Re: How Many use linux

2009-09-12 Thread Thomas Løcke
LyX and Slackware combo. Works a treat!

:o)
/Thomas


Re: How Many use linux

2009-09-12 Thread Thomas Løcke
LyX and Slackware combo. Works a treat!

:o)
/Thomas


Re: How Many use linux

2009-09-12 Thread Thomas Løcke
LyX and Slackware combo. Works a treat!

:o)
/Thomas


Re: LyX crashes in Ubuntu 9.04

2009-06-10 Thread Thomas Løcke
On Thu, Jun 11, 2009 at 6:25 AM, Michael Gasperlmich...@gasperl.at wrote:
 Hi! I have the following Problem:
 LyX 1.6.2 crashes regularily while i scroll down in a bigger document.
 This only happens if showing graphics is enabled. How can I solve this
 problem?
 Thank you very much!

This also happpened to me, on Slackware 12.1,

I fixed it by updating my QT4 library from version 4.4.3 to version
4.5.1, and then recompile LyX against that.

I've no idea why this helped, but at least LyX doesn't crash anymore.

It can't hurt trying,

:o)
/Thomas


Re: LyX crashes in Ubuntu 9.04

2009-06-10 Thread Thomas Løcke
On Thu, Jun 11, 2009 at 6:25 AM, Michael Gasperlmich...@gasperl.at wrote:
 Hi! I have the following Problem:
 LyX 1.6.2 crashes regularily while i scroll down in a bigger document.
 This only happens if showing graphics is enabled. How can I solve this
 problem?
 Thank you very much!

This also happpened to me, on Slackware 12.1,

I fixed it by updating my QT4 library from version 4.4.3 to version
4.5.1, and then recompile LyX against that.

I've no idea why this helped, but at least LyX doesn't crash anymore.

It can't hurt trying,

:o)
/Thomas


Re: LyX crashes in Ubuntu 9.04

2009-06-10 Thread Thomas Løcke
On Thu, Jun 11, 2009 at 6:25 AM, Michael Gasperl wrote:
> Hi! I have the following Problem:
> LyX 1.6.2 crashes regularily while i scroll down in a bigger document.
> This only happens if showing graphics is enabled. How can I solve this
> problem?
> Thank you very much!

This also happpened to me, on Slackware 12.1,

I fixed it by updating my QT4 library from version 4.4.3 to version
4.5.1, and then recompile LyX against that.

I've no idea why this helped, but at least LyX doesn't crash anymore.

It can't hurt trying,

:o)
/Thomas


Shortcuts

2009-06-08 Thread Thomas Løcke
Hey all,

I've now written a small number of texts using LyX, and I'm *very*
happy with it.

I do though have one request for the coming versions of LyX: When you
mouseover the various GUI buttons, how about adding the shortcut to
the popup text, eg. CTRL + E for the Emphasis button?

When learning to use new programs, I try to learn the keyboard
shortcuts as fast as possible, and small hints like the above
mentioned help me a lot.

If this is already available in LyX, then please let me know how to
enable it.  :o)

Regards,
Thomas


Shortcuts

2009-06-08 Thread Thomas Løcke
Hey all,

I've now written a small number of texts using LyX, and I'm *very*
happy with it.

I do though have one request for the coming versions of LyX: When you
mouseover the various GUI buttons, how about adding the shortcut to
the popup text, eg. CTRL + E for the Emphasis button?

When learning to use new programs, I try to learn the keyboard
shortcuts as fast as possible, and small hints like the above
mentioned help me a lot.

If this is already available in LyX, then please let me know how to
enable it.  :o)

Regards,
Thomas


Shortcuts

2009-06-08 Thread Thomas Løcke
Hey all,

I've now written a small number of texts using LyX, and I'm *very*
happy with it.

I do though have one request for the coming versions of LyX: When you
mouseover the various GUI buttons, how about adding the shortcut to
the popup text, eg. CTRL + E for the Emphasis button?

When learning to use new programs, I try to learn the keyboard
shortcuts as fast as possible, and small hints like the above
mentioned help me a lot.

If this is already available in LyX, then please let me know how to
enable it.  :o)

Regards,
Thomas


Source code highlighting and indentation

2009-05-02 Thread Thomas Løcke
Hey again,

Now that I've decided on using LyX for my manual, I've started
wondering how to go about getting the source code examples highlighted
and indented. Most of the code examples will be in Ada, with a little
bit of C here and there.

Is there a way to automate this, or should I just do it manually?

Sincerely,
Thomas


Re: Source code highlighting and indentation

2009-05-02 Thread Thomas Løcke
On Sat, May 2, 2009 at 9:31 PM, rgheck rgh...@bobjweil.com wrote:
 Jeremy C. Reed wrote:

 I have used the listings package. It probably knows ada. (I haven't used
 it with lyx though, just with latex.)


 There is support for listings in LyX. Use the InsertProgram Listing
 environment. Ada is available.

Thank you!

This works a charm. The syntax highlighting is very good, and it
supports Ada 2005. It doesn't do proper indentation though, but it's
very easy for me to do that manually.

The more I learn about LyX, the more amazed I get. What an awesome app!

:o)
Thomas


Source code highlighting and indentation

2009-05-02 Thread Thomas Løcke
Hey again,

Now that I've decided on using LyX for my manual, I've started
wondering how to go about getting the source code examples highlighted
and indented. Most of the code examples will be in Ada, with a little
bit of C here and there.

Is there a way to automate this, or should I just do it manually?

Sincerely,
Thomas


Re: Source code highlighting and indentation

2009-05-02 Thread Thomas Løcke
On Sat, May 2, 2009 at 9:31 PM, rgheck rgh...@bobjweil.com wrote:
 Jeremy C. Reed wrote:

 I have used the listings package. It probably knows ada. (I haven't used
 it with lyx though, just with latex.)


 There is support for listings in LyX. Use the InsertProgram Listing
 environment. Ada is available.

Thank you!

This works a charm. The syntax highlighting is very good, and it
supports Ada 2005. It doesn't do proper indentation though, but it's
very easy for me to do that manually.

The more I learn about LyX, the more amazed I get. What an awesome app!

:o)
Thomas


Source code highlighting and indentation

2009-05-02 Thread Thomas Løcke
Hey again,

Now that I've decided on using LyX for my manual, I've started
wondering how to go about getting the source code examples highlighted
and indented. Most of the code examples will be in Ada, with a little
bit of C here and there.

Is there a way to "automate" this, or should I just do it manually?

Sincerely,
Thomas


Re: Source code highlighting and indentation

2009-05-02 Thread Thomas Løcke
On Sat, May 2, 2009 at 9:31 PM, rgheck  wrote:
> Jeremy C. Reed wrote:
>>
>> I have used the "listings" package. It probably knows ada. (I haven't used
>> it with lyx though, just with latex.)
>>
>
> There is support for listings in LyX. Use the Insert>Program Listing
> environment. Ada is available.

Thank you!

This works a charm. The syntax highlighting is very good, and it
supports Ada 2005. It doesn't do proper indentation though, but it's
very easy for me to do that manually.

The more I learn about LyX, the more amazed I get. What an awesome app!

:o)
Thomas


Re: Using LyX for writing a very long manual

2009-05-01 Thread Thomas Løcke
2009/4/29 Steve Litt sl...@troubleshooters.com:
 Hi Thomas,

 In my opinion, LyX is exactly the right tool for what you're doing. With its
 WYSIAWYG (What You See Is Almost What You Get) environment, you can pound out
 content as fast as your fingers can type, and never have to spend time
 remembering codes or have codes get in your way when proofreading. Almost all
 appearance will be done by styles, so during authoring you needn't spend time
 fine tuning the look of the book. And because LyX uses LaTeX under the hood,
 your book comes out typeset very pleasingly.


I'm currently working my way through the tutorial and the user's
guide, and already I'm impressed at how nice output looks. I can't
quite put my finger on what it is, but there's definitely something
slick about it.


 I've used LyX to write a 309 page 8.5x11, a 201 page 8.5x11, a 231 page 8.5x11
 eBook, 2 more eBooks in the 100+ page range, one that was 90 pages, and I'm
 working on one that's probably going to weigh in at about 150.

 You mentioned this is a programming book and you want to avoid getting painted
 into corners. You need to figure out ahead of time what styles you'll need.
 You'll definitely need a paragraph style for code (paragraph styles are
 called environments in LyX). Personally I make my own (mycode), which is
 really just a copystyle of lyx-code. You'll also need a character style for
 code (mycodec).

 Presumably you're going to need styles Tip, Warning, Caution, and Note for
 callouts. You might also need a generic callout, so if you want a box with
 heading DON'T RETURN A LOCAL POINTER FROM A FUNCTION and text explainging why
 the pointer went out of scope, you can do so.

 If necessary I can send you my code for these styles.


I would like that very much! I tend to learn things faster/easier when
I have some actual working code to look at.


 I'd suggest you read all the LyX help files, especially the customization one.
 I'd also suggest you read Litt's LyX Library at
 http://www.troubleshooters.com/linux/lyx/index.htm. Search the Internet for a
 doc called TeX for the Impatient and read it. There's also a Not So Short
 Introduction to LaTeX or something like that, read it. The Memoir document
 class has some must-read documentation -- read it, but I don't recommend you
 actually use the Memoir document class. A guy named Herbert Voss, who used to
 be a mainstay on the LyX list, has a website with all sorts of cool LaTeX
 riffs. Last but not least, there are a few dead-trees books on LaTeX. They're
 expensive, but helpful. By spending the first 3 days of your project reading,
 you'll understand all the corners you can get out of, and you'll probably
 discover any you can't.


All good stuff. Thank you.


 Remember when you're creating your styles that they don't have to be perfect
 the first time around -- you can change them later. Make em quick and dirty
 at first, but just be sure to use them every time. The docs on my website are
 a pretty good reference for how to make your own styles.


It appears to be quite an involved process, but I'm sure I can manage,
and if not, I can always post here and hope for some expert
assistance.  :o)


 Now I'm going to give you some very controversial advice, and many will argue
 with it. DO NOT use the facilities of your document class for your
 frontmatter -- instead use custom styles and ERT (inserted LaTeX code) to
 fine-tune your front matter exactly how you want it. There's nothing sadder
 than the guy who picks a document class to get the frontmatter just right,
 and then has to live with that document class's ideosyncracies throughout the
 book. Personally, I always start with the plain old Book document class, and
 use a layout file to add the features I need.


I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean: If I don't use any of
the styles of a document class, why use the class in the first place?
Or am I missing something?


 You've picked a great tool to write your book.

I'm sure I have. I look forward to learning how to use it.

/Thomas


Re: Using LyX for writing a very long manual

2009-05-01 Thread Thomas Løcke
2009/4/29 Steve Litt sl...@troubleshooters.com:
 Hi Thomas,

 In my opinion, LyX is exactly the right tool for what you're doing. With its
 WYSIAWYG (What You See Is Almost What You Get) environment, you can pound out
 content as fast as your fingers can type, and never have to spend time
 remembering codes or have codes get in your way when proofreading. Almost all
 appearance will be done by styles, so during authoring you needn't spend time
 fine tuning the look of the book. And because LyX uses LaTeX under the hood,
 your book comes out typeset very pleasingly.


I'm currently working my way through the tutorial and the user's
guide, and already I'm impressed at how nice output looks. I can't
quite put my finger on what it is, but there's definitely something
slick about it.


 I've used LyX to write a 309 page 8.5x11, a 201 page 8.5x11, a 231 page 8.5x11
 eBook, 2 more eBooks in the 100+ page range, one that was 90 pages, and I'm
 working on one that's probably going to weigh in at about 150.

 You mentioned this is a programming book and you want to avoid getting painted
 into corners. You need to figure out ahead of time what styles you'll need.
 You'll definitely need a paragraph style for code (paragraph styles are
 called environments in LyX). Personally I make my own (mycode), which is
 really just a copystyle of lyx-code. You'll also need a character style for
 code (mycodec).

 Presumably you're going to need styles Tip, Warning, Caution, and Note for
 callouts. You might also need a generic callout, so if you want a box with
 heading DON'T RETURN A LOCAL POINTER FROM A FUNCTION and text explainging why
 the pointer went out of scope, you can do so.

 If necessary I can send you my code for these styles.


I would like that very much! I tend to learn things faster/easier when
I have some actual working code to look at.


 I'd suggest you read all the LyX help files, especially the customization one.
 I'd also suggest you read Litt's LyX Library at
 http://www.troubleshooters.com/linux/lyx/index.htm. Search the Internet for a
 doc called TeX for the Impatient and read it. There's also a Not So Short
 Introduction to LaTeX or something like that, read it. The Memoir document
 class has some must-read documentation -- read it, but I don't recommend you
 actually use the Memoir document class. A guy named Herbert Voss, who used to
 be a mainstay on the LyX list, has a website with all sorts of cool LaTeX
 riffs. Last but not least, there are a few dead-trees books on LaTeX. They're
 expensive, but helpful. By spending the first 3 days of your project reading,
 you'll understand all the corners you can get out of, and you'll probably
 discover any you can't.


All good stuff. Thank you.


 Remember when you're creating your styles that they don't have to be perfect
 the first time around -- you can change them later. Make em quick and dirty
 at first, but just be sure to use them every time. The docs on my website are
 a pretty good reference for how to make your own styles.


It appears to be quite an involved process, but I'm sure I can manage,
and if not, I can always post here and hope for some expert
assistance.  :o)


 Now I'm going to give you some very controversial advice, and many will argue
 with it. DO NOT use the facilities of your document class for your
 frontmatter -- instead use custom styles and ERT (inserted LaTeX code) to
 fine-tune your front matter exactly how you want it. There's nothing sadder
 than the guy who picks a document class to get the frontmatter just right,
 and then has to live with that document class's ideosyncracies throughout the
 book. Personally, I always start with the plain old Book document class, and
 use a layout file to add the features I need.


I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean: If I don't use any of
the styles of a document class, why use the class in the first place?
Or am I missing something?


 You've picked a great tool to write your book.

I'm sure I have. I look forward to learning how to use it.

/Thomas


Re: Using LyX for writing a very long manual

2009-05-01 Thread Thomas Løcke
2009/4/29 Steve Litt :
> Hi Thomas,
>
> In my opinion, LyX is exactly the right tool for what you're doing. With its
> WYSIAWYG (What You See Is Almost What You Get) environment, you can pound out
> content as fast as your fingers can type, and never have to spend time
> remembering codes or have codes get in your way when proofreading. Almost all
> appearance will be done by styles, so during authoring you needn't spend time
> fine tuning the look of the book. And because LyX uses LaTeX under the hood,
> your book comes out typeset very pleasingly.


I'm currently working my way through the tutorial and the user's
guide, and already I'm impressed at how nice output looks. I can't
quite put my finger on what it is, but there's definitely something
slick about it.


> I've used LyX to write a 309 page 8.5x11, a 201 page 8.5x11, a 231 page 8.5x11
> eBook, 2 more eBooks in the 100+ page range, one that was 90 pages, and I'm
> working on one that's probably going to weigh in at about 150.
>
> You mentioned this is a programming book and you want to avoid getting painted
> into corners. You need to figure out ahead of time what styles you'll need.
> You'll definitely need a paragraph style for code (paragraph styles are
> called "environments" in LyX). Personally I make my own (mycode), which is
> really just a copystyle of lyx-code. You'll also need a character style for
> code (mycodec).
>
> Presumably you're going to need styles Tip, Warning, Caution, and Note for
> callouts. You might also need a generic callout, so if you want a box with
> heading DON'T RETURN A LOCAL POINTER FROM A FUNCTION and text explainging why
> the pointer went out of scope, you can do so.
>
> If necessary I can send you my code for these styles.


I would like that very much! I tend to learn things faster/easier when
I have some actual working "code" to look at.


> I'd suggest you read all the LyX help files, especially the customization one.
> I'd also suggest you read "Litt's LyX Library" at
> http://www.troubleshooters.com/linux/lyx/index.htm. Search the Internet for a
> doc called "TeX for the Impatient" and read it. There's also a "Not So Short
> Introduction to LaTeX" or something like that, read it. The Memoir document
> class has some must-read documentation -- read it, but I don't recommend you
> actually use the Memoir document class. A guy named Herbert Voss, who used to
> be a mainstay on the LyX list, has a website with all sorts of cool LaTeX
> riffs. Last but not least, there are a few dead-trees books on LaTeX. They're
> expensive, but helpful. By spending the first 3 days of your project reading,
> you'll understand all the corners you can get out of, and you'll probably
> discover any you can't.


All good stuff. Thank you.


> Remember when you're creating your styles that they don't have to be perfect
> the first time around -- you can change them later. Make em quick and dirty
> at first, but just be sure to use them every time. The docs on my website are
> a pretty good reference for how to make your own styles.


It appears to be quite an involved process, but I'm sure I can manage,
and if not, I can always post here and hope for some expert
assistance.  :o)


> Now I'm going to give you some very controversial advice, and many will argue
> with it. DO NOT use the facilities of your document class for your
> frontmatter -- instead use custom styles and ERT (inserted LaTeX code) to
> fine-tune your front matter exactly how you want it. There's nothing sadder
> than the guy who picks a document class to get the frontmatter just right,
> and then has to live with that document class's ideosyncracies throughout the
> book. Personally, I always start with the plain old Book document class, and
> use a layout file to add the features I need.


I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean: If I don't use any of
the styles of a document class, why use the class in the first place?
Or am I missing something?


> You've picked a great tool to write your book.

I'm sure I have. I look forward to learning how to use it.

/Thomas


Using LyX for writing a very long manual

2009-04-29 Thread Thomas Løcke
Hey,

I'm about to start the process of writing the 2nd edition of a fairly
long (+150 A4 pages) internal manual. It's about a set of software
systems and programming practices in my business. The 1st edition was
written using OpenOffice. I remember spending a lot of time trying to
make things look good, and when I'm reading the manual today, I'm
constantly reminded of how hard I failed at that.  :o)

So for this 2nd edition, I've been looking for some better tools, and
this has brought me to LyX. I've installed LyX and TexLive on my
Slackware 12.1 system, and I've tinkered some with it. It appears to
be *exactly* what I'm looking for.

But before I start writing, I'd like to ask if there are any good
resources on using LyX for writing what is essentially a book on
programming. I'd really like to avoid painting myself into a corner,
like I did with OpenOffice.

Any and all advice is more than welcome.

Sincerely,
Thomas Løcke


Using LyX for writing a very long manual

2009-04-29 Thread Thomas Løcke
Hey,

I'm about to start the process of writing the 2nd edition of a fairly
long (+150 A4 pages) internal manual. It's about a set of software
systems and programming practices in my business. The 1st edition was
written using OpenOffice. I remember spending a lot of time trying to
make things look good, and when I'm reading the manual today, I'm
constantly reminded of how hard I failed at that.  :o)

So for this 2nd edition, I've been looking for some better tools, and
this has brought me to LyX. I've installed LyX and TexLive on my
Slackware 12.1 system, and I've tinkered some with it. It appears to
be *exactly* what I'm looking for.

But before I start writing, I'd like to ask if there are any good
resources on using LyX for writing what is essentially a book on
programming. I'd really like to avoid painting myself into a corner,
like I did with OpenOffice.

Any and all advice is more than welcome.

Sincerely,
Thomas Løcke


Using LyX for writing a very long manual

2009-04-29 Thread Thomas Løcke
Hey,

I'm about to start the process of writing the 2nd edition of a fairly
long (+150 A4 pages) internal manual. It's about a set of software
systems and programming practices in my business. The 1st edition was
written using OpenOffice. I remember spending a lot of time trying to
make things "look good", and when I'm reading the manual today, I'm
constantly reminded of how hard I failed at that.  :o)

So for this 2nd edition, I've been looking for some better tools, and
this has brought me to LyX. I've installed LyX and TexLive on my
Slackware 12.1 system, and I've tinkered some with it. It appears to
be *exactly* what I'm looking for.

But before I start writing, I'd like to ask if there are any good
resources on using LyX for writing what is essentially a book on
programming. I'd really like to avoid painting myself into a corner,
like I did with OpenOffice.

Any and all advice is more than welcome.

Sincerely,
Thomas Løcke