Re: [MCN-L] ANNOUNCEMENT! MCN-L to be retired & moved to Groups.io on 6/1

2021-05-07 Thread Matt Morgan
Let us all say a prayer or a poem for mailman (http://www.list.org/), great 
software that provided us service for many, many years and thousands of subject 
lines. And a huge thank-you to whoever is moving the archive over!

Eric, thank you for taking care of this list and this group.

Best,
Matt

-- 
  Matt Morgan
  m...@concretecomputing.com

On Fri, May 7, 2021, at 9:08 AM, Eric Longo wrote:
>  Dear MCN-L subscribers
> 
> 
> *On June 1, 2021, the MCN-L listserv will be retired and replaced with
> Groups.io.*
> What does this mean?
> 
> After June 1, 2021:
> 
>- You will no longer be able to post to MCN-L
>- MCN-L will be replaced with the *MCN Forum on Groups.io*
><https://groups.io/g/mcn>
>- We will NOT migrate your MCN-L email to the new MCN Forum, you will
>have to opt-in to do so before June 1
>- *Sign up TODAY <https://groups.io/g/mcn/join>* to the *new MCN Forum*
><https://groups.io/g/mcn>
>- The MCN-L Mail Archive <https://www.mail-archive.com/mcn-l@mcn.edu/> page
>will be accessible through May 15, 2021
>- After May 15, the old Mail Archive will be uploaded to Groups.io so
>you'll be able to access it there
> 
> 
> The *MCN Forum <https://groups.io/g/mcn>* will remain a free and open
> service to the community and a much improved one! If you're not already an
> MCN member, we encourage you to *join for only $70/year
> <https://membership.mcn.edu/>* ($35 for students) or by making a donation
> <https://mcn.edu/donate/> today. Membership helps us continue to offer
> great opportunities to learn and network with cultural technologists around
> the world.
> 
> Any questions, let us know,
> eric
> 
> -
> Eric Longo
> Executive Director
> MCN <http://www.mcn.edu/> (Museum Computer Network)
> 
> m: 917-822-7343
> w: 888-211-1477 x801
> e...@mcn.edu
> 
> Click HERE <https://calendly.com/ericlongo> to schedule a meeting with 
> me.
> Office hours (ET): M 11am-2pm/T 1-5pm/W 2-5pm/T 8:30-10am & 1-3pm/F 
> 12-4pm
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Re: [MCN-L] Seeking job descriptions: digital content manager

2020-07-25 Thread Matt Morgan

If you haven't tried it, there are several in the MCN-L archives:

https://www.mail-archive.com/search?q=digital+content+manager=mcn-l%40mcn.edu

unfortunately, many postings are links to pages that probably don't 
exist, but at least a few job descriptions were sent into the list.


Best,
Matt

On 7/23/20 3:24 PM, Meredith L. Steinfels wrote:

Greetings,

Anyone have a job description (or posting) for a digital content manager 
position that they'd be willing to share?  Please feel free to message directly.

Thanks!
Meredith
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Re: [MCN-L] Guessable web URLs

2020-05-01 Thread Matt Morgan
If you're saying that you're setting up a system where images you don't want to 
be public are on a public server, you can be sure they will get out sooner or 
later. Probably more or less immediately, especially if you're not black belts 
in robots.txt fu. What is this system? 

-- 
  Matt Morgan
  m...@concretecomputing.com

On Fri, May 1, 2020, at 5:37 PM, Emily Beliveau wrote:
> Hi Sina,
> 
> The way we're planning it, the media server will double as a storage
> repository for all our media assets (masters and associated derivatives) so
> everything will be in the same place in a predictable folder structure. We
> only want to make some of the high-res images available for viewing or
> download due to copyright. We could folder should-not-publish images
> separately so they are not web accessible and can't be accessed by guessing
> the URL, but in our current setup this would require manually moving files
> around between web-accessible and non-web-accessible folders, and splitting
> up the image sets for particular objects. Surely there is a better way, I'm
> just hoping to find one that we can implement within the constraints of our
> current IT environment, budget, and staff allocation.
> 
> (I'm guessing this is a very junior-varsity question for the MCN group, but
> this is where we are.)
> 
> Emily.
> 
> On Fri, May 1, 2020 at 10:31 AM Sina Bahram  wrote:
> 
> > Hi Emily,
> >
> > Just a high-level question, if I may, but if the resources are available
> > for
> > download, then is there a problem with having them be downloaded not
> > through
> > your search page? This seems like a feature, not a bug, IMHO.
> >
> > Take care,
> > Sina
> >
> > President, Prime Access Consulting, Inc.
> > Phone: 919-345-3832
> > https://www.PAC.bz
> > Twitter: @SinaBahram
> > Personal Website: https://www.sinabahram.com
> >
> > -Original Message-
> > From: mcn-l  On Behalf Of Emily Beliveau
> > Sent: Friday, May 1, 2020 11:22 AM
> > To: mcn-l@mcn.edu
> > Subject: [MCN-L] Guessable web URLs
> >
> > Hi all (and attn: DAM and IP SIG members particularly)
> >
> > We are setting up a new media server that will allow us to provide high-res
> > image downloads via our collections search site for the first time
> > (previously only small derivatives were web-accessible and our .tifs were
> > stored elsewhere). We can control the publish-to-web status of each level
> > of image derivative with our collections management system, but since all
> > the high-resolution files will be on the same server, the URLs for all
> > images (regardless of rights/publish status) will be guessable.
> >
> > How is this commonly handled? For context, we do not have a DAMS and manage
> > all our files in folders manually. We currently have ~80K image assets. I'd
> > like to understand our options and whether the community views this as an
> > issue or not.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Emily.
> >
> > *--*
> >
> > *Emily Beliveau*
> >
> > Collections Management Advisor (Humanities)
> >
> > University of Alberta Museums
> > Ring House 1, University of Alberta
> > Edmonton, AB  T6G 2E1
> > T: 780-492-0776
> > ___
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Re: [MCN-L] Seeking advice: planning and budgeting for a virtual exhibition

2020-02-03 Thread Matt Morgan

This is a tough one for a couple reasons:

1) Most browsers right now aren't very willing to play that old Flash 
app, for security reasons. I can't see it. I think this is probably 
happening to a lot of us.


2) You can spend more or less any amount of money on an online 
exhibition component.


The most important component of the cost is the time spent by the people 
you're paying, so the cost depends on a lot of things that don't 
necessarily show on the page. Like, are the artwork metadata and images 
in a database with a pre-existing, well-defined, solid way to get them 
to a web page? Then that's approximately $0 for that part, but if it's 
not already built or won't work right for what you want to do, that part 
may be expensive and you shouldn't skimp on it.


It's lots easier to start with a) a proposed maximum dollar figure, b) 
what you hope to achieve, and c) any pre-existing capabilities, 
requirements and limitations. Then you can talk to people about ways to 
get to (b) for (a) given (c).


One way or another, it's totally fine to reach out directly to potential 
vendors and let them help you figure out the potential cost. There are 
vendors on this list but they are sensitive about jumping into questions 
like this that aren't phrased specifically as "we are seeking proposals 
from vendors." But if you asked "are there any vendors here who'd be 
willing to talk to me about how to phrase my last question better," 
you'll get lots of good contacts and plenty of solid advice.


Is there some other way you can share the example site? I'm guessing a 
Monet retrospective in Paris would be a pretty big deal, so they 
probably spent a lot on it, but I bet they could have done it or 
something like it for a lot less or a lot more (and using future-proof 
tech, i.e. standards-based code).


Best,
Matt


On 1/29/20 4:56 PM, Alexandra Morrison wrote:

Hello all,

New to the Listserv and seeking some advice. I'm an art historian currently
based at a cultural institution in France and helping them develop their
first virtual exhibition project.

The goal is to create a digital accompaniment to a future on-site
installation. At this early stage, we are envisioning something along the
lines of what was created for the Monet retrospective held in Paris in 2010
(for reference: http://www.monet2010.com/fr#/home/).

Would anyone be willing to weigh in on the ballpark timeframe, budget, and
manpower this might require? Would be grateful to be pointed in the right
direction.

Please contact me directly. Many thanks in advance.

All the best,
Alex


Alexandra K. Morrison
Ph.D., Yale University
alexandra.k.morri...@gmail.com
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Re: [MCN-L] Video hosting question

2019-10-15 Thread Matt Morgan
It's worth mentioning Vimeo Pro, 

https://vimeo.com/professionals

which is super cheap compared to self-hosting or the enterprise video providers 
but does everything most people want. You still probably need to be on Youtube 
to reach the crowds there, but you may find Vimeo is better for embeds and 
sharing, plus the pro accounts give you control over all the little things 
(junk promoted at the end etc).

-- 
  Matt Morgan
  m...@concretecomputing.com

On Tue, Oct 15, 2019, at 8:25 AM, Bryan Kennedy wrote:
> Don't mean to take this thread in a new direction, but cielo24 is a
> fantastic machine captioning tool for video (and audio).
> 
> https://cielo24.com/
> 
> Like YT and other machine learning systems, it's far from perfect, but the
> cost is pennies per hour of video and allows you to browse videos by
> machine generated keywords. It even groups text sections into estimated
> topics. You can click on these words in the transcription and jump to the
> video section.
> 
> We use it as a first pass for most videos we use online and in exhibits
> before we even do the edit. It's helpful for the team doing a rough content
> edit on interviews. The rough transcriptions are a useful starting point
> for human cleanup of the captions and translation work as well.
> 
> bk
> 
> bryan kennedy
> director, museum technology & digital operations
> science museum of minnesota
> bkenn...@smm.org   651.221.2522
> 
> 
> 
> On Mon, Oct 14, 2019 at 12:47 PM Matt Popke 
> wrote:
> 
> > Hi Ellice,
> >
> > We have a lot of video currently hosted on YouTube at the DAM. We're still
> > using it for some purpose, but we've recently been moving away from it for
> > some purposes, as well.
> >
> > Regarding copyright: I think the biggest risk of copyright issues on
> > youtube is that it has a very large audience and automated takedown systems
> > regularly scan the content there. It's just more likely that some automated
> > system will flag a video—any video—for takedown, often incorrectly. It
> > really depends on what you're putting up there.
> >
> > The reason we're moving away from youtube for much of our content has more
> > to do with YouTube's recommendation algorithm and the decreasing amount of
> > control we have over YouTube embeds in web pages. There is currently no way
> > to reliably turn off the grid of recommendations that appears in a youtube
> > video after it has finished playing. It used to be an API feature that we
> > could decide to enable or disable depending on our use case, but lately the
> > grid just appears whether we like it or not.
> >
> > We have no control over what shows up in those recommendations, and a
> > significant amount of the content on YouTube is problematic in one way or
> > another (extremism, racism, violence, etc.). We don't want to appear to the
> > unitiated user as though we are tacitly supporting or recommending whatever
> > YouTube's algorithm decides to show when our video is done playing.
> >
> > It's different for video that is viewed on YouTube's site. Users know who
> > is running the show there. But increasingly, when embedding video content
> > on web pages we are using Vimeo because we have more control over the
> > embeds.
> >
> > Also, as YouTube continues to pursue monetization strategies that
> > privilege ads and advertisers, we anticipate service changes that would be
> > at odds with our goals as an institution. It's easier to start moving to a
> > different service now when we have time to adjust then to find ourselves
> > moving to that service in a panicked rush after changes occur. The benefit
> > of paying for a video hosting service is you know what you are getting and
> > can be more assured that, aside from possible price increases, the service
> > isn't going to pull the rug out from under you without warning.
> >
> > Matt Popke
> > Developer
> > 720.913.0126
> > mpo...@denverartmuseum.org
> >
> >
> > On 10/14/19, 07:32, "mcn-l on behalf of Ellice Engdahl" <
> > mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu on behalf of elli...@thehenryford.org> wrote:
> >
> > CAUTION: This email originated from outside of the organization. Do
> > not click links or open attachments unless you recognize the sender and
> > know the content is safe.
> >
> >
> > Hello, all,
> >
> > While we have plenty of "modern" video out on YouTube, we currently
> > host most our historic and collections-item videos (e.g. oral history

Re: [MCN-L] Assistance needed with ULAN data

2019-08-17 Thread Matt Morgan
Shyam's being kind here. It's 2019. I can't believe I'm seeing that 
statement. If that's what they really said, it's completely 
unprofessional at this point.


OpenRefine is in a category unto itself. It's worth them spending some 
time "securing" it, if they're serious. But what they're really saying 
is "we want to control what software you use to make our jobs minimally 
easier." What they could be saying is "IT is about empowering the staff 
with tech, even when it's hard."


Matt Morgan
CTO
Curtis Institute of Music

On 8/16/19 4:17 PM, Shyam Oberoi wrote:

"My network team took it away because they believe open source is generally not 
secure."

That's insane, the product was developed by Google!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenRefine


Shyam Oberoi
Chief Digital Officer
Royal Ontario Museum
O: 416-586-7935
E: sobe...@rom.on.ca



-Original Message-
From: mcn-l  On Behalf Of Nancy Hoffman
Sent: Friday, August 16, 2019 2:48 PM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv 
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] Assistance needed with ULAN data

Hi Samantha -

I have a question related to your answer for Erin. Do you know of a program 
other than OpenRefine that can fetch URIs from the Getty's reconciliation 
services? I have been using OpenRefine for AAT vocabulary terms in a data 
publishing project. My network team took it away because they believe open 
source is generally not secure.

Thanks!

-Nancy

Nancy Buck Hoffman

Project Assistant

Archaeology Collections

Kellogg Center

Minnesota Historical Society

Saint Paul, MN  55102

612-725-2371


On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 12:40 PM Sami Norling 
wrote:


Hi Erin,

I would highly recommend using OpenRefine <http://openrefine.org>'s
reconciliation service to reconcile the museum's data with ULAN entities.
Once reconciled in OpenRefine, you can then enrich the museum's
existing data with any of the data points available in ULAN. I am
going through this process with the Indianapolis Museum of Art data to
better support our linked data initiatives as well as to ensure that
our data is as complete as it can be.

As an added step, I would also suggest that when you are done with the
reconciliation work, you contact the Getty vocabularies team to
inquire about contributing information about artists not currently in
ULAN to their data set. My understanding is that they are very
encouraging of such contributions.

Please consider this e-mail a super basic overview, and feel free to
contact me directly for more specific information about how to use
OpenRefine and their reconciliation services for your project. I'm
more than happy to help!

*Samantha Norling*

Digital Collections Manager

*Newfields Lab* – Technology for Nature & the Arts



*Newfields*

4000 Michigan Road
Indianapolis, IN 46208



snorl...@discovernewfields.org

On Fri, Aug 16, 2019 at 10:20 AM Erin Richardson <
e...@erinrichardsonconsulting.com> wrote:


Hi wise MCN-L members!

I am working with a museum to clean up their data. I don't have a
lot of backend data experience. My task is to populate artist
records with ULAN data. They're using EmbARK. I'd like to upload the
relevant metadata

using

the ULAN ID as a link. I'm having difficulty accessing the ULAN data
from getty's download center.
https://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabularies/obtain/download.ht
ml

Note: I know next to nothing about data that is not in CSV format.
I've tried to convert the sample ULAN XML data to CSV but am getting
lots of errors.

I don't even really understand the reasonable-ness of this question,
so please bear with me!

Thanks for any help you're able to offer!

Erin

_

Erin Richardson, PhD, Principal

Erin Richardson Consulting
<https://www.erinrichardsonconsulting.com/>

518.577.0186

LinkedIn <https://www.linkedin.com/in/erinerichardson/>
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Re: [MCN-L] WordPress-based interactive kiosks?

2019-08-06 Thread Matt Morgan
What is the value of doing this on the server side? I.e. what kiosky 
thing would WP actually be doing here?


It's been a long time but many of us have done kiosks on the client side 
with browser plugins--wrapping whatever web content from whatever CMS in 
a controlled interface. Maybe it's that experience giving me tunnel 
vision, but I'm having trouble seeing what the CMS would have to do with 
the kiosk. Or why a kiosk would benefit from knowing what your CMS is.


Best,
Matt

On 8/3/19 3:04 PM, Winifred Kehl wrote:

Hello everyone! From a discussion on AAMG-L, I'm wondering if anyone knows
of an interactive kiosk that uses WordPress as its content management
system -- like a WP theme that can pull information about objects loaded
into WP and display it in tabs, which can be used from an in-gallery kiosk.
I don't know of any off the top of my head, but it seems like the kind of
thing that should exist.

Best,

Winifred Kehl


museum exhibits | content development | science writing | creative science
communication
www.winifredkehl.com
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Re: [MCN-L] [IP SIG:] International copyright, publication, and U.S. public domain

2019-05-29 Thread Matt Morgan
Oh, you're asking about international. Sorry about that.

-- 
  Matt Morgan
  m...@concretecomputing.com

On Wed, May 29, 2019, at 10:15 AM, Matt Morgan wrote:
> Paul Klee's works are in the public domain owing to the death+70 rule. 
> See this earlier post to MCN-L celebrating that glorious release:
> 
> https://www.mail-archive.com/mcn-l@mcn.edu/msg04126.html
> 
> Best,
> Matt
> 
> -- 
>   Matt Morgan
>   m...@concretecomputing.com
> 
> On Wed, May 29, 2019, at 10:00 AM, Jessica Herczeg-Konecny wrote:
> > Hi everyone,
> > 
> > I have a question about international copyright. I have been scouring 
> > the R Handbook and reached out to Anne Young. Anne provided me with a 
> > lot of helpful information and also encouraged me to post to the 
> > listserv (thank you so much for everything, Anne!)
> > 
> > The Detroit Institute of Arts has a 1924 work by Paul Klee (Swiss, died 
> > 79 years ago) in our collection. I have a strictly commercial use for 
> > the image (definitely not "fair use").
> > 
> >   1.  Do I even bother trying to figure out if our work is in the 
> > public domain since Klee is an ARS artist?
> >   2.  I have found an image of the work in a book published in Germany 
> > in 1931 (there is a copyright notice at the front of the book). I can 
> > show a good-faith effort for research, and I think this image is most 
> > likely the first time the work was published. I should look at German 
> > copyright law, yes? Does this affect copyright in the U.S.? Or should I 
> > be looking to see when the image was first published in the U.S.?
> >   3.  I should also be looking for "the year the work was sold or 
> > offered for sale by a gallery, dealer, or public auction," yes? And if 
> > this is overseas (which it is in this case), I should look at Germany 
> > copyright law, yes? Does this affect copyright the U.S.?
> > 
> > We do not have a copyright attorney on staff. I am trying to put 
> > together a "Copyright Project" here at the DIA and so just trying to 
> > get a sense of what this is going to entail.
> > 
> > Thank you (and feel free to contact me directly).
> > 
> > Best,
> > Jessica
> > 
> > Jessica Herczeg-Konecny
> > Digital Asset Manager
> > Detroit Institute of Arts
> > 5200 Woodward Avenue │ Detroit, MI  48202
> > Tel (313) 833-1391 │ jhkone...@dia.org<mailto:jhkone...@dia.org>
> > 
> > ___
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Re: [MCN-L] [IP SIG:] International copyright, publication, and U.S. public domain

2019-05-29 Thread Matt Morgan
Paul Klee's works are in the public domain owing to the death+70 rule. See this 
earlier post to MCN-L celebrating that glorious release:

https://www.mail-archive.com/mcn-l@mcn.edu/msg04126.html

Best,
Matt

-- 
  Matt Morgan
  m...@concretecomputing.com

On Wed, May 29, 2019, at 10:00 AM, Jessica Herczeg-Konecny wrote:
> Hi everyone,
> 
> I have a question about international copyright. I have been scouring 
> the R Handbook and reached out to Anne Young. Anne provided me with a 
> lot of helpful information and also encouraged me to post to the 
> listserv (thank you so much for everything, Anne!)
> 
> The Detroit Institute of Arts has a 1924 work by Paul Klee (Swiss, died 
> 79 years ago) in our collection. I have a strictly commercial use for 
> the image (definitely not "fair use").
> 
>   1.  Do I even bother trying to figure out if our work is in the 
> public domain since Klee is an ARS artist?
>   2.  I have found an image of the work in a book published in Germany 
> in 1931 (there is a copyright notice at the front of the book). I can 
> show a good-faith effort for research, and I think this image is most 
> likely the first time the work was published. I should look at German 
> copyright law, yes? Does this affect copyright in the U.S.? Or should I 
> be looking to see when the image was first published in the U.S.?
>   3.  I should also be looking for "the year the work was sold or 
> offered for sale by a gallery, dealer, or public auction," yes? And if 
> this is overseas (which it is in this case), I should look at Germany 
> copyright law, yes? Does this affect copyright the U.S.?
> 
> We do not have a copyright attorney on staff. I am trying to put 
> together a "Copyright Project" here at the DIA and so just trying to 
> get a sense of what this is going to entail.
> 
> Thank you (and feel free to contact me directly).
> 
> Best,
> Jessica
> 
> Jessica Herczeg-Konecny
> Digital Asset Manager
> Detroit Institute of Arts
> 5200 Woodward Avenue │ Detroit, MI  48202
> Tel (313) 833-1391 │ jhkone...@dia.org<mailto:jhkone...@dia.org>
> 
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Re: [MCN-L] Multilingual websites

2018-10-22 Thread Matt Morgan
We had the Google Translate widget on the Met's site, in just the visit 
section, for a while during my time there, and then we added it to a 
part of NYPL's site but I never managed to get it added to the whole 
site and actually lost my job there because I wouldn't shut up about it. 
True story! (I've had LOTS of other jobs since then, don't worry.)


Anyway, the problem with human translation is this: you're already 
pretty careful to get the English right, and probably a few people are 
involved in the production and editing of any given page. Some or all of 
them may actually be trained & experienced as professional editors in 
English, and the educators/curators/content owners probably speak and 
write English pretty fluently, perhaps even well. Basically, you spend a 
lot of time getting the words right. How are you going to meet that 
standard in even one other language? You're going to hire some outside 
person who may or may not be good--it's hard to tell because none of you 
are professionals in that language--and not edit it nearly as carefully 
as the English because who's qualified to do that? And then it's so much 
extra work, when you change the English a little bit, you'll probably 
either just change the other languages in-house, with whatever local 
speakers of that language you can find, or maybe put it off for now 
since it really wasn't that big a change anyway. Over time you'll know 
that the translations are kind of falling behind the primary pages, but 
it'll be OK because everyone else is paying less attention to them than 
you are, so it'll just become this thing that eats at you a little bit, 
but you take comfort knowing that at least it's better than having no 
translations at all.


In case it's not obvious, if you're Canadian substitute "French and 
English" for "English," and if you're Belgian or Moroccan or whatever, 
substitute the four or six languages you're a pro at. However many it 
is, it's not 100 and it's probably not even eight or nine.


The problem with machine translation is exactly what Susan points out. 
It has issues. Even when it's pretty good it's not very good at 
technical terms, or colloquialisms, or proper names, or a dozen other 
kinds of repeated issues. And your art or history or science museum 
website is going to be about 30% those things. Probably 50% at the 
Exploratorium.


Here's the thing: even with all those issues, it still helps. If you 
think of machine translation just as an aid to comprehension, and you 
think of adding the widget to your site as a convenience, just to make 
it easier for visitors to do something they can already do and you can't 
stop them anyway, why not? Well I mean, that's what I thought and I lost 
my job. But I still think it's a logical argument. And I haven't seen a 
whole lot of museum websites succeed at human translation in more than a 
couple languages, except on very limited sets of pages.


There have been a couple major museum websites that provided the Google 
translation widget on every page, as a convenience. The two that I 
recall having it in the past no longer seem to provide it, so I have to 
imagine they similarly had a champion for it who moved on (willingly, I 
hope!) and their successors were less interested in fighting that fight.


Anyway, here's my suggestion: try Google on a few of your pages in any 
languages for which you have a local fluent speaker/reader and see how 
well it works. I bet you'll find that it conveys the basic ideas 
reasonably well, that it makes some really boneheaded mistakes, and that 
about 100 out of 100 visitors will not be harmed by it. But I also bet 
that if you share it with your colleagues from marketing, 
communications, etc., you'll quickly get a sense of how politically 
difficult it may be to roll it out. Exploratorium seems like the kind of 
place that might be willing to try it ... but wow, I bet your stuff is 
hard for machines to translate, so who knows.


Best,
Matt

On 10/22/2018 08:40 PM, Susan Edwards wrote:

Hi Mark -

I managed the localization work for the Getty's Visit section 4 years ago
and can give you some tips. From an accessibility point of view, you want
to have human-translated language, not use Google. In general translation
services are ok, but they make mistakes. You also want to think about
non-English language search engines and SEO in other languages as well. So
localization is not just about translation. Feel free to contact me - I am
happy to talk on the phone to discuss.

Things have probably changed in the last 4 years - I do wonder if Google
translate services, which are much more accessible these days through
search, are more commonly accessed and used by users. But ideally a user
from China, for example, isn't coming to your English pages and then
clicking on a button to change the language. They shouldn't see your
English page at all, and should just be sent directly to the Chinese page.
Again, this requires search 

Re: [MCN-L] Job Opportunity: Sr. Web Developer Dallas Museum of Art

2018-09-29 Thread Matt Morgan

Welcome!

The staff ratios topic has come up before, for sure. The list has a 
searchable archives (link in the footer); I tried and it was a little 
hard to narrow it down to that topic (it's hard to avoid job postings) 
but search phrases like "staff survey" and "digital budget" get me some 
related posts.


Does anybody remember who has raised this topic previously? That would help.

Best,
Matt

On 09/24/2018 05:35 PM, Amir Tabei wrote:

Hello MCN Group,

This is my first post and new to the group and also my 12th day at the job.  I 
wanted to share one opening we have for a Sr. Web Developer position 
https://recruiting.paylocity.com/Recruiting/Jobs/Details/58755

Also, I was wondering if you all have discuss or perhaps have a survey in the 
past regarding the IT Staff ratio in your museum?  I will be very interested to 
see where we stack up as I'm digging more into the current state and creating a 
future state roadmap.

Thank you,

___
AMIR TABEI
Director of Information Technology and Digital Media

DMA
Office: 214-922-1206 | Cell: 214-500-8172
Dallas Museum of Art | 1717 N. Harwood St. | Dallas TX 75201

Explore the DMA your way.
Download the free DMA app today.

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Re: [MCN-L] Preparing for quickly approaching GDPR deadline

2018-02-07 Thread Matt Morgan
It depends how actively you're targeting EU customers. Those of you with 
lawyers already on the case will do better than I can to figure out the 
intricacies of this, but:

https://wp.nyu.edu/compliance_enforcement/2017/12/11/the-general-data-protection-regulation-a-primer-for-u-s-based-organizations-that-handle-eu-personal-data/

E.g. if you don't have a physical presence in the EU, 


... a controller or processor not established in the EU will be subject to the 
GDPR "where the processing activities are related to offering goods or services 
to data subjects in the Union," even when the goods and services are offered 
for free.[10] Determining whether an entity "envisages" offering goods or 
services in at least one EU Member State, thereby triggering the GDPR’s 
requirements, depends on "factors such as the use of a language or a currency 
generally used in one or more Member States with the possibility of ordering 
goods and services in that other language, or the mentioning of customers or 
users who are in the Union."


I.e. if you're just sending EU people the same stuff you send to Americans, it 
does not apply. Of course, protecting visitor privacy is potentially an 
opportunity to distinguish your org, so this isn't the only reason to do it.

Thanks,
Matt

-- 
  Matt Morgan
  m...@concretecomputing.com

On Wed, Feb 7, 2018, at 2:40 PM, Sayre, Scott A wrote:
> Nik-
> I unfortunately think that is the case.  
> https://securityintelligence.com/news/us-firms-have-less-than-a-year-to-comply-with-the-gdpr/
> https://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/security-and-risk-strategy/7-steps-to-gdpr-for-us-companies/a/d-id/1329235?
> 
> Diana-
> Thank you.  I'll reach out after we have a couple more meetings here.  
> Lets share what we discover as we go along.
> 
> Best,
> Scott
> 
> On 2/7/18, 2:34 PM, "mcn-l on behalf of Nik Honeysett"  boun...@mcn.edu on behalf of nhoneys...@bpoc.org> wrote:
> 
> James - I don’t think that is right otherwise every business in the 
> U.S. would be potentially liable.
> -nik
> 
> 
> 
> Nik Honeysett | Chief Executive Officer | BPOC | www.bpoc.org
> 
> 
> M (805) 402-3326  P (619) 331-1974  E nhoneys...@bpoc.org 
> <mailto:nhoneys...@bpoc.org>
> 1549 El Prado, Suite 8, San Diego, CA 92101
> 
> A non-profit technology collaboration connecting audiences to art, 
> culture & science.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> > On Feb 7, 2018, at 11:31 AM, Sayre, Scott A <sayr...@cmog.org> 
> wrote:
> > 
> > Agree on both accounts.  We do sell  products, classes, tickets 
> and juried art entries online with EU customers.  
> > -S
> > 
> > On 2/7/18, 2:23 PM, "mcn-l on behalf of Nik Honeysett"  boun...@mcn.edu on behalf of nhoneys...@bpoc.org> wrote:
> > 
> >Also, GDPR wouldn’t apply if they purchased from your website 
> while they were in a hotel next door to you.
> >-nik
> > 
> >
> > 
> >Nik Honeysett | Chief Executive Officer | BPOC | www.bpoc.org
> > 
> > 
> >M (805) 402-3326  P (619) 331-1974  E nhoneys...@bpoc.org 
> <mailto:nhoneys...@bpoc.org>
> >1549 El Prado, Suite 8, San Diego, CA 92101
> > 
> >A non-profit technology collaboration connecting audiences to 
> art, culture & science.
> > 
> >
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> >> On Feb 7, 2018, at 11:20 AM, Nik Honeysett <nhoneys...@bpoc.org> 
> wrote:
> >> 
> >> My understanding is that GDPR is enforced based on the location 
> of the transactee at the time of the transaction, irrespective of where 
> the server is. So, if someone buys something from your website from 
> Blighty, then GDPR is in effect for you and their PII, but if that 
> person physically buys from your store, then GDPR does not apply.
> >> -nik
> >> 
> >> 
> >> 
> >> Nik Honeysett | Chief Executive Officer | BPOC | www.bpoc.org 
> <http://www.bpoc.org/>
> >> M (805) 402-3326  P (619) 331-1974  E nhoneys...@bpoc.org 
> <mailto:nhoneys...@bpoc.org>
> >> 1549 El Prado, Suite 8, San Diego, CA 92101
> >> 
&g

Re: [MCN-L] Online UX testing service recommendation

2018-02-01 Thread Matt Morgan
Scott, I've used usertesting.com a bunch of times, although not for a 
year or so. As long as you're doing a good test it works well, so it's 
often still good to have an expert on your side, i.e. I found them more 
useful for the logistics than for the strategy or design.


Best,
Matt

On 01/31/2018 08:09 PM, Sayre , Scott A wrote:

Hi Folks-
Anyone have a recommendation for an online UX testing service?  We are 
launching a new e-commerce site in March and would like to work with a service 
to do some structured user testing of the site before we go live.
Any recommendations would be much appreciated.
Best,
Scott

Scott Sayre | Chief Information Officer |Corning Museum of Glass | One Museum Way | 
Corning, NY 14830 |  <>www.cmog.org 
Office: (607) 438-5298  |Cell: (612) 423-9691 | Twitter: @zbartrout | Skype: 
@zbarscott



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Re: [MCN-L] Managing and storing video content for website

2017-07-07 Thread Matt Morgan
Like SFMOMA, I've used Brightcove before, but I think the reasons to do 
so are getting really skinny ... it's super expensive and only does a 
bit more than a $20/month Vimeo Pro account (as far as I know).


Keir, do you think if you made the decision today, you would go with 
Brightcove? Why?


Thanks!
Matt

On 07/07/2017 12:42 PM, Keir Winesmith wrote:

Hi Lisa

We use Brightcove as our video CDN, and in-page player for videos on 
sfmoma.org. It's fine, the CMS is pretty straightforward and it's players are 
easily templated.

We put made-for-YouTube videos on YouTube.

We store non-public video, b-roll, etc. on our DAMS (NetX).

Hope that helps.

Keir

Keir Winesmith
Head of Web and Digital Platforms

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Don't miss Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed, June 24 - Oct 9
Tickets available at SFMOMA.org
415.357.2871
kwinesm...@sfmoma.org
151 Third Street | San Francisco, CA 94103

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-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of Susan 
Edwards
Sent: Friday, July 07, 2017 9:30 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv 
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] Managing and storing video content for website

Lisa, I am interested in this as well and will follow responses. If you get 
off-list responses I'd be interested to know what they say.

If it helps, when I was at the Getty, we used the Akamai hosted streaming 
service. But it was not the most user-friendly option. At the Hammer we post to 
Vimeo, YT, and Livestream and embed. This is fine for presentation.
But not so great as a managed storage solution.

Susan Edwards
Associate Director, Digital Content
Hammer Museum
10899 Wilshire Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90024
sedwa...@hammer.ucla.edu
310-209-7921

On Jul 7, 2017 5:52 AM, "Goble, Lisa"  wrote:


Hello All,

I'm interested to know what other institutions use in terms of
managing and storing video content on their websites (rather than
embedding from a video sharing site like YouTube, Vimeo, etc.)  It
seems like we can go with a few different options. Are you using CDNs (Content 
Delivery Networks)?
Cloud-hosted video solutions? Self-hosted? What works best? We are
using Drupal.

Many thanks!

Lisa Candage Goble
Media Producer
The Frick Collection
1 East 70th Street
New York, NY 10021
212-547-6892
go...@frick.org
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Re: [MCN-L] Open access but fees for publishers?

2017-02-22 Thread Matt Morgan
Perian, for examples you might look at software like anti-virus, 
unzipping & PDF-making utilities, etc., which often have "free for 
personal use" licensing models.


My experience has been that policing is unnecessary; anybody who might 
pay is inclined to pay, because it's easiest. Imagine you're a 
publisher--would you rather just pay a small fee, or contact your legal 
department to see if you maybe don't have to? Twenty minutes on the 
phone with a lawyer might cost more than the licensing fee.


But I agree with others that the larger impact may be on those who 
shouldn't have to pay being confused, and that's a cost to you ... I 
used to get calls all the time from people asking for permission to use 
images in clear fair use situations (presentations in educational 
settings, for example) and I wasn't even the right person to get those 
calls. So I'm sure there were a lot more calls others got, too. That's 
staff time and that costs something, so if you're angling for open 
access, that might be an argument to use.


Best,
Matt

On 02/22/2017 12:40 PM, Perian Sully wrote:

Good morning everyone (on the West Coast at least),

For those of you who are pursuing open access initiatives, do you carve out
an exception for publishers? Obviously, publishers can grab whatever they
want if assets are offered at full-resolution, and it's hard for us to
police, but publication fees are still (?) a quantifiable source of
additional income. So I'm guessing honor system is mostly in play here.

What restrictions do you still have? Print run limitations before a fee
kicks in? Type of publication? Don't worry about it at all?

Thanks all,

~Perian



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Re: [MCN-L] Website image cropping

2016-12-12 Thread Matt Morgan

It's a problem, yes!

Whoever makes your printed posters can probably tell you how frequently 
your exh. images need permission/input before cropping. In my 
experience, on top of the literal rights issues, you also have the 
personality issues. E.g., when an important person (artist, curator, 
donor, collector) doesn't like the way something looks, you might not do 
it even if you're within your rights. Different museums may put 
different weight on the latter issue. I don't think I've ever cropped an 
artwork image without a curator having veto power; but that may not be 
the practice everywhere. Being clear about that ahead of time may save 
you a lot of effort down the road, if you can get authority to do it 
within your department.


Sometimes the "full view upon click" approach has helped with one or the 
other kind of issue. But even figuring out what the options are can be a 
time-sink. On the other hand, if you have a poster/print/advertising 
design department already securing permission for this kind of work, 
maybe you can tell them what aspect ratios work for you, and they can 
handle it.


What about resizing for responsive displays ... will the images retain 
the same shape and details at every size? Or will foreheads potentially 
get chopped off, etc. That may be important for everyone to understand 
and plan for.


best,
Matt

On 12/12/2016 11:15 AM, Chris Alexander wrote:

Hello all

We're currently redesigning our website and a question came up. I'm hoping to 
cull some information from the museum community about how other museums handle 
the same situation.

On our exhibition page the redesign relies heavily on landscape image similar 
to this - where text floats to the left of a landscape image then switches on 
the next exhibit listing.

  •••
text  •   Image   •
  •••
•••  
•   Image   •  text
•••  
  •••
text  •   Image   •
  •••

The design requires the images to all be the same size for it to look it's 
best, meaning they would be cropped in a lot of cases. We came across a lot of 
museum sites with similar requirements during our discovery phase.

My question is - how are museums handling this? Do you secure rights for 
cropping artwork? How difficult has it been if so? Are museums offering a full 
image view on click of the cropped image? Are there museums throwing caution to 
the wind?

Very interested in hearing from you all!

Best regards,

Chris Alexander
Digital Media Manager
Cantor Arts Center
Stanford University
328 Lomita Drive
Stanford, CA 94305-5060

650.723.6114 | cma...@stanford.edu 

http://museum.stanford.edu
http://cantorcollections.stanford.edu


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Re: [MCN-L] THoughts about App vs. Responsive Web site?

2016-10-28 Thread Matt Morgan
For this question, are you talking about on the visitor's own devices? 
Others may have data on this, where I just have opinions/experience, but


a) getting most people to use anything takes effort
b) getting anyone to install and use an app takes a LOT of effort.

If you're talking about the loaner devices, an app still makes certain 
things easier, especially related to offline, controls, screen real 
estate, that kind of thing. But if you have pervasive good connections 
and a staff that's more skilled in webapps, that could tip the balance 
in that direction. Also, for most of us, web dev still makes 
experimentation, deployment, and iteration easier.


--Matt

On 10/28/2016 12:56 PM, Sweeting III, Floyd wrote:

Colleagues,

Can you share your thoughts regarding the use of an App as opposed to using a 
Responsive Web site as part of the visitor experience?

Also how you feel about downloading content to personal devices rather than 
just accessing live online?

Thanks,

Floyd Thomas Sweeting III
Head, Technology & Digital Media

THE FRICK COLLECTION
1 East 70th Street
New York, NY   10021

(212) 547-6889 tel
(212) 547-0708 fax

www.frick.org

The information transmitted is intended only for the person or entity to which 
it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any 
review, retransmission, dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action 
in reliance upon, this information by persons or entities other than the 
intended recipient is prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact 
the sender and delete the material from any computer.



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Re: [MCN-L] Online Catalog

2016-09-27 Thread Matt Morgan

Here's something built in almost exactly the way Sina describes:

http://bealearninghero.org/learning-tools/

Though I have to say, using an eCommerce platform for this is pretty 
clever, and it might have "you may also like" features that work out of 
the box, etc. On the other hand it may have lots of features that get in 
your way (shopping carts).


On 09/27/2016 02:38 PM, Sina Bahram wrote:

If you don't need to, or aren't trying to, sell anything, then I suggest simply making a custom 
post type (CPT) of Butterfly with the requisite fields you wish to track. Then use "Search and 
Filter" as well as "Relevanssi". There are several ways of making the CPTs in a 
GUI-like way, not the least of which is either ACF for adding custom fields, as its name suggest, 
or using the PODs framework for achieving the same. ACF is a bit less complicated than PODs, and 
probably does everything you need.

You can then customize the all of two or three files for single page and 
archive views for Butterflies, and in a day or two have yourself a rather 
marvelous DB-driven search aspect of your site, all within WP, and all under 
your control.

Plus, all of this is free, except for "Search and Filter Pro", but trust me, it 
is beyond worth the $20 or $40 they charge. It saves hours upon hours of billable time.

Hope that helps, and good luck!

Take care,
Sina

President, Prime Access Consulting, Inc.
Twitter: @SinaBahram
Company Website: http://www.pac.bz
Personal Website: http://www.sinabahram.com
Blog: http://blog.sinabahram.com

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of Stan 
Orchard
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 2:26 PM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv 
Subject: [MCN-L] Online Catalog

Hello!

I’m working on a project where we want to allow users to search our database of 
butterflies that populate our butterfly house…search by color(s), wing shape, 
maybe some other criteria. We use Wordpress so it seems Woo Commerce is a safe 
bet with maybe another plugin to turn off certain elements such as price. We’ll 
have 150-200 entries in this database. This will utilize the same Wordpress 
theme we’re using and it will be on the same domain, so part of our main site. 
I’m looking for any examples of such a thing. Or any advice anyone may have 
regarding this type of project. Should we set this up off our main site? Any 
advantage/disadvantage to doing that? I have a feeling we’re missing something 
as we work through this. Thanks.

Stan Orchard
Pacific Science Center
Seattle, WA
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Re: [MCN-L] Redundancy

2016-07-12 Thread Matt Morgan
I don't know if redundancy in spam filtering is typical, since getting 
too much spam doesn't prevent people from continuing to work (so 
temporary failures are OK). There's often sort of an informal 
redundancy, since many mail clients have filtering themselves (though 
they take training, so if your centralized filtering is usually doing 
its job, the local filters may not be ready to step in).


How do you do spam filtering? Was it a hosted service that went down, or 
are you filtering on a firewall or other network device?


Best,
Matt

On 07/07/2016 06:23 PM, Sally Swaney wrote:

Question:  we recently had our spam filter fail (of course late on Friday 
before the 3-day weekend!).  We were still able to receive mail, but with a lot 
of spam.  We are wondering what other organizations do for redundancy.  We have 
some redundancy - but not at the spam filter level.  Any input on this would be 
appreciated.

Thank you,

Sally Swaney
Executive Administrator
sswa...@nortonsimon.org




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Re: [MCN-L] Recommendations for a Checksum Program?

2016-05-14 Thread Matt Morgan
Sure, understood. You can write scripts with simple guis, e.g. that's easy to 
do in Python in most OSes. Or you can put a web front-end on it. Or if you have 
a macro function in whatever system you use for storing your digital assets, 
that may work. 

I bet if you find a local dev and say "make this easy to use for interns and 
part-timers" you can get a quote that's not crazy.


On May 14, 2016 11:05:08 AM EDT, Joe Hoover work <joe.hoo...@mnhs.org> wrote:
>That is why I emphasized  "user-friendliness” unfortunately once you
>get into doing scripting, no matter how simple, people have no
>interest. I typically use scripting as well for running checksums but
>this isn’t an option for others.  I know there are several
>checksum/hashsum apps out there and I was hoping to get some advice on
>which folks are using and find useful.
>
>
>> On May 14, 2016, at 8:43 AM, Matt Morgan <m...@concretecomputing.com>
>wrote:
>> 
>> This question gave me deja vu! Here's what I said 11 years ago in
>reply to a related question:
>> 
>> http://www.mail-archive.com/mcn-l@mcn.edu/msg08999.html
>> 
>> I don't know if perl would be the right language, or is mdb is the
>right way to keep the results, but this job is so easy to do with
>simple scripts of almost any kind that I think I would still talk to a
>developer and get a simple program/macro written, in whatever system(s)
>you already use.
>> 
>> Checksum utils tend to be cross-platform, and so are lots of
>scripting languages, so I don't think you'd have significant
>windows/mac issues going this route.
>> 
>> Best,
>> Matt
>> 
>> On 05/13/2016 04:16 PM, Joseph Hoover wrote:
>>> I am looking for recommendations for a user-friendly, affordable
>Checksum
>>> utility that is free-to-low-cost for small archives and history
>>> organizations. Ideally, the utility would be able to batch process
>digital
>>> assets. Recommendations for checksum applications for both Mac and
>Windows
>>> would be very appreciated.
>>> 
>>> Again "user-friendliness" is very important. Most the folks I help
>are
>>> usually volunteers that have no tech background.
>>> 
>>> Thanks!
>>> 
>>> _Joe
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
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>> 
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Re: [MCN-L] Recommendations for a Checksum Program?

2016-05-14 Thread Matt Morgan
This question gave me deja vu! Here's what I said 11 years ago in reply 
to a related question:


http://www.mail-archive.com/mcn-l@mcn.edu/msg08999.html

I don't know if perl would be the right language, or is mdb is the right 
way to keep the results, but this job is so easy to do with simple 
scripts of almost any kind that I think I would still talk to a 
developer and get a simple program/macro written, in whatever system(s) 
you already use.


Checksum utils tend to be cross-platform, and so are lots of scripting 
languages, so I don't think you'd have significant windows/mac issues 
going this route.


Best,
Matt

On 05/13/2016 04:16 PM, Joseph Hoover wrote:

I am looking for recommendations for a user-friendly, affordable Checksum
utility that is free-to-low-cost for small archives and history
organizations. Ideally, the utility would be able to batch process digital
assets. Recommendations for checksum applications for both Mac and Windows
would be very appreciated.

Again "user-friendliness" is very important. Most the folks I help are
usually volunteers that have no tech background.

Thanks!

_Joe



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Re: [MCN-L] Atavist/Creativist for Telling Museum Stories

2016-04-16 Thread Matt Morgan

How does the shelf-life work? What is the advantage?

Thanks,
Matt

On 04/16/2016 07:50 AM, Frank Sträter wrote:

Hi,

At the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision (national audiovisual archive) we 
recently started experimenting with Atavist. As our main website lacked certain 
features for publishing long form multimedia articles, we decided to try Atavist. Our 
first (and only so far) promoted article can be found here: 
https://beeldengeluid.atavist.com/oorsprong-nederlandse-documentaire 


Although the article is in Dutch and is a historical background article about 
early 20th century mostly silent documentaries, written by our in-house media 
historian Bas Agterberg, it illustrates the approach you can take with Atavist. 
What we’ve learned is that to create a good article on Atavist is that apart 
from a good writer, it helps when you have someone with a background in 
editing, desktop publishing, web publishing and online marketing and 
communication (that was me in this case).

Just like a magazine article, a story on Atavist has a short “shelf-life”, so 
it’s important that you promote it correctly and timely. In a museum context 
that would for instance mean that you link to the background article on an 
exposition from your main website and your social media posts and link back to 
your main website in the article.

At our museum we plan to you use the paid version of Atavist as a tool for 
promotional and/or background articles.

Frank Sträter
Senior Frontend Developer
Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision


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Re: [MCN-L] "easy" file duplication cleanup

2015-12-07 Thread Matt Morgan
You could do this with a shell script. One way: write a `find -exec ...` 
that runs through all the files, outputting the md5sums in some usable 
way. Sort the list and look for multiples (double-checking with diff on 
matches, if you're worried), and replace duplicates with symlinks 
if/where you need them, chmodding as necessary. But if multiple versions 
of the same file have different perms, that's a problem in the first 
place, most likely.


Good luck!

On 12/07/2015 06:32 PM, Perian Sully wrote:

Hi everyone:

I know this is possibly something of a fool's errand, but I'm hoping
someone has come up with some magic tool or process for more-easily
cleaning up file storage than going through 12 years of files one-by-one.

As part of our DAMS project, I've run some TreeSize Pro scans on three of
the 20-25 or so network storage directories. Just in those three, there are
approximately 66,467 duplicate files. We initially thought about creating
hardlinks for the duplicates, which will at least help the server access
files more efficiently, but it won't solve the problem of actually having
files all over the place that the DAMS will ultimately ingest.

Another thought was to do symlinks, but as far as I know, there aren't easy
tools to automagically create these for Windows desktops or servers. Plus,
it might create havoc for all of the file permissions.

So does anyone have any other ideas that I might try? Or are we really just
stuck with all of this junk until someone manually goes in and cleans it up?

Thanks,

~Perian



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Re: [MCN-L] Securing public computers

2015-11-06 Thread Matt Morgan
This has been a popular conversation on the list for many years, so have 
a look at the archives for a lot of stuff to dig up:


http://www.mail-archive.com/search?q=kiosk=mcn-l%40mcn.edu

I don't know if this is stuff you already do/know about, but I would say 
the basics at least used to be


1. Use Windows policies to limit what can happen in the OS (like killing 
right-click, etc., & making sure only the browser can start up).
2. Firewall off the kiosk network onto a different segment than Wifi 
networks, internal networks, DMZ, etc.
3. Use some kind of browser kiosk software to restrict what the browser 
can see/do (I think off-the-shelf products are mostly preferred now).
4. Physically secure the boxes and the ethernet ports to prevent a 
million other problems.


For #4, your design department will probably love the idea of 
designing/building beautiful cases, with integrated keyboards (that have 
no ctrl/alt/super/function keys) if you need them, etc (or touch-screen 
keyboards where it makes sense). It will look expensive, but it's less 
costly than your time, and of course anything in the galleries should be 
as good-looking as it can be.


I'm probably forgetting a lot--it's been a while!

On 11/06/2015 09:04 AM, Patrick Davis wrote:

New to the group. Looking forward to seeing what everyone has to say.

One question that just recently was asked of me by our Director of
Technology was how we are securing the computers that run our digital
interactives in the public space. Not well was my answer. We are currently
hovering around 75 different digital interactives and are adding new ones
all the time.

I was wondering what everyone here does to lock down their windows 7 pro
installations. In our situation we have three different kind of
applications running. A majority of them are standalone flash projectors.
The rest either run on Firefox or Chrome. I always lean towards open source
solutions but we do have some room in our budget to purchase software to
make this work. Ideally there would be some kind of central management
solution that we could use to not only lock them down but keep tabs on what
is going on.

Thanks!

---
Patrick Davis | Exhibitions AV Specialist | The Field Museum
1400 S Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605
312-665-7968



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Re: [MCN-L] Proving how the impact of promotional calls-to-action varies by player result within your web games

2015-10-16 Thread Matt Morgan

This is genius.

On 10/16/2015 09:42 AM, Andrew Lewis wrote:

Dear MCN peeps,

Ahead of my session at this year's MCN conference "Designing Evidence: Planning the Data 
You Track to Capture Specific Behaviour", here's the latest Digital Media post from the 
V blog, which outlines one of the ways we have been using these techniques. It's a nice 
simple run-down of the data we collected from a web game and what it tells us.
http://www.vam.ac.uk/blog/digital-media/how-people-really-react-when-judged-as-shown-by-game-data

It describes the results of tracking the interactions of individual players within the game 
"The Definery", made to support a recent exhibition: "What is Luxury?". This 
game is a simple and fun provocation, that allows you to subject your prized possessions to be 
judged as luxury or vulgar, based on questions that probe your emotional attachment, your 
likelihood of bigging it up and things like its cost and so on.

During the build of this game, we set up Google Analytics Event Tracking 
coupled with a bit of cookie setting, which allowed us to identify the various 
actions within an individual game session. There was some dynamic setting of 
variables that could store behavioural feedback and send as a package into our 
stats. This was deployed using Tag Manager, based on structured id and class 
naming within the html. This post shows the data.

The results represent the individual reaction of people from over 12,000 
individual game plays. The data showed a clear pattern that players who 
received a positive (luxury) rating of their item were twice as likely to 
respond to calls-to-action like sharing the game or accessing exhibition 
content.

This sort of data capture is useful if you want to move beyond blunt success 
metrics like number of page loads or number of app downloads. I think quite a 
lot of people on this list might find it of use.

Finally, as well as being able to measure the value of calls to action 
depending on differing game experience of course, we also captured the objects 
submitted. This also means we got the occasional amusingly naughty reference to 
bodily parts in the objects people submitted as well as handbags, scarves, 
vintage posters. Win, win!

For any MCN2015 attendees, I'll be looking at this and other data capture 
applications such as linking prior motivation to actual behaviour, tracking all 
the interactions within individual audioguide sessions (play, pause, search, 
replay, load tours etc.) and capturing why users' need large image downloads on 
our collection search.


Andrew Lewis
Digital Content Delivery Manager
Digital Media

Victoria and Albert Museum | South Kensington | London | SW7 2RL
T: +44 (0)20 7942 2373
linkd.in/andrewlewis

Visit www.vam.ac.uk and 
www.vandashop.com
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3 October 2015 - 10 January 2016 at V South Kensington
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[MCN-L] Searchable MCN-L archive is complete

2015-05-30 Thread Matt Morgan
For many years MCN-L's online archive was only spottily indexed by 
search engines and so wasn't super-usable. Starting last fall I began to 
fix that, and Rob Lancefield joined me a few months ago to make the new, 
fully-searchable archive as complete as it can be (Rob had obsessively 
saved older MCN-L messages that weren't even in the current MCN server's 
archive!). It's now all done, and available at


https://www.mail-archive.com/mcn-l%40mcn.edu/

and it has a pretty great advanced search, too (start with a simple 
search and then it'll offer more options).


The messages by date interface only shows the most recent 3000 or so 
messages, but try the advanced search, and you'll see that (thanks to 
Rob!) the messages go back to 1996 ... the very beginning of MCN-L. 
Check it out:


https://www.mail-archive.com/mcn-l%40mcn.edu/msg09558.html

You might also, with crafty advanced searching, see that a handful of 
messages are erroneously time-stamped in 1970, the beginning of Unix 
time (thank your system admin if this never happened at your employer). 
But sadly, they actually came from much later.


If you ever lose the link, it's in the footer of every MCN-L message.  
Enjoy!


Best,
Matt
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Re: [MCN-L] We're 50

2015-05-11 Thread Matt Morgan

Amazing! Congrats to all.

On 05/11/2015 02:43 AM, Amalyah Keshet wrote:

Today is the 50th birthday of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.   
http://www.imj.org.il/

Thought I’d take this opportunity to share congratulations with colleagues from 
LACMA I’ve met
through MCN over the years:  it’s their birthday year, too.   
http://www.lacma.org/art/exhibition/50-for-50

Looked at ethnographically, 1965 looks like some sort of Proto-Vintage Era, 
it’s cultural artifacts rescued on their way from attics to the garbage dump by 
very young curators.  I suppose Mad Men was the ground-breaker for that kind of 
material culture research.  Anyway, for those classicists into Very Recent 
Antiquity, here’s something we’ve done on what 1965 looked like in Israel and 
on the Israeli art scene:  http://www.imj.org.il/exhibitions/2015/1965/   Don’t 
let the fact that it’s in Hebrew deter you; just click around and enjoy the 
visuals.

Happy birthday to us all.


Amalyah Keshet

Head of Image Resources and Copyright Management

The Israel Museum, Jerusalem










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Re: [MCN-L] Public WiFI and Social Sign-In/Authentication

2014-11-20 Thread Matt Morgan

I'm thread hijacking but for a good cause!

This may be a good time to note that our new MCN-L searchable archive 
seems to be running. I haven't really tested it yet. But anyway, wifi 
and public wifi policies come up now and again on MCN-L, and now we have 
a reliable way to look up what others on the list have said about them 
before (since about May 2006, plus some mystery messages that appear to 
be from January 1970--but aren't). Voilà:


http://www.mail-archive.com/search?q=public+wifil=mcn-l%40mcn.edu
(Public Wifi search)
http://www.mail-archive.com/search?q=wifi+policyl=mcn-l%40mcn.edu
(wifi policy search)

There's some overlap between the two of course. Or just go to 
http://www.mail-archive.com/mcn-l@mcn.edu/ to type in your own search.


Anyway, Brian, I thought of this because I remember a conversation about 
your topic about a year ago, and there were others, so maybe you can 
find something useful in there.


Thanks,
Matt

p.s. When I'm sure this is working well I'll change the archives link in 
the bottom of MCN-L messages. Hope everyone's having a great time at the 
conference!


On 11/19/2014 08:39 PM, Brian Whaley wrote:

I'm the head of IT for the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, and I'm 
researching a request from our marketing department. Currently, our WiFI is 
open (of course, we have firewalled the connection to prevent illegal and 
questionable activity, but it doesn't require a password or authentication of 
any kind at the moment).

So, I'm interested to know how many of you either:

1. Have free public WiFi, and leave internet access open and free (no 
cost,meaning no authentication is required)

Or

2. Use any sort of authentication for your public WiFI (such as giving an email 
address and password for access)  to gather marketing data. More specifically, 
if any of you use any type of social sign-in to authenticate and gather data.

I have a number of concerns about the security and privacy of any 
authentication method, but especially social sign-ins (especially using 
Facebook and anything else that uses oauth and/or openid authentication), so I 
wanted to find out if any of you are using similar configurations, find out 
about your experiences, and ask who you're using and if you had similar 
concerns that were quelled by explanations on why it was safe and secure. I've 
talked to one company and researched several others, and I haven't heard 
satisfactory responses on the security of these authentication methods.

I'd also like to hear your patron's perspective if you use authentication. 
What's the bounce rate? Do you receive many complaints about having to 
authenticate? How reliable is the system you're using (meaning do you have many 
technical issues related to authentication that prevent access?)

I'll be at the MCN conference in Dallas tomorrow and Friday, so if you get 
asked about this by someone, that's probably me!


Brian Whaley
Head of IT and AV
Kimbell Art Museum
 Camp Bowie Boulevard
Fort Worth, TX 76107-2792
bwha...@kimbellmuseum.orgmailto:bwha...@kimbellmuseum.org
www.kimbellart.org



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[MCN-L] Proposed update to MCN-L

2014-09-22 Thread Matt Morgan
Hi everyone. I've been working with Liz Neely, Vicki Portway, and Eric 
Longo on a change to MCN-L that would result in

* a more searchable (i.e., comprehensively-indexed) archive of messages
* an easy way to generate RSS feeds of new messages.

The proposal is that we'd add MCN-L, and any archives that we can, to 
mail-archive.com. That site would keep a permanent record of all 
messages, indexing them for searching, and provide an RSS feed of new 
posts. While there are other ways to achieve these goals, 
mail-archive.com is a single stable, no-cost, and maintenance-free 
method that provides both.

Nothing about how you use the list will need to change as a result of 
this. The only noticeable difference will be that the post archive is 
fully-indexed, so it will be easier to find past discussions as a way of 
investigating topics.

If there are any questions, comments, or concerns, please reply to the 
list! Should this update meet with community approval, I hope to begin 
the switchover around midnight on October 31st, as a way of tempting fate.

Thanks,
Matt


[MCN-L] barrier free wifi

2013-12-11 Thread Matt Morgan
Nik, the wifi doesn't add to this problem, right? I don't need your wifi 
to surf inappropriate sites in your public space.

On 12/11/2013 01:36 PM, Nik Honeysett wrote:
 Ours was rooted in legal, indemnifying the institution, we had a situation to 
 do with surfing inappropriate sites in a public space. Legal suit is a 
 generic problem for us - people only sue you if you have money.

 -Nik

 On Dec 11, 2013, at 10:27, Adam Carrier acarrier at marinersmuseum.org 
 acarrier at marinersmuseum.org wrote:

 We offer free and unrestricted WiFi to our patrons. There's no splash page
 or WiFi policy to get through. It's just easier for us to implement. The
 WiFi is on a commercial broadband account that's physically separate from
 our restricted office and server networks.

 *Adam Carrier*
 Web Manager
 (757) 952-0431
 acarrier at marinersmuseum.org

 *The Mariners' Museum and Park*
 100 Museum Drive
 Newport News, VA 23606

 https://10123.blackbaudhosting.com/10123/200


 On Wed, Dec 11, 2013 at 1:06 PM, Gordy, John J-Gordy at nga.gov wrote:

 Hello MCNers
 I've noticed a trend among a few museums where I can access the wifi
 without having to agree to a wifi policy. It makes the whole process so
 much easier. I'd like to pitch the idea that we might do this here and it
 would help if I could come armed with a list of museums already doing it.
 If your museum has barrier free wifi could you email me directly or
 respond to the list?
 Thank you
 John Gordy
 Web Manager
 National Gallery of Art
 202.842.6872



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Re: MCN-L Digitization procedures

2006-01-18 Thread Matt Morgan




Amalyah Keshet wrote:

  
  
  
  Mike:
  
  What application are you using to generate
derivatives "on the fly"? Can you tell us more about this?
  
  Amalyah Keshet

One approach is to script ImageMagick (http://www.imagemagick.org/), a
free image conversion/resizing/manipulation tool. Actually at least one
of the big enterprise DAMS just uses ImageMagick as a module.

  
  
  
-
Original Message - 
From:
Mike
Rippy 
To:
mcn-l@mcn.edu

Sent:
Friday, January 06, 2006 4:25 PM
Subject:
Re: MCN-L Digitization procedures


Oh, by the way.Our plan here for our collection photography
is to store theraw file, create a master tif file (that has been
corrected for dust, color, etc.)and from that make various jpg
derivitives (as needed). However, do to storage space limitations, we
are considering using a new system thatuses an application togenerate
derivatives on "the fly" to be delivered to our users. Saving the cost
of storing each derivative file.

We also keep each file seperated in a folder for that file
type, raw, tif, jpg_screen, jpg_thumb.

Be sure to pay close attention to you naming conventions also,
http://www.tasi.ac.uk/advice/creating/filenaming.html.
This is also covered in the National Archives guidelines.

Mike.

 m...@concretecomputing.com 12/27/2005 9:54 PM 

There's probably no perfect way
to store images on a filesystem, so maybe it should just come down to
personal preference. Unless you need specific security settings--for
example, so some people can see/edit some files but not others. In that
case, you might want to build the arrangement to mirror the security
arrangement, which will make setup easier, and corrections a lot
easier. There might also be other factors like that, that I'm not
thinking of. Anyone else?

The "right" way to store images is in some kind of databasing system
that keeps image metadata alongside the image files so that you can
always find them again by working your way down a hierarchical tree
(bad but demonstrative example: Paintings--19th
Century--Impressionism--American--Cassatt, Mary--The Cup of Tea) or by
searching according to subject, artist, media, title, etc. It's hard to
impossible to duplicate that with directories on disk and maintain it
reliably. These syst ems go all the way from $0 to high six figures in
cash, and take significant effort and time to implement and maintain.

good luck,
Matt

Perian Sully wrote:

  
  
  Hi all:
  
  I'm currently developing our
digitization procedures and I was wondering what other institutions do
to organize their content. I'm planning on photographing identification
 database images in a fairly high resolution jpg and photograph in
RAW for publication-quality. Once the images are downloaded, I'll be
processing them in small, medium and large dpi (72/150/?) and saving
the original. What I'm really sort of curious about is how many
different file sizes people save in and if they keep file directories
for each size or lump them all together.
  
  Hope you're all having some
relaxing holidays!
  
  Perian Sully
Collection Database and Records Administrator
Judah L. Magnes Museum
2911 Russell Street
Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 549-6950 ext. 335
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Re: MCN-L Digitization procedures

2005-12-27 Thread Matt Morgan




There's probably no perfect way to store images on a filesystem, so
maybe it should just come down to personal preference. Unless you need
specific security settings--for example, so some people can see/edit
some files but not others. In that case, you might want to build the
arrangement to mirror the security arrangement, which will make setup
easier, and corrections a lot easier. There might also be other factors
like that, that I'm not thinking of. Anyone else?

The "right" way to store images is in some kind of databasing system
that keeps image metadata alongside the image files so that you can
always find them again by working your way down a hierarchical tree
(bad but demonstrative example: Paintings--19th
Century--Impressionism--American--Cassatt, Mary--The Cup of Tea) or by
searching according to subject, artist, media, title, etc. It's hard to
impossible to duplicate that with directories on disk and maintain it
reliably. These systems go all the way from $0 to high six figures in
cash, and take significant effort and time to implement and maintain.

good luck,
Matt

Perian Sully wrote:

  
  
  
  Hi all:
  
  I'm currently developing our
digitization procedures and I was wondering what other institutions do
to organize their content. I'm planning on photographing identification
 database images in a fairly high resolution jpg and photograph in
RAW for publication-quality. Once the images are downloaded, I'll be
processing them in small, medium and large dpi (72/150/?) and saving
the original. What I'm really sort of curious about is how many
different file sizes people save in and if they keep file directories
for each size or lump them all together.
  
  Hope you're all having some relaxing
holidays!
  
  Perian Sully
Collection Database and Records Administrator
Judah L. Magnes Museum
2911 Russell Street
Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 549-6950 ext. 335
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Re: [MCN-L] Linux or Windows Servers?

2005-12-09 Thread Matt Morgan




Perian Sully wrote:

  
  
  
  Hi all:
  
  We're ramping up to purchase a
server and several workstations for our new Collections database and we
have pro and con arguments for either Linux or Windows servers.
  
  Currently, we're leaning heavily
toward purchasing KE EMu for our database software.EMu can run on
either type of server. I personally have little knowledge of Linux, and
our IT consultants, when asked, said that "they could learn it."
However, I understand that Windows servers have more security issues
and are more prone to crashing than Linux servers, but Linux servers
are not as easy to set up.
  

You need good IT security no matter what OS your collections database
runs on. Linux is somewhat better than Windows, still, but either can
easily be configured badly. And OS X was recently added to the SANS Top
20 list (http://www.sans.org/top20/)--mostly as a caution, in response
to growing threats, but it's no panacea against the need to do security
properly. 

The question is, what kind of decision are you making? If EMu supports
Windows and Linux, then the selection of EMu should not be a deciding
factor in any OS decision. Will you hold them to a lower standard of
support, simply because you chose Windows? You shouldn't. Will you
excuse crashing and security breaches on a Windows server, because your
consultants said Linux was more reliable and secure? You shouldn't.

On the other hand, if you are trying to make a strategic decision about
moving to Linux in whole or in part, then this issue might be a factor
in that decision. But, in the absence of a strategic decision on your
part to switch or broaden your OS choices, I would not recommend
switching from your strengths.

Good luck,
Matt



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Re: [MCN SIG: Digital Media] Uniiversal Photographic Digital ImagingGuidelines

2005-11-29 Thread Matt Morgan




Tim Au Yeung wrote:

  Couple of thoughts here:

  
  
I read through the UPDIG recommendations and found it really interesting 
and helpful. I thought their recommendation for RAW format was 
relatively unconvincing, though. Almost like they were saying "we want 
to recommend RAW format, but we realize you're going to convert them 
anyway, at least until the DNG format is widely-supported." Their best 
arguments for RAW applied to oddball cameras--which to me is an argument 
not to buy an oddball camera. Is anyone behaving differently, and 
storing files in RAW (but not also storing in TIFF)? I think, although 
I'm not sure, that the UPDIG Working Group has more faith in RAW than 
the museum and library worlds do.

  
  
We generally store tiffs as our archival masters but we don't throw out
device-specific files either (RAW being one of them). From a photographer's
perspective (putting on a different hat for a moment), the RAWs hold so much
valuable information that gets lost in the conversion that at long as
manufacturers are making RAWs available, they're keepers.

  
  
The other question I've been asking myself a lot lately, but haven't 
seen addressed much, is why not store files with some form of reversible 
compression like zip (or gzip or bzip2)? UPDIG doesn't address this 
(although it allows that compression is valuable and acceptable for 
delivery). ZIP (and bzip2 and gzip) is perfectly reversible, and it's 
tried and true. Why store 100Mb TIFF files when we could be storing 10Mb 
tiff.zip files? Has anyone out there opted to use reversible compression 
in digital repositories? If not, why not?

  
  
There are a couple of reasons why compression can be a bad thing. The first
is the issue of intermediary levels of complexity which add to the
preservation problem -- something that Howard Besser put forward in
discussions of preservation. The second is that most compression schemes are
proprietary and patented; the result being that they cannot be easily
implemented without cost. Zip is a good example of this -- it's based on the
LZW algorithm which until very recently (2004 I think) was held by Unisys.
It's only been in the last year that people could start thinking of using
the LZW algorithm freely.
  

So now we can begin compressing our TIFFs? The main reason I ask is
that I have heard a lot of really bad arguments against compression in
the past, and a lot of non-argument (for example: "it's just not
done"). I want to know what the good reasons against it are.

For a small museum especially, that might save hundreds of thousands of
dollars in storage by reversibly compressing RAW and TIFF files, and
therefore be able to preserve where otherwise it might not be able to
afford it, is compression acceptable? Or is it so unacceptable that
nobody should implement a repository with compression?




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Re: [MCN SIG: Digital Media] Uniiversal Photographic Digital ImagingGuidelines

2005-11-29 Thread Matt Morgan




Richard Urban wrote:

  Matt,

Generally compression isn't recommended for a few reasons.  While Zip and
LZW are fairly reliable compression algorithms, they add another layer of
complexity to the file.  

Understood--thanks to you and to Tim Au Yeung. 

  It's possible that the compression could make
unpacking them more difficult down the line.  I've  heard it suggested that
this is particularly true if there is some bit level corruption of the file,
which could cause the compression to fail. (comments from people who get
under the hood with files would be appreciated...sometimes I feel like these
are digital urban legends).  I'd be interested in seeing any hard data on
this. 
  

If there is such a problem, it would be in the different
implementations, not in the algorithm, which is mathematically perfect.
Perhaps nobody has gotten the hard data you're asking for, but if not,
it's probably only because other industries do not doubt the
reversibility of compression in the way we do. I mean, zillions of
files are compressed and uncompressed every day, and for years, almost
every PC hard drive was dblspaced or drvspaced. 

I understand that you're talking about problems not necessarily visible
to the eye, or that we just wouldn't worry about in a spreadsheet or
memo, but in demonstrated practice, common forms of reversible
compression are safe for files. Can I go on that? How much more
convinced can we get?

  
The other concern is over the patents held on both compression algorithms.
There was a time where the patent holders were attempting to claim control
over the patents, suggesting that you'd need a license to unpack your files
(or least the people making the software you use would).  These mostly seem
to have gone away, but the patents are still out there. Generally this is
why we've steered away from proprietary formats towards open standards.
  

I'm all for open standards, especially for museums and libraries--and
ZIP is at least as open (now) as most RAW formats. In any case, there
are other compression algorithms that are well-tested and more open
than ZIP has been in the past. So it just seems like this is a minor
issue compared to the complexity problem.

Thanks,
Matt

  
Richard Urban
Graduate School of Library and Information Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
rjur...@uiuc.edu


-Original Message-
From: Matt Morgan [mailto:m...@concretecomputing.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, November 29, 2005 10:39 AM
To: mcn-l@mcn.edu
Subject: Re: [MCN SIG: Digital Media] Uniiversal Photographic Digital
Imaging Guidelines

Newman, Alan wrote:

  
  
Curious coincidence. I just distributed this link today to my staff and I

  
  was preparing a post to MCN-L.  We've adopted most of these guidelines in my
division at the National Gallery.
  
  
 


  
  I'm curious to know which recommendations you haven't adopted ... let us
know!

I read through the UPDIG recommendations and found it really interesting and
helpful. I thought their recommendation for RAW format was relatively
unconvincing, though. Almost like they were saying "we want to recommend RAW
format, but we realize you're going to convert them anyway, at least until
the DNG format is widely-supported." Their best arguments for RAW applied to
oddball cameras--which to me is an argument not to buy an oddball camera. Is
anyone behaving differently, and storing files in RAW (but not also storing
in TIFF)? I think, although I'm not sure, that the UPDIG Working Group has
more faith in RAW than the museum and library worlds do.

The other question I've been asking myself a lot lately, but haven't seen
addressed much, is why not store files with some form of reversible
compression like zip (or gzip or bzip2)? UPDIG doesn't address this
(although it allows that compression is valuable and acceptable for
delivery). ZIP (and bzip2 and gzip) is perfectly reversible, and it's tried
and true. Why store 100Mb TIFF files when we could be storing 10Mb tiff.zip
files? Has anyone out there opted to use reversible compression in digital
repositories? If not, why not?

I realize that JPEG2000 would also solve the compression problem, but ZIP
ought to have less of an acceptance problem than JPEG2000 (as ZIP is already
so established).

Thanks,
Matt




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Re: [MCN SIG: Digital Media] Uniiversal Photographic Digital ImagingGuidelines

2005-11-29 Thread Matt Morgan




Matt Morgan wrote:

  
  
Richard Urban wrote:
  
Matt,

Generally compression isn't recommended for a few reasons.  While Zip and
LZW are fairly reliable compression algorithms, they add another layer of
complexity to the file.  
  
Understood--thanks to you and to Tim Au Yeung. 
  
It's possible that the compression could make
unpacking them more difficult down the line.  I've  heard it suggested that
this is particularly true if there is some bit level corruption of the file,
which could cause the compression to fail. (comments from people who get
under the hood with files would be appreciated...sometimes I feel like these
are digital urban legends). 
  

I misunderstood what you were saying here. Although maybe then zipping
will expose the bit-level corruption of the file, which would be nice
:-). But probably that's just a fantasy.

  
 I'd be interested in seeing any hard data on
this. 
  
  
If there is such a problem, it would be in the different
implementations, not in the algorithm, which is mathematically perfect.
Perhaps nobody has gotten the hard data you're asking for, but if not,
it's probably only because other industries do not doubt the
reversibility of compression in the way we do. I mean, zillions of
files are compressed and uncompressed every day, and for years, almost
every PC hard drive was dblspaced or drvspaced. 
  
I understand that you're talking about problems not necessarily visible
to the eye, or that we just wouldn't worry about in a spreadsheet or
memo, but in demonstrated practice, common forms of reversible
compression are safe for files. Can I go on that? How much more
convinced can we get?
  
The other concern is over the patents held on both compression algorithms.
There was a time where the patent holders were attempting to claim control
over the patents, suggesting that you'd need a license to unpack your files
(or least the people making the software you use would).  These mostly seem
to have gone away, but the patents are still out there. Generally this is
why we've steered away from proprietary formats towards open standards.
  
  
I'm all for open standards, especially for museums and libraries--and
ZIP is at least as open (now) as most RAW formats. In any case, there
are other compression algorithms that are well-tested and more open
than ZIP has been in the past. So it just seems like this is a minor
issue compared to the complexity problem.
  
Thanks,
Matt
  
Richard Urban
Graduate School of Library and Information Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
rjur...@uiuc.edu


-Original Message-
From: Matt Morgan [mailto:m...@concretecomputing.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, November 29, 2005 10:39 AM
To: mcn-l@mcn.edu
Subject: Re: [MCN SIG: Digital Media] Uniiversal Photographic Digital
Imaging Guidelines

Newman, Alan wrote:

  

  Curious coincidence. I just distributed this link today to my staff and I


was preparing a post to MCN-L.  We've adopted most of these guidelines in my
division at the National Gallery.
  

   



I'm curious to know which recommendations you haven't adopted ... let us
know!

I read through the UPDIG recommendations and found it really interesting and
helpful. I thought their recommendation for RAW format was relatively
unconvincing, though. Almost like they were saying "we want to recommend RAW
format, but we realize you're going to convert them anyway, at least until
the DNG format is widely-supported." Their best arguments for RAW applied to
oddball cameras--which to me is an argument not to buy an oddball camera. Is
anyone behaving differently, and storing files in RAW (but not also storing
in TIFF)? I think, although I'm not sure, that the UPDIG Working Group has
more faith in RAW than the museum and library worlds do.

The other question I've been asking myself a lot lately, but haven't seen
addressed much, is why not store files with some form of reversible
compression like zip (or gzip or bzip2)? UPDIG doesn't address this
(although it allows that compression is valuable and acceptable for
delivery). ZIP (and bzip2 and gzip) is perfectly reversible, and it's tried
and true. Why store 100Mb TIFF files when we could be storing 10Mb tiff.zip
files? Has anyone out there opted to use reversible compression in digital
repositories? If not, why not?

I realize that JPEG2000 would also solve the compression problem, but ZIP
ought to have less of an acceptance problem than JPEG2000 (as ZIP is already
so established).

Thanks,
Matt




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Re: subject keyword searching in CMS and DAMS

2005-11-17 Thread Matt Morgan
This looks like a great place to plug social tagging, (an approach to 
folksonomy, i.e., using popular terminology for subject 
categorization) like what STEVE (http://steve.museum) promises. 
Folksonomies are a way to address the reality that Museum and Library 
professionals often use subject categorizations that don't reflect the 
terms most people use when searching online. STEVE is an open-source 
tool for enabling social tagging of museum object images to create 
folksonomies.

Alongside the folksonomies, I still think it's worthwhile for museums to 
make their internal subject terms more public. Exposing the insides of 
the Museum in a demystifying, educational way is a great 
community-minded thing to do.

Deborah Wythe wrote:

 This doesn't make a lot of sense to me--why would museums not 
 publish subject terms in their web/public versions of the catalog? 
 Isn't the purpose of creating subjects/keywords to make the 
 collections more accessible --to everyone, not just inhouse users? 
 Museum staff are likely to be looking for a specific object and have 
 key data--title or accession numbers--but members of the public 
 (including picture researchers who might buy our images!) may want to 
 ask a system: show me all the cats.

 Deborah

 Original Message Follows
 From: JanaH jana.h...@cartermuseum.org
 Reply-To: mcn-l@mcn.edu
 To: mcn-l@mcn.edu
 Subject: RE: subject  keyword searching in CMS and DAMS
 Date: Wed, 16 Nov 2005 16:04:12 -0600

 Deborah,

 Museums don't always publish their subject cataloging to their websites.
 Usually only select fields are exported from the collection management
 system, and for several reasons, the subject fields don't make the cut.
 I think you'll find that the depth of information stored in collection
 management systems isn't really reflected in museum websites. So I guess
 what I'm saying is that just because you don't see it on the Web doesn't
 mean someone isn't recording that information.

 That said, I think most of us probably use a vocabulary based on the
 Getty Art  Architecture Thesaurus (AAT), with local terms added where
 necessary. We don't use LCSH because they are usually too
 conceptual/vague for our needs, but maybe someone else will weigh in on
 that?


 Jana Hill
 Collection Database Coordinator
 Amon Carter Museum
 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd.
 Fort Worth, Texas 76107
 817-989-5173
 817-989-5179 fax

 All opinions are my own and not those of my employer.




 -Original Message-
 From: Deborah Wythe [mailto:deborahwy...@hotmail.com]
 Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2005 2:12 PM
 To: mcn-l@mcn.edu
 Subject: subject  keyword searching in CMS and DAMS

 I'm curious to know if your museum assigns formal subject headings
 and/or
 keywords to works of art in their collections management or digital
 asset
 management systems. A little poking around on the Web seems to indicate
 it's
 not too common -- artist name, title, medium, collection, maybe a
 general
 category, yes, but something approaching the depth of the subject
 headings
 used in library catalogs--maybe no?

 If you do assign subject headings, which authorities are used -- LCSH?
 AAT?

 Thanks,
 Deborah

 Deborah Wythe
 Brooklyn Museum
 Head, Digital Collections and Services
 200 Eastern Parkway
 Brooklyn, NY 11238
 tel: 718 501 6311
 fax: 718 501 6125
 email: deborahwy...@hotmail.com





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Re: IT SIG -- Meeting followup

2005-11-11 Thread Matt Morgan




Thanks, Janice. I really enjoyed that meeting. Your questions make
excellent subject headings, so I just filled in some responses below!

Janice wrote:

  
  
  
  
  
  I would like to hear more
on the storage issues discussion;
big issues for everyone as the growing demands of digital images take
over the
servers. Does anyone restrict areas that digital images can be
stored? 
  

The plan at Brooklyn Museum was to force images into the new DAMS.
Saving of TIFF, etc., to the network drives was to be disabled.

In the IT SIG meeting, someone (forgive me, I didn't see you again
afterward!) mentioned that she saw this as a loss. I see the point, but
I don't think so. You're not just reducing duplication, you're
encouraging people to go to the primary image store and reuse the
better images that are already there. It saves people time, it results
in them using better images, and it should encourage adoption and
expertise in the DAMS, which will ultimately have benefits we can't
predict today. There's a positive feedback there that will result in a
net gain for all the staff, I'm pretty sure. Not to mention the
simplification on the storage side.

  
  Set folder limits?
Require periodic cleanup? What
works for you?
  

We had quotas on the network drives, and as you'd expect, when people
needed to make room it was all images taking up the space (and
Powerpoint files). Everybody hated the quotas, including those of us
who had to enforce them, but what else can you do? Running out of space
for real would be worse. I hope that moving to a DAMS and getting
images off the network drives will minimize this problem for them.

  
   Are you responsible for
these issues or do you have a records management,
visual resources, or other department who takes care of that?
  

Brooklyn Museum reorganized a new department, from Rights  Repro,
Photography, etc. to handle the DAMS. I think it's a profession unto
itself, so if you can do that it's the right thing to do. Photography
was already going all digital, which made it a lot easier
(inevitable?), and we had an excellent staff member (Deborah Wythe,
formerly the Museum Archivist) ready for new challenges, who was the
right person to take over. 

Everything won't come together like that in every museum, and there are
some places that are opting to keep DAM in IT.

  
   
  
  How do you backup all
that stuff? Full vs. incremental
backup -- pros and cons? Do you use tapes, hard drive, DVDs, or
Internet Services?
  

The plan at Brooklyn was to use nightly disk-to-disk, which may be the
only method fast enough to keep up during the intense parts of the
initial project, and then to back up the disk backup to tape (which I
think was LTO3, if that's the newest kind of LTO). Generally we
preferred differentials to incrementals, since they can make big
restores a lot easier, so the tape backup would probably be nightly
differentials and weekly or bi-weekly fulls. All this adds up to a ton
of cost--the equipment, the time, the tapes. 

I was just pricing Internet live backup. US Data Trust is among the
better ones, but is expensive
(http://www.usdatatrust.com/service/pricing.asp). It might be worth it,
if you could really put a price on the time (in addition to the
materials  equipment), and if you can therefore avoid paying for
some other off-site storage. But they don't even list prices for the
quantities an average museum would require in a DAMS. And bandwidth is
a problem, I think--it's live, over-the-Internet backup, which is
fantastic, but when you're taking 100MB files with a fancy camera just
50 pics a day would eat up about 9 hours on a T1. Basically, they seem
like they're about backing up regular files, not high-quality images. 

Museums can usually do well with being a little bit behind the
technology curve. Not so, apparently, when it comes to image storage
and backup. Unless, of course, we switch to JPEG2000 or become more
comfortable with other kinds of reversible compression.

  
  
What else would you like to know?
  

Given the high cost of the commercial DAMS solutions, who's interested
in a more low-key (but still high-tech) open source or anyway very
customized approach? I think that actually relatively little separates
the $15K products from the $100K products, and there's room for
low-cost products to do all the important things right, while maybe
leaving out some of the glitz.

--Matt




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Re: Authenticity and integrity of archived digital master files

2005-07-05 Thread Matt Morgan
On 07/03/2005 10:55 AM, Real, Will wrote:

Dear list,
 
We are about to implement a new strategy for archiving our digital image 
masters. One copy of each file will be maintained on a live RAID server and 
another on an off-line hard drive stored off-site. The access to the on-line 
masters will be very restricted; nonetheless we are concerned about two 
things: guaranteeing the authenticity of the master file, and monitoring the 
masters for any possible degradation.
 
Up to now we had been using offline CDR for master image storage. We had been 
burning the MD5 checksums of all of the images onto their CD to enable future 
monitoring of the integrity of the file. The idea was that we would 
periodically scan the CDs to detect any changes in the MD5 checksum, which we 
thought would be indicative of some degradation and therefore a signal to 
migrate the data to another medium. What we did not have was a manageable and 
affordable procedure for monitoring the MD5 checksums for thousands of files 
on hundreds of CDs. [We were not so worried about authenticity since we had 
read-only files on the CD. Now however it is more of a concern because in 
theory, though access to the files will be restricted, someone could in fact 
replace the original file with an altered one].
 
Now that the files will be stored on the server, we envision some kind of 
automated monitoring of the MD5 checksums. We picture an application running 
in the background, or running on a schedule (nightly, weekly, etc.)  that 
compares current checksums to the checksums originally recorded and stored in 
a database, and reports in a log any mismatches. The same application could 
perform this analysis on the files stored on off-line hard drives as well.
 
We are currently using an image browser called ThumbsPlus (version 7) which, 
among other things, creates reference thumbnails and stores MD5 checksum 
values in its back-end database, written in MS Access. It could be that with 
these MD5 values stored in the image browser database, we are part-way 
there--we have the first half of the equation. (I think the new Photoshop CS2 
file browser, and perhaps many of the other image browsers like Cumulus or 
Portfolio do the same thing)
 
Do any of you have a system of the kind we are envisioning? Is there any 
off-the-shelf software that does this? Absent a pre-existing application, 
would any of you be interested in sharing the cost of developing something 
like this?
  

It sounds like a perl script, running on schedule, could do it and that
shouldn't be expensive to develop. Perl can read and write to MDB
(Access) files, and it can do checksums. I would have it store its own
history of stored checksums, so that it's not only comparing to the
original value--at Brooklyn Museum, at least, there will always be
some people who'd have rights to bother replace the image, and change
the original stored checksum value. And you should burn the checksum
history to CD or otherwise store it in a form that's hard to alter, but
easy to access should you suspect tampering.


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Re: mcn-l providing Internet access in public spaces

2005-07-01 Thread Matt Morgan
Bill, we have done this. I recommend:

1) run the public side on completely separate segment of your firewall.
We also use the same segment for some in-gallery kiosks and other public
stations (learning center, library catalog, etc.--some of these are
wired, some wireless), and for staff access to internal resources vis
VPN. A 3-for-1 deal! (I don't mean to sound sarcastic--really this was
all pretty cheap, considering the return).
2) use some kind of traffic shaping/QOS on your firewall to guarantee
the public segment does not eat up more of your bandwidth than your
private network needs. Cisco, Netscreen, etc. can all do this. There are
great, clever ways to do it so that the public side can get a lot more
when the private side is quiet--that is, you're not just setting a
limit, you're setting policies.
3) Use the NoCat captive portal (http://nocat.net/) between your public
users and the firewall to handle auth. We don't require user accounts
and login, but we require anonymous agreement to an acceptable-use
policy once every four hours. Our AUP is straight from NYCWireless.net,
who had it written for general use by some expensive lawyers. I can't
find it now but I'll send it to you when I get a chance to get on the
wireless and copy it.
4) limit tcp/udp port access very sparingly. We disallow 25 (SMTP)
because the anti-spam blocklists complained, immediately, about all the
viro-spam our users were broadcasting. Yuck. We also block the MS-SQL
ports because the slammer/blaster worms are still out there and no
end-user needs those ports anyway. Apart from that, I think it's all
open. Just like their connections at home :-).
5) We wrote very limited end-user instructions available at our front
desk, but you know how it goes: if they need the instructions, it's not
going to work. Just set it up so it works the most common way (no MAC
filtering, no encryption, broadcast SSID--as open as possible), so what
they know already will work for them. Once in a great while we get
somebody asking a question of our front-desk staff. You might get more
users than we do but I doubt this will be a problem.
6) Information capture is possible as part of the NoCat auth. We decided
not to do it, except via web logs in the most anonymous way. But I bet
you'll get more users than we do, since you have a more central
location, so it may be more worthwhile for you (now, if we could just
sell coffee in our new entranceway ...). We could collect email
addresses, and we should direct people to our email list signup, but we
just wanted this to be a gift, ultimately. We might change our minds one
day.
7) The only hardware we use that we didn't already have was this little
solid-state computer that we run the NoCat portal on. It runs
PebbleLinux (a very small distro developed for these applications:
http://nycwireless.net/tiki-index.php?page=PebbleLinux) off a CF card,
so it's fast, simple, and secure. Ours is just put together from parts,
but you can buy them now pre-made at places like acrosser.com and
metrix.net. Or you could equally well run Pebble, or whatever other
distro, on some surplus PC. NoCat is written in perl so it's pretty
portable.

I can get you more detail off-list. Good luck!

--Matt

On 06/29/2005 12:38 PM, Weinstein, William wrote:

We are considering creating some public hotspots (@ entrances and in
cafeteria) for our visitors to use.  We have some evening and other programs
where that kind of access would be seen as a service.  Right now we are not
considering a charge but that is still undecided.  We have a T-1 that we can
dedicate to this project and we have spare network capacity so we can
connect these areas on their own physical network.  We have wireless in some
back office areas and in storage so this is not a quesion on how to set up
wireless access.  My questions are aimed at anyone who has done this for
public spaces and if they have suggestions on how that set-up needs to
differ. Do we require logins or registration, what info if any do we
capture?  Has anyone developed end user instructions to help visitors
connect?  Have there been any issues with staff having to service visitors
attempting to connect?  Has anyone developed any disclaimer language on the
use of the service? Does anyone have any recommendations of hardware and
software?

Thanks to all.

Bill

  
 


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Re: MCN-L subject lines (was Electronic Signs)

2005-06-10 Thread Matt Morgan
On 06/09/2005 01:29 PM, Peter Rooney wrote:

 Could I make a suggestion? I'm on the MCN-L mail list, and some of the
 traffic is useful to me (but Electronic signs is not,).  I'd
 appreciate if people would attach the prefix  MCN-L to their posts,
 as I've done above, so that one can see at a glance who the source is.
 Otherwise, in a time of spam, worthy messages have a real chance of
 being overlooked. I believe the listowner could arrange to have this
 prefix added automatically.

Some kind of message filtering on your end is the better way to do this;
my filters look for mcn-l@mcn.edu in the Reply-To: and move those
messages into an MCN folder.


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Re: Electronic signs

2005-06-08 Thread Matt Morgan
On 06/08/2005 10:47 AM, Weinstein, William wrote:

We are looking into renovations of our information desk and want to explore
the possibility of using electronic signs for visitor information, tours,
lectures, etc.  We have grand plans that include creating a sign that will
require multiple monitors and we would eventually like this information to
be available in multiple locations.  

At this stage I would be interested in anyone's experience in developing
this type of system.  What hardware and software was used.  What
infrastructure issues needed to be addressed.  What existing content
resources were used or developed to provide the information sources for the
signs.   You all get the idea.
  

For our new lobby, we installed LED signs (a la Jenny Holzer, but with
the newer blue LEDs) around our circular admissions desk, over the coat
check, and between brick piers by the front entrance. The standard
interface to these was a super-old-fashioned, desktop app connecting
over RS-232 to the signs. It looked like HyperTerminal and it require
that the operator memorize a series of arcane command strings.
Unrealistic. We bought serial to Ethernet adapters, used firewalling and
IP restrictions for security (passwords are clear-text), and set up a
web-based app on our intranet to replace the subset of the control
interface that we needed. It's just a series of web forms, providing an
interface to server-side scripts that send command strings according to
the format the signs expect. It can happen on schedule (the texts are
mostly pre-defined), or the Visitor Services and Security departments
can set up special messages, as needed. Apart from the fun of using a
modern, purely web-based interface to control ancient technology, this
was all sort of strange. It was a design decision to go with the LED
signs, not a technical decision.

Second, in much smaller and more temporary installations that what you
may be talking about, we've used our Open Kiosk software
(http://www.mozdevgroup.com/clients/bm/) to display banners/flash
movies/etc. delivered from a web server. In this way you could use
standard, off-the-shelf parts, and pretty basic web programming, but
you'd be limited by the number of monitors you can plug into one
computer or by the number of computers you want to deal with. The web
display might also be limiting, depending on what you were trying to do
(e.g., Douglas Hegley's requirement that they be able to play same or
unique information on every screen; and coordinating the
displays--sequencing them, for example--might be very hard).

I have no experience with any standard way to do this, and I'd be
curious to know how it's done on a larger scale. So Douglas Hegley's
response was very interesting. How do the buildings in Times Square do it?

Good luck,
Matt


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Re: Podcasting - Recreating the Museum Tour

2005-05-31 Thread Matt Morgan

On 05/28/2005 04:23 PM, amalyah keshet wrote:

...The exchange sounded a lot more like MTV than Modern Art 101, but 
...it had a few things to recommend it. It was free. It didn't involve 
the museum's audio device, which resembles a cellphone crossed with a 
nightstick. And best of all, it was slightly subversive: an 
unofficial, homemade and thoroughly irreverent audio guide to MoMA, 
downloaded onto her own iPod...


...Specifically, these museum guides are an outgrowth of a recent 
podcasting trend called sound seeing, in which people record 
narrations of their travels - walking on the beach, wandering through 
the French Quarter - and upload them onto the Internet for others to 
enjoy. In that spirit, the creators of the unauthorized guides to the 
Modern have also invited anyone interested to submit his or her own 
tour for inclusion on the project's Web site, mod.blogs.com/art_mobs 
http://mod.blogs.com/art_mobs...


http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/28/arts/design/28podc.html


How long before we see the new business model: a community web site for 
user-supplied tour uploads and free redistribution (ad-supported of 
course) of audio tours for museums, tourist destinations, etc.?


It would be nice to see a museum web site offer this service for its 
visitors. Was it on Gail Durbin's list of 50 ways for a museum site to 
be two-way? We had a little system crash last week and I haven't had a 
chance to read it yet. Or is anyone already doing this? I have always 
hoped that our PocketMuseum project would be used not just on the 
handhelds we supply, but also on visitors' own web-enabled handhelds. 
But there are a lot more mp3 players out there than web-enabled 
handhelds (for now). This would be a much quicker path to getting 
visitors to take advantage of their own devices.


--Matt


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Re: Software Question

2005-04-19 Thread Matt Morgan

On 04/19/2005 09:45 AM, Goral, Becky wrote:

I was wondering if anyone is using any type of software program to 
track/log exhibition tasks and schedules.  For example, we are looking 
for something that includes which person is responsible for painting 
pedestals as well as a start and finish date for that task.  We would 
also like to log when the art arrives, the installation and 
de-installation of it, who is hanging it, etc.  Additionally, it 
should be able to include curators and curatorial assistants tasks 
related to the exhibition.


I asked our Vice-Director of Operations what he does. He uses 
MS-Project, and he said:


This is about the way I use [MS Project]; only I do not program the 
individuals. I have the number of men (resources) and the time allowed 
to do the job. All of it is reviewed on the Gantt Chart which I use to 
plan my manpower resources. It is possible to do what you are asking; 
but I would go into those details only if I had 30 or more people to 
schedule. With 3 or 4 people per shop, it is more important to schedule 
to windows for the shops rather than the individuals.


By shop he means carpentry, electricians, engineers, painters, etc.

FYI, there is a free, open-source analog to MS-Project called Planner 
(http://www.imendio.com/projects/planner/). I use it and it seems very 
similar to MS-Project to me, but I'm not an expert in either. I've been 
hoping to switch some of our Project users to Planner; they're expecting 
the Windows port to come out in a few weeks (no Mac ports planned, as 
far as I know).




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Re: Ineractive sites

2005-03-22 Thread Matt Morgan

On 03/18/2005 08:42 AM, Gail Durbin wrote:


Can anyone suggest any good museum websites in North America where there
are examples of visitors' art work or other creative activity?  I am
also interested in innovative message boards and chat rooms run by
museums.
Gail Durbin
Head of VA Online
g.dur...@vam.ac.uk


http://basquiatonline.org



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Re: 2005 MUSE awards deadline extended

2005-01-27 Thread Matt Morgan

Maybe he knows how lazy we can all be.

On 01/27/2005 05:49 PM, su...@wisegirl.net wrote:


Is this because there were not many entries?

 Original Message 
From: guenter_wai...@notes.rlg.org
To: mcn-l@mcn.edu
Subject: RE: 2005 MUSE awards deadline extended
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 13:47:28 -0800

 





Posted on behalf of Muse Awards Chair Phyllis Hecht... - Günter

***

The 2005 MUSE awards deadline has been extended until Friday,
February 4,
2005!


Apply online at http://www.mediaandtechnology.org/muse/


For more information, consult the committee's Web site at
http://www.mediaandtechnology.org


Entry fees:
$50.00 for Media and Technology committee members per entry
$100.00 for all other AAM members per entry


We look forward to your entries!


Thanks,

Phyllis Hecht
Muse Awards Chair
m...@mediaandtechnology.org




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Re: OpenKiosk (was MozillaKiosk)

2004-12-30 Thread Matt Morgan

On 12/29/2004 10:11 AM, mvol...@fruitlands.org wrote:

Thanks Matt. Its nice to see OpenKiosk on mozdev.org. 
 


My pleasure!

For comparasin, here is a link to a kiosk chrome I developed for our kiosks. We've used this on both linux and wondows platforms. 
http://wiki.mozdev.org:8080/cgi-bin/mozdev-wiki.pl?KioskProject/VolmarSetup
 

How cool. We did know about that effort, but I had no idea it came from 
another museum. Good work!


I think developing kiosk applications using mozilla XULs is a good way to go. Once the basic kiosk interface is set up, the rest of the development is largely standard web programming technologies. I dont remember exactly but I think Matt uses a client-server model. 

Right. There are a few benefits for us, relative to a kiosk with a local 
http server: in short, they are a) centralized management; b) the 
clients are all nearly identical and thus easier to replace/swap; c) we 
can take advantage of external online resources (which we can manage 
using blacklisting/whitelisting in OpenKiosk).



Our smaller museum is not networked in all exhibit halls.
 

We're not either! We have switch cabinets and a backbone throughout the 
building, though, so we pay only about $200 for an ethernet cable--which 
does not add much to the cost of a kiosk. That's easily worth it, 
considering the benefits, especially the labor-savings. If we had not 
had the luxury of installing a modern network backbone a few years ago, 
this would be harder. But wireless is an option.


The beauty of using mozilla as a program platform is that you can enable server side scripting and database functionality - even on stand alone machines. On linux this is a little easier since you can automatically install an apache webserver with php and mySQL. Using php triad or easy php on windows can achieve the same result. 

I also recommend xampp.org (apache, MySQL, php, perl, plus great config 
tools), which is similar and runs on Mac, Windows, and Linux.



Each OS has its own keyboard issues.

It would be great to hear about your non-stnadard keyboard vendors Matt.
 

Here's a list of links from some places we've tried. They all sell 
tamper-proof, spill-proof, panel-mountable (so you can build them into a 
desk) keyboards. Not all of their models are shown on these pages; you 
may have to call to ask about keyboards lacking problem keys.


http://www.stealthcomputer.com/peripherals_oem.htm
http://www.input-tech.com/
http://www.ikey.com/

There is some overlap between them because, we think, Stealth is a 
vendor while iKey and Input-Tech are manufacturers.


Thanks,
Matt



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OpenKiosk (was MozillaKiosk)

2004-12-23 Thread Matt Morgan
The MozillaKiosk that I announced last month has been renamed OpenKiosk 
and is now an official Mozilla Extension! So this is a good time to do a 
little bit more of a write-up for the people who a) had trouble getting 
it working, or b) had more general questions, or c) didn't even try it :-(.


This message is, first, an announcement of the official release of 
OpenKiosk under the Mozilla Public License (MPL), and second, a short 
intro to the installation and configuration of OpenKiosk. Part two follows.



INSTALLATION

First, install Mozilla itself 
(http://www.mozilla.org/products/mozilla1.x/). You only need the browser 
component, but it won't hurt to install the mail/news components as 
well. OpenKiosk doesn't work on Firefox.


Next, install the official Mozilla extension jslib 
(http://mozdevgroup.com/products/), an API for Mozilla-based application 
development with javascript that you can get at


https://addons.update.mozilla.org/extensions/moreinfo.php?application=mozillaid=257vid=1351 



Finally, install the OpenKiosk extension:

https://addons.update.mozilla.org/extensions/moreinfo.php?application=firefoxid=417vid=1353 



CONFIGURATION/USAGE

Once OpenKiosk is installed, you can run it with

mozilla -kiosk

at whatever kind of prompt (CMD on Windows, terminal session on Mac or 
Linux) your computer uses. That will give you the basic idea. Our actual 
kiosks work by forcing this command to run at startup.


Then, log in under an account with administrative privileges (like root 
in Linux or OS X, or any local or domain admin user under Windows) and run


mozilla -kiosk admin

(the default password is 'admin'; you can change it in the admin 
options) and that will get you the admin configuration window. Paging 
through here and trying a few different settings will really explain things.


A FEW IMPORTANT NOTES

1) OpenKiosk makes several assumptions about the physical nature of the 
kiosk computer and hardware--for example, the keyboard can't have an Alt 
key (or you could Alt-Tab, Ctrl-Alt-Backspace, or Ctrl-Alt-Del and get 
out of the kiosk session). Ctrl is also problematic, independent of Alt. 
You can disable key combinations in the OS, but it's platform-dependent, 
confusing for users when keys don't work, and generally a big hassle. If 
you're having trouble finding keyboards that will work for you, email 
me. There are a few manufacturers that we like.


2) OpenKiosk disables right-clicking, since the Save As option or other 
items that open dialogs, for example, would confuse everything (and give 
access to the filesystem and potentially, to the OS). Use touch-screen 
monitors and/or a keyboard with a built-in one-button trackball.


3) The next feature we're working on is a way to set some pages to be 
full-screen with NO buttons or widgets, while other pages show some 
buttons and widgets (Home, Back, etc.). This will accommodate attract 
screens, which shouldn't have home and back buttons, for example, even 
when the following pages might need them. This seems really obvious, now 
... oops.


4) This is open source software. If there's something you don't like 
about OpenKiosk, or that you think is missing, please email me, and/or 
write a comment for the extension page. Better yet, please consider 
doing it yourself, or paying someone to do it! We worked with 
MozDevGroup (http://www.mozdevgroup.com) and they have been fantastic.


5) For more on the story of the development of OpenKiosk, and a few more 
details about usage, see http://mozdevgroup.com/clients/bm/ .

-

So give it a try, and happy holidays!

Thanks a lot,
Matt


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Re: Announcing PocketMuseum(TM) Digital Guides

2004-11-05 Thread Matt Morgan

On 11/04/2004 05:55 PM, Randy Heise wrote:


Matt

We've been playing with the same idea but have hesitated due to a perceived
problem with the cost of ownership of the handhelds. 

It's not just a perception, but a reality :-). We bought off-the-shelf 
Dell hardware with the full replacement warranty. So we're somewhat 
protected, and based on conversations with SFMOMA and a couple other 
places, we don't expect terrible trouble with people dropping them and 
breaking them, etc. But we do intend to keep an eye on this, very 
carefully, and if we decide to do this long-term we will have to replace 
the handhelds eventually.



Currently, we're
constantly retrieving what's left of cameras and cell phones from our
various animal exhibits (amazing what an otter can do to a cell phone in 30
seconds!!) 


Sounds really cute, actually! I hope it wasn't your phone.


and are afraid that the cost of PDA ownership/replacement would
be too great. 

In most cases, I think content development is going to be more expensive 
than the hardware. Not that the hardware cost is negligible or anything. 
But these Dells, with WiFi built-in, lanyards, extra styluses, and the 
warranty, came in around $350 each. We bought 20 to start so that's well 
under $10,000. But we did all the content internally, and it was a ton 
of work. Had we contracted for help (writing, project management, 
editing), I could imagine spending many tens of thousands of dollars on 
that. And I don't know if we can keep doing it all internally, it's very 
time-consuming.



At this point we're approaching it from the standpoint of
wi-fi connection/content delivery to visitor owned PDAs/Phones to avoid the
cost of ownership of the device itself.
 

It will be only a matter of a couple years before most web browsing 
takes place on phones, handhelds, etc. I think you have the right idea 
here.



Look forward to hearing further developments with your pilot program.

 


I'll post again in a while, when we've gotten through the surveys, etc.

Thanks!



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Announcing Mozilla Kiosk

2004-11-04 Thread Matt Morgan
I'm thrilled to announce the public release of Mozilla Kiosk, developed 
jointly by Brooklyn Museum and Mozdev Group. Mozilla Kiosk is an 
extension to the Mozilla web browser that enables a secure kiosk mode. 
Although it may not be clear in the docs, this is a GPL release of the 
software and you can use and distribute the software as you would any 
other GPL-licensed code. Find the extension, a small related dependency, 
and a description of the features of Mozilla Kiosk at


http://www.mozdevgroup.com/clients/bm/

(one day this will be an official Mozilla extension, available in the 
official extensions area, but that process takes a while). We developed 
Mozilla Kiosk because there's no other really good kiosk browser, and 
everything we do, we do in a browser. Mozilla Kiosk, I can say 
confidently, is the best, most useful kiosk-mode browser available 
today. We already use it in many, many places, such as


1) actual gallery kiosks
2) learning center computers
3) library web terminals
4) terminal server sessions

(basically, anywhere that's anonymous, public, semi-public, and/or 
shared, or that requires special security precautions).


The easy way to try it is to

a) install Mozilla (1.7 or newer)
b) click on the links on the above page to install the two extensions 
you need.


So try it out and let me know what you think!

Thanks,
Matt Morgan
Manager of Information Systems
Brooklyn Museum




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Re: FTP alternative

2004-01-29 Thread Matt Morgan




There are a lot of web services out there that provide off-site
file-transfer and sharing. One that we've used a lot, both as "vendor"
and "customer," is http://filesdirect.com; http://xdrive.com is more or
less equivalent, though it works differently. I don't know about the
thumbnail capabilities, but I would expect someone offers that.

I would guess that Randy Heise's suggestion is going to be cheaper than
my suggestion, but maybe a little less user-friendly. It's probably
worthwhile to compare a little of each--for example, there are free web
server interfaces to ftp, like WebFtp (http://www.web-ftp.org), that
you could possibly have installed on your hosted ftp site, and that
would make it more user-friendly (if you think that matters).

At BMA we are actually taking Mia Ridge's advice (a CMS-based system)
for our PR dept., but dealing with a CMS is often a larger scale
issue--we already have one, and we're using it for lots of other
things, so it was an easy decision to integrate what they wanted into
an existing system.

Your IT department could set up an ftp server outside the firewall, or
on a restricted and isolated network segment, which would be the secure
way to handle this on-site; but that would be a lot of work for them
and I think, given that there are inexpensive and secure ways to pay
someone else to do this, they are doing the right thing by asking you
to handle it some other way.

--Matt

Christina DePaolo wrote:

  
  
  Hello,
  Wehave
had a longstanding request to build aFTP site forour PR department.
Our IT staff does not like FTP because of security issues. Is there an
alternative? Do any of you have software/tool
recommendations? We are a Windows shop. 
  
  FYI
-- here are some of the requirements:
  PR
staff can assign temporary and permanent log in and passwords
  PR
staff can post and delete files
  --
they would like a web interface so the press can see thumbnails
  
  I
am wondering how other museum IT/New Media shops deal with these
requests.
  
  Thank
you.
  
  Christina
DePaolo
  New
Media Manager
  www.seattleartmuseum.org
  
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Re: Archival fixed storage media

2003-11-18 Thread Matt Morgan
I'm coming at this from an IT perspective, rather than an archivist's 
perspective, or that of a Collections Specialist. I would hate to think 
that you're setting up a library of removable media, just because you're 
running out of space on the servers. In an honest comparison, it would 
be probably cheaper to install a new server with some digital repository 
software (DSpace, for example, but there some others) and tons of disk 
space than to set up a library of removable media and the related 
systems and equipment and people the library would require.


Whenever I think about this issue, hard disks seem like the best way to 
keep images, and not removing them from the server at all seems like the 
absolute best. In other words, I hope we can never have to remove our 
stored images from the servers. For these reasons:


   * Server disk space (while more expensive than cheap removable
 drives) is pretty cheap and continuing to get cheaper all the time.
   * You can easily back up your image DB occasionally, and send the
 tapes somewhere safe.
   * It takes effort not to lose track of a DVD or other removable
 media, if you're really using it, but you won't lose track of the
 server.
   * Distribution is simpler--people can get the images out of the db,
 instead of calling the DVD librarian.
   * It probably takes less space, and fewer people (you don't need a
 DVD librarian).
   * When you do have to migrate to new media, on-line disks are very
 fast and labor-unintensive, relative to removable media.

I know this isn't the question you're asking, Marla, but when the 
servers are filling up, and you have to change what you do, it's 
probably a good time to look at the whole IT picture and see what your 
IT department could be doing differently. Personally, given the fact 
that disk space is so cheap, I feel like it's my job as IT manager to 
make sure that BMA never runs out of it (while enforcing reasonable 
quotas and policies to make sure it's not wasted). Managing server space 
is definitely not free or simple, and removable media is a valid option 
at times, but maybe there is a better way to handle your server space 
than the way it's being done now.


Good luck,
Matt Morgan
Manager of Information Systems
Brooklyn Museum of Art


akes...@imj.org.il wrote:


Kodak doesn't make the Ultima Gold anymore. (That should give you an idea of 
the problem with digital storage media...)  Mitsui is now recommended.
The suggestion that removable HD is better sounds good to me.
There's a lot about this on the ImageLib listserv right now.

Just some hurried thoughts.

	-Original Message- 
	From: Misunas, Marla [mailto:mmisu...@sfmoma.org] 
	Sent:  ë 17/11/2003 22:06 
	To: mcn-l@mcn.edu 
	Cc: 
	Subject: Archival fixed storage media




Hi everyone,

	 


At SFMOMA we are beginning to archive some large raw image files (our 
servers are getting full) and are looking to tap into your 
information/experience on the elusive question of which fixed storage media we 
should use -- now.  Should we use Kodak ��s Gold Ultima?  Should we use DVD?  
Does anyone have information on predicted longevity for DVD?  Is there a 
specific type of DVD we should use?  Is there an archival alternative to DVD?  
Which different redundant media storage formats are recommended?  Does anyone 
(really) migrate their fixed media every few years?  Any issues about migration 
we should look out for?

	 


We ��ve tossed these questions around for quite a while and we are 
familiar with many resources (such as the Colorado Digitization Program) but as 
our field is always updating itself, I wanted to check in on any current 
thinking/research, etc.

	 

	Thanks so much for any ideas or suggestions. 

	 


Marla Misunas

Collections Information Manager

Collections Information and Access

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

(415) 357- 4186 (voice)

(415) 947-1186 (fax)

www.sfmoma.org

___

Board Member, Museum Computer Network

Conference Co-Chair, Minneapolis 2004

www.mcn.edu

	 

	 

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Re: Subject categories for museum website

2003-03-26 Thread Matt Morgan

For a more fun/less academic approach you could use something like the
questions that Komar and Melamid used in their Most Wanted
Painting project, where they created desirable paintings based on
responses to survey questions like

What's your favorite color?
What's your second favorite color?
Do you prefer wild or domestic animals?
What size painting do you like?
etc. See
http://www.diacenter.org/km/
for links to the actual survey questions and images of the resulting paintings. Of course the paintings all ended up sort of funny, which was the point, but it would make a fun web project, to tie the questions to an actual collection. Or you could do it without the tongue-in-cheekness, although that might be harder.
At 11:15 AM 3/25/2003 -0800, you wrote:
Hi everyone,
At SFMOMA we are continuing to work on getting our collections information on-line. In the past, in addition to searchable label information in-house, we have used only the most basic keywords to identify objects, like painting, drawing, photograph. But we want to give visitors other ways into the collections and we could use some advice. 
Do you have broad categories that you use at the top level of your website's collections hierarchy? The ones that always come to mind are things like landscape, portrait, abstract; or religious art, historical scenes, etc.; but surely there's more creative thinking out there. Any comments or ideas are welcome, including ideas of other websites we might visit. thanks!
Marla Misunas
Manager, Collections Database
Collections Information and Access
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
415 357 4186 voice
415 947 1186 fax
http://www.sfmoma.org
Board Member, Museum Computer Network
Conference Chair, Las Vegas, 2003
http://www.mcn.edu

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ElcomSoft/DMCA verdict: not guilty

2002-12-17 Thread Matt Morgan

I don't know if this case has come up on MCN before. Basically, a
Russian software company wrote software, intended for sale, that cracks
the protection on Adobe's eBook format for digital books.
Apparently the technology for doing so is trivial. They were
prosecuted under the DMCA, but found not guilty today in San Jose,
CA. The long version of the story is at
http://rss.com.com/2100-1023-978176.html?type=ptpart=rsstag=feedsubj=news
One key, free-speech-affirming quote follows:
After much wrangling among attorneys over the definition of the
word 'willful,' the judge told jurors that in order to find the company
guilty, they must agree that company representatives knew their actions
were illegal and intended to violate the law. Merely offering a product
that could violate copyrights was not enough to warrant a conviction, the
jury instructions said.
Ultimately the jury believed ElcomSoft's story, that they had only
intended that the software be used on legally purchased eBooks--I
imagine,  for fair-use type purposes.



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Re: Voyager libraries museums

2002-08-16 Thread Matt Morgan
Hey, I know a little about Voyager.  We started working on it almost a year 
ago.  Ours is running Oracle on the back-end, so it can do anything Oracle 
can do, which is everything.  But that's for our library collection and 
processes.  For the rest of the collections, that is, the art, we use The 
Museum System (TMS), with MS-SQL 2000 on the back-end.  It can do anything 
MS-SQL can do--which is almost everything, if you can find the necessary 
add-on product, and stay within the licensing terms.


Unfortunately I have no current public addresses I can direct people to, 
but we've had lots of success using basic, standard cgi programming 
techniques to query data in either server.  In other words, we step outside 
the client software provided, and write our own simple web-based 
queries.  Once that's done, combining queries of two+ db's into one web 
form, and one returned results page, is trivial.


I should be clear that we make no attempts to modify data in either of 
these databases except via the standard client applications.  I believe, in 
the case of TMS, that would violate our licensing terms (in addition to 
being risky for the data, possibly).  Not so sure about Voyager, but I'm 
not anxious to try it.  In any case I can't think of any circumstances 
where you'd want a web visitor altering data in a Voyager db.


Perl, PHP, and tcl are what we've used.  In some most cases we run actually 
run SQL scripts that copy, overnight, the data from the servers into a 
database (PostgreSQL) on the web server, and query it from there.  That 
relieves some load on Voyager and TMS servers.   All the Cold Fusion-type 
middleware development systems have no trouble connecting to SQL servers, 
not to mention VB/ASP, Lotus Domino, Java, etc (if that's where you have 
expertise).  As long as you're SQL, this is not really the hard part, I 
don't think.


The hard part for us has been getting this stuff out to the public--we 
don't have a real web strategy worked out for how to present this 
data.  The librarians are doing a great job with their data, which is 
cleaner and more complete, and that may be out on the web soon.  Of course, 
looking for library books online is a proven crowd-pleasing service at this 
point.  The collections data isn't super-interesting for the general public 
right now (not much description, mostly just names  numbers, so to 
speak).  I don't think just making it all available for searching really 
serves some compelling public interest.  But on the intranet, of course, 
that's fine, that's exactly what the staff want.


--Matt


At 11:13 AM 8/16/2002 -0700, you wrote:

Hi Margaret,

like everybody else, I don't know anything about Voyager, but I do have an 
example of University Art Museum and Library collaboration. And of course 
it is my favorite example, because it is a project the Berkeley Art Museum 
is leading :-). Museums and the Online Archive of California (MOAC) 
provides fairly sophisticated integration of museum and library / archival 
collections through the use of various standards such as Encoded Archival 
Description (EAD), Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) and 
Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). The museum data gets integrated into a 
union database consisting of about 6000 collections from about 60 
repositories (libraries, archives, museums) statewide. You can check out 
the project and its documentation at http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu/moac/.


Cheers,
Guenter


Hello--

I was wondering if anyone working within a Museum collection has utilized
Voyager software to make their collections information accessible via the 
Web.

Any comments or info greatly appreciated!

And while I am at it, does anyone have any favorite examples of University
Museum and Library collections being linked so at least a basic search is 
done

across both collections?
Thanks!

Margaret Tamulonis
Project Manager
The Robert Hull Fleming Museum
University of Vermont
Burlington, Vermont


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--
~~~
Guenter Waibel
Berkeley Art Museum  Pacific Film Archive
Digital Media Developer http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu/
Digital Imaging SIG Chair, MCN http://www.mcn.edu/visig_subscribe.taf
guen...@uclink4.berkeley.edu
Phone   510-643-8655
Fax 510-642-4889
~~~

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Re: Online Catalogue Planning

2002-07-12 Thread Matt Morgan
I really wonder about user studies of searchable online collections.  I'm 
going to go out on a limb and predict that either no convincing studies 
have been done, or that most people don't really use them.


I spend a lot of time thinking about this, but I feel like I have yet to 
see a really interesting use for searchable online collections.  In my 
mind, they serve a narrow set of people, relative to the varieties of 
people the entire museum serves, and provide scant service to those 
people.  I'm sort of struck by Claudio's message, since I previously 
thought searchable online collections might at least serve academic 
purposes, but they don't help him, I guess.


It seems that nobody has addressed, online, the fact that a visit to a 
museum is an interactive social event that people conduct in the presence 
(either actual or implied) of several other kinds of people: experts, 
strangers, and friends.  I have not once seen any interesting interactive 
capabilities on a museum web site (discussion between visitors, 
ask-the-expert--to name a couple really obvious possibilities).  And the 
sort of mental exercise that a visitor goes through when faced with a 
challenging exhibit (why is this artwork here?  Who thought this was any 
good?  Why are those people over there reacting in that way to that artwork 
that had no effect on me?)--how is that even approached by a searchable 
online collection?  Outside the context of an exhibition, even with related 
descriptive information, artworks lose a lot of their impact.  Of course, 
they also lose a lot of their impact when reduced to digitized colors, a 
flat monitor, and the size of the computer screen (or less).


What kinds of people use searchable online collections?  For what 
purposes?  For the amount of money you can spend on this vs. the benefits, 
I'm more amazed how many museums have searchable online collections, than 
how many don't have them.  I'm not talking about for internal 
collections-related purposes, where there's tremendous value, but for 
viewing on the internet.


At 04:50 PM 7/11/2002 -0300, you wrote:

OK,
I'm researching about cybermuseu. There are many problems in those museus.
for exemplo: informations about objects, 3D in the objects. Those problems
are impossible to the master or doctor's study in museum.
Cláudio.
- Original Message -
From: stephanie_parr...@aismail.wustl.edu
To: mcn-l@mcn.edu
Sent: Wednesday, May 15, 2002 11:20 AM
Subject: Online Catalogue Planning



 Like the Cincinnati Art Musuem, the Gallery of Art at Washington
University
 in St. Louis is also in the planning stages of developing an online,
 searchable catalogue of its collection (we recognize we are behind the
 times).  I too am interested in learning about end-user studies and other
 helpful resources to guide us in the planning process.

 Stephanie Parrish

 Washington University Gallery of Art
 Saint Louis, Missouri 63130
 http://galleryofart.wustl.edu/


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