Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
I have always understood this as: American English: A, B, and C British English: A, B and C -- Dotan Cohen http://bido.com http://what-is-what.com Please CC me if you want to be sure that I read your message. I do not read all list mail.

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
The meal consisted of soup, salad, and macaroni and cheese. The meal consisted of macaroni and cheese, soup, and salad. Or, if the order is important: The meal consisted of soup, salad, and macaroni cheese. To my parents, Ayn Rand and God. To Ayn Rand, my parents, and God. Or, if the order

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Paul Rubin
Dotan Cohen dotanco...@... writes: I have always understood this as: American English: A, B, and C British English: A, B and C AFAIK A, B and C is the predominant usage in the U.S. (where, given the state of our educational system, we're lucky if we get the first comma). That's what I was

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Andrew Sullivan
On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 01:57:13PM +, Paul Rubin wrote: AFAIK A, B and C is the predominant usage in the U.S. (where, given the state of our educational system, we're lucky if we get the first comma). That's what I was taught (in New York) (after the American Revolution). Can't speak

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
On 20 April 2010 17:12, Andrew Sullivan a...@shinkuro.com wrote: On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 01:57:13PM +, Paul Rubin wrote: AFAIK A, B and C is the predominant usage in the U.S. (where, given the state of our educational system, we're lucky if we get the first comma). That's what I was

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Andrew Sullivan
On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 06:06:57PM +0300, Dotan Cohen wrote: These are contrived examples. I'm pretty sure that all the examples in Fowler are not contrived examples: they're real ones from real texts. And it's not as though Fowler wasn't pretty keen on clarity and elegance in prose. In

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
On 20 April 2010 18:17, Andrew Sullivan a...@shinkuro.com wrote: On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 06:06:57PM +0300, Dotan Cohen wrote: These are contrived examples. I'm pretty sure that all the examples in Fowler are not contrived examples: they're real ones from real texts.  And it's not as though

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
I have always understood this as: American English: A, B, and C British English: A, B and C -- Dotan Cohen http://bido.com http://what-is-what.com Please CC me if you want to be sure that I read your message. I do not read all list mail.

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
The meal consisted of soup, salad, and macaroni and cheese. The meal consisted of macaroni and cheese, soup, and salad. Or, if the order is important: The meal consisted of soup, salad, and macaroni cheese. To my parents, Ayn Rand and God. To Ayn Rand, my parents, and God. Or, if the order

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Paul Rubin
Dotan Cohen dotanco...@... writes: I have always understood this as: American English: A, B, and C British English: A, B and C AFAIK A, B and C is the predominant usage in the U.S. (where, given the state of our educational system, we're lucky if we get the first comma). That's what I was

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Andrew Sullivan
On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 01:57:13PM +, Paul Rubin wrote: AFAIK A, B and C is the predominant usage in the U.S. (where, given the state of our educational system, we're lucky if we get the first comma). That's what I was taught (in New York) (after the American Revolution). Can't speak

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
On 20 April 2010 17:12, Andrew Sullivan a...@shinkuro.com wrote: On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 01:57:13PM +, Paul Rubin wrote: AFAIK A, B and C is the predominant usage in the U.S. (where, given the state of our educational system, we're lucky if we get the first comma). That's what I was

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Andrew Sullivan
On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 06:06:57PM +0300, Dotan Cohen wrote: These are contrived examples. I'm pretty sure that all the examples in Fowler are not contrived examples: they're real ones from real texts. And it's not as though Fowler wasn't pretty keen on clarity and elegance in prose. In

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
On 20 April 2010 18:17, Andrew Sullivan a...@shinkuro.com wrote: On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 06:06:57PM +0300, Dotan Cohen wrote: These are contrived examples. I'm pretty sure that all the examples in Fowler are not contrived examples: they're real ones from real texts.  And it's not as though

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
I have always understood this as: American English: A, B, and C British English: A, B and C -- Dotan Cohen http://bido.com http://what-is-what.com Please CC me if you want to be sure that I read your message. I do not read all list mail.

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
> "The meal consisted of soup, salad, and macaroni and cheese." "The meal consisted of macaroni and cheese, soup, and salad." Or, if the order is important: "The meal consisted of soup, salad, and macaroni & cheese." > "To my parents, Ayn Rand and God." "To Ayn Rand, my parents, and God." Or,

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Paul Rubin
Dotan Cohen writes: > > I have always understood this as: > American English: A, B, and C > British English: A, B and C > AFAIK "A, B and C" is the predominant usage in the U.S. (where, given the state of our educational system, we're lucky if we get the first comma). That's

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Andrew Sullivan
On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 01:57:13PM +, Paul Rubin wrote: > AFAIK "A, B and C" is the predominant usage in the U.S. (where, given the > state > of our educational system, we're lucky if we get the first comma). That's > what I > was taught (in New York) (after the American Revolution). Can't

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
On 20 April 2010 17:12, Andrew Sullivan wrote: > On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 01:57:13PM +, Paul Rubin wrote: >> AFAIK "A, B and C" is the predominant usage in the U.S. (where, given the >> state >> of our educational system, we're lucky if we get the first comma). That's >>

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Andrew Sullivan
On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 06:06:57PM +0300, Dotan Cohen wrote: > These are contrived examples. I'm pretty sure that all the examples in Fowler are not contrived examples: they're real ones from real texts. And it's not as though Fowler wasn't pretty keen on clarity and elegance in prose. > In

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-20 Thread Dotan Cohen
On 20 April 2010 18:17, Andrew Sullivan wrote: > On Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 06:06:57PM +0300, Dotan Cohen wrote: >> These are contrived examples. > > I'm pretty sure that all the examples in Fowler are not contrived > examples: they're real ones from real texts.  And it's not as

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread rgheck
On 04/19/2010 02:25 PM, Marshall Feldman wrote: Hello, I have several questions regarding numbered equations: 1. How does one add punctuation to numbered equations? 2. How does one make the equations be part of a paragraph that begins before and continues after them? 3. How does one

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Uwe Stöhr
Am 19.04.2010 20:25, schrieb Marshall Feldman: I have several questions regarding numbered equations: At first, please have a look at LyX's Math manual that you find in LyX's help menu. This will give you many info and answers. 1. How does one add punctuation to numbered equations? What

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Paul Rubin
Marshall Feldman ma...@... writes: I have several questions regarding numbered equations: 1. How does one add punctuation to numbered equations? Inside the equations, you add punctuation the usual way. After the equation numbers, you don't add punctuation. If you somehow succeed, the

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Marshall Feldman
Thanks to everyone. I'll have to look at the Math manual. I do, however, want to add one thing: On 4/19/2010 4:09 PM, Uwe Stöhr wrote: (By the way in English there is no comma before the and if the part after the and is the last enumeration in a sentence; like in A, B, C and D are letters.)

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Uwe Stöhr
Am 19.04.2010 22:57, schrieb Marshall Feldman: (By the way in English there is no comma before the and if the part after the and is the last enumeration in a sentence; like in A, B, C and D are letters.) The following comes from the /Chicago Manual of Style/, 15th ed., section 6.18: When a

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Bruce Pourciau
On Apr 19, 2010, at 4:18 PM, Uwe Stöhr wrote: Am 19.04.2010 22:57, schrieb Marshall Feldman: (By the way in English there is no comma before the and if the part after the and is the last enumeration in a sentence; like in A, B, C and D are letters.) The following comes from the /Chicago

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread rgheck
On 04/19/2010 04:57 PM, Marshall Feldman wrote: Here's an example of what the CMS is talking about: The meal consisted of soup, salad, and macaroni and cheese. Of course, the better known case is the panda, who eats, shoots and leaves. rh

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread rgheck
On 04/19/2010 02:25 PM, Marshall Feldman wrote: Hello, I have several questions regarding numbered equations: 1. How does one add punctuation to numbered equations? 2. How does one make the equations be part of a paragraph that begins before and continues after them? 3. How does one

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Uwe Stöhr
Am 19.04.2010 20:25, schrieb Marshall Feldman: I have several questions regarding numbered equations: At first, please have a look at LyX's Math manual that you find in LyX's help menu. This will give you many info and answers. 1. How does one add punctuation to numbered equations? What

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Paul Rubin
Marshall Feldman ma...@... writes: I have several questions regarding numbered equations: 1. How does one add punctuation to numbered equations? Inside the equations, you add punctuation the usual way. After the equation numbers, you don't add punctuation. If you somehow succeed, the

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Marshall Feldman
Thanks to everyone. I'll have to look at the Math manual. I do, however, want to add one thing: On 4/19/2010 4:09 PM, Uwe Stöhr wrote: (By the way in English there is no comma before the and if the part after the and is the last enumeration in a sentence; like in A, B, C and D are letters.)

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Uwe Stöhr
Am 19.04.2010 22:57, schrieb Marshall Feldman: (By the way in English there is no comma before the and if the part after the and is the last enumeration in a sentence; like in A, B, C and D are letters.) The following comes from the /Chicago Manual of Style/, 15th ed., section 6.18: When a

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Bruce Pourciau
On Apr 19, 2010, at 4:18 PM, Uwe Stöhr wrote: Am 19.04.2010 22:57, schrieb Marshall Feldman: (By the way in English there is no comma before the and if the part after the and is the last enumeration in a sentence; like in A, B, C and D are letters.) The following comes from the /Chicago

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread rgheck
On 04/19/2010 04:57 PM, Marshall Feldman wrote: Here's an example of what the CMS is talking about: The meal consisted of soup, salad, and macaroni and cheese. Of course, the better known case is the panda, who eats, shoots and leaves. rh

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread rgheck
On 04/19/2010 02:25 PM, Marshall Feldman wrote: Hello, I have several questions regarding numbered equations: 1. How does one add punctuation to numbered equations? 2. How does one make the equations be part of a paragraph that begins before and continues after them? 3. How does one

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Uwe Stöhr
Am 19.04.2010 20:25, schrieb Marshall Feldman: I have several questions regarding numbered equations: At first, please have a look at LyX's Math manual that you find in LyX's help menu. This will give you many info and answers. 1. How does one add punctuation to numbered equations? What

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Paul Rubin
Marshall Feldman writes: > > I have several questions regarding numbered equations: > >1. How does one add punctuation to numbered equations? Inside the equations, you add punctuation the usual way. After the equation numbers, you don't add punctuation. If you somehow succeed,

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Marshall Feldman
Thanks to everyone. I'll have to look at the Math manual. I do, however, want to add one thing: On 4/19/2010 4:09 PM, Uwe Stöhr wrote: (By the way in English there is no comma before the "and" if the part after the "and" is the last enumeration in a sentence; like in "A, B, C and D are

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Uwe Stöhr
Am 19.04.2010 22:57, schrieb Marshall Feldman: (By the way in English there is no comma before the "and" if the part after the "and" is the last enumeration in a sentence; like in "A, B, C and D are letters.") The following comes from the /Chicago Manual of Style/, 15th ed., section 6.18:

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread Bruce Pourciau
On Apr 19, 2010, at 4:18 PM, Uwe Stöhr wrote: Am 19.04.2010 22:57, schrieb Marshall Feldman: (By the way in English there is no comma before the "and" if the part after the "and" is the last enumeration in a sentence; like in "A, B, C and D are letters.") The following comes from the

Re: Formatting numbered equations

2010-04-19 Thread rgheck
On 04/19/2010 04:57 PM, Marshall Feldman wrote: Here's an example of what the CMS is talking about: "The meal consisted of soup, salad, and macaroni and cheese." Of course, the better known case is the panda, who eats, shoots and leaves. rh