Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-13 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:

Uwe, in the page 2 you have on top an specific trigonometric example 
(Blancos) without brackets.


As I stated in my last email this document is not correct because it violates the norm ISO 31 
although the document states that it follows it.


And more, when I say that the brackets are 
no necessary is because LaTeX add a little space between the function 
and his argument. So the reality is that LaTeX don't type,

cos2vt
but,
cos 2vt
with a little more space after cos and this is very comprehensive for 
everybody.


This is nevertheless against the possibility to omit the braces only for 1 or 2 characters in the 
argument as defined in the norm.

Don't you own a math or physics book or at least a school book? There you ca 
see how it is done.

Please don't mention me the Wikipedia because this resource isn't at all 
a canon for nothing.


The Wikipedia is the most impartial resource you can find. When you think there's something wrong 
you can correct it and cite other resources like books and norms. And furthermore, as everybody is 
writing it, mathematicians, as well as engineers, physicists, etc., the typesetting follows the 
common rules to avoid misunderstandings. (You are a military officer and know that most conflicts 
arise only out of misunderstandings.)


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-13 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:

Uwe, in the page 2 you have on top an specific trigonometric example 
(Blancos) without brackets.


As I stated in my last email this document is not correct because it violates the norm ISO 31 
although the document states that it follows it.


And more, when I say that the brackets are 
no necessary is because LaTeX add a little space between the function 
and his argument. So the reality is that LaTeX don't type,

cos2vt
but,
cos 2vt
with a little more space after cos and this is very comprehensive for 
everybody.


This is nevertheless against the possibility to omit the braces only for 1 or 2 characters in the 
argument as defined in the norm.

Don't you own a math or physics book or at least a school book? There you ca 
see how it is done.

Please don't mention me the Wikipedia because this resource isn't at all 
a canon for nothing.


The Wikipedia is the most impartial resource you can find. When you think there's something wrong 
you can correct it and cite other resources like books and norms. And furthermore, as everybody is 
writing it, mathematicians, as well as engineers, physicists, etc., the typesetting follows the 
common rules to avoid misunderstandings. (You are a military officer and know that most conflicts 
arise only out of misunderstandings.)


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-13 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:

Uwe, in the page 2 you have on top an specific trigonometric example 
(Blancos) without brackets.


As I stated in my last email this document is not correct because it violates the norm ISO 31 
although the document states that it follows it.


And more, when I say that the brackets are 
no necessary is because LaTeX add a little space between the function 
and his argument. So the reality is that LaTeX don't type,

cos2vt
but,
cos 2vt
with a little more space after "cos" and this is very comprehensive for 
everybody.


This is nevertheless against the possibility to omit the braces only for 1 or 2 characters in the 
argument as defined in the norm.

Don't you own a math or physics book or at least a school book? There you ca 
see how it is done.

Please don't mention me the Wikipedia because this resource isn't at all 
a "canon" for nothing.


The Wikipedia is the most impartial resource you can find. When you think there's something wrong 
you can correct it and cite other resources like books and norms. And furthermore, as everybody is 
writing it, mathematicians, as well as engineers, physicists, etc., the typesetting follows the 
common rules to avoid misunderstandings. (You are a military officer and know that most conflicts 
arise only out of misunderstandings.)


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:


For example when you say,

(when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)

you don't remember the lineal functions (archs) in a circle that are 
typed with the first letter upright, like this:


Sin AM


I meant upright (the opposite of italic) and not uppercase.

Nevertheless, Bruce also described what I meant in his today's post in this email thread: You are 
using your own typesetting rules making communication with the rest of the world complicted.


The appendix of LyX's Math manual consists of a list of math typesetting rules. You might at least 
have a look at them in case you have to read math in books that are not specially written for naval 
military.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Yago
See the page Nr. 2 in the document ortomatem.pdf refered in the Lyx's Math 
Manual, or pages Nrs. 6, 8 and 13 in the same document;and the reference to the 
ISO 31 in the page Nr. 18 about the round brackets. All the trigonometric 
functions without brackets I suppose not only for naval military uses and not 
for my personal use.
- Original Message - 
From: Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@web.de
To: Yago diazd...@ono.com
Cc: LyX-Users lyx-users@lists.lyx.org
Sent: Saturday, September 12, 2009 12:36 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices


 Yago schrieb:
 
 For example when you say,
 
 (when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
 
 you don't remember the lineal functions (archs) in a circle that are 
 typed with the first letter upright, like this:
 
 Sin AM
 
 I meant upright (the opposite of italic) and not uppercase.
 
 Nevertheless, Bruce also described what I meant in his today's post in this 
 email thread: You are 
 using your own typesetting rules making communication with the rest of the 
 world complicted.
 
 The appendix of LyX's Math manual consists of a list of math typesetting 
 rules. You might at least 
 have a look at them in case you have to read math in books that are not 
 specially written for naval 
 military.
 
 regards Uwe

Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:


See the page Nr. 2 in the document ortomatem.pdf refered in the Lyx's Math 
Manual,


There is no such reference.
I googled this:
http://www.tex-tipografia.com/archive/ortomatem.pdf
There the also using round brackets on page 2 (Disposición de fórmulas aisladas)


page and 13


They write there for example
cos2vt
This is inexact wrong because this could mean
cos(2)*v*t or cos(2*v)*t
Moreover this is against the the character omitting rules, see below.


in the same document;and the reference to the ISO 31 in the page Nr. 18 about 
the round brackets.


In the norm it is defined that you _can_ but needn't to omit the brackets. But omitting the brackets 
leads to inexact result:

tan2pt
versus
tan2pt
In the first case I meant tan(2)*p*t, in the second I meant tan(2*p)*t. So you 
see the problem.

Besides this, look at
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funci%C3%B3n_matem%C3%A1tica
all other Wikipedia entries state the same. Typesetting rules are important to be able to 
communicate with each other. You can take any math book, look at webpages, school books, and also 
another LyX user told you as mathematician that your notation is incorrect. So it's up to you to 
change it or to ignore this.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Yago
Uwe, in the page 2 you have on top an specific trigonometric example 
(Blancos) without brackets. And more, when I say that the brackets are no 
necessary is because LaTeX add a little space between the function and his 
argument. So the reality is that LaTeX don't type,


cos2vt

but,

cos 2vt

with a little more space after cos and this is very comprehensive for 
everybody.


Please don't mention me the Wikipedia because this resource isn't at all a 
canon for nothing.


Regards Yago.
- Original Message - 
From: Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@web.de

To: Yago diazd...@ono.com
Cc: LyX-Users lyx-users@lists.lyx.org
Sent: Saturday, September 12, 2009 11:17 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Yago schrieb:

See the page Nr. 2 in the document ortomatem.pdf refered in the Lyx's 
Math Manual,


There is no such reference.
I googled this:
http://www.tex-tipografia.com/archive/ortomatem.pdf
There the also using round brackets on page 2 (Disposición de fórmulas 
aisladas)



page and 13


They write there for example
cos2vt
This is inexact wrong because this could mean
cos(2)*v*t or cos(2*v)*t
Moreover this is against the the character omitting rules, see below.

in the same document;and the reference to the ISO 31 in the page Nr. 18 
about the round brackets.


In the norm it is defined that you _can_ but needn't to omit the brackets. 
But omitting the brackets leads to inexact result:

tan2pt
versus
tan2pt
In the first case I meant tan(2)*p*t, in the second I meant tan(2*p)*t. So 
you see the problem.


Besides this, look at
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funci%C3%B3n_matem%C3%A1tica
all other Wikipedia entries state the same. Typesetting rules are 
important to be able to communicate with each other. You can take any math 
book, look at webpages, school books, and also another LyX user told you 
as mathematician that your notation is incorrect. So it's up to you to 
change it or to ignore this.


regards Uwe 




Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:


For example when you say,

(when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)

you don't remember the lineal functions (archs) in a circle that are 
typed with the first letter upright, like this:


Sin AM


I meant upright (the opposite of italic) and not uppercase.

Nevertheless, Bruce also described what I meant in his today's post in this email thread: You are 
using your own typesetting rules making communication with the rest of the world complicted.


The appendix of LyX's Math manual consists of a list of math typesetting rules. You might at least 
have a look at them in case you have to read math in books that are not specially written for naval 
military.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Yago
See the page Nr. 2 in the document ortomatem.pdf refered in the Lyx's Math 
Manual, or pages Nrs. 6, 8 and 13 in the same document;and the reference to the 
ISO 31 in the page Nr. 18 about the round brackets. All the trigonometric 
functions without brackets I suppose not only for naval military uses and not 
for my personal use.
- Original Message - 
From: Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@web.de
To: Yago diazd...@ono.com
Cc: LyX-Users lyx-users@lists.lyx.org
Sent: Saturday, September 12, 2009 12:36 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices


 Yago schrieb:
 
 For example when you say,
 
 (when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
 
 you don't remember the lineal functions (archs) in a circle that are 
 typed with the first letter upright, like this:
 
 Sin AM
 
 I meant upright (the opposite of italic) and not uppercase.
 
 Nevertheless, Bruce also described what I meant in his today's post in this 
 email thread: You are 
 using your own typesetting rules making communication with the rest of the 
 world complicted.
 
 The appendix of LyX's Math manual consists of a list of math typesetting 
 rules. You might at least 
 have a look at them in case you have to read math in books that are not 
 specially written for naval 
 military.
 
 regards Uwe

Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:


See the page Nr. 2 in the document ortomatem.pdf refered in the Lyx's Math 
Manual,


There is no such reference.
I googled this:
http://www.tex-tipografia.com/archive/ortomatem.pdf
There the also using round brackets on page 2 (Disposición de fórmulas aisladas)


page and 13


They write there for example
cos2vt
This is inexact wrong because this could mean
cos(2)*v*t or cos(2*v)*t
Moreover this is against the the character omitting rules, see below.


in the same document;and the reference to the ISO 31 in the page Nr. 18 about 
the round brackets.


In the norm it is defined that you _can_ but needn't to omit the brackets. But omitting the brackets 
leads to inexact result:

tan2pt
versus
tan2pt
In the first case I meant tan(2)*p*t, in the second I meant tan(2*p)*t. So you 
see the problem.

Besides this, look at
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funci%C3%B3n_matem%C3%A1tica
all other Wikipedia entries state the same. Typesetting rules are important to be able to 
communicate with each other. You can take any math book, look at webpages, school books, and also 
another LyX user told you as mathematician that your notation is incorrect. So it's up to you to 
change it or to ignore this.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Yago
Uwe, in the page 2 you have on top an specific trigonometric example 
(Blancos) without brackets. And more, when I say that the brackets are no 
necessary is because LaTeX add a little space between the function and his 
argument. So the reality is that LaTeX don't type,


cos2vt

but,

cos 2vt

with a little more space after cos and this is very comprehensive for 
everybody.


Please don't mention me the Wikipedia because this resource isn't at all a 
canon for nothing.


Regards Yago.
- Original Message - 
From: Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@web.de

To: Yago diazd...@ono.com
Cc: LyX-Users lyx-users@lists.lyx.org
Sent: Saturday, September 12, 2009 11:17 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Yago schrieb:

See the page Nr. 2 in the document ortomatem.pdf refered in the Lyx's 
Math Manual,


There is no such reference.
I googled this:
http://www.tex-tipografia.com/archive/ortomatem.pdf
There the also using round brackets on page 2 (Disposición de fórmulas 
aisladas)



page and 13


They write there for example
cos2vt
This is inexact wrong because this could mean
cos(2)*v*t or cos(2*v)*t
Moreover this is against the the character omitting rules, see below.

in the same document;and the reference to the ISO 31 in the page Nr. 18 
about the round brackets.


In the norm it is defined that you _can_ but needn't to omit the brackets. 
But omitting the brackets leads to inexact result:

tan2pt
versus
tan2pt
In the first case I meant tan(2)*p*t, in the second I meant tan(2*p)*t. So 
you see the problem.


Besides this, look at
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funci%C3%B3n_matem%C3%A1tica
all other Wikipedia entries state the same. Typesetting rules are 
important to be able to communicate with each other. You can take any math 
book, look at webpages, school books, and also another LyX user told you 
as mathematician that your notation is incorrect. So it's up to you to 
change it or to ignore this.


regards Uwe 




Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:


For example when you say,

(when the "sin" would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)

you don't remember the "lineal functions" (archs) in a circle that are 
typed with the first letter upright, like this:


Sin AM


I meant upright (the opposite of italic) and not uppercase.

Nevertheless, Bruce also described what I meant in his today's post in this email thread: You are 
using your own typesetting rules making communication with the rest of the world complicted.


The appendix of LyX's Math manual consists of a list of math typesetting rules. You might at least 
have a look at them in case you have to read math in books that are not specially written for naval 
military.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Yago
See the page Nr. 2 in the document ortomatem.pdf refered in the Lyx's Math 
Manual, or pages Nrs. 6, 8 and 13 in the same document;and the reference to the 
ISO 31 in the page Nr. 18 about the round brackets. All the trigonometric 
functions without brackets I suppose not only for naval military uses and not 
for my personal use.
- Original Message - 
From: "Uwe Stöhr" <uwesto...@web.de>
To: "Yago" <diazd...@ono.com>
Cc: "LyX-Users" <lyx-users@lists.lyx.org>
Sent: Saturday, September 12, 2009 12:36 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices


> Yago schrieb:
> 
>> For example when you say,
>> 
>> (when the "sin" would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
>> 
>> you don't remember the "lineal functions" (archs) in a circle that are 
>> typed with the first letter upright, like this:
>> 
>> Sin AM
> 
> I meant upright (the opposite of italic) and not uppercase.
> 
> Nevertheless, Bruce also described what I meant in his today's post in this 
> email thread: You are 
> using your own typesetting rules making communication with the rest of the 
> world complicted.
> 
> The appendix of LyX's Math manual consists of a list of math typesetting 
> rules. You might at least 
> have a look at them in case you have to read math in books that are not 
> specially written for naval 
> military.
> 
> regards Uwe

Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:


See the page Nr. 2 in the document ortomatem.pdf refered in the Lyx's Math 
Manual,


There is no such reference.
I googled this:
http://www.tex-tipografia.com/archive/ortomatem.pdf
There the also using round brackets on page 2 (Disposición de fórmulas aisladas)


page and 13


They write there for example
cos2vt
This is inexact wrong because this could mean
cos(2)*v*t or cos(2*v)*t
Moreover this is against the the character omitting rules, see below.


in the same document;and the reference to the ISO 31 in the page Nr. 18 about 
the round brackets.


In the norm it is defined that you _can_ but needn't to omit the brackets. But omitting the brackets 
leads to inexact result:

tan2pt
versus
tan2pt
In the first case I meant tan(2)*p*t, in the second I meant tan(2*p)*t. So you 
see the problem.

Besides this, look at
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funci%C3%B3n_matem%C3%A1tica
all other Wikipedia entries state the same. Typesetting rules are important to be able to 
communicate with each other. You can take any math book, look at webpages, school books, and also 
another LyX user told you as mathematician that your notation is incorrect. So it's up to you to 
change it or to ignore this.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-12 Thread Yago
Uwe, in the page 2 you have on top an specific trigonometric example 
(Blancos) without brackets. And more, when I say that the brackets are no 
necessary is because LaTeX add a little space between the function and his 
argument. So the reality is that LaTeX don't type,


cos2vt

but,

cos 2vt

with a little more space after "cos" and this is very comprehensive for 
everybody.


Please don't mention me the Wikipedia because this resource isn't at all a 
"canon" for nothing.


Regards Yago.
- Original Message - 
From: "Uwe Stöhr" <uwesto...@web.de>

To: "Yago" <diazd...@ono.com>
Cc: "LyX-Users" <lyx-users@lists.lyx.org>
Sent: Saturday, September 12, 2009 11:17 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Yago schrieb:

See the page Nr. 2 in the document ortomatem.pdf refered in the Lyx's 
Math Manual,


There is no such reference.
I googled this:
http://www.tex-tipografia.com/archive/ortomatem.pdf
There the also using round brackets on page 2 (Disposición de fórmulas 
aisladas)



page and 13


They write there for example
cos2vt
This is inexact wrong because this could mean
cos(2)*v*t or cos(2*v)*t
Moreover this is against the the character omitting rules, see below.

in the same document;and the reference to the ISO 31 in the page Nr. 18 
about the round brackets.


In the norm it is defined that you _can_ but needn't to omit the brackets. 
But omitting the brackets leads to inexact result:

tan2pt
versus
tan2pt
In the first case I meant tan(2)*p*t, in the second I meant tan(2*p)*t. So 
you see the problem.


Besides this, look at
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funci%C3%B3n_matem%C3%A1tica
all other Wikipedia entries state the same. Typesetting rules are 
important to be able to communicate with each other. You can take any math 
book, look at webpages, school books, and also another LyX user told you 
as mathematician that your notation is incorrect. So it's up to you to 
change it or to ignore this.


regards Uwe 




Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Yago
Uwe, thank you very much for your comments about my reply to Luca. In my 
case I have finished a book about trigonometry with 386 pages and obviously 
there are a lot of formulas and his deduction. All my problem with the 
method that I sended is reduced to copy and paste for the tables and 
matrices with too much rows.


Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval Military 
School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer) the brackets are 
omited in the notation to the half addition or difference of trigonometrical 
functions because the formula,


sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the addition 
of the angles A and B (also in radians). But in astronomical navigation this 
has no sense when we use, normally,  the Delambre Analogies for the position 
triangle calculus, so we omit the brackets.


Regards Yago.
- Original Message - 
From: Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@web.de

To: Yago diazd...@ono.com
Cc: LyX-Users lyx-users@lists.lyx.org
Sent: Friday, September 11, 2009 12:33 AM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Yago schrieb:

Without new commands, for matrix you can use the command \vspace like in 
the attachedd file that presents the Delambre Analogies in a matrix.


This is indeed also a solution but might need more time when you have many 
rows and columns.


Looking at you file I noticed that you are using terms like
cos1/2(A+B)
This is incorrect typesetting. The correct one is this:
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/GausssFormulas.html
(the 1/2 in in the argument of the function)

regards Uwe 




Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:

Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval 
Military School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer) the 
brackets are omited in the notation to the half addition or difference 
of trigonometrical functions because the formula,


sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the 
addition of the angles A and B (also in radians).


There are strict rules in math how to typeset formulas.
sin1/2
means
sin*1/2
(when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
So sin is in your typesetting a variable or an operator but not a function. A function has to have 
an argument. For arguments round brackets are used:

sin(0.5(a+b))
When you have several levels of brackets it is allowed to use brackets for the 
outer ones:
sin[0.5(a+b)]
although this is quite unusual. Normally one uses larger round brackets for the outer level and 
smaller ones for the inner level as explained in LyX's Math manual.

Reading
sin1/2(a+b)
I first thought that you mean
sqrt(sin(a+b))
although the 1/2 would then have to be set as superscript.

You definitively need a bracket behind sin and the like, no matter where you are working. Math is 
the same all over the world and it is important that everybody can understand what you are writing.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Bruce Pourciau


On Sep 11, 2009, at 12:18 PM, Uwe Stöhr wrote:


Yago schrieb:


Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval
Military School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer)  
the
brackets are omited in the notation to the half addition or  
difference

of trigonometrical functions because the formula,

sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the
addition of the angles A and B (also in radians).


There are strict rules in math how to typeset formulas.
sin1/2
means
sin*1/2
(when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
So sin is in your typesetting a variable or an operator but not a  
function. A function has to have

an argument. For arguments round brackets are used:
sin(0.5(a+b))
When you have several levels of brackets it is allowed to use  
brackets for the outer ones:

sin[0.5(a+b)]
although this is quite unusual. Normally one uses larger round  
brackets for the outer level and

smaller ones for the inner level as explained in LyX's Math manual.
Reading
sin1/2(a+b)
I first thought that you mean
sqrt(sin(a+b))
although the 1/2 would then have to be set as superscript.

You definitively need a bracket behind sin and the like, no matter  
where you are working. Math is
the same all over the world and it is important that everybody can  
understand what you are writing.


regards Uwe


A mathematician would read sin1/2(A+B) as the sine of 1 divided by 2(A 
+B), unless, of course, the context -- say a navel military text --  
suggested a different reading. Uwe is right: mathematicians all agree  
on the typographical rules for typesetting and writing mathematics so  
there will be no ambiguity in communicating. But when the  
communication takes place within a closed world, like our navel  
military formula, I suppose that world can get away with having its  
own rules, for brevity say.


Bruce

Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Yago
Uwe thank you any other time for your comments, but I think you are wrong 
about the strict rules to typeset  formulas, at least in the trigonometric 
formulas. For example when you say,


(when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)

you don't remember the lineal functions (archs) in a circle that are typed 
with the first letter upright, like this:


Sin AM

without brackets; a little more space between Sin and AM is all that it 
is needed. The trigonometrical functions are the lineal functions in a 
circle with the radius equal to the unity of mesaure. Then:


Sin AM/R=sin a  (R = radius)

where a is the angle that subtends the AM arch. And also in this case 
that suffits the space between Sin and AM/R and sin and a to 
understand correctly the formula.


And more, in the trigonometric formulas the strict notation sin(a) is 
normally not used but sin a, like sin 2a, sin (A+B) and so on, and I 
think that there aren't confussion about this. And if you type this formulas 
in LaTeX math mode an aditional space is added between the function and the 
argument.


If you want to search a little that exists more secondary circular functions 
(due to spanish mariner Mendoza) not used today named Sin v AM (Seno 
verso), Cos v AM (Coseno verso), and also Ver AM (Verso of AM) or Cov 
AM (Coverso of AM) and Sub v AM (Subverso of AM). Without brackets.


Regards Yago.

- Original Message - 
From: Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@web.de

To: Yago diazd...@ono.com
Cc: LyX-Users lyx-users@lists.lyx.org
Sent: Friday, September 11, 2009 7:18 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Yago schrieb:

Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval Military 
School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer) the brackets 
are omited in the notation to the half addition or difference of 
trigonometrical functions because the formula,


sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the 
addition of the angles A and B (also in radians).


There are strict rules in math how to typeset formulas.
sin1/2
means
sin*1/2
(when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
So sin is in your typesetting a variable or an operator but not a 
function. A function has to have an argument. For arguments round brackets 
are used:

sin(0.5(a+b))
When you have several levels of brackets it is allowed to use brackets for 
the outer ones:

sin[0.5(a+b)]
although this is quite unusual. Normally one uses larger round brackets 
for the outer level and smaller ones for the inner level as explained in 
LyX's Math manual.

Reading
sin1/2(a+b)
I first thought that you mean
sqrt(sin(a+b))
although the 1/2 would then have to be set as superscript.

You definitively need a bracket behind sin and the like, no matter where 
you are working. Math is the same all over the world and it is important 
that everybody can understand what you are writing.


regards Uwe 




Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Yago
Uwe, thank you very much for your comments about my reply to Luca. In my 
case I have finished a book about trigonometry with 386 pages and obviously 
there are a lot of formulas and his deduction. All my problem with the 
method that I sended is reduced to copy and paste for the tables and 
matrices with too much rows.


Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval Military 
School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer) the brackets are 
omited in the notation to the half addition or difference of trigonometrical 
functions because the formula,


sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the addition 
of the angles A and B (also in radians). But in astronomical navigation this 
has no sense when we use, normally,  the Delambre Analogies for the position 
triangle calculus, so we omit the brackets.


Regards Yago.
- Original Message - 
From: Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@web.de

To: Yago diazd...@ono.com
Cc: LyX-Users lyx-users@lists.lyx.org
Sent: Friday, September 11, 2009 12:33 AM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Yago schrieb:

Without new commands, for matrix you can use the command \vspace like in 
the attachedd file that presents the Delambre Analogies in a matrix.


This is indeed also a solution but might need more time when you have many 
rows and columns.


Looking at you file I noticed that you are using terms like
cos1/2(A+B)
This is incorrect typesetting. The correct one is this:
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/GausssFormulas.html
(the 1/2 in in the argument of the function)

regards Uwe 




Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:

Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval 
Military School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer) the 
brackets are omited in the notation to the half addition or difference 
of trigonometrical functions because the formula,


sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the 
addition of the angles A and B (also in radians).


There are strict rules in math how to typeset formulas.
sin1/2
means
sin*1/2
(when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
So sin is in your typesetting a variable or an operator but not a function. A function has to have 
an argument. For arguments round brackets are used:

sin(0.5(a+b))
When you have several levels of brackets it is allowed to use brackets for the 
outer ones:
sin[0.5(a+b)]
although this is quite unusual. Normally one uses larger round brackets for the outer level and 
smaller ones for the inner level as explained in LyX's Math manual.

Reading
sin1/2(a+b)
I first thought that you mean
sqrt(sin(a+b))
although the 1/2 would then have to be set as superscript.

You definitively need a bracket behind sin and the like, no matter where you are working. Math is 
the same all over the world and it is important that everybody can understand what you are writing.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Bruce Pourciau


On Sep 11, 2009, at 12:18 PM, Uwe Stöhr wrote:


Yago schrieb:


Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval
Military School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer)  
the
brackets are omited in the notation to the half addition or  
difference

of trigonometrical functions because the formula,

sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the
addition of the angles A and B (also in radians).


There are strict rules in math how to typeset formulas.
sin1/2
means
sin*1/2
(when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
So sin is in your typesetting a variable or an operator but not a  
function. A function has to have

an argument. For arguments round brackets are used:
sin(0.5(a+b))
When you have several levels of brackets it is allowed to use  
brackets for the outer ones:

sin[0.5(a+b)]
although this is quite unusual. Normally one uses larger round  
brackets for the outer level and

smaller ones for the inner level as explained in LyX's Math manual.
Reading
sin1/2(a+b)
I first thought that you mean
sqrt(sin(a+b))
although the 1/2 would then have to be set as superscript.

You definitively need a bracket behind sin and the like, no matter  
where you are working. Math is
the same all over the world and it is important that everybody can  
understand what you are writing.


regards Uwe


A mathematician would read sin1/2(A+B) as the sine of 1 divided by 2(A 
+B), unless, of course, the context -- say a navel military text --  
suggested a different reading. Uwe is right: mathematicians all agree  
on the typographical rules for typesetting and writing mathematics so  
there will be no ambiguity in communicating. But when the  
communication takes place within a closed world, like our navel  
military formula, I suppose that world can get away with having its  
own rules, for brevity say.


Bruce

Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Yago
Uwe thank you any other time for your comments, but I think you are wrong 
about the strict rules to typeset  formulas, at least in the trigonometric 
formulas. For example when you say,


(when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)

you don't remember the lineal functions (archs) in a circle that are typed 
with the first letter upright, like this:


Sin AM

without brackets; a little more space between Sin and AM is all that it 
is needed. The trigonometrical functions are the lineal functions in a 
circle with the radius equal to the unity of mesaure. Then:


Sin AM/R=sin a  (R = radius)

where a is the angle that subtends the AM arch. And also in this case 
that suffits the space between Sin and AM/R and sin and a to 
understand correctly the formula.


And more, in the trigonometric formulas the strict notation sin(a) is 
normally not used but sin a, like sin 2a, sin (A+B) and so on, and I 
think that there aren't confussion about this. And if you type this formulas 
in LaTeX math mode an aditional space is added between the function and the 
argument.


If you want to search a little that exists more secondary circular functions 
(due to spanish mariner Mendoza) not used today named Sin v AM (Seno 
verso), Cos v AM (Coseno verso), and also Ver AM (Verso of AM) or Cov 
AM (Coverso of AM) and Sub v AM (Subverso of AM). Without brackets.


Regards Yago.

- Original Message - 
From: Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@web.de

To: Yago diazd...@ono.com
Cc: LyX-Users lyx-users@lists.lyx.org
Sent: Friday, September 11, 2009 7:18 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Yago schrieb:

Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval Military 
School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer) the brackets 
are omited in the notation to the half addition or difference of 
trigonometrical functions because the formula,


sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the 
addition of the angles A and B (also in radians).


There are strict rules in math how to typeset formulas.
sin1/2
means
sin*1/2
(when the sin would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
So sin is in your typesetting a variable or an operator but not a 
function. A function has to have an argument. For arguments round brackets 
are used:

sin(0.5(a+b))
When you have several levels of brackets it is allowed to use brackets for 
the outer ones:

sin[0.5(a+b)]
although this is quite unusual. Normally one uses larger round brackets 
for the outer level and smaller ones for the inner level as explained in 
LyX's Math manual.

Reading
sin1/2(a+b)
I first thought that you mean
sqrt(sin(a+b))
although the 1/2 would then have to be set as superscript.

You definitively need a bracket behind sin and the like, no matter where 
you are working. Math is the same all over the world and it is important 
that everybody can understand what you are writing.


regards Uwe 




Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Yago
Uwe, thank you very much for your comments about my reply to Luca. In my 
case I have finished a book about trigonometry with 386 pages and obviously 
there are a lot of formulas and his deduction. All my problem with the 
method that I sended is reduced to copy and paste for the tables and 
matrices with too much rows.


Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval Military 
School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer) the brackets are 
omited in the notation to the half addition or difference of trigonometrical 
functions because the formula,


sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the addition 
of the angles A and B (also in radians). But in astronomical navigation this 
has no sense when we use, normally,  the Delambre Analogies for the position 
triangle calculus, so we omit the brackets.


Regards Yago.
- Original Message - 
From: "Uwe Stöhr" <uwesto...@web.de>

To: "Yago" <diazd...@ono.com>
Cc: "LyX-Users" <lyx-users@lists.lyx.org>
Sent: Friday, September 11, 2009 12:33 AM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Yago schrieb:

Without new commands, for matrix you can use the command \vspace like in 
the attachedd file that presents the Delambre Analogies in a matrix.


This is indeed also a solution but might need more time when you have many 
rows and columns.


Looking at you file I noticed that you are using terms like
cos1/2(A+B)
This is incorrect typesetting. The correct one is this:
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/GausssFormulas.html
(the 1/2 in in the argument of the function)

regards Uwe 




Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:

Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval 
Military School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer) the 
brackets are omited in the notation to the half addition or difference 
of trigonometrical functions because the formula,


sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the 
addition of the angles A and B (also in radians).


There are strict rules in math how to typeset formulas.
sin1/2
means
sin*1/2
(when the "sin" would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
So "sin" is in your typesetting a variable or an operator but not a function. A function has to have 
an argument. For arguments round brackets are used:

sin(0.5(a+b))
When you have several levels of brackets it is allowed to use brackets for the 
outer ones:
sin[0.5(a+b)]
although this is quite unusual. Normally one uses larger round brackets for the outer level and 
smaller ones for the inner level as explained in LyX's Math manual.

Reading
sin1/2(a+b)
I first thought that you mean
sqrt(sin(a+b))
although the 1/2 would then have to be set as superscript.

You definitively need a bracket behind sin and the like, no matter where you are working. Math is 
the same all over the world and it is important that everybody can understand what you are writing.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Bruce Pourciau


On Sep 11, 2009, at 12:18 PM, Uwe Stöhr wrote:


Yago schrieb:


Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval
Military School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer)  
the
brackets are omited in the notation to the half addition or  
difference

of trigonometrical functions because the formula,

sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the
addition of the angles A and B (also in radians).


There are strict rules in math how to typeset formulas.
sin1/2
means
sin*1/2
(when the "sin" would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
So "sin" is in your typesetting a variable or an operator but not a  
function. A function has to have

an argument. For arguments round brackets are used:
sin(0.5(a+b))
When you have several levels of brackets it is allowed to use  
brackets for the outer ones:

sin[0.5(a+b)]
although this is quite unusual. Normally one uses larger round  
brackets for the outer level and

smaller ones for the inner level as explained in LyX's Math manual.
Reading
sin1/2(a+b)
I first thought that you mean
sqrt(sin(a+b))
although the 1/2 would then have to be set as superscript.

You definitively need a bracket behind sin and the like, no matter  
where you are working. Math is
the same all over the world and it is important that everybody can  
understand what you are writing.


regards Uwe


A mathematician would read sin1/2(A+B) as the sine of 1 divided by 2(A 
+B), unless, of course, the context -- say a navel military text --  
suggested a different reading. Uwe is right: mathematicians all agree  
on the typographical rules for typesetting and writing mathematics so  
there will be no ambiguity in communicating. But when the  
communication takes place within a closed world, like our navel  
military formula, I suppose that world can get away with having its  
own rules, for brevity say.


Bruce

Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-11 Thread Yago
Uwe thank you any other time for your comments, but I think you are wrong 
about the strict rules to typeset  formulas, at least in the trigonometric 
formulas. For example when you say,


(when the "sin" would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)

you don't remember the "lineal functions" (archs) in a circle that are typed 
with the first letter upright, like this:


Sin AM

without brackets; a little more space between "Sin" and "AM" is all that it 
is needed. The trigonometrical functions are the lineal functions in a 
circle with the radius equal to the unity of mesaure. Then:


Sin AM/R=sin a  (R = radius)

where "a" is the angle that subtends the "AM" arch. And also in this case 
that suffits the space between "Sin" and "AM/R" and "sin" and "a" to 
understand correctly the formula.


And more, in the trigonometric formulas the strict notation "sin(a)" is 
normally not used but "sin a", like "sin 2a", "sin (A+B)" and so on, and I 
think that there aren't confussion about this. And if you type this formulas 
in LaTeX math mode an aditional space is added between the function and the 
argument.


If you want to search a little that exists more secondary circular functions 
(due to spanish mariner Mendoza) not used today named "Sin v AM" (Seno 
verso), "Cos v AM" (Coseno verso), and also "Ver AM" (Verso of AM) or "Cov 
AM" (Coverso of AM) and "Sub v AM" (Subverso of AM). Without brackets.


Regards Yago.

- Original Message - 
From: "Uwe Stöhr" <uwesto...@web.de>

To: "Yago" <diazd...@ono.com>
Cc: "LyX-Users" <lyx-users@lists.lyx.org>
Sent: Friday, September 11, 2009 7:18 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Yago schrieb:

Respect to your second kindly comment, in the Spanish Navy Naval Military 
School (I am Commander in the Spanish Navy, Hydrographer) the brackets 
are omited in the notation to the half addition or difference of 
trigonometrical functions because the formula,


sin1/2(A+B)

in purity is the product of sin1/2 (I suppose in radians) and the 
addition of the angles A and B (also in radians).


There are strict rules in math how to typeset formulas.
sin1/2
means
sin*1/2
(when the "sin" would not be upright, it would even mean s*i*n*1/2)
So "sin" is in your typesetting a variable or an operator but not a 
function. A function has to have an argument. For arguments round brackets 
are used:

sin(0.5(a+b))
When you have several levels of brackets it is allowed to use brackets for 
the outer ones:

sin[0.5(a+b)]
although this is quite unusual. Normally one uses larger round brackets 
for the outer level and smaller ones for the inner level as explained in 
LyX's Math manual.

Reading
sin1/2(a+b)
I first thought that you mean
sqrt(sin(a+b))
although the 1/2 would then have to be set as superscript.

You definitively need a bracket behind sin and the like, no matter where 
you are working. Math is the same all over the world and it is important 
that everybody can understand what you are writing.


regards Uwe 




Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Luca Carlon
Hi! I'm writing some matrices where I put inside some quite big terms (dfracs
for instance). I noticed that it is frequent that some term is too close, almost
overlapping, to the element over it. Is it possible somehow to increase the
vertical spacing?
Thanks!



Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Luca Carlon schrieb:


Hi! I'm writing some matrices where I put inside some quite big terms (dfracs
for instance). I noticed that it is frequent that some term is too close, almost
overlapping, to the element over it. Is it possible somehow to increase the
vertical spacing?


You can use the commands \arraycolsep and \arraystretch. Have a look at the Math manual, section 4, 
that you find in LyX's Help menu.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Luca Carlon
Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@... writes:
 You can use the commands \arraycolsep and \arraystretch. Have a look at the
Math manual, section 4, 
 that you find in LyX's Help menu.
 
 regards Uwe

Thanks! This is great! Anyway, I noticed it increses the space for tables in
floats too. Isn't it possible to do this only for matrices? It's not too
comfortable to change i continuously...
Thanks again!

Luca



Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Luca Carlon schrieb:


I noticed it increses the space for tables in
floats too. Isn't it possible to do this only for matrices?


No because a table is actually an array as well as a matrix is an array. What you can do is to 
define your own short command that you can use before and after the matrices, see the attached file.

You can also define two keyboard shortcuts that inserts these commands.

regards Uwe



newfile3.lyx
Description: application/lyx


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Yago
Without new commands, for matrix you can use the command \vspace like in the 
attachedd file that presents the Delambre Analogies in a matrix.
- Original Message - 
From: Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@web.de

To: Luca Carlon carlon.l...@gmail.com
Cc: lyx-users@lists.lyx.org
Sent: Thursday, September 10, 2009 7:09 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Luca Carlon schrieb:


I noticed it increses the space for tables in
floats too. Isn't it possible to do this only for matrices?


No because a table is actually an array as well as a matrix is an array. 
What you can do is to
define your own short command that you can use before and after the 
matrices, see the attached file.

You can also define two keyboard shortcuts that inserts these commands.

regards Uwe




Analogias_Delambre_Matriz.lyx
Description: application/lyx


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:

Without new commands, for matrix you can use the command \vspace like in 
the attachedd file that presents the Delambre Analogies in a matrix.


This is indeed also a solution but might need more time when you have many rows 
and columns.

Looking at you file I noticed that you are using terms like
cos1/2(A+B)
This is incorrect typesetting. The correct one is this:
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/GausssFormulas.html
(the 1/2 in in the argument of the function)

regards Uwe


Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Luca Carlon
Hi! I'm writing some matrices where I put inside some quite big terms (dfracs
for instance). I noticed that it is frequent that some term is too close, almost
overlapping, to the element over it. Is it possible somehow to increase the
vertical spacing?
Thanks!



Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Luca Carlon schrieb:


Hi! I'm writing some matrices where I put inside some quite big terms (dfracs
for instance). I noticed that it is frequent that some term is too close, almost
overlapping, to the element over it. Is it possible somehow to increase the
vertical spacing?


You can use the commands \arraycolsep and \arraystretch. Have a look at the Math manual, section 4, 
that you find in LyX's Help menu.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Luca Carlon
Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@... writes:
 You can use the commands \arraycolsep and \arraystretch. Have a look at the
Math manual, section 4, 
 that you find in LyX's Help menu.
 
 regards Uwe

Thanks! This is great! Anyway, I noticed it increses the space for tables in
floats too. Isn't it possible to do this only for matrices? It's not too
comfortable to change i continuously...
Thanks again!

Luca



Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Luca Carlon schrieb:


I noticed it increses the space for tables in
floats too. Isn't it possible to do this only for matrices?


No because a table is actually an array as well as a matrix is an array. What you can do is to 
define your own short command that you can use before and after the matrices, see the attached file.

You can also define two keyboard shortcuts that inserts these commands.

regards Uwe



newfile3.lyx
Description: application/lyx


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Yago
Without new commands, for matrix you can use the command \vspace like in the 
attachedd file that presents the Delambre Analogies in a matrix.
- Original Message - 
From: Uwe Stöhr uwesto...@web.de

To: Luca Carlon carlon.l...@gmail.com
Cc: lyx-users@lists.lyx.org
Sent: Thursday, September 10, 2009 7:09 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Luca Carlon schrieb:


I noticed it increses the space for tables in
floats too. Isn't it possible to do this only for matrices?


No because a table is actually an array as well as a matrix is an array. 
What you can do is to
define your own short command that you can use before and after the 
matrices, see the attached file.

You can also define two keyboard shortcuts that inserts these commands.

regards Uwe




Analogias_Delambre_Matriz.lyx
Description: application/lyx


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:

Without new commands, for matrix you can use the command \vspace like in 
the attachedd file that presents the Delambre Analogies in a matrix.


This is indeed also a solution but might need more time when you have many rows 
and columns.

Looking at you file I noticed that you are using terms like
cos1/2(A+B)
This is incorrect typesetting. The correct one is this:
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/GausssFormulas.html
(the 1/2 in in the argument of the function)

regards Uwe


Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Luca Carlon
Hi! I'm writing some matrices where I put inside some quite big terms (dfracs
for instance). I noticed that it is frequent that some term is too close, almost
overlapping, to the element over it. Is it possible somehow to increase the
vertical spacing?
Thanks!



Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Luca Carlon schrieb:


Hi! I'm writing some matrices where I put inside some quite big terms (dfracs
for instance). I noticed that it is frequent that some term is too close, almost
overlapping, to the element over it. Is it possible somehow to increase the
vertical spacing?


You can use the commands \arraycolsep and \arraystretch. Have a look at the Math manual, section 4, 
that you find in LyX's Help menu.


regards Uwe


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Luca Carlon
Uwe Stöhr  writes:
> You can use the commands \arraycolsep and \arraystretch. Have a look at the
Math manual, section 4, 
> that you find in LyX's Help menu.
> 
> regards Uwe

Thanks! This is great! Anyway, I noticed it increses the space for tables in
floats too. Isn't it possible to do this only for matrices? It's not too
comfortable to change i continuously...
Thanks again!

Luca



Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Luca Carlon schrieb:


I noticed it increses the space for tables in
floats too. Isn't it possible to do this only for matrices?


No because a table is actually an array as well as a matrix is an array. What you can do is to 
define your own short command that you can use before and after the matrices, see the attached file.

You can also define two keyboard shortcuts that inserts these commands.

regards Uwe



newfile3.lyx
Description: application/lyx


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Yago
Without new commands, for matrix you can use the command \vspace like in the 
attachedd file that presents the Delambre Analogies in a matrix.
- Original Message - 
From: "Uwe Stöhr" <uwesto...@web.de>

To: "Luca Carlon" <carlon.l...@gmail.com>
Cc: <lyx-users@lists.lyx.org>
Sent: Thursday, September 10, 2009 7:09 PM
Subject: Re: Vertical spacing of matrices



Luca Carlon schrieb:


I noticed it increses the space for tables in
floats too. Isn't it possible to do this only for matrices?


No because a table is actually an array as well as a matrix is an array. 
What you can do is to
define your own short command that you can use before and after the 
matrices, see the attached file.

You can also define two keyboard shortcuts that inserts these commands.

regards Uwe




Analogias_Delambre_Matriz.lyx
Description: application/lyx


Re: Vertical spacing of matrices

2009-09-10 Thread Uwe Stöhr

Yago schrieb:

Without new commands, for matrix you can use the command \vspace like in 
the attachedd file that presents the Delambre Analogies in a matrix.


This is indeed also a solution but might need more time when you have many rows 
and columns.

Looking at you file I noticed that you are using terms like
cos1/2(A+B)
This is incorrect typesetting. The correct one is this:
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/GausssFormulas.html
(the 1/2 in in the argument of the function)

regards Uwe