Re: Recommended third-party tools

2012-02-22 Thread Russell D Brunelle
I'd like to thank everyone who offered suggestions for this guide. I've 
implemented almost all of them, and anyone who wants to take this thing and 
make something more official out of it is welcome to.

I remain of the opinion that a simple, one-page guide which takes the user 
step-by-step not only through installing LyX, but also through installing at 
least one good example of each of the main types of supporting tools, would be 
a boon for beginners.

Although one of the strengths of open source software is the amount of choice 
you get, I also believe it's helpful to be able to say to a beginner, You are 
welcome and encouraged to try everything and see what best suits you, but for 
purpose X, right now package Y (or perhaps package Z) would be an excellent 
place to start.

Not only does this make LyX more attractive through showing the power of the 
entire software ecosystem, but it raises the odds that the user actually *will* 
end up using some sort of software for purpose X instead of nothing (a great 
example of this is reference management software like jabref or pybliographer 
which seems to me to be woefully underutilized).

Anyway, thank you again for all the suggestions. I've always loved LyX and hope 
in some small way this contribution was worthwhile.

Russell

 http://russellb.livejournal.com/1335718.html
 
 I believe a simplified guide such as this could be very helpful for students 
 about to enter college to study one of the sciences



Re: Recommended third-party tools

2012-02-22 Thread Russell D Brunelle
I'd like to thank everyone who offered suggestions for this guide. I've 
implemented almost all of them, and anyone who wants to take this thing and 
make something more official out of it is welcome to.

I remain of the opinion that a simple, one-page guide which takes the user 
step-by-step not only through installing LyX, but also through installing at 
least one good example of each of the main types of supporting tools, would be 
a boon for beginners.

Although one of the strengths of open source software is the amount of choice 
you get, I also believe it's helpful to be able to say to a beginner, You are 
welcome and encouraged to try everything and see what best suits you, but for 
purpose X, right now package Y (or perhaps package Z) would be an excellent 
place to start.

Not only does this make LyX more attractive through showing the power of the 
entire software ecosystem, but it raises the odds that the user actually *will* 
end up using some sort of software for purpose X instead of nothing (a great 
example of this is reference management software like jabref or pybliographer 
which seems to me to be woefully underutilized).

Anyway, thank you again for all the suggestions. I've always loved LyX and hope 
in some small way this contribution was worthwhile.

Russell

 http://russellb.livejournal.com/1335718.html
 
 I believe a simplified guide such as this could be very helpful for students 
 about to enter college to study one of the sciences



Re: Recommended third-party tools

2012-02-22 Thread Russell D Brunelle
I'd like to thank everyone who offered suggestions for this guide. I've 
implemented almost all of them, and anyone who wants to take this thing and 
make something more official out of it is welcome to.

I remain of the opinion that a simple, one-page guide which takes the user 
step-by-step not only through installing LyX, but also through installing at 
least one good example of each of the main types of supporting tools, would be 
a boon for beginners.

Although one of the strengths of open source software is the amount of choice 
you get, I also believe it's helpful to be able to say to a beginner, "You are 
welcome and encouraged to try everything and see what best suits you, but for 
purpose X, right now package Y (or perhaps package Z) would be an excellent 
place to start."

Not only does this make LyX more attractive through showing the power of the 
entire software ecosystem, but it raises the odds that the user actually *will* 
end up using some sort of software for purpose X instead of nothing (a great 
example of this is reference management software like jabref or pybliographer 
which seems to me to be woefully underutilized).

Anyway, thank you again for all the suggestions. I've always loved LyX and hope 
in some small way this contribution was worthwhile.

Russell

> http://russellb.livejournal.com/1335718.html
> 
> I believe a simplified guide such as this could be very helpful for students 
> about to enter college to study one of the sciences



Why do YOU love LyX?

2012-02-18 Thread Russell D Brunelle
If you have a good idea, then there's something special (I'm almost 
tempted to say sacred) about committing it to paper.


The emergence of abstract thinking was an early inflection point in the 
development of our species. The invention of written language was another. 
The invention of the printing press was yet another.


More recently, LaTeX made professional typesetting standards available for 
free, and even more recently LyX made using those standards as easy as 
using anything else.


I'm not saying that LyX is as significant as the printing press, only that 
there's an unbroken stream of progress which it's a proud part of, and for 
that reason I feel proud about using it.


So, why do YOU love LyX?

Russell



Recommended third-party tools

2012-02-18 Thread Russell D Brunelle
I'm working on creating the perfect step-by-step procedure for setting 
up a Linux workstation for scientific writing, based on LyX and with an 
emphasis on selecting the best available FOSS tools for creating graphics 
and performing computations.  Whenever possible I wanted to select tools 
which are in common use, so that the skills being gained might have 
lasting value.


Here's the draft I have so far, which builds on something I mentioned on 
this list a while ago: http://russellb.livejournal.com/1335718.html


I believe a simplified guide such as this could be very helpful for 
students about to enter college to study one of the sciences, and I'm 
hoping members of this list might be able to offer suggestions for 
additional third-party tools, or enhancements to LyX, which may have been 
left out.  I don't consider myself a LyX expert, but I do believe there is 
a need for something like this, and I gave this my best shot in the hopes 
of getting the ball rolling.


Russell



Re: Free software writing appliance -- email clients

2012-02-18 Thread Russell D Brunelle

On Sun, 19 Feb 2012, Steve Litt wrote:


In it he recommended Evolution as an email client.


FWIW I deleted that portion: it was left over from something else, and 
really shouldn't have been there.


At the same time I made other edits based on some of the suggestions I've 
received so far, including explictly mentioning sweave 
(http://wiki.lyx.org/LyX/LyxWithRThroughSweave), and flagging anything 
that might be different under Ubuntu.


The combination of R and LyX is a powerful one.  I'm wondering if it would 
be worth the time to make a YouTube video demonstrating what you can do 
with R (via its Rstudio IDE) and LyX (via sweave): this alone might be a 
compelling reason for a lot of science students to give this entire 
arrangement a shot.


Russell



Why do YOU love LyX?

2012-02-18 Thread Russell D Brunelle
If you have a good idea, then there's something special (I'm almost 
tempted to say sacred) about committing it to paper.


The emergence of abstract thinking was an early inflection point in the 
development of our species. The invention of written language was another. 
The invention of the printing press was yet another.


More recently, LaTeX made professional typesetting standards available for 
free, and even more recently LyX made using those standards as easy as 
using anything else.


I'm not saying that LyX is as significant as the printing press, only that 
there's an unbroken stream of progress which it's a proud part of, and for 
that reason I feel proud about using it.


So, why do YOU love LyX?

Russell



Recommended third-party tools

2012-02-18 Thread Russell D Brunelle
I'm working on creating the perfect step-by-step procedure for setting 
up a Linux workstation for scientific writing, based on LyX and with an 
emphasis on selecting the best available FOSS tools for creating graphics 
and performing computations.  Whenever possible I wanted to select tools 
which are in common use, so that the skills being gained might have 
lasting value.


Here's the draft I have so far, which builds on something I mentioned on 
this list a while ago: http://russellb.livejournal.com/1335718.html


I believe a simplified guide such as this could be very helpful for 
students about to enter college to study one of the sciences, and I'm 
hoping members of this list might be able to offer suggestions for 
additional third-party tools, or enhancements to LyX, which may have been 
left out.  I don't consider myself a LyX expert, but I do believe there is 
a need for something like this, and I gave this my best shot in the hopes 
of getting the ball rolling.


Russell



Re: Free software writing appliance -- email clients

2012-02-18 Thread Russell D Brunelle

On Sun, 19 Feb 2012, Steve Litt wrote:


In it he recommended Evolution as an email client.


FWIW I deleted that portion: it was left over from something else, and 
really shouldn't have been there.


At the same time I made other edits based on some of the suggestions I've 
received so far, including explictly mentioning sweave 
(http://wiki.lyx.org/LyX/LyxWithRThroughSweave), and flagging anything 
that might be different under Ubuntu.


The combination of R and LyX is a powerful one.  I'm wondering if it would 
be worth the time to make a YouTube video demonstrating what you can do 
with R (via its Rstudio IDE) and LyX (via sweave): this alone might be a 
compelling reason for a lot of science students to give this entire 
arrangement a shot.


Russell



Why do YOU love LyX?

2012-02-18 Thread Russell D Brunelle
If you have a good idea, then there's something special (I'm almost 
tempted to say "sacred") about committing it to paper.


The emergence of abstract thinking was an early inflection point in the 
development of our species. The invention of written language was another. 
The invention of the printing press was yet another.


More recently, LaTeX made professional typesetting standards available for 
free, and even more recently LyX made using those standards as easy as 
using anything else.


I'm not saying that LyX is as significant as the printing press, only that 
there's an unbroken stream of progress which it's a proud part of, and for 
that reason I feel proud about using it.


So, why do YOU love LyX?

Russell



Recommended third-party tools

2012-02-18 Thread Russell D Brunelle
I'm working on creating the "perfect" step-by-step procedure for setting 
up a Linux workstation for scientific writing, based on LyX and with an 
emphasis on selecting the best available FOSS tools for creating graphics 
and performing computations.  Whenever possible I wanted to select tools 
which are in common use, so that the skills being gained might have 
lasting value.


Here's the draft I have so far, which builds on something I mentioned on 
this list a while ago: http://russellb.livejournal.com/1335718.html


I believe a simplified guide such as this could be very helpful for 
students about to enter college to study one of the sciences, and I'm 
hoping members of this list might be able to offer suggestions for 
additional third-party tools, or enhancements to LyX, which may have been 
left out.  I don't consider myself a LyX expert, but I do believe there is 
a need for something like this, and I gave this my best shot in the hopes 
of getting the ball rolling.


Russell



Re: Free software writing appliance -- email clients

2012-02-18 Thread Russell D Brunelle

On Sun, 19 Feb 2012, Steve Litt wrote:


In it he recommended Evolution as an email client.


FWIW I deleted that portion: it was left over from something else, and 
really shouldn't have been there.


At the same time I made other edits based on some of the suggestions I've 
received so far, including explictly mentioning sweave 
(http://wiki.lyx.org/LyX/LyxWithRThroughSweave), and flagging anything 
that might be different under Ubuntu.


The combination of R and LyX is a powerful one.  I'm wondering if it would 
be worth the time to make a YouTube video demonstrating what you can do 
with R (via its Rstudio IDE) and LyX (via sweave): this alone might be a 
compelling reason for a lot of science students to give this entire 
arrangement a shot.


Russell