Re: [MCN-L] mcn-l Digest, Vol 114, Issue 8

2015-02-12 Thread Will Real
Carissa et al.,

Not sure I saw CCO, CDWA, AACR2, CONA, DNG, XMP, and a few personal
favorites (maybe a little obscure for this project), FRBR (and the verb
form FRBRize), LOCKSS and CLOCKSS. Don't forget the old standby RTFM, and
perhaps most relevant, PCMCIA (people can't memorize computer industry
acronyms).

Will
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[MCN-L] Color to Grayscale (mpara...@gallery.ca)

2013-05-21 Thread Will Real
Marianne, Kevin, et al.,

I've been following this discussion with interest.

I was involved in a large B+W negative scanning project starting back in
2003, and we debated this issue extensively. Back then, the cost of storage
was a significant factor. The images were to be 6000 pixels on the long
side, stored as 16-bit TIFFs in both unedited and edited versions, for each
of 80,000 negatives in the collection.

We decide to convert to grayscale not only because of the storage concerns,
but also because we concluded that it was most important to capture the
relative density values of the negative, the information on the negative
that enables the image to be rendered in positive form. For this purpose
grayscale is a reasonable analog for the actual density values in the
negative. The primary aim of the project was access to the images in
positive form, rather than capturing detailed characteristics of the
negatives themselves as physical objects. We ended up scanning the
negatives in RGB, and then converting to Grayscale in Photoshop, usually
with the Green channel, which generally had the best tonal characteristics
and the least scanner noise compared with the other color channels.

Some of the negatives had pink, blue, or yellow stains, originating in the
anti-halation layer of the negative. These negatives posed a further
dilemma. We did not want to lose the condition information because it might
be useful for future researchers. But we also did not want to memorialize
the staining as part of the positive image itself. In the end we decided
that in these cases we would convert to grayscale using the color channel
that mimimized the stain the most. This gave us a grayscale image that was
truest to the image represented by the negative. We also saved a
lower-resolution version of the scan in RGB, as a reference for the
condition aspects of the negative as a physical object.

There was a group of about 500 B+W prints in the collection. All of the
prints were scanned in RGB in order to preserve the color characteristics
of the prints. Even though the prints were all monochrome, very few were
strictly grayscale images.

If I were starting a project like this today, the storage issue would not
drive the decision at all. I think I would save the masters in RGB, and
when converting the images into positive form, I would probably only
convert to grayscale when the staining in the negatives would compromise
the accuracy of the positive image.

Will

PS for what it's worth, we also included with each negative scan a density
step-wedge reference. With these references it is possible to extrapolate
the actual densities present in the negative, rather than simply having the
relative densities represented as grayscale values.We considered storing
actual  densitometer measurements with the metadata, but the economics and
time constraints of the project did not allow it. So the step-wedges
offered a way to capture at least some useful density information much more
expediently.



On Sat, May 18, 2013 at 8:44 AM, Kevin Sprague kevin at studiotwo.com wrote:

 Marianne

 The simple answer to your question is that no - if you have a color image
 and you reduce it to grayscale you lose data - its that simple. Scanning or
 photographing in color is going to provide a greater range of options for
 data retrieval from an image over time than a greyscale image. It you want
 to see evidence of this for yourself, in photoshop open a color image and
 go to windowchannels - you will see the RGB color challens (assuming that
 you are in RGB color space) displayed in the palette. You can click on each
 of the channels and the image should show you just that channel - usually
 in greyscal - and you can see how the different color channels manage data
 independently. For instance, in many photographs, the luminance data -
 that is, the gradient of greys between Balck and White - is often very well
 represented in the Red channel. Often the blue channel will contain color
 noise  - the blue wavelength is difficult for modern sensors and scanners
 to capture but there may be critical picture information in this channel.
 You can play with combining channels and see what emerges.

 It your question regarding greyscale vs. color motivated by storage
 concerns? A greyscale image will contain only about 1/3 the data of the
 same RGB image and therefore takes up less storage space on hard drives.
 This used to be a consideration for insititutions but with the declining
 cost of storage and the availability of very large 2-3TB hard drives, the
 economic argument of storing large, high resolution images is ceasing to be
 an issue. At my business we maintain around 500,000 high res files on about
 10TB or storage and the overall cost is not much more than about $4,000 at
 this point, and dropping every day.

 So - the simple answer is - scan and shoot in color, save in the largest
 color range you can (i.e. 32bit vs 16bit), explore file formats 

[MCN-L] Job Postings: Rubin Museum of Art

2011-03-03 Thread Real, Will
Posted on behalf of someone who is not a list subscriber; see contact
information at end of each posting.

Head of IT Implementation and Operations 
Immediate Opening 
The Rubin Museum of Art, opened October, 2004, is dedicated to the
collection, preservation, research and exhibition of Himalayan Art. This
position will report to the Chief Operating Officer and will have two
primary duties: Leading the IT Network Team and developing strategies
for the articulation, prioritization, and implementation of IT
initiatives throughout RMA including upgrading and further development
of networked applications. 
This incumbent will be an integral member of two teams: As 1) direct
supervisor of a small but diverse team who work to provide stable,
up-to-date and efficient place-of-business applications to RMA staff and
2) as a member of a larger group who work together to implement an
ambitious technology-based series of initiatives for providing public
access to content created by RMA staff. 

Responsibilities 
Primary responsibilities include, but are not limited to, the following:


Network Operations 

* Supervises a staff of two in the area of network operations (Network
and Telecommunications Manager and Desktop Support Technician) 
* Assures that network staff is appropriately trained, assists with
prioritization of tasks, provides leadership and evaluates staff
performance. 
* Prepares budgets and timelines, develops and implements staff training
and serves as project manager for network IT initiatives. 
* Has responsibility (directly and through networking staff) for
assuring a stable, robust, and capable computer network and
networked-application infrastructure. 
* Periodically evaluates existing hardware and software platforms and
support structures, and assures robustness, balance and alignment in
support of project-related initiatives. 
* With subordinate staff, and as directed by the incumbent, the network
team is: 
o Responsible for all activities relating to administration of Microsoft
Server and Microsoft Exchange, Active Directory management, VMware
server virtualization and data storage management. 
o Responsible for procurement, maintenance, upgrade, and replacement of
desktop computers and peripheral equipment for all staff. 
o Responsible for budgeting and purchasing of all IT assets. 
o Maintains detailed schedules for the utilization of all technology and
telecommunications equipment. Develops procedures for handling equipment
maintenance issues. 
o Confers with and advises operations personnel on technical problems,
priorities, and service methods. 
o May research and recommend expansion of computer operations and/or
adoption of new technologies as appropriate. 
o Responsible for network security, including all internal networks,
e-mail systems, firewalls and tunnel applications. 

Strategy and Implementation 

* Works with staff across the institution to understand, articulate,
evaluate and prioritize IT-based projects and strategic initiatives. 
* Ensures that systems can support technology projects initiated from
museum departments. 
* Develops and recommends project scopes, manages project budgets,
serves as liaison between museum departments throughout project
lifecycles, and follows-up to assure that objectives were met. 
* Initiates, develops and guides project management for IT projects, so
that they are completed on time and on budget. 

Salary Level 

* Up to $80,000. commensurate with experience 
* Competitive benefits package 

Qualifications 

* Bachelor's degree required; Master's degree or commensurate experience
preferred. 
* 5+ years of professional experience which is directly applicable to
this position. 
* Demonstrated experience with network operations, IT project management
and implementation. 
* Specific demonstrated experience with managing Cisco switches,
routers, Exchange servers, Microsoft-based and Linux/Apple servers and
systems. 
* Relevant supervisory experience, including managing IT operations and
managing and implementing IT based projects. 
* Familiarity with both PC and Mac-based operating systems and their
integration. 
* Experience with a wide range of software products. Experience with
admissions, collection management, donor management, retail and
reporting software is a plus as is experience with Blackbaud, TMS, and
other similar software. 
* A self-motivated professional, detail-oriented, with strong
team-building experienced. 
* Excellent verbal, written, organizational and time-management skills. 
* Excellent organizational skills and ability to prioritize, and meet
deadlines. 
* Proven ability to work collaboratively with diverse employees and
partners. 

Please provide the following as part of your application: 

* Summarize your relevant qualifications for this specific position. No
generic statements please. 
* Complete resume, including salary history and salary requirements. 

Applications 

* Indicate IT Strategy and Implementation on Subject 

[MCN-L] Google Art Project has gone live

2011-02-01 Thread Real, Will
Heads up: I have been looking at it and it is apparently really busy,
and delivers frequent server error messages. Maybe wait awhile. 

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Rob Lancefield on lists
Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2011 9:28 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: [MCN-L] Google Art Project has gone live

Hi all,

Probably of interest to many here: http://www.googleartproject.com.

There's more information on the Google blog at

http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2011/02/explore-museums-and-great-works-
of-art.html

Rob

Rob Lancefield
Manager of Museum Information Services / Registrar of Collections
Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University
301 High Street, Middletown CT 06459-0487 USA rlancefield [at] wesleyan
[dot] edu  |  tel. 860.685.2965

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[MCN-L] rights question

2009-09-16 Thread Real, Will
Hi everyone,

This is a timely discussion for us as we are looking ahead to a redesign
of our web site and online collection.

I believe that a few museums have taken the position that publishing
copyrighted images, in thumbnail size only, on their online
collections, is fair use. I don't know if they publish thumbnails of
copyrighted works only after a reasonable effort to secure permission,
or whether they simply publish them without asking. I believe they
arrived at their policy with legal counsel.

I don't think there is any commonly-accepted definition of what
constitutes a thumbnail that would pass a fair use test (100 pixels? 250
pixels?).

I'd be interested to hear your opinions: is this approach is an emerging
trend in the museum field, and/or is there is an emerging understanding
in the field regarding what a thumbnail is?

Our own legal counsel has suggested that it would be difficult to make
generalized policies about which images could be published under this
kind of approach; they recommended we consider each case on its own
merits--not exactly what we were hoping to hear. In many ways it boils
down to a risk assessment. 

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art
Pittsburgh PA

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Eve Sinaiko
Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 4:02 PM
To: 'Museum Computer Network Listserv'
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] rights question

 
 On Sep 14, 2009, at 2:29 PM, Weinstein, William wrote:
 
 We are evaluating our policy regarding obtaining rights for images of
 works we publish in our online collection section.   The issue of what
 to do with works where there is an apparent copyright holder that can 
 either not be contacted or does not respond to repeated permission 
 requests.  Does anyone have a position of what to do regarding works 
 in this particular state of limbo?
 
 Bill Weinstein

 Bill, legally if you do not have permission, you may not use the work.
 There is no mechanism in US copyright law to help you.  However, if 
 you are based in Canada, there is an unlocatable copyright owner 
 provision which can help you just in that circumstance.  And it is 
 possible that you can use it if using a Canadian work (though I would 
 have to double check to see who is eligible if you are not in Canada.)
 
 Lesley
 
 Lesley Ellen Harris
 lesley at copyrightlaws.com
 www.copyrightanswers.blogspot.com


I think this is an incomplete answer. I'm not a lawyer, so I can only
speak to how many publishers and museums are addressing this question in
practical terms, on the ground. If I've gotten any of the legal aspects
wrong, please correct me. 

There are two kinds of in limbo works: 1) Those known still to be in
copyright or probably in copyright (because they are not very old), for
whom no rights holder can be found; and 2) those whose rights holder
ignores repeated efforts to obtain permission. 

The first group are Orphan Works (OWs)--works still in copyright for
whom no known rights holder can be found. Congress has been working on
legislation to deal with OWs for several years. Last year the Senate
passed an OW bill, but the House version died. It's uncertain whether
the bill will be revived any time soon or not. Absent an OW law, users
must consider whether they may assert fair use. (At museums, a common
type of OWs are archive photos of objects, where the object is out of
copyright but the photo is not, the photographer's name is missing, and
the museum has no document to indicate that the photo was made as a work
for hire.)

The second group includes works where the copyright holder has been
found and is not responding, or works where it's not absolutely clear
who the rights holder really is (e.g., two different nephews of a dead
artist both claim to own the rights, or a work by an artist may have
been made while he was on staff somewhere and therefore be a work for
hire). 

For the second group, as for the first, fair use may be an option. One
also has to evaluate whether the use one wants to make of the work is
protected under fair use (or in the UK, under fair dealing). The
Stanford Fair Use Project has a very good, clear rundown of fair use and
how it works:
http://fairuse.stanford.edu/Copyright_and_Fair_Use_Overview/chapter9/ind
ex.h
tml
  
Fair use depends on the context of the use, so institutions should
develop guidelines on fair use in consultation with legal counsel--both
for using works in their own collections and for when others use works
whose copyrights you control. In the last couple of years there have
been some important court decisions strengthening the assertion of fair
use for visual images. Thus, it's not always the case that one must not
publish a work because the rights have not been cleared. Especially in
the case of those OWs where it's pretty clear that there is no living
rights holder, publication may be very low-risk.  

Fair use and fair dealing are US- and UK-specific, and some

[MCN-L] Online collections and content management systems

2009-06-10 Thread Real, Will
Later this year or next we will be implementing a content management
system for our web site. Currently we do not plan to content-manage our
online collections search. It would run on its own, with its own
separate underlying database. But I've lately been wondering whether
this is the best approach (though it is certainly simpler and less
expensive, at least in the short run). 

Do some of you run your online collections through your cms? Yes or no,
was this a conscious decision and if so what was the rationale?

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art
Pittsburgh, PA



[MCN-L] image sizes

2009-05-05 Thread Real, Will
We typically use 2400 px images in our internal database. The database creates 
a series of derivatives upon import and the user can then choose which version 
they want to open, save, or print. The derivatives are about 900 px, and a 
thumbnail. The tiff masters are stored outside of the database and range from 
about 3000 px to 8000 px.
 
When the images are processed over to the web side, three sizes are created: 
500 px, 240 px, and 80 px.
 
In the future we hope to use zoomable formats on the web (e.g. Zoomify, 
jpeg2000) and if so would probably publish the full 2400 px version from the 
collections database.
 
Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art



From: mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu on behalf of Images
Sent: Fri 5/1/2009 14:57
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: [MCN-L] image sizes



I'm wondering what size(s) of images people are using in their internal 
databases? 1024 pixels on the long side plus a thumbnail view? What size do you 
use for online purposes?

Many thanks!
Danielle
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[MCN-L] image sizes

2009-05-05 Thread Real, Will
Hi Matt,

The reason is simple: the museum does not want people to be able to use
the large images to produce commercially viable prints. There was a
thread on this list awhile back about that issue, and it seems our
museum is not alone in taking this approach. We seem to think that there
is some money to be made off the images and if anyone is going to make
it, it should be us.

With Zoomify or jpeg2000 we can offer up the full size image without
loading it all at once. If someone really wants to they will still be
able to download all of the high-res tiles and reassemble them, but it
would be a lot more difficult.

Another reason is that some images are published on the web with
permission from the copyright owners. The permission form specifies the
online image size. We'd have to maintain at least two different maximum
file sizes online depending on copyright. Not impossible of course, just
kind of a pain!

Will

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Morgan, Matt
Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 2009 9:57 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] image sizes

Will, why wait for zoom before providing the large images? I think there
are a lot of good arguments for very big images online now:

1) modern browsers handle resizing well
2) scrolling (when an image is too big for the window) is at least as
easy for users as zooming, and shows them as much of the picture as will
fit in the window (rather than arbitrarily limiting to a zoom pane)
3) connections are getting faster
4) and anyway, images are our franchise so if we're going to test
users' bandwidth limits, this is the place to do it.

Thanks,
Matt


On 5/5/09 8:50 AM, Real, Will RealW at CarnegieMuseums.Org wrote:

We typically use 2400 px images in our internal database. The database
creates a series of derivatives upon import and the user can then choose
which version they want to open, save, or print. The derivatives are
about 900 px, and a thumbnail. The tiff masters are stored outside of
the database and range from about 3000 px to 8000 px.

When the images are processed over to the web side, three sizes are
created: 500 px, 240 px, and 80 px.

In the future we hope to use zoomable formats on the web (e.g. Zoomify,
jpeg2000) and if so would probably publish the full 2400 px version from
the collections database.

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art



From: mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu on behalf of Images
Sent: Fri 5/1/2009 14:57
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: [MCN-L] image sizes



I'm wondering what size(s) of images people are using in their internal
databases? 1024 pixels on the long side plus a thumbnail view? What size
do you use for online purposes?

Many thanks!
Danielle
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[MCN-L] image sizes

2009-05-05 Thread Real, Will
Matt, you are probably right, but 500 was what other people here (e.g.
Publications staff) were comfortable with. A postcard-sized inkjet print
we made from a 600 pixel image was surprisingly good, good enough to
scare people. I hope someday we can move beyond this stalemate and
provide more useful images to the public, with or without tools such as
Zoomify.

Will  

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Morgan, Matt
Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 2009 10:48 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] image sizes

I'm aware of the discussion, but what's the limit before you hit
commercially viable? Surely more than 500px.

On 5/5/09 10:39 AM, Real, Will RealW at CarnegieMuseums.Org wrote:

Hi Matt,

The reason is simple: the museum does not want people to be able to use
the large images to produce commercially viable prints. There was a
thread on this list awhile back about that issue, and it seems our
museum is not alone in taking this approach. We seem to think that there
is some money to be made off the images and if anyone is going to make
it, it should be us.

With Zoomify or jpeg2000 we can offer up the full size image without
loading it all at once. If someone really wants to they will still be
able to download all of the high-res tiles and reassemble them, but it
would be a lot more difficult.

Another reason is that some images are published on the web with
permission from the copyright owners. The permission form specifies the
online image size. We'd have to maintain at least two different maximum
file sizes online depending on copyright. Not impossible of course, just
kind of a pain!

Will

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Morgan, Matt
Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 2009 9:57 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] image sizes

Will, why wait for zoom before providing the large images? I think there
are a lot of good arguments for very big images online now:

1) modern browsers handle resizing well
2) scrolling (when an image is too big for the window) is at least as
easy for users as zooming, and shows them as much of the picture as will
fit in the window (rather than arbitrarily limiting to a zoom pane)
3) connections are getting faster
4) and anyway, images are our franchise so if we're going to test
users' bandwidth limits, this is the place to do it.

Thanks,
Matt


On 5/5/09 8:50 AM, Real, Will RealW at CarnegieMuseums.Org wrote:

We typically use 2400 px images in our internal database. The database
creates a series of derivatives upon import and the user can then choose
which version they want to open, save, or print. The derivatives are
about 900 px, and a thumbnail. The tiff masters are stored outside of
the database and range from about 3000 px to 8000 px.

When the images are processed over to the web side, three sizes are
created: 500 px, 240 px, and 80 px.

In the future we hope to use zoomable formats on the web (e.g. Zoomify,
jpeg2000) and if so would probably publish the full 2400 px version from
the collections database.

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art



From: mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu on behalf of Images
Sent: Fri 5/1/2009 14:57
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: [MCN-L] image sizes



I'm wondering what size(s) of images people are using in their internal
databases? 1024 pixels on the long side plus a thumbnail view? What size
do you use for online purposes?

Many thanks!
Danielle
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[MCN-L] image sizes

2009-05-05 Thread Real, Will
Hi Matt, Ken, et al.,

Matt said there is no business model in stealing images which may well
be true. At the same time, I know my administration would ask me what my
business plan would be for giving images away (in the manner of the
British Library link posted by Ken). And they would not mean we should
do it because we are a public service institution. 

Anecdotally the case has been stated for the business sense of giving
stuff away, and certainly there are high-profile examples in other media
(Radiohead, Paolo Coelho) but has anyone in the museum industry studied
this formally with regard to images? If so, I am ready to try.

Will

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Morgan, Matt
Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 2009 11:44 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] image sizes

I get it, definitely. There are lots of things we should be doing, but
don't, purely for least-cost path analysis. But it's raining like crazy
here so it's a good day to sit in my office and rant about one of my
bugbears a little bit.

We (the museum community) have hardly ever (never?) seen a significant,
commercial, inappropriate, reuse of museum object images. It just isn't
done--there is no business model in stealing images. Getting images of
more than 1000px (from Flickr, for example) of our objects is a trivial
matter, so it cannot be that increasing image sizes on our own websites
will make this problem materialize.

I am utterly, totally sympathetic to the political problems we all face.
I just think it's time to get over this image-size thing and start
letting people enjoy our images instead of squinting at them or blowing
them up until they're fuzzy.

Thanks,
Matt


On 5/5/09 11:10 AM, Real, Will RealW at CarnegieMuseums.Org wrote:

Matt, you are probably right, but 500 was what other people here (e.g.
Publications staff) were comfortable with. A postcard-sized inkjet print
we made from a 600 pixel image was surprisingly good, good enough to
scare people. I hope someday we can move beyond this stalemate and
provide more useful images to the public, with or without tools such as
Zoomify.

Will

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Morgan, Matt
Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 2009 10:48 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] image sizes

I'm aware of the discussion, but what's the limit before you hit
commercially viable? Surely more than 500px.

On 5/5/09 10:39 AM, Real, Will RealW at CarnegieMuseums.Org wrote:

Hi Matt,

The reason is simple: the museum does not want people to be able to use
the large images to produce commercially viable prints. There was a
thread on this list awhile back about that issue, and it seems our
museum is not alone in taking this approach. We seem to think that there
is some money to be made off the images and if anyone is going to make
it, it should be us.

With Zoomify or jpeg2000 we can offer up the full size image without
loading it all at once. If someone really wants to they will still be
able to download all of the high-res tiles and reassemble them, but it
would be a lot more difficult.

Another reason is that some images are published on the web with
permission from the copyright owners. The permission form specifies the
online image size. We'd have to maintain at least two different maximum
file sizes online depending on copyright. Not impossible of course, just
kind of a pain!

Will

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Morgan, Matt
Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 2009 9:57 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] image sizes

Will, why wait for zoom before providing the large images? I think there
are a lot of good arguments for very big images online now:

1) modern browsers handle resizing well
2) scrolling (when an image is too big for the window) is at least as
easy for users as zooming, and shows them as much of the picture as will
fit in the window (rather than arbitrarily limiting to a zoom pane)
3) connections are getting faster
4) and anyway, images are our franchise so if we're going to test
users' bandwidth limits, this is the place to do it.

Thanks,
Matt


On 5/5/09 8:50 AM, Real, Will RealW at CarnegieMuseums.Org wrote:

We typically use 2400 px images in our internal database. The database
creates a series of derivatives upon import and the user can then choose
which version they want to open, save, or print. The derivatives are
about 900 px, and a thumbnail. The tiff masters are stored outside of
the database and range from about 3000 px to 8000 px.

When the images are processed over to the web side, three sizes are
created: 500 px, 240 px, and 80 px.

In the future we hope to use zoomable formats on the web (e.g. Zoomify,
jpeg2000) and if so would probably publish the full 2400 px version from
the collections database.

Will Real

[MCN-L] Color management/IT question

2009-04-02 Thread Real, Will
Hi everyone,

We are planning to implement a color-managed publication workflow that
includes a networked RIP installation. The RIP is to be networked so
that it can serve two printers located in different places and also to
allow more than one workstation to send print jobs through the RIP.

The vendor has advised against installing the RIP on a virtualized
server. We recently transitioned to a fully virtualized data center, and
our IT staff is understandably keen to avoid one-off server purchases
for isolated purposes such as this one. They intend to install the RIP
on a virtualized server, despite the warnings of the vendor.

Have any of you been down this road? Are you running your RIPs on a
virtualized server or on a dedicated box?

Thanks,

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art




[MCN-L] Standards SIG: Medium description for works on paper

2009-03-30 Thread Real, Will
We aspire to more detailed medium descriptions in the collections system, but 
often use a dumbed-down version for wall labels. This is determined by 
editorial and stylistic standards. While many times the back end and front end 
versions coincide, in some cases I don't see a way around distinguising between 
the collections data and the public presentation of the same information. 
Personally I favor more information over less, specific information over 
generic. But that may be the ex-conservator in me talking.

We have also been cleaning up our old medium descriptions so that the 
terminology we use is consistent and as much as possible based on AAT. We'll 
probably be at this well into the next decade at least.  

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of 
Perian Sully
Sent: Monday, March 30, 2009 11:58 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] Standards SIG: Medium description for works on paper

I have to admit that I'm fairly inconsistent with adding the color info (mostly 
because I tend to use CDWA standards). It also makes it somewhat difficult when 
the ink in question is now sepia, but it used to be black ink. which is correct?

But for textiles, in particular, I often get really detailed: ex: gold 
metallic embroidery and red satin silk appliqu? on green silk velvet.

I'm curious about others' answers to this as well.

~P

Perian Sully
Collections Information Manager
Web Programs Strategist
The Magnes
Berkeley, CA

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of 
Morgan, Amber
Sent: Monday, March 30, 2009 7:07 AM
To: mcn-l at mcn.edu
Subject: [MCN-L] Standards SIG: Medium description for works on paper

I was wondering if some of you would be willing to share how you describe works 
on paper.  Specifically, how detailed is the medium information on your wall 
labels?  If you have an ink drawing on paper, would you just say ink on 
paper, or would you include the color and specific paper type, such as red 
ink on ivory paper?  CCO seems to favor longer, more detailed descriptions for 
works on paper.  CDWA indicates that material color is optional.  If you are 
following these standards, are you indicating color all of the time, or only 
when it is somehow exceptional or necessary?  I did a quick search on a handful 
of museums' sites and it seemed like color was always being indicated for 
drawings.  

 

Thanks,
Amber

 

the warhol:
Amber E. Morgan
Associate Registrar
117 Sandusky Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15212
T 412.237.8306
F 412.237.8340
E morgana at warhol.org
W www.warhol.org 

The Andy Warhol Museum
One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh 

Email newsletter http://members.carnegiemuseums.org/email
Membership http://members.carnegiemuseums.org/SupportCMP 

 

 

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[MCN-L] Need a list of DAMS options

2009-03-20 Thread Real, Will
Hi Perian, we are investigating this too and I look forward to hearing
more from others on the list.

This link has a good summary (as of 2007/2008 I think) of the commercial
DAMS market and trends: http://tiny.cc/K6q6s 

Will 

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Perian Sully
Sent: Friday, March 20, 2009 11:13 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: [MCN-L] Need a list of DAMS options

Hi everyone:

 

Sorry if this is a redundant question, but we're sticking our toe into
DAMS territory soon and I'm being asked to outline all of the various
options.

 

I am currently aware of:

Commercial DAMS:

Extensis

Luna Insight

me

 

Open Source DAMS:

OpenEdit

ResourceSpace

Razuna

(Omeka  Wordpress)

 

I'm specifically looking for the range of products available, along with
reviews. We're trying to figure out how to get the DAMS to talk to our
CIS (IDEA at ALM, which uses MS SQL and does have some sort of API
available with it, so it should be do-able), but we'll likely need to
get a programmer to do that for us.

 

Thanks in advance for your help. Feel free to reply to me offlist. I'll
be setting up a Google Docs to organize the information, and I'd be
happy to share that list once it's available.

 

~Perian

 

Perian Sully

Collections Information Manager

Web Programs Strategist

The Magnes

2911 Russell St.

Berkeley, CA 94705

Work: 510-549-6950 x 357

Fax: 510-849-3673

http://www.magnes.org

http://www.musematic.org

http://www.mediaandtechnology.org

 

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[MCN-L] Photo Management Software

2009-01-15 Thread Real, Will
Another option, which is built on Access, is ThumbsPlus 7
http://www.cerious.com/thumbnails.shtml
Relatively inexpensive, free demo, though not available for Mac. 

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Jeff Evans
Sent: Thursday, January 15, 2009 10:50 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] Photo Management Software

Adobe Bridge
Extensis Portfolio
Canto Cumulus
Lightroom

All have demos you download and try.  Single-user licenses will be
affordable.


Jeffrey Evans
Digital Imaging Specialist
Princeton University Art Museum
609.258.8579









On 1/15/09 10:41 AM, Susan Fishman-Armstrong sfishman at westga.edu
wrote:

 We are at the very beginning of a digital photo project for one of our

 collections.  I am interested in learning about what software to use 
 to manage these photos and their categories.  I know that in the end -

 we will need something very large and more complex.  But, right now I 
 need to start with something simple that can be expanded when we are 
 ready.  We have a very small budget.
 
 We also have lot of photos taken for publicity about our facility that

 needs to be managed.  We are also looking at something to manage our 
 ~300 photos (still pretty small)
 
 I have Microsoft Access and am very good at programming it.  Could 
 that work for our photos at this time?
 
 Someone suggested FileMaker Pro.  I know that it holds lots of memory,

 but I haven't used it since version 5.  Would that work for our needs?

 Or, is there a cheaper over the counter program we can purchase?
 
 I would be happy to hear any suggestions.
 
 
 Thanks,
 
 Susie
 
 +
 Susie Fishman-Armstrong
 Laboratory Coordinator
 Antonio J. Waring, Jr. Archaeological Laboratory University of West 
 Georgia Carrollton, GA 30118
 
 678-839-6303 (office)
 678-839-6306 (fax)
 www.westga.edu/~ajwlab/
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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[MCN-L] image annotation tools, redux

2008-12-04 Thread Real, Will
Hi everyone,
Not long ago on this list there was a thread about image annotation
tools ([MCN-L] image annotation tools  001803.html ).
I have a related question and hope someone out there can point the way.

We have an archive of over 60,000 negatives representing the life work
of the Pittsburgh photographer Teenie Harris. We are about to complete
the second of two NEH Preservation and Access grants to catalogue and
scan the collection and publish it online. There are countless people
represented in the images, some of whom have been identified by
researchers during the grant. There are many more to be identified and
we will continue to look to the community to help. For the last few
years we have provided a form-based tool as part of our on-line
collection that can be used to submit image subject information to the
museum.

We are finding that the existing tools are an ineffective way to gather,
store, and deliver this kind of information (e.g. we receive feedback
like the third person from the left in the second row, wearing the
paisely jacket, is my uncle John Smith, who sang in the Baptist Church
choir which gets vetted and then recorded into the collections
management system, awkwardly incorporated into the item's description
and subject headings).

What we envision is an image annotation tool along the lines of Flickr's
annotations or Picasa Web Album's face labelling tool (which also links
labels of the same person across multiple images and includes a facial
recognition utility). This seems to be an ideal way to capture and
deliver subject information from the community over the web. However, as
far as I know, there is no way to capture the annotation data and store
it locally, with the image, in our collections management system. Our
collections management system does allow us to create multimedia records
from URLs pointing to resources stored remotely, which could be part of
a solution. But while we hope flickr and similar services will be there
for eternity, we must have direct control over the information
associated with the archive. Ideally the tool would also have the abilty
to embed name authorities, like the Picasa face labelling system, that
allows names to be controlled, edited, merged, etc.

Anyone care to advise? Is there something out there already that we
could adapt, or are we talking custom development?

Will

William Real 
Director of Technology Initiatives 
Carnegie Museum of Art 
4400 Forbes Ave 
Pittsburgh, PA 15213 
412.622.3267 
412.622.3112 (fax)
www.cmoa.org
 
Join our email list for exhibition and event news:
http://members.carnegiemuseums.org/email

Member Exclusives!  Insider e-newsletters-plus private previews,
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[MCN-L] What is a Collections Management System supposed to manage?

2008-12-03 Thread Real, Will
Amber,

A resource worth looking at is Annamaria Poma Swank's report on
collections management systems at
http://documenti.rinascimento-digitale.info/Collection_Management_System
s

I have looked through it and it appears to address some of the issues
you are grappling with. The overall gist, if I understood correctly, is
that museums have come to use collections management systems more
broadly, as a foundation for providing content to end users. 

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Morgan, Amber
Sent: Wednesday, December 03, 2008 10:41 AM
To: mcn-l at mcn.edu
Subject: [MCN-L] What is a Collections Management System supposed to
manage?

We are addressing some concerns regarding our collections management
system.  Something that has become clear is that our staff is not in
agreement as to what a CMS is and what it should do.  

 

We are attempting to address the needs of our education department.  It
would be very helpful to know how other institutions maintain what could
be considered educational content.  If anyone out there would be willing
to answer a few questions, I would be very grateful!  

 

Do you store label copy in your CMS?  

Do you use your CMS to manage detailed information about artists,
events, places, etc?  If so, do you limit it to information specifically
about your collection, or do you also maintain information about related
materials held elsewhere?

Does your institution collect any user-generated content, and if so,
does it go into your CMS?

And finally, if you're feeling up to it - what, in your opinion, is a
collections management system; what should it do and what should it NOT
be expected to do?

 

Many thanks,
Amber

the warhol:
Amber E. Morgan
Associate Registrar
117 Sandusky Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15212
T 412.237.8306
F 412.237.8340
E morgana at warhol.org
W www.warhol.org 

The Andy Warhol Museum
One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh 

Email newsletter http://members.carnegiemuseums.org/email
Membership http://members.carnegiemuseums.org/SupportCMP 

 

 

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[MCN-L] Support for professional development and travel

2008-12-03 Thread Real, Will
Hi everyone,

If you are willing, could you comment about your institution's support
(or not) for your professional development, including training and
attendance at professional meetings?

A possibly related question: to what degree, if any, are you seeing
evidence of the economy's impact on your institution's spending plans,
particularly in the area of technology?

Respond off-list if you want; depending on responses I can post an
anonymized summary if people are interested.

Thanks,

Will

William Real 
Director of Technology Initiatives 
Carnegie Museum of Art 
4400 Forbes Ave 
Pittsburgh, PA 15213 
412.622.3267 
412.622.3112 (fax)
www.cmoa.org
 
Join our email list for exhibition and event news:
http://members.carnegiemuseums.org/email

Member Exclusives!  Insider e-newsletters-plus private previews,
e-invites, free admission, and more when you join online:
http://members.carnegiemuseums.org/SupportCMP 






[MCN-L] Terminology question

2008-11-18 Thread Real, Will
On the more esoteric end of things:

We are cataloguing a collection of black and white negatives. In many
cases there are groups of negatives depicting the same subject. In some
of these cases the depictions are very close (for example, multiple
takes of a posed studio portrait, multiple takes of a wedding party) and
in other cases the relationship is more distant (for example, multiple
exposures taken in sequence during the same event). 

We have been using the term version to refer to these. We looked in
AAT and found the term version under the derivative objects section,
and discovered that it is meant to refer to objects that are based on an
original, which is really not applicable in our situation since no
single negative in these cases can be called the original or primary
negative.

We are wondering if there is another term we should consider using to
describe these relationships and particularly if there are two terms
that would permit us to distinguish between the relationships that are
very close from those that are looser. 

Thanks,

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh



[MCN-L] Measures of Success

2008-10-02 Thread Real, Will
Hi everyone, great discussion on the Web vs. Real World visitors thread.


I have a related question. We have already successfully made the case to
our administration and board, as part of an ongoing strategic planning
process, to significantly increase our use of technology as a way of
engaging our public. We have articulated several initiatives and have
now been asked to provide a means to determine how successful these
initiatives turn out to be. How do we know we have achieved what we
hoped to? Do we articulate our goals in strictly quantitative terms (web
analytics, survey results, etc.) or are there other, less tangible
measures? I personally find the number-based benchmarks to be tricky.
For instance, is a blog successful if it generates a certain number of
comments? Or is a blog successful if it manages to change the museum's
internal culture to be more transparent and outwardly-focused,
regardless of the number of hits or comments?

We are also aware that while we cannot set the bar for success too high
(thus setting ourselves up to fail), we can't set it too low either
(lest it be perceived as too trivial to be considered a success).

I'd be interested to hear from anyone, on- or off-list, who has been
through a similar process and has any advice or suggestions.

Will

William Real 
Director of Technology Initiatives 
Carnegie Museum of Art 
4400 Forbes Ave 
Pittsburgh, PA 15213 
412.622.3267 
412.622.3112 (fax)
www.cmoa.org
 
Join our email list for exhibition and event news:
http://members.carnegiemuseums.org/email

Member Exclusives!  Insider e-newsletters-plus private previews,
e-invites, free admission, and more when you join online:
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[MCN-L] Bar-codes / RFID / Both?

2008-09-29 Thread Real, Will
There is a useful study on this subject compiled about a year ago by
Julian Tomlin, at 
http://www.collectionslink.org.uk/find_a_network/regional_networks/susta
inable_storage

Will Real 

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Cathryn Goodwin
Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 1:33 PM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: [MCN-L] Bar-codes / RFID / Both?

Is your museum using RFID?  Princeton University Art Museum is
researching the pros/cons of barcoding and RFID for inventory
management. Is RFID ready for use in location management? Are some
museums using it for other purposes (security/ visitor interaction? )  

Thanks in advance
Cathryn Goodwin

Cathryn L. Goodwin
Princeton University Art Museum
Princeton, NJ  08540
609.258.9374
cathryng at princeton.edu
President, MCN
www.mcn.edu

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[MCN-L] What to save: Policies for selecting/archiving digital assets

2008-03-05 Thread Real, Will
Have any of the institutions who have gone down the DAMS road also
succeeded in developing policies for deciding which assets to retain?
The discussions we have had here leave our heads spinning wondering who
would make these decisions and with what criteria. Like everyone else,
we have thousands of images depicting multiple views of an event or
gallery, multiple bracketed exposures of conservation treatment or
collections documentation, multiple images specific to a particular
initiative or campaign long past, alternate crops or edits, and so on.
We realized quickly that these decisions would have to be made in many
cases by a knowledgeable and broad-minded staff person rather than a
student intern or volunteer. But who has the time?

And then there is the perhaps even more complex world of audio and
video. Archive the raw footage, the outtakes, the clips, the final
edits, etc.?

We have a task force that is developing a proposal for an
enterprise-wide DAMS and the task force wants to include information
about the impact a DAMS would have on process and staffing.

If anyone has been through this and come up with solutions for their
institutions, we would very much appreciate it if you could share them
with us. It would also be interesting to know whether the permissions
and policies that can be set by a DAMS administrator might also enforce
conformity to established standards for content selection.

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh



[MCN-L] Where is the metadata that defines a jpeg format (standard/optimized/progressive)?

2007-12-14 Thread Real, Will
I hope someone on the list can point me in the right direction. I have a
weird problem that I think I have traced to the compression format used
in the Photoshop JPEG Options dialog box. There are three Format
Options: Baseline (Standard), Baseline (Optimized), and Progressive. It
seems that when the third format option, Progressive, is chosen, the
image cannot be rendered in my report-writing software (Crystal Reports
XI).

So far, the only way I have figured out to tell which format the jpeg
was saved in is to open the image in Photoshop, save it as a copy, and
examine the dialog box to see which radio button is checked.

What I'd like to be able to do is find this attribute in the metadata so
I can browse the properties of large numbers of files without having to
open and save a copy of each one. I have not been able to find the
attribute in any of the metadata schema that Photoshop uses. 

Any help appreciated,

Will

William Real 
Director of Technology Initiatives 
Carnegie Museum of Art 
4400 Forbes Ave 
Pittsburgh, PA 15213 
412.622.3267 
412.622.3112 (fax)
www.cmoa.org
 
Join our email list for exhibition and event news:
http://members.carnegiemuseums.org/email

Member Exclusives!  Insider e-newsletters-plus private previews,
e-invites, free admission, and more when you join online:
http://members.carnegiemuseums.org/SupportCMP 






[MCN-L] Evidence of web project impact on teens?

2007-11-15 Thread Real, Will
Hi everyone,

We are looking for evidence, published or anecdotal or whatever, that
indicates the impact that museum web projects aimed at teens have
actually had on the target group. We would like to help a potential
funder understand why other museums have embarked on these kinds of
efforts and what the results look like so far.

We've looked at some of the recent published work at archimuse from
Museums and the Web, which is a good start. Any other input is
appreciated.

Many thanks,

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh 



[MCN-L] Bar coding museums objects

2007-10-30 Thread Real, Will
Annamaria,

We use a barcoding system here at Carnegie Museum of Art. The barcoding
software is a third-party application developed for use with our
collections management system (KE Emu). It functions over our wireless
network and is used primarily for updating object locations, though it
can also be configured for on-site data-entry and/or object accessioning
projects. At present not all of the collection has been barcoded so the
system is not used consistently. We have found that the biggest
challenges, besides finding the time to complete the barcoding of the
entire collection, are deciding how to approach barcoding for multi-part
objects (whether at the item or part level) and how to keep track of the
physical bar code tags of three-dimensional objects as they come on and
off view. While we agree with others who have said that the barcoding
system increases accuracy, there is always going to be an element of
human or procedure error that no technology that I am aware of can quite
overcome!

Another source to investigate: a several years ago someone, I think an
MCN member on this list, did a survey and posted specific information on
museum barcoding on a website. I don't have the link and don't know if
the site is even live anymore. Does this ring a bell to anyone else?

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Annamaria Poma-Swank
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2007 7:35 AM
To: mcn-l at mcn.edu
Subject: [MCN-L] Bar coding museums objects

Dear all,
I would like to know :
1. how many museums are using the
barcoding objects inventory system
2. if the CMS they use support the system 3. A feedback on the use of
this tool Annamaria Poma Swank Rinascimento Digitale project consultant
pomaswank at rinascimento-digitale.it
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[MCN-L] Adding mutlimedia to museum websites: bandwidth hit?

2007-10-11 Thread Real, Will
Our IT staff is concerned about the bandwidth effect caused by
delivering multimedia content, particularly video, on the museum's
website. Would folks from museums who have gone thru this care to
comment on their experiences? I realize it comes down to what the
content is and how much traffic there is, but we are hoping we can
extrapolate, in a general way, from the actual before-and-after
experience of others.

Thanks in advance,

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art
Pittsburgh PA



[MCN-L] Image Size (was Pan Zoom Server)

2007-09-06 Thread Real, Will
Matt's comment about image size leads me to wonder what members of the
MCN community think is the biggest possible image that would not be
worth stealing for financial gain. Here we have settled on 500 pixel
images, but that was fairly arbitrary.

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Morgan, Matt
Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2007 5:55 PM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] Pan Zoom Server

Do we know that users like zooming? Or if certain particular groups of
users like zooming?

I often find zooming irritating. I would mostly rather have a single,
somewhat larger full view of an image than to zoom in on just a piece of
the image, even if the detail is not as good. Zooming takes more clicks
 drags, and then I end up with something where I can't really see the
work.

I just wonder sometimes if the effort we put into zoom is worthwhile.
Should we just make the images bigger? I know that ours could be a lot
bigger before it's possible to get any financial gain by stealing them.

Thanks,
Matt

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use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information by persons 
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[MCN-L] IP SIG: LACMA's Magritte exhibit: This is not fair use

2007-01-22 Thread Real, Will
Richard, et al., I wonder if the guards at LACMA (or any museum) could
tell disgruntled patrons there are images of the exhibition on the
museum website that are available  according to the Terms of Use, which
almost always allows downloading without permission for personal,
non-commercial use such as remixing and so on, as it does in LACMA's
case.

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art 

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Amalyah Keshet
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 4:06 AM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: Re: [MCN-L] IP SIG: LACMA's Magritte exhibit: This is not fair
use

Richard:

At first glance, the article contains quite a few mistakes regarding
legal issues.  
Example:  When we absolve curators of responsibility for defending our
fair use rights...   Well, we do NOT have a fair use right to
photograph, without the artist's permission, works protected by
copyright -- wherever they are displayed -- except for certain very
limited purposes, and property, privacy, and contract law may indeed
preempt that.  Only a court of law can determine whether the purpose of
the photography was fair use or not. (And it could be argued that a
curator's repsonsibility is to keep his or her museum away from courts
of law.)

Yes, that's the problem with the fair use concept as currently expressed
in the US copyright code, but that's another article altogether -- one
that should be written by someone who does their legal research a lot
better.

While I sympathize with the fair use spirit of the article, one has to
get one's facts right in order to make a decent argument for
...anything.

I'm off to London for a museums copyright conference at the National
Gallery: Connecting Culture and Commerce: Getting the Right Balance
http://www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/mcg2007/index.htm, organized by Simon Tanner
and Naomi Korn and sponsored by the Museums Copyright Group.  I hope to
meet MCN IP colleages there -- yes? -- and I promise to report back to
the MCN constituency.  

Amalyah Keshet
Head of Image Resources  Copyright Management The Israel Museum,
Jerusalem  akeshet at imj.org.il
Chair, MCN IP SIG   www.mcn.edu
Blog  www.musematic.net 


- Original Message -
From: Richard Urban rjur...@uiuc.edu
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv mcn-l at mcn.edu
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 2:58 AM
Subject: [MCN-L] IP SIG: LACMA's Magritte exhibit: This is not fair use


 
 LACMA's Magritte exhibit: This is not fair use
 http://www.boingboing.net/2007/01/21/lacmas_magritte_exhi.html
 
 Anyone from LACMA have a comment? 
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[MCN-L] Query: estimating storage for digital collections

2007-01-20 Thread Real, Will
Hi Stacey,
I've been eagerly awaiting the flood of responses to this query; surely this is 
exactly the sort of thing MCN members are supposed to have some experience 
with! Maybe others hesitate to respond, as I have, because it is not so easy to 
give an account of our experience that sounds like we had any idea what we were 
getting into when we started and implemented our projects.
 
In our case, we faced a far more modest project and yet could not fully get our 
brains around all of the implications and imperatives for image standards, 
workflow, staffing, storage, access, preservation, metadata, and so on. Maybe 
that was a good thing because had we really known what lay ahead, we might have 
given up in despair.
 
We did our project by jumping in and finding out, by doing, what the issues 
were. Our image standards changed as our equipment improved, as we scrounged 
the necessary funds. As our image standards changed so too our understanding of 
our storage requirements changed. The workflow has morphed at least 4 times. 
For five years we have been just barely staying ahead of the storage space 
limit. By handling storage incrementally we have probably saved money, as 
storage has gotten cheaper year after year. However this has not been kind to 
our stress levels and has perhaps kept us from considering alternative 
approaches. When we started it seemed that the paradigm was offline storage of 
master image files on CD, and live storage of derivative images for access by 
staff and public. Now just a few years later CDs are shunned, and more and more 
of us are storing master images on live servers and in some cases using DAMS to 
create on-the-fly derivatives for access. Now there is another delivery 
format in the mix, jpeg2000, which no one was thinking of using when we 
started. In sum, the landscape is ever-changing and it seems one can never 
quite settle into a system permanently. Perhaps that argues for a more 
open-ended, make-it-up-as-you-go approach, or maybe making plans in 3 year or 5 
year cycles.
 
At my institution, unlike yours by the sound of it, the administration was not 
fully sold on the value of the project and would certainly have flinched at any 
truly sober projection of the actual costs, had we even been able to come up 
with it. We had to demonstrate bit by bit that the project was valuable and 
doable and fundable (barely). Whether it is truly sustainable is still an open 
question, frankly, though I probably should not be admitting that in public!
 
I'd love it if others would chime in here.
 
Will


From: mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu on behalf of Stacey Herbert
Sent: Wed 1/17/2007 7:44
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: [MCN-L] Query: estimating storage for digital collections



Hello All,

I'm looking for some advice on estimating storage needs for a large-
scale digital imaging project for the Chester Beatty Library and 
Museum. The aim is a comprehensive, archival-quality digital 
collection of the holdings. (We do not need to plan for extensive, 
ongoing acquisitions). The collection is made up of a very wide 
variety of materials, from papyri, illuminated manuscripts, codices 
and scrolls, to textiles and other decorative art objects. The 
objects themselves also vary greatly in size. My initial, gross 
estimation suggests that the completed digital collection could 
consist of 750,000-1,000,000 images. If anyone is interested, I could 
supply additional estimated details.

I would benefit from hearing about others' experience: how you have 
projected and planned for growth; whether you have sought complete 
storage solutions from vendors (at the outset of the project, or down 
the road); how closely your estimates matched actual needs, etc. We 
are nearly starting from scratch here, in terms of creating a digital 
collection, so we have lots of options.

Many thanks in advance,

Stacey Herbert



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[MCN-L] DAMS comparisons?

2006-12-19 Thread Real, Will
Hi Perian,
 
TASI has a comparison chart of image management systems, and other information 
that might be relevant.
 
http://www.tasi.ac.uk/advice/delivering/ims-software.html
 
William Real 
Director of Technology Initiatives 
Carnegie Museum of Art 
4400 Forbes Ave 
Pittsburgh, PA 15213 
412.622.3267 
412.622.3112 (fax) 



From: mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu on behalf of Perian Sully
Sent: Mon 12/18/2006 18:42
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: [MCN-L] DAMS comparisons?



Hi again everyone:

I'm wondering if anyone has developed a comparison of various DAMS
systems from the museum perspective, much like CHIN has done for
Collection Management systems? I'm finding some from a business
perspective, or for individuals, but nothing that applies to
museum-specific needs. CHIN does have links to several How-Tos and to
different companies, but again, they've not appeared to go into it from
a cultural heritage perspective. I suspect that there isn't one out
there, and so if anyone has an evaluation form they've created, I'd be
completely grateful if you're willing to share.

Thanks for all of your help, both now and in the past (and, I daresay,
in the future)

--
Perian Sully
Collection Database and Records Administrator
Judah L. Magnes Museum
2911 Russell St.
Berkeley, CA 94705
510-549-6950 x 335


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[MCN-L] metadata for dummies

2006-11-21 Thread Real, Will
Perian et al.

I recently came across a helpful table on the hangingtogether.org blog
that sorted a lot of this out for me.

http://hangingtogether.org/?p=152 

Will Real
Carnegie Musuem of Art

-Original Message-
From: mcn-l-bounces at mcn.edu [mailto:mcn-l-boun...@mcn.edu] On Behalf Of
Perian Sully
Sent: Monday, November 20, 2006 2:48 PM
To: Museum Computer Network Listserv
Subject: [MCN-L] metadata for dummies

Hi list of smart people much more knowledgeable than me:

I'm trying to wrap my brain around the technical aspects of metadata
sharing and structures, reading though (and not entirely comprehending)
a lot of different sources. As I am a visual, hands-on type learner, I'm
trying to put everything I'm reading into non-technical language this
neophyte can understand. I'm pretty sure I've got #'s 2-4 wrong, but can
anyone help me unravel this?

1) You have objects. You apply vocabularies to the objects in order to
describe them. The vocabularies facilitate how your object information
is seen by other computers. Examples of Vocabularies are: AAT, ULAN,
Chenhall's

(I understand #1 pretty well. Here's where I start to get lost...)

2) In order for the other computers to understand what you're giving
them, the information needs to be arranged in a specific way. These are
the element sets...? these are MARC, LOC, VRA, Dublin Core

3) Because very few institutions have pure collections that fit into
one of the Vocabularies, we can use multiple Vocabularies. Do we use
multiples of #2 as well? These are defined and plugged into the element
sets. They are tagged as belonging to a specific Vocabulary

(I think there's a middle piece in here I'm missing)

4) There is an umbrella structure, the Harvester, which can read #2 and
serve it to the user in readable form. Examples: OAI, MARC (also fits as
a #2), XML

So as you can see, I'm dreadfully muddled. I know it's important to
understand it, but I'm just not able to wrap my head around the various
resources out there. I'm starting to think that Ask A Ninja is more my
level...

Help! and thanks in advance

-- 

Perian Sully
Collection Database and Records Administrator Judah L. Magnes Museum
2911 Russell St.
Berkeley, CA 94705
510-549-6950 x 335


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[MCN-L] Tricky question - is Mac better than PC?

2006-09-08 Thread Real, Will
What better way to energize our moribund list serv than a PC/Mac debate!

In my experience we could not make this decision solely on the actual or 
perceived advantages of one or another operating system. Our insitution is an 
all-Windows shop and our IT staff would not support Macs and worse, would not 
integrate them into the network. In our case, the advantages of having our 
imaging systems on the network, with access to high-volume storage servers, 
covered by the regular backup operations, and supported by our IT staff far 
outweigh any possible downside to using PCs for imaging rather than Macs.

All of our imaging staff has come in primarily with Mac experience, and they 
all adapted quickly to Windows. The fact is that working within Photoshop, 
which is what they do all day long, the platform does not seem to influence the 
actual workflow all that much. Some of them still prefer (marginally) working 
in the Mac platform but cannot say convincingly why; I chalk it up to old, 
ingrained personal allegiances or ideologies rather than actual performance 
differences.

I agree with Sam that the external graphics environment/printing industry/etc. 
has been built around Mac and this is perhaps the best argument for Mac, all 
other things being equal. On the other hand, there are in fact high-end imaging 
products that are PC-only, such as the excellent Aztek flatbed scanners, last 
time I checked. This variability in platform support is true in the graphics 
software area as well; a number of highly-regarded imaging applications, used 
by many people in association with photoshop, are only available for PC, though 
I can't think which at the moment. In short, as far as compatibility, for the 
moment either choice will present certain limitations in one's options for 
hardware or software.

William Real
Carnegie Museum of Art



[MCN-L] informal survey of digital photography devices in museums

2006-07-30 Thread Real, Will
As the time for submitting budget requests for our next fiscal year approaches 
I am curious to know what digital photography devices are being used in the 
museum community. Would any of you be willing to volunteer whether you are 
using any of the following for photography of collections? Please be as 
specific as you can. (respond offline directly to me if you wish to remain 
anonymous: realw [at] carnegiemuseums.org)
 
Nikon D1X, D200, D2X
Canon 5D, EOS 1Ds Mark II
Leaf Aptus 75
Phase One P 45, etc.
BetterLight 6000 etc.
Sinar Bron 44, 54, emotion75, etc.
Others (Imacon, Jenoptik, etc.)
 
I would also be interested to know if you have switched to all-digital capture 
or not.
 
Thanks, 
 
Will
 
William Real 
Director of Technology Initiatives 
Carnegie Museum of Art 
4400 Forbes Ave 
Pittsburgh, PA 15213 
412.622.3267 
412.622.3112 (fax) 



[MCN-L] MCN Membership

2006-06-30 Thread Real, Will
Hi everyone,
 
Only days left!
 
Please don't forget to renew your MCN membership, if you haven't already. It's 
easy to join online at http://www.mcn.edu/join/index.asp.
 
If you are not already a member, now would be a good time to join.
 
WHY JOIN MCN?



*   Network with information professionals from around the world at the MCN 
Annual Conference and throughout the year. 

*   Benefit from the expertise of MCN colleagues on your next technology 
project. 

*   Share a project or paper with an interested audience at the Annual 
Conference or on the MCN Website. 

*   Access the Membership Directory in the Members-Only section of the MCN 
website. 

*   Support the quest for excellence in museum technology.

*   Exchange ideas an information on MCN's list serv.

Go to http://www.mcn.edu/join/index.asp to join right away.
 
Thanks in advance,
 
Will Real
MCN Membership Chair
 
William Real 
Director of Technology Initiatives 
Carnegie Museum of Art 
4400 Forbes Ave 
Pittsburgh, PA 15213 
412.622.3267 
412.622.3112 (fax) 



Re: archival storage of CDs

2006-01-04 Thread Real, Will
My sense is that more and more institutions are beginning to store image master 
files on servers rather than offline on CDs or some other medium.  We started 
with offline CD storage, in duplicate, using the archival mitsui/mam-e gold 
CDs. We recently loaded these files onto an image server and only 1 CD out of 
about 500 was unreadable (fortunately the duplicate was fine).

Our most vexing problem is backing up the server files. We could just rely on 
the RAID 5 configuration on the server to protect us from a hard drive failure, 
but there is an outside chance that two or more disks could fail at the same 
time (the scenario would be some kind of disaster like fire, flood, etc.). So 
we do want a second copy of each file offline (and off-site). For the volume of 
data to be backed up (1 Terabyte and counting), tape is expensive--you need an 
automated tape library system, which is out of our reach. So we are going with 
external hard drives. These come in many flavors (some have fans for cooling, 
some have a version of RAID, some are network-attached and some are standalone, 
etc.). We are using external drives made by Seagate. The capacity is anywhere 
from 160 GB up to 400 GB. Western Digital makes similar devices. There are 
other manufacturers (e.g. LaCie) but I've been advised that the hard disks used 
in some of these devices are of lower quality than those made by Seagate and 
Western Digital (and perhaps a few others). It is also possible to purchase the 
external hard drive enclosure, and purchase and install the hard drives 
oneself. 

When a file is archived we copy it to the server and to the off-line hard 
drive. There is a period of time when the external drive is not filled yet and 
remains on-site, where theoretically it is vulnerable to the same kind of 
catastrophe that could nix the server. But we feel it is a relatively small 
risk. However we do use the smaller- capacity drives (which are a bit more 
expensive per gigabyte than the higher capacity drives) so they fill up and get 
out the door to offsite storage more quickly.

I often wonder if we are going totally overboard with this. It is very 
expensive to purchase and maintain the hardware, and very difficult and time 
consuming for staff to implement and maintain the procedures required. What we 
are storing is not original art work, just images of the art work. I've heard 
some people say it would be cheaper and easier to just re-create the digital 
archive, in case of a loss, than it is to fastidiously maintain the archive 
through time. I suppose we've concluded, at least for now, that though this 
might be true, we prefer to minimize handling the collection as much as 
possible, so we are committed to maintaining the archive.

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art

 remko.janson...@vizcayamuseum.org 12/30/2005 10:18 AM 

After a year on the job I have collected loads of digital images * =
scanned, shot, donated. It's time to put the master files in storage.Is =
there a general consensus on what materials to use? What type of CDs? Is =
there a specific pro or con to use CD envelops (compacter) or jewel boxes =
(more rigid)? Does anyone have good experiences with specific CD drawers/bo=
xes/cabinets? Is there anything I am overlooking here? Any and all =
comments are appreciated! * and a good new year to all!  Remko JansoniusCol=
lections and Archives ManagerVizcaya Museum  Gardens3251 South Miami =
AvenueMiami, FL 33129t: 305-860-8433f: 305-250-9117www.vizcayamuseum.org =
miamidade.govDelivering Excellence Every Day Miami-Dade County is a =
public entity, subject to Chapter 119 of the Florida Statutes concerning =
public records. E-mail messages and their attachments are covered under =
such laws and thus subject to disclosure. All e-mail sent to and received =
at this address is captured by Miami-Dade County servers and kept as a =
public record.=20

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Re: Linux or Windows Servers?

2005-12-09 Thread Real, Will
?

Perian et al.,

EMu (or rather, its underlying database, Texpress) is natively UNIX. We opted 
to run it on Windows server because as others have pointed out, our IT staff 
was expert in Windows server management but had no experience with UNIX/Linux. 
I have no direct experience to compare EMu's performance on Windows vs. Linux 
but I can say that in general EMu is quite stable in Windows. When we were 
pondering this decision, the Linux advocates told us we would be giving up 
Linux's relatively leaner/meaner qualities compared to Windows, in exchange for 
Windows' more user-friendly graphical interface etc. I have practically no 
experience with Linux so I can't comment on the accuracy of those assessments. 
I did get a subtle sense from KE staff that if we could have gone with Linux 
they would have recommended it, but it was very subtle. I recall there was also 
some relationship between the number of records in the database and which 
platform was recommended; as I recall the threshhold was something like 100,000 
records. Above that, I think there was a stronger recommendation for Linux. We 
were quite a bit below that level, so felt more comfortable with our choice of 
Windows.

Will Real

Carnegie Museum of Art

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Re: STEVE folksonomies / was subject keyword searching

2005-12-05 Thread Real, Will
Richard et al.,

I wanted to clarify something about my question Does anyone have an opinion 
about the value, in the networked information world, of the hierarchical LC 
subject format I described (Steel Industry--Pennsylvania--Pittsburgh.)? 

We do buy in to the idea of using LCSH as an authority for subject terms, for 
the reasons that Richard stated. What to me is questionable is the insistence 
on the pre-coordinated format in all of its arcane requirements. Recently, for 
example, I was asked by the cataloguer to correct some subject headings in our 
database because a) the heading was missing the period at the end, b) the 
second word of a two word phrase was inappropriately capitalized (Steel 
Industry should have been Steel industry), c) one of the two hyphens was 
missing, d) Pittsburgh, PA should have been written Pittsburgh, Pa. (with 
the dot at the end!).

For internal use (within the museum) these formatting subtleties are entirely 
irrelevant since our collections management system is blind to case and 
punctuation. It doesn't matter whether you query for PA or Pa., you will get 
the same results either way. It also does not matter to the database whether 
the terms are properly strung together or listed separately.

What I would like to know is, are there good arguments for maintaining this 
kind of consistency in the internet environment? If there is, it would be 
easier to bear the extra effort it takes to conform; if not, it seems like a 
waste of time and resources, with no real payoff in the end.

If we did away with the pre-coordinated, hyper-formatted version of LCSH, and 
went to a format of single terms, we would still likely use the LCSH as a 
vocabulary control, to maintain consistency in the use of subject terms. We do 
understand how critical that would be. 

If we were ever to pursue a social tagging strategy, I would imagine that the 
tags would be stored either somewhere between the catalogue itself and the 
public interface, as I think Jennifer Trant said earlier in this thread, or, in 
another field in the catalogue itself, designated for this purpose, so as not 
to overlap the social (relatively uncontrolled) vocabulary with the 
cataloguer's (LCSH etc. controlled) vocabulary.

Richard Urban wrote:

The problem that I see in these discussions is that those not 
steeped in the
cataloging tradition don't often see the LCSH as a larger 
social system of
collaboratively creating a common set of terms.  There are, no 
doubt,
challenges with using LCSH that derive from what LCSH is.  (And 
I'm going
out on a limb here. LCSH isn't covered in my cataloging class 
until next
weekcorrections welcome) LCSH subject headings aren't just 
made up willy
nilly, they're based on the concept of literary warrant or 
that the terms
used are actually represented in the body of materials being 
described.
For bibliographic texts there's a leading organization and a 
large group of
users, following a common format that debate the 
addition/deletion and
change of terms based on the bibliographic materials they see.  
I'm not
exactly sure how visual materials feed into this process, but 
the bulk of
LCSH is likely to be based on texts, rather than images. It 
often looks like
madness, but there is method to it.

The question seems to suggest whether we can/should develop a 
visual
literary warrant for describing the ofness and aboutness 
of the
materials we're describing.  Things like Cataloging Cultural 
Objects (CCO)
are an important step towards that goal because they provide 
guidance and
some liberal constraints on what kinds of controlled 
vocabularies are used
for subject description.  LCSH is not a magic bullet, but an 
appropriate
controlled vocabulary is going to offer some advantages over 
keywords.


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Re: STEVE folksonomies / was subject keyword searching

2005-11-23 Thread Real, Will
We are grappling with the question of subject headings at the moment, in 
several ways. We had not done any subject cataloguing until about 2 years ago, 
in a collaborative project involving a museum (ours), a digital library, an 
archive, and a history center. The partners decided to use library-style LCSH 
headings, as in Steel Industry--Pennsylvania--Pittsburgh. There was a 
fundamental difference of opinion among the partners regarding what the subject 
headings represent. Some (coming more out of a library/archives environment) 
seemed to think of the headings primarily as descriptive metadata about the 
images, embedded in their permanent records, while others (like us) thought of 
them primarily as a means of public access and therefore advocated a more 
liberal standard, including allowing subject headings of what the image is 
about as well as what the image is of.

On the website that resulted from the collaboration, the subject headings are 
indeed published within the individual records, along with other descriptive 
metadata like creator, title, date, etc. [It seems that publishing the subject 
headings online is more common in digital libraries than museums] Certainly the 
subject headings do provide a means of access to the images, to a point, but 
the headings were definitely created from the cataloguer's point-of-view, not 
the end user's. Thus an image depicting a person wearing a plaid suit would not 
have included plaid anywhere in the subject headings because this detail 
would not have risen to the cataloguer's idea of the image's main subjects. 
From the end user's point-of-view, however, someone could very well want to 
find this image by searching under the term plaid.

We are now engaged in another archives project ourselves, and the archivist 
responsible for the cataloguing has adopted the library-style LCSH approach 
established in the earlier collaborative project. This new project in 
particular would lend itself very well to the folksonomy approach, but my 
initial presentation of this idea has met, not unexpectedly, with resistance 
and skepticism. What seems to be hard to get accross is that this is not 
necessarily an either/or proposition. The cataloguer's LC standards can be met, 
if necessary, but end-user-friendly access terms can also be provided. But the 
mere fact that the folksonomy tags could become part of the image's database 
record seems quite disturbing to some.

Soon we will be creating subject terms for the museum's online collections 
access. It is nearly unimaginable that we will ever get there if we have to 
hire trained cataloguers or curators to provide proper LC-style headings, and 
the resulting access to the images would not be nearly as rich as it might be 
if we use the folksonomy approach, so we are keen to try.

A few questions:

Does anyone have an opinion about the value, in the networked information 
world, of the hierarchical LC subject format I described above (Steel 
Industry--Pennsylvania--Pittsburgh.)? Are others using this format (and why) 
or are you using single terms, more like keywords?

For those who have done social tagging projects, do the tags become part of a 
permanent collections database record of an object, or do they exist outside of 
that, as part of a strictly web-based implementation?

William Real, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

 

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Authenticity and integrity of archived digital master files

2005-07-03 Thread Real, Will
Dear list,
 
We are about to implement a new strategy for archiving our digital image 
masters. One copy of each file will be maintained on a live RAID server and 
another on an off-line hard drive stored off-site. The access to the on-line 
masters will be very restricted; nonetheless we are concerned about two things: 
guaranteeing the authenticity of the master file, and monitoring the masters 
for any possible degradation.
 
Up to now we had been using offline CDR for master image storage. We had been 
burning the MD5 checksums of all of the images onto their CD to enable future 
monitoring of the integrity of the file. The idea was that we would 
periodically scan the CDs to detect any changes in the MD5 checksum, which we 
thought would be indicative of some degradation and therefore a signal to 
migrate the data to another medium. What we did not have was a manageable and 
affordable procedure for monitoring the MD5 checksums for thousands of files on 
hundreds of CDs. [We were not so worried about authenticity since we had 
read-only files on the CD. Now however it is more of a concern because in 
theory, though access to the files will be restricted, someone could in fact 
replace the original file with an altered one].
 
Now that the files will be stored on the server, we envision some kind of 
automated monitoring of the MD5 checksums. We picture an application running in 
the background, or running on a schedule (nightly, weekly, etc.)  that compares 
current checksums to the checksums originally recorded and stored in a 
database, and reports in a log any mismatches. The same application could 
perform this analysis on the files stored on off-line hard drives as well.
 
We are currently using an image browser called ThumbsPlus (version 7) which, 
among other things, creates reference thumbnails and stores MD5 checksum values 
in its back-end database, written in MS Access. It could be that with these MD5 
values stored in the image browser database, we are part-way there--we have the 
first half of the equation. (I think the new Photoshop CS2 file browser, and 
perhaps many of the other image browsers like Cumulus or Portfolio do the same 
thing)
 
Do any of you have a system of the kind we are envisioning? Is there any 
off-the-shelf software that does this? Absent a pre-existing application, 
would any of you be interested in sharing the cost of developing something like 
this?
 
Will Real
Technology Initiatives
Carnegie Museum of Art
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IP Question regarding meaning of Publication in the Museum context

2005-05-10 Thread Real, Will
No doubt this has been hashed out before but I've not found anything explicit 
on this subject. I am wondering if any consensus has been reached in the museum 
field.

The copyright law says that works published before 1923 are in the public 
domain. For the purposes of museum objects, what constitutes publication? Does 
public exhibition of a unique work satisfy the publication requirement? What 
about publication of an image of a unique work in a catalogue or brochure  or 
periodical prior to 1923? Do print editions constitute publication? Are 
mass-produced objects (furniture, utensils, clocks, etc.) created for retail 
sales considered published? What if these items were designed by someone not 
working for hire, whose death date is 1935 or later? There are undoubtedly many 
other related questions, but perhaps that is enough for now.

If any of you are subscribed to the RARIN list (there is one, right?) would you 
consider posting my query there with a request to send responses directly to 
me? I would be happy to post a synopsis to MCN-L later.

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art

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Optical Media Pen available from the AIC Electronic Media Group

2005-04-19 Thread Real, Will
Many pens commonly used to label CDs, DVDs, and other optical disks may cause 
permanent damage, making the disk unreadable.

ANNOUNCING THE EMG PEN--SAFE FOR USE IN LABELING CDS AND DVDS
The EMG Pen has a felt tip and water-based ink. Other marking pens with fine 
points or rolling balls, as well as those with solvent-based inks, pose a 
danger to optical media because they may cause damage that interferes with a 
laser's ability to read recorded data.

There are two ways to obtain an EMG Pen:

Purchase
Your purchase of EMG pens supports future EMG programming and education 
efforts. 
Pens are priced as follows:
1-3 pens$4.00 each
4-10 pens   $3.50 each
11+ pens$3.00 each
(prices include shipping  handling charges)

To order pens, download the order form and follow the printed instructions at 
http://aic.stanford.edu/sg/emg/pen/pen_order.pdf

Pens will also be on sale during the EMG 2005 program at the AIC Annual Meeting 
in Minneapolis.

AIC Members may obtain the pen by joining the EMG specialty group.
(Current EMG members will receive their free pen in the mail.)
EMG annual membership dues to AIC members are $15.
Membership benefits include access to the EMG listserv and affiliation with 
AIC's newest speciality group.
Your dues support EMG's programs at the annual AIC meetings, programs which 
explore some of the newest challenges facing conservators of modern media 
today. 
To become a member of EMG, visit the AIC membership web page at
http://aic.stanford.edu/about/overview/membership.html 


Find out more about:
*the EMG specialty group http://aic.stanford.edu/sg/emg/about.html
*the EMG 2005 program http://aic.stanford.edu/sg/emg/minneapolis2005-NEXT.html

William Real
AIC EMG Chair

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A Cataloguing Question

2005-01-31 Thread Real, Will
Hi everyone,

We are having a disagreement here among staff with differing approaches to 
cataloguing a large collection of Japanese prints in our collections management 
system. Many of the prints are part of a series, and in many cases we own the 
entire series of prints.

One school of thought is that the series title ought to be part of the print 
title, and that no hierarchical records (e.g. a group record for the series as 
a whole, with child records for each print that is part of the series) are 
needed since a user could recall the records by either the print title or the 
series title in the main title field.

Others gravitate towards segregating the print title and the series title (and 
number), and creating group-level records for the series, with child records 
for the prints. Those of us who favor this understand that when the data is 
displayed (on the web or on a label or other publication), data from the Series 
 and Number in Series fields have to be concatenated with data from the Title 
field so it looks like the title of the object is print so and so, No. 3 from 
the series such and such.

It was suggested that we take an informal survey to find out how other 
institutions approach this or similar situations, to see if there is in fact 
some consensus. We are especially interested in hearing from insitutions that 
catalogue Japanese prints in particular, since it is this group of objects that 
seems to have stirred up the most controversy.

CCO seems to favor separate fields for Title and Series (or designating one 
title as collective title which is similar), and also seems to favor 
Whole/Part relationships for this situation. It does say that when a repository 
does not have the entire series, it may not want to create the record for the 
whole series, which might be misleading. In our case, more often than not, the 
series are complete.

A third way would be to create an Alternate Title of type Display that 
includes the entire string of print title, number in series, and series title, 
as preferred by one group, while also entering the data in the separate fields 
and in hierarchical relationships, as favored by the other group. (Though this 
seems like a labor intensive way to try to satisfy everyone.)

Anyone care to jump in?

[full disclosure: I am in the whole/part camp, but if you are not doing it that 
way, bring it on!]

Will Real
Technology Initiatives
Carnegie Museum of Art
Pittsburgh PA

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Part/Whole Relationships in Museum Collections

2002-03-19 Thread Real, Will
I am curious to see if there is any consensus in the museum community
regarding the cataloguing of objects with part/whole relationships. I
realize there are countless permutations of this situation, but the
prototypical example in our institution is a tea set. The tea set contains
various components--teapot, cups/saucers, sugar bowls--which themselves are
composed of parts--the sugar bowl lid and the bowl itself; the cup and its
saucer, the teapot and its stand, etc.

We are about to implement a new collections management system (KE EMu) and
currently our strategy is as follows:

1. Catalogue the various components as individual items--the pot, the bowl,
the cups/saucers, all with unique numbers (2001.2.1, etc.). The components
would be linked to eachother in the database as Related Objects
2. Catalogue the parts of a component in a Child relationship to that
component's record--the bowl and lid, the cup and saucer, etc., all
designated with letters (2001.2.1.A, etc.)

We are not sure what to do about the ensemble of all the components--the tea
set as a whole. It currently does not have a catalogue number, but we can
imagine the usefulness of having a record for the set, in a Parent
relationship to each individual component. If we do this, we have to give
the set itself a unique number, or refer to it by the range of numbers it
includes (2001.2.1-10), or employ a totally new (for our institution)
cataloguing level, more like a scope note or folder-level record, as might
be typical in a catalogue of archival material, for example.

Perhaps this is a query for the AAM Registrar's Committee listserv (is
anyone out there a member who would be willing to post it on my behalf?).
However, if any of you have some ideas on the matter we would be interested
to hear them.

William Real
Director of Technology Initiatives
Carngie Museum of Art
412-622-3267



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[MCN-L] Jpeg2000 deployments online?

1970-01-01 Thread Real, Will
Do any of you know of any museums/libraries/archives that are deploying
jpeg2000 images online with a viewer that allows the user to zoom into
fine detail?

We are envisioning various scenarios as part of a budget planning
process. I want to get an idea of the file sizes required (perhaps in
terms of a percentage of the master TIFF from which it is derived) to
provide a zoomable jpeg online.

I am also interested in knowing what is being used, if anything, to
provide the end user with the jpeg2000 viewer. A home grown application?
Luna? Aware, Inc.? Etc.?

Any tips or pointers appreciated.

Will Real
Carnegie Museum of Art
Realw [at] carnegiemuseums.org