:

I tried to export my lyx document. It has a lot of bibtex references.
The references shows up correctly in the document when editing it.
However, they appear just as question marks when I export the file.
The only way I can export it where the reference name (but not the
entire reference list) appears is in plain text. Can any of give me a
solution to this problem. I am on Ubuntu 10.04 with Lyx 1.6.5. Thanks.

   
We need more information. Where is the LyX file? Where is the BibTeX 
file? And
here is the really crucial question: Does the BibTeX file have Unicode 
in it? If so,

then that is the problem: BibTeX does NOT handle Unicode.

Richard



Re: Printing a beamer outline

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
I guess this is impossible.

Unless someone has had a brainwave since my original post.

I've had no reply to this on the Beamer forum or on the comp.text.tex group.

 I was hoping that someone might have known of a simple Latex switch
to switch off the graphics and the article only text, but obviously
not.

I'm not sure how I get round this, certainly don't want to go back to
PowerPoint, but nor do I fancy manually creating and keeping an
outline in sync with the main presentation and article.

Thanks,

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Rob Oakes
Hi Les,

 I had no idea people were asking for this kind of feature.  Real-time 
 collaboration on a document seems to me to be a formula for a colossal waste 
 of time, extending the concept of endless meetings to an online equivalent.

I'm not sure if ti's people in general or just people that I know.  But I've 
seen it come up quite frequently in the past few months.  Particularly on blogs 
and in discussion of software tools.  When it arises in face to face 
communication, as it did during a meeting a month ago, I really try to sit up 
and pay attention.

In the meeting, people were bitching about long-distance collaboration and the 
slow turn around of document exchange.  Several options were suggested: VCS, 
Google Docs, chat, phone conferences, WebEx, etc.  It was a very good 
discussion and even got a little heated.  But then, I'm on the fringes of 
academics and written documents (particularly reports) are extremely important. 
 It's how we get money and share the results of our work.

 In the organizations I'm involved in, written documents of all kinds seem to 
 be actively discouraged by most managers.  The most common kind of report 
 is 
 an incoherent PowerPoint presentation put together with thought processes and 
 artistic taste worthy of a four-year-old.
 
 Writing of any kind is so rare I can't imagine there being any demand for 
 collaborative writing.

Since I've been trying to move toward industry and private consulting, I've 
also noticed this as well.  For that reason, I might be experiencing the 
effects of an echo chamber.

To reiterate my other email, I'm extremely skeptical of the real time collab 
solutions in general.  But if there is a clear use-case where it can be 
helpful, count me interested.  I'd just like to see it done right.

Cheers,

Rob

Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Gregory Jefferis
Hi all,

I would distinguish two kinds of collaborative editing.

* interactive collaborative editing - 2 or more people working
simultaneously on a document

* non-interactive collaborative editing - only one person actually modifying
the document at any one time BUT others always having live access to the
latest version if required.

I think typically you would spend 5% of writing time in the first mode but
that implementing it solves nasty problems with collaborating in the second
mode.

More specifically: 

On 2010-09-24 17:41, Richard Heck rgh...@comcast.net wrote:

 On 09/24/2010 11:43 AM, Les Denham wrote:
 On Friday 24 September 2010 10:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
 I have to confess that I too am somewhat puzzled by this, but I can see
 a use case that would be good for me. Say I've written a paper with a
 collaborator. We are now at a pretty late stage in the process. It might
 be useful to be able to read through the document together and make
 changes we can both see in real time. I'm not saying this really would
 be all that great, but I can see using it.

This is the kind of situation where actively using real time editing is
really useful and for me it crops up whenever I am writing something with a
colleague for another institution.  It is incredibly motivating and leads to
better writing if you can skype and write in an _interactive_ and
collaborative fashion. There are potential low tech ways to do this using
screen sharing, but they do lose the significant benefit of attaching edits.
Furthermore since you don't usually want to have a permanent share of your
desktop you can't leave them on the whole time and that for me is the
problem - in my view the real benefit of a rich collaborative editing
implementation is that allows much easier and more consistent -
non-interactive collaborative editing.

Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that you
are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

Does this seem reasonable to others?  Or have other people found ways to
solve the non-interactive collaborative writing situation when people end up
modifying the same document.  In my experience this happens often enough
that it's a problem and existing software that I am aware of makes it too
hard to solve for most researchers.

Greg.




Re: change pdf save location

2010-09-24 Thread Gwen Barnes
Thank you all for your responses.  I will just leave it with the comment
that this is a functionality that I would definitely be interested in, if it
were to be incorporated in some future version of lyx.

-Gwen


On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 10:21 AM, Murat Yildizoglu 
murat.yildizo...@univ-cezanne.fr wrote:

 You can use File/Export/PdfLatex (or another format, if you prefer).
 The PDF file will be generated and saved in the same folder es the LyX
 file.

 Murat

 2010/9/21 Gwen Barnes gwen.bar...@gmail.com:
  Hi,
 
  When I hit the button on the lyx toolbar to either view or update the
 pdf,
  the pdf gets created in a temporary location.  Is there a way to get it
 to
  automatically save the pdf to my current working directory?  I'd hate to
  accidentally submit an old version of my document because I forgot to do
  save as from my pdf viewer or export from lyx after my last edit; I
  certainly don't want to be doing that constantly as I am working.  I
 haven't
  been able to find any settings that will let me change the pdf location.
  Have I just missed them, or is there some work-around way to do this?
 
  -Gwen
 




Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Steve Litt
On Friday 24 September 2010 10:18:30 Kevin Brubeck Unhammer wrote:
 2010/9/24 Jose Quesada ques...@gmail.com:
  Hi,
  We've had previous discussions on whether or not it's useful to have some
  kind of real-time collaboration in LyX.
  The death of wave seemed to reinforce the idea that this is not a killer
  feature, and people don't need it. Collaboration using a VCS is
  sufficient.
 
 I think the problem with Wave is that... well... what's it for really?
 It's not an editor, not a chat program, not...anything...except a tech
 demonstration. 

Aw contrair. Google Wave was techs greatest status symbol. Who got it first? 
How many invitations did you get? This was the first time since the IPO of VA 
Linux that you could be a true tech snob.

:-)

SteveT

Steve Litt
Recession Relief Package
http://www.recession-relief.US
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/stevelitt



Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Steve Litt
On Friday 24 September 2010 11:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
 Hi Jose and other LyX-Users,
 
 Very interesting articles, thanks for sending them.
 
 While trying to digest the ideas, though, I found myself asking two
  questions and I'd be interested in your feedback.  The first question, of
  course is spurred by pure skepticism.
 
 In what instances do you think this feature would be useful?
 
 For my part, I'm not a collaborative writer.  I don't think well in the
  presence of others and I hate writing with an audience.  

All Unleashed books are written by a main author and lots of contributing 
authors. However, it's carved up by chapter, so no chapter is collaborative.

I see collaborative situations as a meeting where everyone's trying to design 
something. For years the VimOutliner project has tried to build in 
collaboration, but it's very difficult.

You can always do poor man's collaboration. Have ten people in a room, each 
with their own VNC client, and have them all work on a single instance of a 
single program.

I can't for the life of me see why a document writing software like LyX should 
be collaborative above and beyond being able to farm out chapters to different 
people, which it can already do.

SteveT

Steve Litt
Recession Relief Package
http://www.recession-relief.US
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/stevelitt



Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Kevin Brubeck Unhammer
2010/9/24 Gregory Jefferis jeffe...@gmail.com:
 Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
 live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
 versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
 conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that you
 are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
 changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
 arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
 designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

And this is the reason why most users love Google Docs and will never
use git (even though as we all know, merging with git is Fun and
Easy).


I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)


-Kevin


[1] http://gobby.0x539.de


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Jacob Bishop
I would simply like to say that I think going too far down this road could
lead to a lot of effort, and only a marginal return. I think we do need to
make LyX better, but I don't think it needs to be too multi-purpose. You
know the whole Swiss-Army knife versus a tool that does one thing, but does
it well debate. I think we would be best to improve how well LyX does its
primary job: document processing. We can leave other jobs to other tools.
That said, as soon as there's a good tool to say, track versions of a file
(like subversion), we can provide meaningful integration with that tool (and
have).

I have used Google docs collaboratively, but would personally be very
unlikely to use LyX in such a way. I can get up-to-date copies of my
document out to people with Subversion or dropbox well enough.

Just my two bits.

-Jacob

On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 12:21 PM, Kevin Brubeck Unhammer 
kun...@student.uib.no wrote:

 2010/9/24 Gregory Jefferis jeffe...@gmail.com:
  Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
  live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
  versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
  conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that
 you
  are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
  changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
  arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
  designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

 And this is the reason why most users love Google Docs and will never
 use git (even though as we all know, merging with git is Fun and
 Easy).


 I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
 LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
 the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
 lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)


 -Kevin


 [1] http://gobby.0x539.de



Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
Steve,

 All Unleashed books are written by a main author and lots of contributing
 authors. However, it's carved up by chapter, so no chapter is collaborative.

While this may well be true in general, the two books I have
collaborated on (my only book experience)  I contributed to every
chapter, writing some sections as well as heavy editing of the content
written by the main author (or the other authors).

Certainly this wasn't live collaboration, and relied on the track
changes features of Word.

I have done the same thing with Lyx and co-authoring Technical reports.

We also tried a Skype/Google Apps approach for live editing, but it
didn't work very well because of how slow the Skype connection was.
But this was more of brainstorming exercise trying to flesh out a
Report outline.

The books are:

http://www.amazon.com/Effects-Extensions-Ecology-Statistics-Biology/dp/0387874577/ref=sr_1_1?s=booksie=UTF8qid=1285353221sr=1-1

and

http://www.amazon.com/Analysing-Ecological-Statistics-Biology-Health/dp/0387459677/ref=sr_1_2?s=booksie=UTF8qid=1285353262sr=1-2

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 02:21 PM, Kevin Brubeck Unhammer wrote:


I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)

   
I see that there is also a Kobby (KDE, of course), which gets you closer 
to something LyX could handle. Both of these are built on libinfinity, 
libqinfinity in Kobby's case, which again is something that could 
conceivably be integrated into LyX.


That's the interactive collaborative editing version, of course.

Richard



Re: Printing a beamer outline

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
Richard


 I guess this is impossible.

 Unless someone has had a brainwave since my original post.



 I just haven't had time to think about it. LyX time is spent chasing other
 bugs right now.

I still appreciate you thinking about it, if you do have a sudden
eureka moment, then I would still appreciate you getting back to me.

I am already viewed with some suspicion, as I don't use PowerPoint,
and as its now department policy to hand out outlines, not being able
to produce them in Lyx/Beamer, gives me a bit of a problem.

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 01:34 PM, Gregory Jefferis wrote:


Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that you
are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

   
Surely the way this works could be mimicked with VC. What you need to 
have is some kind of push going on, so that, whenever a document is 
saved, it is /automatically/ VC'd. And then you need to have some kind 
of system for signalling when a new version has been committed. An even 
lower-tech solution would involve some kind of polling.


I think this would actually be relatively /easy/ to integrate into LyX. 
Here's the idea. When we have a version controlled file and 
collaborative editing is enabled, we run svn up filename.lyx in the 
background from time to time and see if we get anything back. This is 
not wholly trivial because we don't want to lose our local edits. But 
this could be handled by covertly saving the Buffer before doing svn up; 
we can backup the original and restore it if need be. Maybe the best way 
to do this would be to clone the local repository into LyX's temporary 
directory and do all the work there, only touching the real directory 
when the user saves the file. Anyway, something like that will work. 
What do we do, though, if there is a conflict between the newly saved 
file and the local edits? I guess we report the issue and give the user 
options, e.g., open both documents. In LyX 2.0, we could even use the 
new comparison feature to show the user the differences between them. 
Going the other way, we could commit all changes whenever they are 
saved, again reporting any issues we might run into. Then the most 
current version is always on the server.


This could almost be done without any changes to LyX. Here's how.
1. Set up a cron job that does svn up filename.lyx every two minutes.
2. Set up another cron job that watches filename.lyx and, if it changes, 
does svn ci filename.lyx.
If people aren't often editing the very same part of the document at the 
very same time, then this will work fine.


Richard



Re: Printing a beamer outline

2010-09-24 Thread Paul Rubin
First off, unless you have a specific reason to put the article-only text in
child documents, I'd probably advocate including it in the original text file in
branches (just to keep things together).  If you have a particular reason to use
child documents, then maybe put the child include statements in a branch (so you
can turn them on and off easily).

I assume you only need to generate the outline thingy for the final
presentation.  Does the following produce what you want?

1. Once the presentation is done, save a copy of the LyX file with a new name
(so as not to molest the original).

2. Change the document class from presentation (beamer) to article (beamer).

3. If necessary, delete the inclusion of the child documents from the copy
(easily done if they're in a branch -- just turn the branch off).

4. Compile/print/distribute.

This gets rid of the background stuff and cosmetic graphics.  I'm not 100% sure
it's what you're looking for, but it's easy enough to try.

/Paul




Re: Printing a beamer outline

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
Paul,

 First off, unless you have a specific reason to put the article-only text in
 child documents, I'd probably advocate including it in the original text file 
 in
 branches (just to keep things together).  If you have a particular reason to 
 use
 child documents, then maybe put the child include statements in a branch (so 
 you
 can turn them on and off easily).

I used to do it all in one doc and switch document class as you
suggest.  However, I found the presentation often  needs tweaked to
get the article to look right and the child document approach allows
easier regular compilation to check that it looks OK. But I agree
using branches looks a promising approach

Certainly its going to be better than PowerPoint, I will give it a go.

Thanks,

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Julien Rioux

On 24/09/2010 3:01 PM, Richard Heck wrote:

This could almost be done without any changes to LyX. Here's how.
1. Set up a cron job that does svn up filename.lyx every two minutes.
2. Set up another cron job that watches filename.lyx and, if it changes,
does svn ci filename.lyx.


If I was crazy about such a feature, this is exactly how I would set it 
up. Or I would use dropbox, which essentially does the file watching 
itself.


But, once your file has been updated on disk by svn up, how do you 
automatically update the displayed document within lyx? Is it currently 
possible?


Julien



Spell checker

2010-09-24 Thread Alberto Sanchez
Hi 

I have installed Lyx 1.6.7 for windows, and noticed that there is no spell 
checker. Downloaded Aspell and reconfigured Lyx. However, I have not been able 
to make it work.Everything else works just fine.

Will appreciate your help

Regards


Alberto





Re: spellchecker

2010-09-24 Thread Stephan Witt
Am 24.09.2010 um 18:47 schrieb goncalo.b.santos:

 
 Hi!
 
 I'm using Lyx on a mac (OSX) but am not being able to get the spellchecker
 to work.

You're using which version?

 I've downloaded the latest version of cocoaspell, installed it, went to
 system preferences/spelling/dictionaries and put all the dictionaries in the
 list on.
 In Lyx I did preferences/language settings/spellchecker/alternative language
 and added /Library/Application
 Support/cocoAspell/aspell6-en-6.0-0/english.alias

I did some work on spellchecking for mac in 2.0.0. There it works out of the 
box.
But LyX-2.0.0 not recommended for production.

For 1.6.x I'm not sure how to get it work with cocoAspell.
You're following the description on the wiki closely?

 I then did Lyx/Reconfigure and restarted.
 
 After doing all this, when I do tools/spellchecker the following message
 appears:
 
 The spellchecker could not be started
 Error: The file /Library/Application
 Support/cocoAspell/aspell6-en-6.0-0/english.alias  can not be opened for
 reading.
 
 Did I do something wrong during the installation process or still need to do
 something else?

Sorry, I have no time to reproduce this for today.

Stephan

Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 05:34 PM, Julien Rioux wrote:

On 24/09/2010 3:01 PM, Richard Heck wrote:

This could almost be done without any changes to LyX. Here's how.
1. Set up a cron job that does svn up filename.lyx every two minutes.
2. Set up another cron job that watches filename.lyx and, if it changes,
does svn ci filename.lyx.


If I was crazy about such a feature, this is exactly how I would set 
it up. Or I would use dropbox, which essentially does the file 
watching itself.


But, once your file has been updated on disk by svn up, how do you 
automatically update the displayed document within lyx? Is it 
currently possible?


No, it's not. That's why it's almost. LyX will warn you when you try 
to save it, but that's all.


rh



Re: Spell checker

2010-09-24 Thread Jacob Bishop
Alberto,

I am also using LyX 1.6.7 on Windows, and have no trouble with the spell
checker. Can you provide a bit more information? What installer did you use?
What os (Vista, XP, W7)? Do you know how to start a spell-check, and you get
a message? What exactly? Please explain.

Jacob

On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 3:38 PM, Alberto Sanchez albertst...@yahoo.comwrote:

 Hi

 I have installed Lyx 1.6.7 for windows, and noticed that there is no spell
 checker. Downloaded Aspell and reconfigured Lyx. However, I have not been
 able
 to make it work.Everything else works just fine.

 Will appreciate your help

 Regards


 Alberto






Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Jose Quesada
Hi Kevin,
I tried Gobby. it's as simple as notepad, so for serious programming/writing
it'd feel a bit limited. But the deal breaker is no undo. Yes, you hear that
right. I think Gobby is actually feature-wise worse than in-browser
alternatives.
Best,
-Jose

Jose Quesada, PhD.
Research scientist,
Max Planck Institute,
Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition,
Berlin
http://www.josequesada.name/
http://twitter.com/Quesada


On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 8:21 PM, Kevin Brubeck Unhammer 
kun...@student.uib.no wrote:

 2010/9/24 Gregory Jefferis jeffe...@gmail.com:
  Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
  live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
  versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
  conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that
 you
  are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
  changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
  arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
  designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

 And this is the reason why most users love Google Docs and will never
 use git (even though as we all know, merging with git is Fun and
 Easy).


 I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
 LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
 the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
 lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)


 -Kevin


 [1] http://gobby.0x539.de



arccot?

2010-09-24 Thread xPol
How to type the arccot function?

It seems strange it is not included in the lyx functions list. Isn't a latex 
function?


thank you 

---p
 



Re: arccot?

2010-09-24 Thread Daniel CLEMENT
xPol wrote:
> How to type the arccot function?
> 
> It seems strange it is not included in the lyx functions list. Isn't a latex 
> function?

No, LaTeX stops at arctan...

If you use it often, just put in your document preamble:

\DeclareMathOperator{\arccot}{arccot}

and then you can typeset just as a builtin function.

But for functions that happen only once or twice, I usually find it
sufficient to type it as normal (math) text, then select it and apply
Roman font style.
> 
> 
> thank you 
> 
> ---p
>  
> 
> 
HTH,
-- 
Daniel CLEMENT




Re: IEEEtran file Inserting photo help please..............

2010-09-24 Thread Sachin Garg
On Tuesday 14 September 2010 08:05 AM, Uwe Stöhr wrote:
> Am 13.09.2010 07:20, schrieb step...@vinvish.com:
> 
>> In the end of the IEEE trans template there is an option to insert the
>> authors photo in the Biography section
>> If we do nothing a BOX printed with "PLACE YOUR PHOTO HERE " appears
>>   I want to remove that and insert a photos there
>> Can somebody help me out??
> 
> What exactly is the problem? In the IEEEtran template there is an image
> named "CV-image.png" as example. Simply left-click on that image and
> select an image file you like.

I am also unable to add a photo. I can't also see this "CV-image.png"
file. I am on Ubuntu 10.04, LyX 1.6.5

Thanks,
Sachin



Re: IEEEtran file Inserting photo help please..............

2010-09-24 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Am 24.09.2010 14:39, schrieb Sachin Garg:


What exactly is the problem? In the IEEEtran template there is an image
named "CV-image.png" as example. Simply left-click on that image and
select an image file you like.


I am also unable to add a photo. I can't also see this "CV-image.png"
file. I am on Ubuntu 10.04, LyX 1.6.5


You need LyX 1.6.7 to get this. If you cannot update to that version, 
replace the files IEEEtran.lyx and IEEEtran.layout in your installation 
with these ones:


http://www.lyx.org/trac/export/35491/lyx-devel/branches/BRANCH_1_6_X/lib/layouts/IEEEtran.layout

and

http://www.lyx.org/trac/export/35491/lyx-devel/branches/BRANCH_1_6_X/lib/templates/IEEEtran.lyx

and afterwards reconfigure LyX (menu Tools->Reconfigure).

regards Uwe


more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Jose Quesada
Hi,
We've had previous discussions on whether or not it's useful to have some
kind of real-time collaboration in LyX.
The death of wave seemed to reinforce the idea that this is not a killer
feature, and people don't need it. Collaboration using a VCS is sufficient.

Well, recently I found two counterexamples.
One is http://docs.latexlab.org
A decent latex editor built on top of google docs.
The other one is... abiword. surprised :) ?
While being a crappy word processor, it's actually better than anything
built within a browser:
http://msevior.livejournal.com/28805.html
http://www.abisource.com/wiki/AbiCollab

I still think LyX would benefit from such functionality.
Thoughts?

Best,
-Jose

Jose Quesada, PhD.
Research scientist,
Max Planck Institute,
Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition,
Berlin
http://www.josequesada.name/
http://twitter.com/Quesada


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Kevin Brubeck Unhammer
2010/9/24 Jose Quesada :
> Hi,
> We've had previous discussions on whether or not it's useful to have some
> kind of real-time collaboration in LyX.
> The death of wave seemed to reinforce the idea that this is not a killer
> feature, and people don't need it. Collaboration using a VCS is sufficient.

I think the problem with Wave is that... well... what's it for really?
It's not an editor, not a chat program, not...anything...except a tech
demonstration. Not likely to win the public over.

> Well, recently I found two counterexamples.
> One is http://docs.latexlab.org
> A decent latex editor built on top of google docs.
> The other one is... abiword. surprised :) ?
> While being a crappy word processor, it's actually better than anything
> built within a browser:
> http://msevior.livejournal.com/28805.html
> http://www.abisource.com/wiki/AbiCollab
>
> I still think LyX would benefit from such functionality.
> Thoughts?

For myself, I doubt I would use it much, however: I'm a geek and I
love version control. For other users, I think collaborative editing
would be a killer feature.

Not long ago I held a little demonstration of Zotero for some rather
non-geekier people, and the thing that really sold them (and got them
off Endnote) was the collaborative features. They thought the plugins
for OpenOffice and LyX sounded convenient, but were really
disappointed that there was no true Google Docs integration, as all of
them were mainly using Google Docs to write their master's theses...
again because they could edit the same document at the same time as
the rest of their group. Even the ones who plan on eventually getting
a LyX document in the end insist on copy-pasting back and forth
between Google Docs and LyX, just because it's supposedly so much more
convenient (yes, they lose formatting and have to re-add references;
they still do it).

Even from the slightly geekier camp I've had lots of requests to
install SubEthaEdit back when I ran OS X, so it's not just the
non-geeks who get hooked on that stuff.



best regards,

Kevin Brubeck Unhammer


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Gregory Jefferis
Hi Kevin, Jose et al,

We use version control (git) + to write papers in the lab.  It works fine
but handling merge conflicts is still difficult; the chaps in the lab are
all very computer literate but I regularly have to help out with a broken
merge. It's certainly too complicated for me to insist on with external
collaborators. For them I initially suggested LyX + track changes. However
LyX's track changes plays very poorly with VCS in LyX 1.6.X and this is only
partly solved in 2.0.

The beauty of real time editing is that it handles merge conflicts in a way
that is easy to understand and really pretty transparent.  Of course for it
to be transparent, there has to be a clear way to see who (and ideally when)
last edited any piece of text.  For my group and colleagues beyond the lab,
collaborative editing (a la SubEthaEdit) would be the killer feature that
would really expand the audience for LyX.  I hope that at some point this
will resonate with one of the developers with the skills to implement this
kind of feature.

Best,

Greg.

-- 
Gregory Jefferis, PhD
Division of Neurobiology
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology,
Hills Road,
Cambridge, CB2 0QH, UK.

http://www2.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/group-leaders/h-to-m/g-jefferis
http://www.neuroscience.cam.ac.uk/directory/profile.php?gsxej2
http://flybrain.stanford.edu






Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Rob Oakes
Hi Jose and other LyX-Users,

Very interesting articles, thanks for sending them.

While trying to digest the ideas, though, I found myself asking two questions 
and I'd be interested in your feedback.  The first question, of course is 
spurred by pure skepticism.

In what instances do you think this feature would be useful?

For my part, I'm not a collaborative writer.  I don't think well in the 
presence of others and I hate writing with an audience.  My one and only 
experience with Google Wave was a nightmare.  People could see just how much 
backspacing was involved in my replies!  It was deeply humiliating and I'm 
quite glad that Wave died.  

(Unfortunately, this whole real time collaboration thing is the next major 
front in online communication, and I'm 
sure others will take up the mantle.  Pity.)

But I'm probably not representative of the general population.  Even VCS 
collaboration often feels too "real time" for me (though I use it and heartily 
recommend it to others).  I much prefer distinct drafts (PDF) sent via email.  
Even better is paper sent via post.   This allows for me to organize my 
commentary and deliver an overall impression and specific recommendations

(To be clear, I prefer this arrangement when editing and when receiving 
feedback.)

However, with all that said, real time collaboration is becoming an expected 
feature.  AbiWord and Google Docs have it, OpenOffice is talking about it, and 
MS Word even has a rudimentary option.  I have several colleagues that have 
moved to Google Docs specifically because of the real time collaboration 
options.  Even though they've never actually used them, at least to the best of 
my knowledge and the editing experience is hideous in every other respect.

The people I've talked to take solace in knowing that they are present and 
"would never move to a platform that didn't have them."  I've even heard this 
from the small cadre of users I've converted to LyX.

In effect, real time document collaboration is a marketing feature.

Unfortunately, marketing features matter.  They differentiate program A from 
program B and providing a talking point.  And because they're talked about, 
such features become part of the criteria by which a program is judged.

If you need an example, look at what Google Docs has done for real time 
collaboration.  The presence/lack of a collaboration feature has become a 
standard review of any word processor.  Microsoft Word 2007 was knocked on 
ZdNet because it wasn't present.  MS Word 2010 was lauded because it was (even 
though it sucks).

Yet, I've never actually met anyone who writes with others in real time.  The 
only counterexample I can think of was an exchange with Michael Foord, who uses 
it to start program documentation.  But when I pressed him, what Michael 
described was more of an outlining tool and could easily be created via an 
interactive whiteboard rather than a full-featured real-time editing 
environment.

Which leads to my second question.  What should real time collaboration look 
like in order to be helpful?  Should it be built into an IM client (ala 
screensharing) with voice and video? Or would it be better as an online 
service?  Is integration into a desktop writing program necessary? Or would an 
implementation similar to the MS Word 2010 version be more appropriate, which 
is a hybrid approach?

You have advocated for this strongly and I would love to hear your opinions on 
the above questions.  What would be most helpful for your work?  Based on other 
implementations, what doesn't work quite so well?

As more tools release similar real time solutions, I think calls for something 
similar in LyX will increase.  Not necessarily because it's useful, but because 
it's expected.  And yes, I know that this is a terrible reason to add new 
features.  Which is actually my general point.

Current implementations of real-time editing are generally terrible.  A desktop 
level approach would be infinitely superior to the approach we are seeing now 
where each word processor does its own thing.  So, if the feature doesn't fit 
within LyX, perhaps we could send the use case scenarios and discussion to 
another project where it did fit?  The natural fit, at least to my mind, would 
be one of the IM clients.  Perhaps Empathy?

Anyone else have any thoughts?

Cheers,

Rob Oakes

Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Les Denham
On Friday 24 September 2010 10:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
> Anyone else have any thoughts?
> 
Rob,

I had no idea people were asking for this kind of feature.  Real-time 
collaboration on a document seems to me to be a formula for a colossal waste 
of time, extending the concept of endless meetings to an online equivalent.

In the organizations I'm involved in, written documents of all kinds seem to 
be actively discouraged by most managers.  The most common kind of "report" is 
an incoherent PowerPoint presentation put together with thought processes and 
artistic taste worthy of a four-year-old.

Writing of any kind is so rare I can't imagine there being any demand for 
collaborative writing.
-- 
..
Les Denham


References not exporting

2010-09-24 Thread Lars Olesen
I tried to export my lyx document. It has a lot of bibtex references.
The references shows up correctly in the document when editing it.
However, they appear just as question marks when I export the file.
The only way I can export it where the reference name (but not the
entire reference list) appears is in plain text. Can any of give me a
solution to this problem. I am on Ubuntu 10.04 with Lyx 1.6.5. Thanks.

-- 
Lars Olesen


Spacing Around Quote Environment

2010-09-24 Thread Bruce Pourciau
In the article class, the quote environment puts some extra space  
above and below the quotation to help separate it from the body text.  
In the article (AMS) class, though, the quote environment inserts no  
extra space, which would seem in conflict with normal typographic  
practice. What would be the right way to insert the extra vertical  
space?


Bruce


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 11:43 AM, Les Denham wrote:

On Friday 24 September 2010 10:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
   

Anyone else have any thoughts?

 

Rob,

I had no idea people were asking for this kind of feature.  Real-time
collaboration on a document seems to me to be a formula for a colossal waste
of time, extending the concept of endless meetings to an online equivalent.

In the organizations I'm involved in, written documents of all kinds seem to
be actively discouraged by most managers.  The most common kind of "report" is
an incoherent PowerPoint presentation put together with thought processes and
artistic taste worthy of a four-year-old.

Writing of any kind is so rare I can't imagine there being any demand for
collaborative writing.

   
I have to confess that I too am somewhat puzzled by this, but I can see 
a use case that would be good for me. Say I've written a paper with a 
collaborator. We are now at a pretty late stage in the process. It might 
be useful to be able to read through the document together and make 
changes we can both see "in real time". I'm not saying this really would 
be all that great, but I can see using it.


Still, I have to agree with Rob that doing this at the level of each 
program just seems wrong in principle. Having some very generic 
client-server model, where the program's display could show up here 
there and everywhere, and the program could take its input too from 
various sources, that would be much more general and much more useful.


That said, if we're talking *nix, I wonder how hard it would be to use 
LyX's multiple windows feature to implement some kind of collaborative 
editing. You only need to get that second window onto your 
collaborator's screen somehow.


Richard




spellchecker

2010-09-24 Thread goncalo.b.santos

Hi!

I'm using Lyx on a mac (OSX) but am not being able to get the spellchecker
to work.

I've downloaded the latest version of cocoaspell, installed it, went to
system preferences/spelling/dictionaries and put all the dictionaries in the
list "on".
In Lyx I did preferences/language settings/spellchecker/alternative language
and added "/Library/Application
Support/cocoAspell/aspell6-en-6.0-0/english.alias"
I then did Lyx/Reconfigure and restarted.

After doing all this, when I do tools/spellchecker the following message
appears:

The spellchecker could not be started
Error: The file "/Library/Application
Support/cocoAspell/aspell6-en-6.0-0/english.alias " can not be opened for
reading.

Did I do something wrong during the installation process or still need to do
something else?

Many thanks.
Regards,

Gonçalo


-- 
View this message in context: 
http://lyx.475766.n2.nabble.com/spellchecker-tp5567511p5567511.html
Sent from the LyX - Users mailing list archive at Nabble.com.


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Tennessee Carmel-Veilleux
On 24 September 2010 12:41, Richard Heck  wrote:

>
> Still, I have to agree with Rob that doing this at the level of each
> program just seems wrong in principle. Having some very generic
> client-server model, where the program's display could show up here there
> and everywhere, and the program could take its input too from various
> sources, that would be much more general and much more useful.
>
>
I think TeamViewer and similar products (DimDim, Webex) allow this use case
without any change.

TeamViewer is even available for MacOS and Linux, and there is a free
version.

Basically, they are all screen-sharing applications, with some kind of
communication features (phone-in, IM, VoIP, webcam chat). Control can be
given to any participant, in a format similar to VNC. Setup is usually
trivial (starting a program and giving-out your IP address).

I have used Webex and TeamViewer for this and other collaboration tasks and
it is truly useful.

Best regards,

Tennessee Carmel-Veilleux, ing. jr (OIQ)
Electrical engineering masters student, ETS (http://www.etsmtl.ca)
Project AREXIMAS (http://areximas.etsmtl.ca)


Re: Spacing Around Quote Environment

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 12:31 PM, Bruce Pourciau wrote:
In the article class, the quote environment puts some extra space 
above and below the quotation to help separate it from the body text. 
In the article (AMS) class, though, the quote environment inserts no 
extra space, which would seem in conflict with normal typographic 
practice. What would be the right way to insert the extra vertical space?


If that's how it looks in that class, then that is now the designers of 
the class wanted it to look. You can change it by redefining the quote 
environment, e.g.:


\renewenvironment{quote}{%

\list{}{\setlength{\topsep}{10ex}\rightmargin\leftmargin}\item[]%

}{%

\endlist

}

Adjust as needed.

rh



Re: References not exporting

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 11:58 AM, Lars Olesen wrote:

I tried to export my lyx document. It has a lot of bibtex references.
The references shows up correctly in the document when editing it.
However, they appear just as question marks when I export the file.
The only way I can export it where the reference name (but not the
entire reference list) appears is in plain text. Can any of give me a
solution to this problem. I am on Ubuntu 10.04 with Lyx 1.6.5. Thanks.

   
We need more information. Where is the LyX file? Where is the BibTeX 
file? And
here is the really crucial question: Does the BibTeX file have Unicode 
in it? If so,

then that is the problem: BibTeX does NOT handle Unicode.

Richard



Re: Printing a beamer outline

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
I guess this is impossible.

Unless someone has had a brainwave since my original post.

I've had no reply to this on the Beamer forum or on the comp.text.tex group.

 I was hoping that someone might have known of a simple Latex switch
to switch off the graphics and the article only text, but obviously
not.

I'm not sure how I get round this, certainly don't want to go back to
PowerPoint, but nor do I fancy manually creating and keeping an
outline in sync with the main presentation and article.

Thanks,

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Rob Oakes
Hi Les,

> I had no idea people were asking for this kind of feature.  Real-time 
> collaboration on a document seems to me to be a formula for a colossal waste 
> of time, extending the concept of endless meetings to an online equivalent.

I'm not sure if ti's people in general or just people that I know.  But I've 
seen it come up quite frequently in the past few months.  Particularly on blogs 
and in discussion of software tools.  When it arises in face to face 
communication, as it did during a meeting a month ago, I really try to sit up 
and pay attention.

In the meeting, people were bitching about long-distance collaboration and the 
slow turn around of document exchange.  Several options were suggested: VCS, 
Google Docs, chat, phone conferences, WebEx, etc.  It was a very good 
discussion and even got a little heated.  But then, I'm on the fringes of 
academics and written documents (particularly reports) are extremely important. 
 It's how we get money and share the results of our work.

> In the organizations I'm involved in, written documents of all kinds seem to 
> be actively discouraged by most managers.  The most common kind of "report" 
> is 
> an incoherent PowerPoint presentation put together with thought processes and 
> artistic taste worthy of a four-year-old.
> 
> Writing of any kind is so rare I can't imagine there being any demand for 
> collaborative writing.

Since I've been trying to move toward industry and private consulting, I've 
also noticed this as well.  For that reason, I might be experiencing the 
effects of an echo chamber.

To reiterate my other email, I'm extremely skeptical of the real time collab 
solutions in general.  But if there is a clear use-case where it can be 
helpful, count me interested.  I'd just like to see it done "right."

Cheers,

Rob

Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Gregory Jefferis
Hi all,

I would distinguish two kinds of collaborative editing.

* interactive collaborative editing - 2 or more people working
simultaneously on a document

* non-interactive collaborative editing - only one person actually modifying
the document at any one time BUT others always having live access to the
latest version if required.

I think typically you would spend 5% of writing time in the first mode but
that implementing it solves nasty problems with collaborating in the second
mode.

More specifically: 

On 2010-09-24 17:41, "Richard Heck"  wrote:

> On 09/24/2010 11:43 AM, Les Denham wrote:
>> On Friday 24 September 2010 10:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
> I have to confess that I too am somewhat puzzled by this, but I can see
> a use case that would be good for me. Say I've written a paper with a
> collaborator. We are now at a pretty late stage in the process. It might
> be useful to be able to read through the document together and make
> changes we can both see "in real time". I'm not saying this really would
> be all that great, but I can see using it.

This is the kind of situation where actively using real time editing is
really useful and for me it crops up whenever I am writing something with a
colleague for another institution.  It is incredibly motivating and leads to
better writing if you can skype and write in an _interactive_ and
collaborative fashion. There are potential low tech ways to do this using
screen sharing, but they do lose the significant benefit of attaching edits.
Furthermore since you don't usually want to have a permanent share of your
desktop you can't leave them on the whole time and that for me is the
problem - in my view the real benefit of a rich collaborative editing
implementation is that allows much easier and more consistent -
non-interactive collaborative editing.

Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that you
are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

Does this seem reasonable to others?  Or have other people found ways to
solve the non-interactive collaborative writing situation when people end up
modifying the same document.  In my experience this happens often enough
that it's a problem and existing software that I am aware of makes it too
hard to solve for most researchers.

Greg.




Re: change pdf save location

2010-09-24 Thread Gwen Barnes
Thank you all for your responses.  I will just leave it with the comment
that this is a functionality that I would definitely be interested in, if it
were to be incorporated in some future version of lyx.

-Gwen


On Tue, Sep 21, 2010 at 10:21 AM, Murat Yildizoglu <
murat.yildizo...@univ-cezanne.fr> wrote:

> You can use File/Export/PdfLatex (or another format, if you prefer).
> The PDF file will be generated and saved in the same folder es the LyX
> file.
>
> Murat
>
> 2010/9/21 Gwen Barnes :
> > Hi,
> >
> > When I hit the button on the lyx toolbar to either view or update the
> pdf,
> > the pdf gets created in a temporary location.  Is there a way to get it
> to
> > automatically save the pdf to my current working directory?  I'd hate to
> > accidentally submit an old version of my document because I forgot to do
> > "save as" from my pdf viewer or "export" from lyx after my last edit; I
> > certainly don't want to be doing that constantly as I am working.  I
> haven't
> > been able to find any settings that will let me change the pdf location.
> > Have I just missed them, or is there some work-around way to do this?
> >
> > -Gwen
> >
>
>


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Steve Litt
On Friday 24 September 2010 10:18:30 Kevin Brubeck Unhammer wrote:
> 2010/9/24 Jose Quesada :
> > Hi,
> > We've had previous discussions on whether or not it's useful to have some
> > kind of real-time collaboration in LyX.
> > The death of wave seemed to reinforce the idea that this is not a killer
> > feature, and people don't need it. Collaboration using a VCS is
> > sufficient.
> 
> I think the problem with Wave is that... well... what's it for really?
> It's not an editor, not a chat program, not...anything...except a tech
> demonstration. 

Aw contrair. Google Wave was techs greatest status symbol. Who got it first? 
How many invitations did you get? This was the first time since the IPO of VA 
Linux that you could be a true tech snob.

:-)

SteveT

Steve Litt
Recession Relief Package
http://www.recession-relief.US
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/stevelitt



Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Steve Litt
On Friday 24 September 2010 11:29:10 Rob Oakes wrote:
> Hi Jose and other LyX-Users,
> 
> Very interesting articles, thanks for sending them.
> 
> While trying to digest the ideas, though, I found myself asking two
>  questions and I'd be interested in your feedback.  The first question, of
>  course is spurred by pure skepticism.
> 
> In what instances do you think this feature would be useful?
> 
> For my part, I'm not a collaborative writer.  I don't think well in the
>  presence of others and I hate writing with an audience.  

All Unleashed books are written by a main author and lots of contributing 
authors. However, it's carved up by chapter, so no chapter is collaborative.

I see collaborative situations as a meeting where everyone's trying to design 
something. For years the VimOutliner project has tried to build in 
collaboration, but it's very difficult.

You can always do poor man's collaboration. Have ten people in a room, each 
with their own VNC client, and have them all work on a single instance of a 
single program.

I can't for the life of me see why a document writing software like LyX should 
be collaborative above and beyond being able to farm out chapters to different 
people, which it can already do.

SteveT

Steve Litt
Recession Relief Package
http://www.recession-relief.US
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/stevelitt



Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Kevin Brubeck Unhammer
2010/9/24 Gregory Jefferis :
> Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
> live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
> versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
> conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that you
> are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
> changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
> arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
> designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

And this is the reason why most users love Google Docs and will never
use git (even though as we all know, merging with git is Fun and
Easy).


I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)


-Kevin


[1] http://gobby.0x539.de


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Jacob Bishop
I would simply like to say that I think going too far down this road could
lead to a lot of effort, and only a marginal return. I think we do need to
make LyX better, but I don't think it needs to be too multi-purpose. You
know the whole Swiss-Army knife versus a tool that does one thing, but does
it well debate. I think we would be best to improve how well LyX does its
primary job: document processing. We can leave other jobs to other tools.
That said, as soon as there's a good tool to say, track versions of a file
(like subversion), we can provide meaningful integration with that tool (and
have).

I have used Google docs collaboratively, but would personally be very
unlikely to use LyX in such a way. I can get up-to-date copies of my
document out to people with Subversion or dropbox well enough.

Just my two bits.

-Jacob

On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 12:21 PM, Kevin Brubeck Unhammer <
kun...@student.uib.no> wrote:

> 2010/9/24 Gregory Jefferis :
> > Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
> > live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
> > versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
> > conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that
> you
> > are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
> > changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
> > arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
> > designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.
>
> And this is the reason why most users love Google Docs and will never
> use git (even though as we all know, merging with git is Fun and
> Easy).
>
>
> I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
> LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
> the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
> lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)
>
>
> -Kevin
>
>
> [1] http://gobby.0x539.de
>


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
Steve,

> All Unleashed books are written by a main author and lots of contributing
> authors. However, it's carved up by chapter, so no chapter is collaborative.

While this may well be true in general, the two books I have
collaborated on (my only book experience)  I contributed to every
chapter, writing some sections as well as heavy editing of the content
written by the main author (or the other authors).

Certainly this wasn't live collaboration, and relied on the track
changes features of Word.

I have done the same thing with Lyx and co-authoring Technical reports.

We also tried a Skype/Google Apps approach for live editing, but it
didn't work very well because of how slow the Skype connection was.
But this was more of brainstorming exercise trying to flesh out a
Report outline.

The books are:

http://www.amazon.com/Effects-Extensions-Ecology-Statistics-Biology/dp/0387874577/ref=sr_1_1?s=books=UTF8=1285353221=1-1

and

http://www.amazon.com/Analysing-Ecological-Statistics-Biology-Health/dp/0387459677/ref=sr_1_2?s=books=UTF8=1285353262=1-2

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 02:21 PM, Kevin Brubeck Unhammer wrote:


I think the ideal situation would look like Gobby[1] running inside
LyX (not necessarily with chat features, but at least showing where
the other user is editing), but I can understand how that would be a
lot of work to implement. Sponsorship project? ;-)

   
I see that there is also a Kobby (KDE, of course), which gets you closer 
to something LyX could handle. Both of these are built on libinfinity, 
libqinfinity in Kobby's case, which again is something that could 
conceivably be integrated into LyX.


That's the "interactive collaborative editing" version, of course.

Richard



Re: Printing a beamer outline

2010-09-24 Thread Graham Smith
Richard


>> I guess this is impossible.
>>
>> Unless someone has had a brainwave since my original post.
>>
>>
>
> I just haven't had time to think about it. LyX time is spent chasing other
> bugs right now.

I still appreciate you thinking about it, if you do have a sudden
eureka moment, then I would still appreciate you getting back to me.

I am already viewed with some suspicion, as I don't use PowerPoint,
and as its now department policy to hand out outlines, not being able
to produce them in Lyx/Beamer, gives me a bit of a problem.

Graham


Re: more on collaboration

2010-09-24 Thread Richard Heck

On 09/24/2010 01:34 PM, Gregory Jefferis wrote:


Non-interactive collaborative editing means that there can always be one
live version of a document to which anyone can apply changes that are
versioned, identified and much more likely.  Essentially it solves the
conflicting merge problem by automatically merging all the time so that you
are always looking at the latest version (and can be alerted to recent
changes).  You can try and do this with traditional version control
arrangements but you will always run into a conflict if the system isn't
designed for the possibility of interactive collaborative editing.

   
Surely the way this works could be mimicked with VC. What you need to 
have is some kind of push going on, so that, whenever a document is 
saved, it is /automatically/ VC'd. And then you need to have some kind 
of system for signalling when a new version has been committed. An even 
lower-tech solution would involve some kind of polling.


I think this would actually be relatively /easy/ to integrate into LyX. 
Here's the idea. When we have a version controlled file and 
"collaborative editing" is enabled, we run "svn up filename.lyx" in the 
background from time to time and see if we get anything back. This is 
not wholly trivial because we don't want to lose our local edits. But 
this could be handled by covertly saving the Buffer before doing svn up; 
we can backup the original and restore it if need be. Maybe the best way 
to do this would be to clone the local repository into LyX's temporary 
directory and do all the work there, only touching the "real" directory 
when the user saves the file. Anyway, something like that will work. 
What do we do, though, if there is a conflict between the newly saved 
file and the local edits? I guess we report the issue and give the user 
options, e.g., open both documents. In LyX 2.0, we could even use the 
new comparison feature to show the user the differences between them. 
Going the other way, we could commit all changes whenever they are 
saved, again reporting any issues we might run into. Then the most 
current version is always on the server.


This could almost be done without any changes to LyX. Here's how.
1. Set up a cron job that does "svn up filename.lyx" every two minutes.
2. Set up another cron job that watches filename.lyx and, if it changes, 
does "svn ci filename.lyx".
If people aren't often editing the very same part of the document at the 
very same time, then this will work fine.


Richard



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