Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-15 Thread WILTON via Mercedes
Yep.  Yonder -- often preceded by up, down or over - not far thatta way, 
sometimes accompanied by nod or wave of hand.


Wilton

- Original Message - 
From: Rich Thomas via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com

To: mercedes@okiebenz.com
Cc: Rich Thomas richthomas79td...@constructivity.net
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2015 11:42 AM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY


Yonder -- some indeterminate location over yonder  Where it at? Over 
yonder sometimes with a nod of the head in a general direction


Plum wo out -- completely worn out

wawmehn -- a watermelon

all y'all -- evvabody

--R

On 6/13/15 11:04 PM, WILTON via Mercedes wrote:

More GLOSSARY
By Wilton Strickland

Wachamacallit, wachamadoodle -- whatever you may call it - a thing
Warda, warder -- water
Way up yonh -- a long way up there
Well, I do declare. -- I'm amazed.
Weuns -- we, us
Wheelbar' -- wheelbarrow
'While ago -- a few minutes ago
Whir -- where
Whuppin'-- spanking
Wid -- with
Wide open -- full speed, as fast as it will go
Wire grass -- wild Bermuda grass in the fields of d'backa, corn, cotton, 
etc.

Whoa, Ho -- signal or command for mule to stop
Who'da thunkit? -- Who would have thought 
Won't -- wasn't, weren't, will not
Wore out -- badly worn
Ya -- you
Yabut -- yes, but
Y'all, pl. all y'all -- you, Southern for youse guys (Y'all has always 
been plural for me; I've never used all y'all.)

Y'all's, y'allses -- your, yours
Yeah -- yes
Yep -- yes
Yestiddy -- yesterday
Yon't da? -- Do you want to?
You can't get blood out of a turnip. -- You can't take from me what I 
don't have (usually on the subject of money).

You'da -- you would/should have
You look like a gutted herring. -- You look really bad!
You may want horns, but you'll die mull-headed. -- Your wants have no 
bearing whatever on the situation.

Yourn -- your, yours
Your goose is cooked. --You are really in trouble.
Youse guys -- y'all, you (not native to the area; imported from up nawth 
and used by a native only in jest)

Yowbut -- Yes, but
Yungun -- child
Zink -- sink

Wilton

___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com





___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com




___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-14 Thread Rich Thomas via Mercedes
Yonder -- some indeterminate location over yonder  Where it at? Over 
yonder sometimes with a nod of the head in a general direction


Plum wo out -- completely worn out

wawmehn -- a watermelon

all y'all -- evvabody

--R

On 6/13/15 11:04 PM, WILTON via Mercedes wrote:

More GLOSSARY
By Wilton Strickland

Wachamacallit, wachamadoodle -- whatever you may call it - a thing
Warda, warder -- water
Way up yonh -- a long way up there
Well, I do declare. -- I'm amazed.
Weuns -- we, us
Wheelbar' -- wheelbarrow
'While ago -- a few minutes ago
Whir -- where
Whuppin'-- spanking
Wid -- with
Wide open -- full speed, as fast as it will go
Wire grass -- wild Bermuda grass in the fields of d'backa, corn, 
cotton, etc.

Whoa, Ho -- signal or command for mule to stop
Who'da thunkit? -- Who would have thought 
Won't -- wasn't, weren't, will not
Wore out -- badly worn
Ya -- you
Yabut -- yes, but
Y'all, pl. all y'all -- you, Southern for youse guys (Y'all has always 
been plural for me; I've never used all y'all.)

Y'all's, y'allses -- your, yours
Yeah -- yes
Yep -- yes
Yestiddy -- yesterday
Yon't da? -- Do you want to?
You can't get blood out of a turnip. -- You can't take from me what I 
don't have (usually on the subject of money).

You'da -- you would/should have
You look like a gutted herring. -- You look really bad!
You may want horns, but you'll die mull-headed. -- Your wants have no 
bearing whatever on the situation.

Yourn -- your, yours
Your goose is cooked. --You are really in trouble.
Youse guys -- y'all, you (not native to the area; imported from up 
nawth and used by a native only in jest)

Yowbut -- Yes, but
Yungun -- child
Zink -- sink

Wilton

___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com





___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



[MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-13 Thread WILTON via Mercedes

More GLOSSARY
By Wilton Strickland

Wachamacallit, wachamadoodle -- whatever you may call it - a thing
Warda, warder -- water
Way up yonh -- a long way up there
Well, I do declare. -- I'm amazed.
Weuns -- we, us
Wheelbar' -- wheelbarrow
'While ago -- a few minutes ago
Whir -- where
Whuppin'-- spanking
Wid -- with
Wide open -- full speed, as fast as it will go
Wire grass -- wild Bermuda grass in the fields of d'backa, corn, cotton, 
etc.

Whoa, Ho -- signal or command for mule to stop
Who'da thunkit? -- Who would have thought 
Won't -- wasn't, weren't, will not
Wore out -- badly worn
Ya -- you
Yabut -- yes, but
Y'all, pl. all y'all -- you, Southern for youse guys (Y'all has always been 
plural for me; I've never used all y'all.)

Y'all's, y'allses -- your, yours
Yeah -- yes
Yep -- yes
Yestiddy -- yesterday
Yon't da? -- Do you want to?
You can't get blood out of a turnip. -- You can't take from me what I don't 
have (usually on the subject of money).

You'da -- you would/should have
You look like a gutted herring. -- You look really bad!
You may want horns, but you'll die mull-headed. -- Your wants have no 
bearing whatever on the situation.

Yourn -- your, yours
Your goose is cooked. --You are really in trouble.
Youse guys -- y'all, you (not native to the area; imported from up nawth and 
used by a native only in jest)

Yowbut -- Yes, but
Yungun -- child
Zink -- sink

Wilton 



___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-09 Thread archer75--- via Mercedes

When a woman of the '30s, '40s, '50s said she had fallen off the roof it 
meant that she was having her period. I looked it up and couldn't find its 
origin. I wonder if it has something to do with rusty tin roof, tin roof, 
rusted, etc.?
Gerry


WILTON wrote:

 'Never heard anything 'bouta rusty tin roof for anything related to 
 pregnancy.
 
 Wilton
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Curt Raymond via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com
 To: Mercedes Discussion List mercedes@okiebenz.com
 Cc: Curt Raymond curtlud...@yahoo.com
 Sent: Monday, June 08, 2015 5:44 PM
 Subject: Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY
 
 
  Did anybody ever actually hear anybody say tin roof, rusted for 
  pregnancy? I've heard it used in music (most famously by the B52s) but 
  never actually heard anybody say it.
  -Curt
   From: Rich Thomas via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com
  To: mercedes@okiebenz.com
  Cc: Rich Thomas richthomas79td...@constructivity.net
  Sent: Monday, June 8, 2015 4:35 PM
  Subject: Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY
 
  You forgot, I'll swann which I think meant I'll swear but
  Baptists never swore so swan it was. And Lawslaws or Lawsamercy
  which also substituted for lawdlawd etc.
 
  And Rectum -- that boy drove them tars off the road and rectum. Had ta
  git a coupla recaps ta fixem.
 
 
  --R
 
 
 
  On 6/8/15 3:19 PM, WILTON via Mercedes wrote:
  More GLOSSARY
  By Wilton Strickland
 
  I lost my homework. -- I did not do my homework.
  I'll be dog, I'll be doggone -- I'm amazed
  In a bind, in a scrape/squeeze, in a tight -- in trouble, need money
  to pay bills
  In a family way -- pregnant
  In high cotton -- got it made; doing very well
  In hog heaven -- also doing very well - very comfortable
  In the foot of the truck or car -- on the floor
  In the short rows -- almost finished
  I'm done. -- I've finished.
  I'm fixin' da -- I'm getting ready to; I'm about to; I'm going to
  In the heat o' d'day -- during the hottest part of the day, usually,
  early to mid-afternoon
  I put it right where I'd know where it is. -- I've lost it.
  Irregardless -- regardless
  I snibbed it -- I just brushed the side of it; almost missed
  I stole it -- I paid hardly anything for it.
  I swanny -- substitute for I swear
  Itching like a man on a fuzzy tree -- itching really bad
  It floored me. -- It astonished, surprised or baffled me.
  It really got away with me -- It embarrassed me.
  I yea'bout died or I near 'bout died -- I was so shocked, I almost died.
  Jawl-P? -- Did you go to the bathroom?
  Jeet yet -- Have you eaten yet?
  Jes' like a sharecropper in a drought -- not doing very well
  Johnny on the spot -- always on time
  Jump from the fryin' pan into the fire -- get in even worse trouble
  Just a hair -- a very small unit of measure; a hair's width
  Kick the traces -- out of line; breach restraints
  Knock on wood -- to prevent bad luck
  Landlord -- landowner
  'Lasses -- molasses
  Layin' down -- lying down
  Layin' by d'backa, hillin' d'backa -- final plowing of the tobacco
  crop for the season
  Leastwise -- at least
  'Lectwisty -- electricity
  Less is more. -- Don't over do it. Keep it simple.
  Lick -- a brush with the tongue, a blow with a hand
  Lick of work -- a token stroke of work
  Lickity-split -- quickly
  Light the fahr -- start the fire
  Like something on a stick -- something special, such as a candy apple
  or a lollipop
  Loopin' d'backa, stringin' d'backa -- attaching the tobacco leaves to
  sticks with cotton string (d'backa twine) to facilitate hanging it in
  the curing or drying barn.
  Mad as a wet settin' hen -- really upset, angry
  Mad as fire -- very angry, violent temper
  Mad as Hell -- even more angry
  Makin' hay -- making good progress
  Malarkey -- mess, foolishness, worthless stuff
  Mash -- squeeze tightly, push a button or pedal; often done to
  potatoes to cream them
  'Matahs, 'maters, 'matussusses -- tomatoes
  Mendin' up, puttin' on a little -- gaining weight
  Mess of peas, beans, corn, turnip salad (salit), etc. -- enough to
  cook for a meal
  Messed up -- made a mistake; out of order
  Might -- may
  Might can -- may be able to
  Might would -- may decide to
  Mighty -- southern for very
  Mitzibushy Zero -- Mitsubishi Zero, WW II Japanese fighter plane
  Mommic or mommic up -- break or render inoperative, mess up
  Monks, i. e., in 6 monks -- months - in 6 months
  Moppin' cotton -- mopping arsenic-laced molasses onto cotton plants
  using a mop of rags on the end of a short stick
  Mud hole -- puddle of water
  My ears are burning. -- Somebody is talking about me.
  My left palm is itching. -- I'm getting some money.
  My nose is itching. -- Somebody is coming.
  My right palm is itching. -- I'm going to shake a stranger's hand.
  My stomach hurts. -- I don't want to go to school this morning. I
  don't want to drop soda. I don't want to sucker tobacco today. Etc.
  Nab -- catch - The police will nab

[MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-09 Thread WILTON via Mercedes

More GLOSSARY
By Wilton Strickland

Settin' hen -- a chicken hen sitting on eggs to incubate them
Sharif - sheriff
Sharp as a tack.-- very crisp, well defined, clean, neat, smart
Sheet berry -- cockle burr
She has let herself go. -- She is looking bad.
Sho'nuff, shore 'nuff, sure 'nuff  -- certainly
Shoulda -- should have
Shevel -- shovel
Shy on the collar -- mule or horse not pulling very well; not pulling his 
weight; not doing his part

Silent as a tomb.  Can't get any quieter than that!!!
Slap out of town -- way out of town; in the country
Slide truck -- small mule-drawn truck with burlap sides; used  to haul d'backa 
from the fields to the curing barn; usually sits on two wooden 2 x 4 
runners/slides.
Sling a nasty, cut a circle -- spinning rear wheels of a car to sling dirt 
and gravel, often in a circular pattern.
Slop -- a soupy mixture of table scraps, leftovers and, sometimes, ground 
grain, fed to swine
Slop jar -- chamber pot, usually kept under Mama's bed (I think she was the 
only one in our family to use it occasionally at night as necessary; the 
rest of us went outside.)

Smart as a briar -- very smart
Smidgen -- just a little bit
Snake in the grass -- a no good, no account, sorry scoundrel, a crook. 
(Sometimes used in lieu of landlord or certain landlord's name - that's 
where I heard it most, anyway.)

Snib -- just brush the edge of it (He snibbed the ball.)
Sorry-- no good scoundrel; also, an expression of remorse
Sottin' out d'backa -- transplanting tobacco
Souge -- stick or ram something in with great force
'Spensive -- expensive
Spinnin' like a top or in a whirl -- moving fast, always in motion
S'pose -- supposed to or suppose; ought to, should, required to; also, what 
if

Squeatden -- Let's go eat, then.
Steering knob -- a knob mounted on outer rim of a steering wheel to 
facilitate hard, rapid steering with one hand

Stick in the mud -- stubborn, slow to change
Stob -- stake
Stomp -- quick pressure with the bottom of a foot
Store-bought -- professionally-made, bought in a store, not home-made
Straw that broke the camel's back -- the last in a series of events that 
finally produced a certain result

Strowed -- strewn
Sturning wheel -- steering wheel
Suckrin', toppin' d'backa -- breaking the suckers and/or tops off of tobacco 
plants.
Sugar -- a kiss - Come here and give me some sugar.  Any Southern child 
knows the difference between this and that sweet stuff on the dinner table.

Sumpn -- something
Suppah, supper -- evening meal, dinner
Sure as shootin' -- certainly
Sut -- soot
Sweet as apple pie -- a sweet, agreeable disposition or personality
Swe'gum tree -- sweet gum tree
Swell -- very good, also to expand
Swingle tree -- single tree - short beam device used to connect a single 
draft animal's harness to a load (plow, wagon, etc.)

Take up with -- develop a relationship regardless of good reasons against it
'Taters, 'tatahs -- potatoes
Talking through his hat -- 'doesn't have a clue about what is happening
Tawk, tawkin' -- talk, talking
'Tend to, attend to -- take care of
That's a different set of dogs. -- That's an unrelated family.
That's a plenny.  That's a plenty. -- That's enough.
Thang - thing
The cat is out of the bag. -- The secret is out.
The dog ate my homework. -- I did not do my homework.
The house has lights. -- The house has electricity.
The onlyest -- by itself - absolutely the only one
There ya go.  'Air ya go. -- Here it is.
The skinny, the scoop, the straight poop -- information, the truth
The whole nine yards, the whole kit and kabouddle -- all of it
Thingamagig, thingamabob-- thing
Thumb, hitch or bum a ride -- stand by the road and ask passersby for a ride 
by holding your thumb up and motioning with it in the direction you want to 
go; hitch hiking

Thunder mug -- chamber pot
Tight -- stingy, usually with money (reluctant to spend money)
Tight as Dick's hat band -- very tight
Toss in your hat, and see if it's thrown back out.  -- a test of acceptance. 
If you toss in your hat and it is thrown back out, you are in big trouble!!!

Tote -- to lug, carry, or transport, usually, in one's arms or hands
T'rectly, d'rectly -- immediately
Truckin' d'backa -- hauling the newly primed tobacco to the barn to be 
strung onto sticks to facilitate hanging it in the curing barn.

Tryin' to get up with 'im  -- trying to find him, trying to meet with him.
Tuckered out -- exhausted, tired
Turnip salad or salit -- cooked turnip greens, best eaten with cornbread 
sticks or hush puppies.

Twiced -- twice, two times
Ugly -- unpleasant or disagreeable
Ugly as homemade soap -- really ugly
Um-humh -- yes
Ump-unh - no
Up'air -- up there
Up and at 'em.  Rise and shine. -- Get up and get started!
Uppity -- acting beyond/above his or her raising/training
Upsey, Daisy -- Get up.
Up yonh, up yondah, up yonder -- up there a little way (a short distance)

Wilton 



___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

[MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread WILTON via Mercedes

More GLOSSARY
By Wilton Strickland

I lost my homework. -- I did not do my homework.
I'll be dog, I'll be doggone -- I'm amazed
In a bind, in a scrape/squeeze, in a tight -- in trouble, need money to pay 
bills

In a family way -- pregnant
In high cotton -- got it made; doing very well
In hog heaven -- also doing very well - very comfortable
In the foot of the truck or car -- on the floor
In the short rows -- almost finished
I'm done. -- I've finished.
I'm fixin' da -- I'm getting ready to; I'm about to; I'm going to
In the heat o' d'day -- during the hottest part of the day, usually, early 
to mid-afternoon

I put it right where I'd know where it is. -- I've lost it.
Irregardless -- regardless
I snibbed it -- I just brushed the side of it; almost missed
I stole it -- I paid hardly anything for it.
I swanny -- substitute for I swear
Itching like a man on a fuzzy tree -- itching really bad
It floored me. -- It astonished, surprised or baffled me.
It really got away with me -- It embarrassed me.
I yea'bout died or I near 'bout died -- I was so shocked, I almost died.
Jawl-P? -- Did you go to the bathroom?
Jeet yet -- Have you eaten yet?
Jes' like a sharecropper in a drought -- not doing very well
Johnny on the spot -- always on time
Jump from the fryin' pan into the fire -- get in even worse trouble
Just a hair -- a very small unit of measure; a hair's width
Kick the traces -- out of line; breach restraints
Knock on wood -- to prevent bad luck
Landlord  -- landowner
'Lasses -- molasses
Layin' down -- lying down
Layin' by d'backa, hillin' d'backa -- final plowing of the tobacco crop for 
the season

Leastwise -- at least
'Lectwisty -- electricity
Less is more. -- Don't over do it.  Keep it simple.
Lick -- a brush with the tongue, a blow with a hand
Lick of work -- a token stroke of work
Lickity-split -- quickly
Light the fahr -- start the fire
Like something on a stick -- something special, such as a candy apple or a 
lollipop
Loopin' d'backa, stringin' d'backa -- attaching the tobacco leaves to sticks 
with cotton string (d'backa twine) to facilitate hanging it in the curing or 
drying barn.

Mad as a wet settin' hen -- really upset, angry
Mad as fire -- very angry, violent temper
Mad as Hell -- even more angry
Makin' hay -- making good progress
Malarkey -- mess, foolishness, worthless stuff
Mash -- squeeze tightly, push a button or pedal; often done to potatoes to 
cream them

'Matahs, 'maters, 'matussusses -- tomatoes
Mendin' up, puttin' on a little -- gaining weight
Mess of peas, beans, corn, turnip salad (salit), etc. -- enough to cook for 
a meal

Messed up -- made a mistake; out of order
Might -- may
Might can -- may be able to
Might would -- may decide to
Mighty -- southern for very
Mitzibushy Zero -- Mitsubishi Zero, WW II Japanese fighter plane
Mommic or mommic up -- break or render inoperative, mess up
Monks, i. e., in 6 monks -- months - in 6 months
Moppin' cotton -- mopping arsenic-laced molasses onto cotton plants using a 
mop of rags on the end of a short stick

Mud hole -- puddle of water
My ears are burning. -- Somebody is talking about me.
My left palm is itching. -- I'm getting some money.
My nose is itching. -- Somebody is coming.
My right palm is itching. -- I'm going to shake a stranger's hand.
My stomach hurts. -- I don't want to go to school this morning.  I don't 
want to drop soda.  I don't want to sucker tobacco today.  Etc.

Nab -- catch - The police will nab the killer.
Nabs -- small crackers with peanut butter between them, some square, some 
round (disc-shaped), often made by Nabisco and available at d'store with a 
cold Co-Cola, Pepsi, RC, etc., for a snack.  Substitute for a moon pie or a 
small bag of salted peanuts.

Nairn -- none
Nairy -- neither, as in, Nairy one.
Name your poison. -- What would you like to eat or drink?
Naw, nawp, nope -- no
Nekkid -- naked, nude
Noggin' -- head
Not a lick of sense -- really stupid
Not worth a nickel ridin' or walkin' -- nearly worthless in any way 
considered
Nubb, nubbin' -- a very small ear of corn; the short part left after part of 
a normally long object is missing.  He stuck out his hand to pet the large 
dog, and drew back a nubb.

Oh, Lordy! Oh Gosh!, Oh me! -- surprised, shocked
Onct -- once, one time
On the ball -- got it just right
Ourn -- ours
Out of something is to temporarily have none of it; to be slap out of it is 
to have none of it and have little chance of having any more soon.

Ort to, orta -- ought to, should
Own -- on
Packhouse -- a building on the farm to store cured tobacco awaiting grading 
and transport to market

Pallet -- bed on the floor usually made by spreading a quilt
Pattirolman -- state police - highway patrolman
Peaked -- sick, not feeling well
Peggin' d'backa -- transplanting tobacco using a hand-held wooden peg to 
punch holes in wet soil

Percolator -- coffee maker
Picture show -- movie
Piffy -- pithy, soft
Pinhooker -- an individual who buys tobacco at the sales warehouse, re-packs 
it and re-sells 

Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread Rich Thomas via Mercedes
You forgot, I'll swann  which I think meant I'll swear but 
Baptists never swore so swan it was.  And Lawslaws or Lawsamercy 
which also substituted for lawdlawd etc.


And Rectum -- that boy drove them tars off the road and rectum. Had ta 
git a coupla recaps ta fixem.



--R



On 6/8/15 3:19 PM, WILTON via Mercedes wrote:

More GLOSSARY
By Wilton Strickland

I lost my homework. -- I did not do my homework.
I'll be dog, I'll be doggone -- I'm amazed
In a bind, in a scrape/squeeze, in a tight -- in trouble, need money 
to pay bills

In a family way -- pregnant
In high cotton -- got it made; doing very well
In hog heaven -- also doing very well - very comfortable
In the foot of the truck or car -- on the floor
In the short rows -- almost finished
I'm done. -- I've finished.
I'm fixin' da -- I'm getting ready to; I'm about to; I'm going to
In the heat o' d'day -- during the hottest part of the day, usually, 
early to mid-afternoon

I put it right where I'd know where it is. -- I've lost it.
Irregardless -- regardless
I snibbed it -- I just brushed the side of it; almost missed
I stole it -- I paid hardly anything for it.
I swanny -- substitute for I swear
Itching like a man on a fuzzy tree -- itching really bad
It floored me. -- It astonished, surprised or baffled me.
It really got away with me -- It embarrassed me.
I yea'bout died or I near 'bout died -- I was so shocked, I almost died.
Jawl-P? -- Did you go to the bathroom?
Jeet yet -- Have you eaten yet?
Jes' like a sharecropper in a drought -- not doing very well
Johnny on the spot -- always on time
Jump from the fryin' pan into the fire -- get in even worse trouble
Just a hair -- a very small unit of measure; a hair's width
Kick the traces -- out of line; breach restraints
Knock on wood -- to prevent bad luck
Landlord  -- landowner
'Lasses -- molasses
Layin' down -- lying down
Layin' by d'backa, hillin' d'backa -- final plowing of the tobacco 
crop for the season

Leastwise -- at least
'Lectwisty -- electricity
Less is more. -- Don't over do it.  Keep it simple.
Lick -- a brush with the tongue, a blow with a hand
Lick of work -- a token stroke of work
Lickity-split -- quickly
Light the fahr -- start the fire
Like something on a stick -- something special, such as a candy apple 
or a lollipop
Loopin' d'backa, stringin' d'backa -- attaching the tobacco leaves to 
sticks with cotton string (d'backa twine) to facilitate hanging it in 
the curing or drying barn.

Mad as a wet settin' hen -- really upset, angry
Mad as fire -- very angry, violent temper
Mad as Hell -- even more angry
Makin' hay -- making good progress
Malarkey -- mess, foolishness, worthless stuff
Mash -- squeeze tightly, push a button or pedal; often done to 
potatoes to cream them

'Matahs, 'maters, 'matussusses -- tomatoes
Mendin' up, puttin' on a little -- gaining weight
Mess of peas, beans, corn, turnip salad (salit), etc. -- enough to 
cook for a meal

Messed up -- made a mistake; out of order
Might -- may
Might can -- may be able to
Might would -- may decide to
Mighty -- southern for very
Mitzibushy Zero -- Mitsubishi Zero, WW II Japanese fighter plane
Mommic or mommic up -- break or render inoperative, mess up
Monks, i. e., in 6 monks -- months - in 6 months
Moppin' cotton -- mopping arsenic-laced molasses onto cotton plants 
using a mop of rags on the end of a short stick

Mud hole -- puddle of water
My ears are burning. -- Somebody is talking about me.
My left palm is itching. -- I'm getting some money.
My nose is itching. -- Somebody is coming.
My right palm is itching. -- I'm going to shake a stranger's hand.
My stomach hurts. -- I don't want to go to school this morning.  I 
don't want to drop soda.  I don't want to sucker tobacco today. Etc.

Nab -- catch - The police will nab the killer.
Nabs -- small crackers with peanut butter between them, some square, 
some round (disc-shaped), often made by Nabisco and available at 
d'store with a cold Co-Cola, Pepsi, RC, etc., for a snack.  Substitute 
for a moon pie or a small bag of salted peanuts.

Nairn -- none
Nairy -- neither, as in, Nairy one.
Name your poison. -- What would you like to eat or drink?
Naw, nawp, nope -- no
Nekkid -- naked, nude
Noggin' -- head
Not a lick of sense -- really stupid
Not worth a nickel ridin' or walkin' -- nearly worthless in any way 
considered
Nubb, nubbin' -- a very small ear of corn; the short part left after 
part of a normally long object is missing.  He stuck out his hand to 
pet the large dog, and drew back a nubb.

Oh, Lordy! Oh Gosh!, Oh me! -- surprised, shocked
Onct -- once, one time
On the ball -- got it just right
Ourn -- ours
Out of something is to temporarily have none of it; to be slap out of 
it is to have none of it and have little chance of having any more soon.

Ort to, orta -- ought to, should
Own -- on
Packhouse -- a building on the farm to store cured tobacco awaiting 
grading and transport to market

Pallet -- bed on the floor usually made by spreading a quilt

Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread WILTON via Mercedes
Yep, I swanny (on the list) for I swear and Lawsamercy for Lord, have 
mercy.


Wilton

- Original Message - 
From: Rich Thomas via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com

To: mercedes@okiebenz.com
Cc: Rich Thomas richthomas79td...@constructivity.net
Sent: Monday, June 08, 2015 4:35 PM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY


You forgot, I'll swann  which I think meant I'll swear but 
Baptists never swore so swan it was.  And Lawslaws or Lawsamercy which 
also substituted for lawdlawd etc.


And Rectum -- that boy drove them tars off the road and rectum. Had ta 
git a coupla recaps ta fixem.



--R



On 6/8/15 3:19 PM, WILTON via Mercedes wrote:

More GLOSSARY
By Wilton Strickland

I lost my homework. -- I did not do my homework.
I'll be dog, I'll be doggone -- I'm amazed
In a bind, in a scrape/squeeze, in a tight -- in trouble, need money to 
pay bills

In a family way -- pregnant
In high cotton -- got it made; doing very well
In hog heaven -- also doing very well - very comfortable
In the foot of the truck or car -- on the floor
In the short rows -- almost finished
I'm done. -- I've finished.
I'm fixin' da -- I'm getting ready to; I'm about to; I'm going to
In the heat o' d'day -- during the hottest part of the day, usually, 
early to mid-afternoon

I put it right where I'd know where it is. -- I've lost it.
Irregardless -- regardless
I snibbed it -- I just brushed the side of it; almost missed
I stole it -- I paid hardly anything for it.
I swanny -- substitute for I swear
Itching like a man on a fuzzy tree -- itching really bad
It floored me. -- It astonished, surprised or baffled me.
It really got away with me -- It embarrassed me.
I yea'bout died or I near 'bout died -- I was so shocked, I almost died.
Jawl-P? -- Did you go to the bathroom?
Jeet yet -- Have you eaten yet?
Jes' like a sharecropper in a drought -- not doing very well
Johnny on the spot -- always on time
Jump from the fryin' pan into the fire -- get in even worse trouble
Just a hair -- a very small unit of measure; a hair's width
Kick the traces -- out of line; breach restraints
Knock on wood -- to prevent bad luck
Landlord  -- landowner
'Lasses -- molasses
Layin' down -- lying down
Layin' by d'backa, hillin' d'backa -- final plowing of the tobacco crop 
for the season

Leastwise -- at least
'Lectwisty -- electricity
Less is more. -- Don't over do it.  Keep it simple.
Lick -- a brush with the tongue, a blow with a hand
Lick of work -- a token stroke of work
Lickity-split -- quickly
Light the fahr -- start the fire
Like something on a stick -- something special, such as a candy apple or 
a lollipop
Loopin' d'backa, stringin' d'backa -- attaching the tobacco leaves to 
sticks with cotton string (d'backa twine) to facilitate hanging it in the 
curing or drying barn.

Mad as a wet settin' hen -- really upset, angry
Mad as fire -- very angry, violent temper
Mad as Hell -- even more angry
Makin' hay -- making good progress
Malarkey -- mess, foolishness, worthless stuff
Mash -- squeeze tightly, push a button or pedal; often done to potatoes 
to cream them

'Matahs, 'maters, 'matussusses -- tomatoes
Mendin' up, puttin' on a little -- gaining weight
Mess of peas, beans, corn, turnip salad (salit), etc. -- enough to cook 
for a meal

Messed up -- made a mistake; out of order
Might -- may
Might can -- may be able to
Might would -- may decide to
Mighty -- southern for very
Mitzibushy Zero -- Mitsubishi Zero, WW II Japanese fighter plane
Mommic or mommic up -- break or render inoperative, mess up
Monks, i. e., in 6 monks -- months - in 6 months
Moppin' cotton -- mopping arsenic-laced molasses onto cotton plants using 
a mop of rags on the end of a short stick

Mud hole -- puddle of water
My ears are burning. -- Somebody is talking about me.
My left palm is itching. -- I'm getting some money.
My nose is itching. -- Somebody is coming.
My right palm is itching. -- I'm going to shake a stranger's hand.
My stomach hurts. -- I don't want to go to school this morning.  I don't 
want to drop soda.  I don't want to sucker tobacco today. Etc.

Nab -- catch - The police will nab the killer.
Nabs -- small crackers with peanut butter between them, some square, some 
round (disc-shaped), often made by Nabisco and available at d'store with 
a cold Co-Cola, Pepsi, RC, etc., for a snack.  Substitute for a moon pie 
or a small bag of salted peanuts.

Nairn -- none
Nairy -- neither, as in, Nairy one.
Name your poison. -- What would you like to eat or drink?
Naw, nawp, nope -- no
Nekkid -- naked, nude
Noggin' -- head
Not a lick of sense -- really stupid
Not worth a nickel ridin' or walkin' -- nearly worthless in any way 
considered
Nubb, nubbin' -- a very small ear of corn; the short part left after part 
of a normally long object is missing.  He stuck out his hand to pet the 
large dog, and drew back a nubb.

Oh, Lordy! Oh Gosh!, Oh me! -- surprised, shocked
Onct -- once, one time
On the ball -- got it just right
Ourn -- ours
Out

Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread WILTON via Mercedes
'Never heard anything 'bouta rusty tin roof for anything related to 
pregnancy.


Wilton

- Original Message - 
From: Curt Raymond via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com

To: Mercedes Discussion List mercedes@okiebenz.com
Cc: Curt Raymond curtlud...@yahoo.com
Sent: Monday, June 08, 2015 5:44 PM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY


Did anybody ever actually hear anybody say tin roof, rusted for 
pregnancy? I've heard it used in music (most famously by the B52s) but 
never actually heard anybody say it.

-Curt
 From: Rich Thomas via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com
To: mercedes@okiebenz.com
Cc: Rich Thomas richthomas79td...@constructivity.net
Sent: Monday, June 8, 2015 4:35 PM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

You forgot, I'll swann which I think meant I'll swear but
Baptists never swore so swan it was. And Lawslaws or Lawsamercy
which also substituted for lawdlawd etc.

And Rectum -- that boy drove them tars off the road and rectum. Had ta
git a coupla recaps ta fixem.


--R



On 6/8/15 3:19 PM, WILTON via Mercedes wrote:

More GLOSSARY
By Wilton Strickland

I lost my homework. -- I did not do my homework.
I'll be dog, I'll be doggone -- I'm amazed
In a bind, in a scrape/squeeze, in a tight -- in trouble, need money
to pay bills
In a family way -- pregnant
In high cotton -- got it made; doing very well
In hog heaven -- also doing very well - very comfortable
In the foot of the truck or car -- on the floor
In the short rows -- almost finished
I'm done. -- I've finished.
I'm fixin' da -- I'm getting ready to; I'm about to; I'm going to
In the heat o' d'day -- during the hottest part of the day, usually,
early to mid-afternoon
I put it right where I'd know where it is. -- I've lost it.
Irregardless -- regardless
I snibbed it -- I just brushed the side of it; almost missed
I stole it -- I paid hardly anything for it.
I swanny -- substitute for I swear
Itching like a man on a fuzzy tree -- itching really bad
It floored me. -- It astonished, surprised or baffled me.
It really got away with me -- It embarrassed me.
I yea'bout died or I near 'bout died -- I was so shocked, I almost died.
Jawl-P? -- Did you go to the bathroom?
Jeet yet -- Have you eaten yet?
Jes' like a sharecropper in a drought -- not doing very well
Johnny on the spot -- always on time
Jump from the fryin' pan into the fire -- get in even worse trouble
Just a hair -- a very small unit of measure; a hair's width
Kick the traces -- out of line; breach restraints
Knock on wood -- to prevent bad luck
Landlord -- landowner
'Lasses -- molasses
Layin' down -- lying down
Layin' by d'backa, hillin' d'backa -- final plowing of the tobacco
crop for the season
Leastwise -- at least
'Lectwisty -- electricity
Less is more. -- Don't over do it. Keep it simple.
Lick -- a brush with the tongue, a blow with a hand
Lick of work -- a token stroke of work
Lickity-split -- quickly
Light the fahr -- start the fire
Like something on a stick -- something special, such as a candy apple
or a lollipop
Loopin' d'backa, stringin' d'backa -- attaching the tobacco leaves to
sticks with cotton string (d'backa twine) to facilitate hanging it in
the curing or drying barn.
Mad as a wet settin' hen -- really upset, angry
Mad as fire -- very angry, violent temper
Mad as Hell -- even more angry
Makin' hay -- making good progress
Malarkey -- mess, foolishness, worthless stuff
Mash -- squeeze tightly, push a button or pedal; often done to
potatoes to cream them
'Matahs, 'maters, 'matussusses -- tomatoes
Mendin' up, puttin' on a little -- gaining weight
Mess of peas, beans, corn, turnip salad (salit), etc. -- enough to
cook for a meal
Messed up -- made a mistake; out of order
Might -- may
Might can -- may be able to
Might would -- may decide to
Mighty -- southern for very
Mitzibushy Zero -- Mitsubishi Zero, WW II Japanese fighter plane
Mommic or mommic up -- break or render inoperative, mess up
Monks, i. e., in 6 monks -- months - in 6 months
Moppin' cotton -- mopping arsenic-laced molasses onto cotton plants
using a mop of rags on the end of a short stick
Mud hole -- puddle of water
My ears are burning. -- Somebody is talking about me.
My left palm is itching. -- I'm getting some money.
My nose is itching. -- Somebody is coming.
My right palm is itching. -- I'm going to shake a stranger's hand.
My stomach hurts. -- I don't want to go to school this morning. I
don't want to drop soda. I don't want to sucker tobacco today. Etc.
Nab -- catch - The police will nab the killer.
Nabs -- small crackers with peanut butter between them, some square,
some round (disc-shaped), often made by Nabisco and available at
d'store with a cold Co-Cola, Pepsi, RC, etc., for a snack. Substitute
for a moon pie or a small bag of salted peanuts.
Nairn -- none
Nairy -- neither, as in, Nairy one.
Name your poison. -- What would you like to eat or drink?
Naw, nawp, nope -- no
Nekkid -- naked, nude
Noggin' -- head
Not a lick of sense -- really stupid

Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread Rich Thomas via Mercedes
When I was a kid I always heard PG as in I think she's PG and had no 
idea what it meant, which is why I guess the grownups used the term.  I 
finally figured it out and asked my dad why he said PG and not 
pregnant and he got all embarrassed.   Like the proper term was 
somehow nasty or dirty or something.   And it was always said in a 
somewhat low knowing conspiratorial tone, like it was dirty talk or 
something.  No idea where it comes from, maybe some medical term or 
something?


OMG I just figured it out -- the Baptists just knew someone was doing 
it


--R (whose parents, coming from the Baptist persuasion, probably only 
did it once, for procreational purposes only, as I have no siblings)


On 6/8/15 5:44 PM, Curt Raymond via Mercedes wrote:

Did anybody ever actually hear anybody say tin roof, rusted for pregnancy? 
I've heard it used in music (most famously by the B52s) but never actually heard anybody 
say it.
-Curt
   From: Rich Thomas via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com
  To: mercedes@okiebenz.com
Cc: Rich Thomas richthomas79td...@constructivity.net
  Sent: Monday, June 8, 2015 4:35 PM
  Subject: Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

You forgot, I'll swann  which I think meant I'll swear but

Baptists never swore so swan it was.  And Lawslaws or Lawsamercy
which also substituted for lawdlawd etc.

And Rectum -- that boy drove them tars off the road and rectum. Had ta
git a coupla recaps ta fixem.


--R



On 6/8/15 3:19 PM, WILTON via Mercedes wrote:

More GLOSSARY
By Wilton Strickland

I lost my homework. -- I did not do my homework.
I'll be dog, I'll be doggone -- I'm amazed
In a bind, in a scrape/squeeze, in a tight -- in trouble, need money
to pay bills
In a family way -- pregnant
In high cotton -- got it made; doing very well
In hog heaven -- also doing very well - very comfortable
In the foot of the truck or car -- on the floor
In the short rows -- almost finished
I'm done. -- I've finished.
I'm fixin' da -- I'm getting ready to; I'm about to; I'm going to
In the heat o' d'day -- during the hottest part of the day, usually,
early to mid-afternoon
I put it right where I'd know where it is. -- I've lost it.
Irregardless -- regardless
I snibbed it -- I just brushed the side of it; almost missed
I stole it -- I paid hardly anything for it.
I swanny -- substitute for I swear
Itching like a man on a fuzzy tree -- itching really bad
It floored me. -- It astonished, surprised or baffled me.
It really got away with me -- It embarrassed me.
I yea'bout died or I near 'bout died -- I was so shocked, I almost died.
Jawl-P? -- Did you go to the bathroom?
Jeet yet -- Have you eaten yet?
Jes' like a sharecropper in a drought -- not doing very well
Johnny on the spot -- always on time
Jump from the fryin' pan into the fire -- get in even worse trouble
Just a hair -- a very small unit of measure; a hair's width
Kick the traces -- out of line; breach restraints
Knock on wood -- to prevent bad luck
Landlord  -- landowner
'Lasses -- molasses
Layin' down -- lying down
Layin' by d'backa, hillin' d'backa -- final plowing of the tobacco
crop for the season
Leastwise -- at least
'Lectwisty -- electricity
Less is more. -- Don't over do it.  Keep it simple.
Lick -- a brush with the tongue, a blow with a hand
Lick of work -- a token stroke of work
Lickity-split -- quickly
Light the fahr -- start the fire
Like something on a stick -- something special, such as a candy apple
or a lollipop
Loopin' d'backa, stringin' d'backa -- attaching the tobacco leaves to
sticks with cotton string (d'backa twine) to facilitate hanging it in
the curing or drying barn.
Mad as a wet settin' hen -- really upset, angry
Mad as fire -- very angry, violent temper
Mad as Hell -- even more angry
Makin' hay -- making good progress
Malarkey -- mess, foolishness, worthless stuff
Mash -- squeeze tightly, push a button or pedal; often done to
potatoes to cream them
'Matahs, 'maters, 'matussusses -- tomatoes
Mendin' up, puttin' on a little -- gaining weight
Mess of peas, beans, corn, turnip salad (salit), etc. -- enough to
cook for a meal
Messed up -- made a mistake; out of order
Might -- may
Might can -- may be able to
Might would -- may decide to
Mighty -- southern for very
Mitzibushy Zero -- Mitsubishi Zero, WW II Japanese fighter plane
Mommic or mommic up -- break or render inoperative, mess up
Monks, i. e., in 6 monks -- months - in 6 months
Moppin' cotton -- mopping arsenic-laced molasses onto cotton plants
using a mop of rags on the end of a short stick
Mud hole -- puddle of water
My ears are burning. -- Somebody is talking about me.
My left palm is itching. -- I'm getting some money.
My nose is itching. -- Somebody is coming.
My right palm is itching. -- I'm going to shake a stranger's hand.
My stomach hurts. -- I don't want to go to school this morning.  I
don't want to drop soda.  I don't want to sucker tobacco today. Etc.
Nab -- catch - The police will nab the killer.
Nabs -- small crackers with peanut

Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread Curt Raymond via Mercedes
Did anybody ever actually hear anybody say tin roof, rusted for pregnancy? 
I've heard it used in music (most famously by the B52s) but never actually 
heard anybody say it.
-Curt
  From: Rich Thomas via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com
 To: mercedes@okiebenz.com 
Cc: Rich Thomas richthomas79td...@constructivity.net 
 Sent: Monday, June 8, 2015 4:35 PM
 Subject: Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY
   
You forgot, I'll swann  which I think meant I'll swear but 
Baptists never swore so swan it was.  And Lawslaws or Lawsamercy 
which also substituted for lawdlawd etc.

And Rectum -- that boy drove them tars off the road and rectum. Had ta 
git a coupla recaps ta fixem.


--R



On 6/8/15 3:19 PM, WILTON via Mercedes wrote:
 More GLOSSARY
 By Wilton Strickland

 I lost my homework. -- I did not do my homework.
 I'll be dog, I'll be doggone -- I'm amazed
 In a bind, in a scrape/squeeze, in a tight -- in trouble, need money 
 to pay bills
 In a family way -- pregnant
 In high cotton -- got it made; doing very well
 In hog heaven -- also doing very well - very comfortable
 In the foot of the truck or car -- on the floor
 In the short rows -- almost finished
 I'm done. -- I've finished.
 I'm fixin' da -- I'm getting ready to; I'm about to; I'm going to
 In the heat o' d'day -- during the hottest part of the day, usually, 
 early to mid-afternoon
 I put it right where I'd know where it is. -- I've lost it.
 Irregardless -- regardless
 I snibbed it -- I just brushed the side of it; almost missed
 I stole it -- I paid hardly anything for it.
 I swanny -- substitute for I swear
 Itching like a man on a fuzzy tree -- itching really bad
 It floored me. -- It astonished, surprised or baffled me.
 It really got away with me -- It embarrassed me.
 I yea'bout died or I near 'bout died -- I was so shocked, I almost died.
 Jawl-P? -- Did you go to the bathroom?
 Jeet yet -- Have you eaten yet?
 Jes' like a sharecropper in a drought -- not doing very well
 Johnny on the spot -- always on time
 Jump from the fryin' pan into the fire -- get in even worse trouble
 Just a hair -- a very small unit of measure; a hair's width
 Kick the traces -- out of line; breach restraints
 Knock on wood -- to prevent bad luck
 Landlord  -- landowner
 'Lasses -- molasses
 Layin' down -- lying down
 Layin' by d'backa, hillin' d'backa -- final plowing of the tobacco 
 crop for the season
 Leastwise -- at least
 'Lectwisty -- electricity
 Less is more. -- Don't over do it.  Keep it simple.
 Lick -- a brush with the tongue, a blow with a hand
 Lick of work -- a token stroke of work
 Lickity-split -- quickly
 Light the fahr -- start the fire
 Like something on a stick -- something special, such as a candy apple 
 or a lollipop
 Loopin' d'backa, stringin' d'backa -- attaching the tobacco leaves to 
 sticks with cotton string (d'backa twine) to facilitate hanging it in 
 the curing or drying barn.
 Mad as a wet settin' hen -- really upset, angry
 Mad as fire -- very angry, violent temper
 Mad as Hell -- even more angry
 Makin' hay -- making good progress
 Malarkey -- mess, foolishness, worthless stuff
 Mash -- squeeze tightly, push a button or pedal; often done to 
 potatoes to cream them
 'Matahs, 'maters, 'matussusses -- tomatoes
 Mendin' up, puttin' on a little -- gaining weight
 Mess of peas, beans, corn, turnip salad (salit), etc. -- enough to 
 cook for a meal
 Messed up -- made a mistake; out of order
 Might -- may
 Might can -- may be able to
 Might would -- may decide to
 Mighty -- southern for very
 Mitzibushy Zero -- Mitsubishi Zero, WW II Japanese fighter plane
 Mommic or mommic up -- break or render inoperative, mess up
 Monks, i. e., in 6 monks -- months - in 6 months
 Moppin' cotton -- mopping arsenic-laced molasses onto cotton plants 
 using a mop of rags on the end of a short stick
 Mud hole -- puddle of water
 My ears are burning. -- Somebody is talking about me.
 My left palm is itching. -- I'm getting some money.
 My nose is itching. -- Somebody is coming.
 My right palm is itching. -- I'm going to shake a stranger's hand.
 My stomach hurts. -- I don't want to go to school this morning.  I 
 don't want to drop soda.  I don't want to sucker tobacco today. Etc.
 Nab -- catch - The police will nab the killer.
 Nabs -- small crackers with peanut butter between them, some square, 
 some round (disc-shaped), often made by Nabisco and available at 
 d'store with a cold Co-Cola, Pepsi, RC, etc., for a snack.  Substitute 
 for a moon pie or a small bag of salted peanuts.
 Nairn -- none
 Nairy -- neither, as in, Nairy one.
 Name your poison. -- What would you like to eat or drink?
 Naw, nawp, nope -- no
 Nekkid -- naked, nude
 Noggin' -- head
 Not a lick of sense -- really stupid
 Not worth a nickel ridin' or walkin' -- nearly worthless in any way 
 considered
 Nubb, nubbin' -- a very small ear of corn; the short part left after 
 part of a normally long object is missing.  He stuck out his hand to 
 pet the large dog

Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread WILTON via Mercedes

Or Swallowed a watermelon seed.

Wilton

- Original Message - 
From: Randy Bennell via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com
To: Curt Raymond curtlud...@yahoo.com; Mercedes Discussion List 
mercedes@okiebenz.com

Cc: Randy Bennell rbenn...@bennell.ca
Sent: Monday, June 08, 2015 6:10 PM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY



On 08/06/2015 4:44 PM, Curt Raymond via Mercedes wrote:
Did anybody ever actually hear anybody say tin roof, rusted for 
pregnancy? I've heard it used in music (most famously by the B52s) but 
never actually heard anybody say it.

-Curt


Or how about up the stump for being pregnant?

RB

___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com




___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread Randy Bennell via Mercedes

On 08/06/2015 4:44 PM, Curt Raymond via Mercedes wrote:

Did anybody ever actually hear anybody say tin roof, rusted for pregnancy? 
I've heard it used in music (most famously by the B52s) but never actually heard anybody 
say it.
-Curt
  

Or how about up the stump for being pregnant?

RB

___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread Curly McLain via Mercedes

Or Swallowed a watermelon seed.

Wilton




Yep,  'member hearin thatun

Or swallered a 'melonseed

___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread Curly McLain via Mercedes
When I was a kid I always heard PG as in I think she's PG and 
had no idea what it meant, which is why I guess the grownups used 
the term.  I finally figured it out and asked my dad why he said 
PG and not pregnant and he got all embarrassed.   Like the 
proper term was somehow nasty or dirty or something.   And it was 
always said in a somewhat low knowing conspiratorial tone, like it 
was dirty talk or something.  No idea where it comes from, maybe 
some medical term or something?


OMG I just figured it out -- the Baptists just knew someone was doing it

--R (whose parents, coming from the Baptist persuasion, probably 
only did it once, for procreational purposes only, as I have no 
siblings)


Yep when I was a kid, PG was the terminology.

___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-08 Thread Curly McLain via Mercedes
Did anybody ever actually hear anybody say tin roof, rusted for 
pregnancy? I've heard it used in music (most famously by the B52s) 
but never actually heard anybody say it.

-Curt

nope, but tin roof and roof tin (its opposite) are both tasty  sundaes.

___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-02 Thread WILTON via Mercedes

Yep, thanks.  How'd I miss that'un?

Wilton

- Original Message - 
From: Rich Thomas via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com

To: Mercedes Discussion List mercedes@okiebenz.com
Cc: Rich Thomas richthomas79td...@constructivity.net
Sent: Tuesday, June 02, 2015 12:09 AM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY


Fixin -- like fixin ta go ( apparently this referred to fixing up the 
horses and getting all their gear on)


--R (sent from my miniPad)

On Jun 1, 2015, at 10:51 AM, WILTON via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com 
wrote:


GLOSSARY CONTINUED:

D’mar -- tomorrow
Droppin’ soda -- dropping sodium nitrate fertilizer, by each plant, 
usually, corn, by hand.
Eatin’ pokey, rolls and grits. -- We are so poor, all we can do is poke 
our feet under the table, roll our eyes, and grit our teeth.

Eite -- alright, OK, yes
Ellem -- elm
Enough money to burn a wet mule -- a lot of money, rich
Fat lightard -- kindling; a pine knot or a pine tree stump with a high 
concentration of resin; often chopped and split into small pieces 
(splinters a few inches long) and used to start fires in fireplaces, 
heaters and wood-fired cook stoves.

Fat n sassy -- feeling very good
Feelin’ his oats -- feeling good
Fahr -- fire
Fetch -- to find, to look for
‘Fican and ‘Fican see my way to -- if I can
‘Fida -- if I had
‘Fida knowed it -- If I had known it
Flat out -- full speed
Flat out buffaloed -- completely fooled
Flat out of luck -- really out of luck, unlucky
Floorboard -- floor of a car or truck
Flustrated -- frustrated
Foot loose and fancy free -- without a worry
Fly-by-night -- unreliable, untrustworthy
Fly off the handle -- quick to anger
‘Fore light, ‘fore dark -- before dawn, before dusk
Fox in the hen house -- conflict of interest
Fret -- worry
Funnies -- comic strips in the news paper
Galavanting -- out having a good time; carousing
Gangbuster or like gangbusters -- forceful, active, very effective
Gee, Haw - signal for mule to turn right, turn left
Get a hold of yourself. -- Calm down, relax, control yourself.
Gimmie -- give me
Git a holdt -- grasp firmly
Git up; chk, chk (sound made in cheek by quick, short air intake) --  
signal or command for mule to go forward

Git -- get
Gitcha, gotcha -- get you, got you
Git!  Scat!  Skedaddle -- go quickly
Git ‘er dander up -- upset her, make her mad
Git ‘er done -- finish it
Goin’ bare-footed -- wearing no shoes
Goin’ like 60, goin’ like mad, goin’ like wildfire, really flyin’-- going 
very fast

Goin’ ta town -- movin’ along expeditiously, movin’ right along
Go to the pore house -- go home
Gone to the dogs -- gone bad
Gonna -- going to
Gosh onlyest -- a very special only one, exceptional
‘Gotta git home ‘fore dark -- we don’t have “lights”; ‘gotta feed the 
chickens, cows, mules, etc.

GreaGLOSSARY CONTINUED:

D’mar -- tomorrow
Droppin’ soda -- dropping sodium nitrate fertilizer, by each plant, 
usually, corn, by hand.
Eatin’ pokey, rolls and grits. -- We are so poor, all we can do is poke 
our feet under the table, roll our eyes, and grit our teeth.

Eite -- alright, OK, yes
Ellem -- elm
Enough money to burn a wet mule -- a lot of money, rich
Fat lightard -- kindling; a pine knot or a pine tree stump with a high 
concentration of resin; often chopped and split into small pieces 
(splinters a few inches long) and used to start fires in fireplaces, 
heaters and wood-fired cook stoves.

Fat n sassy -- feeling very good
Feelin’ his oats -- feeling good
Fahr -- fire
Fetch -- to find, to look for
‘Fican and ‘Fican see my way to -- if I can
‘Fida -- if I had
‘Fida knowed it -- If I had known it
Flat out -- full speed
Flat out buffaloed -- completely fooled
Flat out of luck -- really out of luck, unlucky
Floorboard -- floor of a car or truck
Flustrated -- frustrated
Foot loose and fancy free -- without a worry
Fly-by-night -- unreliable, untrustworthy
Fly off the handle -- quick to anger
‘Fore light, ‘fore dark -- before dawn, before dusk
Fox in the hen house -- conflict of interest
Fret -- worry
Funnies -- comic strips in the news paper
Galavanting -- out having a good time; carousing
Gangbuster or like gangbusters -- forceful, active, very effective
Gee, Haw - signal for mule to turn right, turn left
Get a hold of yourself. -- Calm down, relax, control yourself.
Gimmie -- give me
Git a holdt -- grasp firmly
Git up; chk, chk (sound made in cheek by quick, short air intake) --  
signal or command for mule to go forward

Git -- get
Gitcha, gotcha -- get you, got you
Git!  Scat!  Skedaddle -- go quickly
Git ‘er dander up -- upset her, make her mad
Git ‘er done -- finish it
Goin’ bare-footed -- wearing no shoes
Goin’ like 60, goin’ like mad, goin’ like wildfire, really flyin’-- going 
very fast

Goin’ ta town -- movin’ along expeditiously, movin’ right along
Go to the pore house -- go home
Gone to the dogs -- gone bad
Gonna -- going to
Gosh onlyest -- a very special only one, exceptional
‘Gotta git home ‘fore dark -- we don’t have “lights”; ‘gotta feed the 
chickens

[MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-01 Thread WILTON via Mercedes

GLOSSARY CONTINUED:

D’mar -- tomorrow
Droppin’ soda -- dropping sodium nitrate fertilizer, by each plant, usually, 
corn, by hand.
Eatin’ pokey, rolls and grits. -- We are so poor, all we can do is poke our 
feet under the table, roll our eyes, and grit our teeth.

Eite -- alright, OK, yes
Ellem -- elm
Enough money to burn a wet mule -- a lot of money, rich
Fat lightard -- kindling; a pine knot or a pine tree stump with a high 
concentration of resin; often chopped and split into small pieces (splinters 
a few inches long) and used to start fires in fireplaces, heaters and 
wood-fired cook stoves.

Fat n sassy -- feeling very good
Feelin’ his oats -- feeling good
Fahr -- fire
Fetch -- to find, to look for
‘Fican and ‘Fican see my way to -- if I can
‘Fida -- if I had
‘Fida knowed it -- If I had known it
Flat out -- full speed
Flat out buffaloed -- completely fooled
Flat out of luck -- really out of luck, unlucky
Floorboard -- floor of a car or truck
Flustrated -- frustrated
Foot loose and fancy free -- without a worry
Fly-by-night -- unreliable, untrustworthy
Fly off the handle -- quick to anger
‘Fore light, ‘fore dark -- before dawn, before dusk
Fox in the hen house -- conflict of interest
Fret -- worry
Funnies -- comic strips in the news paper
Galavanting -- out having a good time; carousing
Gangbuster or like gangbusters -- forceful, active, very effective
Gee, Haw - signal for mule to turn right, turn left
Get a hold of yourself. -- Calm down, relax, control yourself.
Gimmie -- give me
Git a holdt -- grasp firmly
Git up; chk, chk (sound made in cheek by quick, short air intake) -- signal 
or command for mule to go forward

Git -- get
Gitcha, gotcha -- get you, got you
Git!  Scat!  Skedaddle -- go quickly
Git ‘er dander up -- upset her, make her mad
Git ‘er done -- finish it
Goin’ bare-footed -- wearing no shoes
Goin’ like 60, goin’ like mad, goin’ like wildfire, really flyin’-- going 
very fast

Goin’ ta town -- movin’ along expeditiously, movin’ right along
Go to the pore house -- go home
Gone to the dogs -- gone bad
Gonna -- going to
Gosh onlyest -- a very special only one, exceptional
‘Gotta git home ‘fore dark -- we don’t have “lights”; ‘gotta feed the 
chickens, cows, mules, etc.

Grease monkey  -- automobile mechanic
Grinnin’ like a ‘possum eatin’ persimmons -- a really big grin.
Ground itch, foot itch -- an infection between little boys’ and girls’ toes 
from wading in puddles of water after a rain; probably related to soldier’s 
“jungle rot”

Hafta -- have to, must
Haint -- spook
Hain’t -- have not, has not
Hain’tcha -- haven’t you
Hankrin’ -- hankering, want, desire
Happy go lucky -- without a care
Hard-favored -- ugly
Have your ducks in a row. -- Have everything in proper order.
He has lost a couple of screws. -- He’s crazy or is mentally deficient.
He just ain’t right. -- He’s mentally deficient.
Hep, hope -- help, helped
Here 'bouts -- around here, near here, in the neighborhood
Hey -- hello
High on the hog, high falutin’ -- upscale, upper class
Hisn -- his
Hissy fit -- really upset, shown by extreme agitation
Hit the nail on the head. -- Got it exactly right!
Holler -- yell
Hop, skip and a jump -- a short distance - nearby
Horse of a different color -- another subject completely
Hot potato -- something really hard to handle
Hot under the collar -- upset, angry
How ‘bout that? How ‘bout them apples? -- I’m really proud of that.
How sweet it is! -- everything going just right
Holy smokes, holy moly -- surprised, astonished
Hunk -- piece
Hush puppies -- small pieces of corn bread originally thrown out to feed the 
dogs, now a southern meal delicacy, especially with fish, bobby-q or turnip 
salit.

I ain’t stud’n’ ‘im. -- I’m not concerned about him.
I’da -- I would have
Idin - isn’t
I don’t give a hoot.  -- I don’t care.
I don't have a dog in that fight. -- I have no concern or interest at all in 
that situation.

If ‘n -- if
If a toad frog had wings, he wouldn't bump his tail. -- IF
I got no -- I don't have any.
Ignorance can be cured with education; stupidity lasts forever.
I liked to have -- I almost did.

Wilton 



___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-06-01 Thread Rich Thomas via Mercedes
Fixin -- like fixin ta go ( apparently this referred to fixing up the horses 
and getting all their gear on)

--R (sent from my miniPad)

On Jun 1, 2015, at 10:51 AM, WILTON via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com wrote:

GLOSSARY CONTINUED:

D’mar -- tomorrow
Droppin’ soda -- dropping sodium nitrate fertilizer, by each plant, usually, 
corn, by hand.
Eatin’ pokey, rolls and grits. -- We are so poor, all we can do is poke our 
feet under the table, roll our eyes, and grit our teeth.
Eite -- alright, OK, yes
Ellem -- elm
Enough money to burn a wet mule -- a lot of money, rich
Fat lightard -- kindling; a pine knot or a pine tree stump with a high 
concentration of resin; often chopped and split into small pieces (splinters a 
few inches long) and used to start fires in fireplaces, heaters and wood-fired 
cook stoves.
Fat n sassy -- feeling very good
Feelin’ his oats -- feeling good
Fahr -- fire
Fetch -- to find, to look for
‘Fican and ‘Fican see my way to -- if I can
‘Fida -- if I had
‘Fida knowed it -- If I had known it
Flat out -- full speed
Flat out buffaloed -- completely fooled
Flat out of luck -- really out of luck, unlucky
Floorboard -- floor of a car or truck
Flustrated -- frustrated
Foot loose and fancy free -- without a worry
Fly-by-night -- unreliable, untrustworthy
Fly off the handle -- quick to anger
‘Fore light, ‘fore dark -- before dawn, before dusk
Fox in the hen house -- conflict of interest
Fret -- worry
Funnies -- comic strips in the news paper
Galavanting -- out having a good time; carousing
Gangbuster or like gangbusters -- forceful, active, very effective
Gee, Haw - signal for mule to turn right, turn left
Get a hold of yourself. -- Calm down, relax, control yourself.
Gimmie -- give me
Git a holdt -- grasp firmly
Git up; chk, chk (sound made in cheek by quick, short air intake) -- signal or 
command for mule to go forward
Git -- get
Gitcha, gotcha -- get you, got you
Git!  Scat!  Skedaddle -- go quickly
Git ‘er dander up -- upset her, make her mad
Git ‘er done -- finish it
Goin’ bare-footed -- wearing no shoes
Goin’ like 60, goin’ like mad, goin’ like wildfire, really flyin’-- going very 
fast
Goin’ ta town -- movin’ along expeditiously, movin’ right along
Go to the pore house -- go home
Gone to the dogs -- gone bad
Gonna -- going to
Gosh onlyest -- a very special only one, exceptional
‘Gotta git home ‘fore dark -- we don’t have “lights”; ‘gotta feed the chickens, 
cows, mules, etc.
GreaGLOSSARY CONTINUED:

D’mar -- tomorrow
Droppin’ soda -- dropping sodium nitrate fertilizer, by each plant, usually, 
corn, by hand.
Eatin’ pokey, rolls and grits. -- We are so poor, all we can do is poke our 
feet under the table, roll our eyes, and grit our teeth.
Eite -- alright, OK, yes
Ellem -- elm
Enough money to burn a wet mule -- a lot of money, rich
Fat lightard -- kindling; a pine knot or a pine tree stump with a high 
concentration of resin; often chopped and split into small pieces (splinters a 
few inches long) and used to start fires in fireplaces, heaters and wood-fired 
cook stoves.
Fat n sassy -- feeling very good
Feelin’ his oats -- feeling good
Fahr -- fire
Fetch -- to find, to look for
‘Fican and ‘Fican see my way to -- if I can
‘Fida -- if I had
‘Fida knowed it -- If I had known it
Flat out -- full speed
Flat out buffaloed -- completely fooled
Flat out of luck -- really out of luck, unlucky
Floorboard -- floor of a car or truck
Flustrated -- frustrated
Foot loose and fancy free -- without a worry
Fly-by-night -- unreliable, untrustworthy
Fly off the handle -- quick to anger
‘Fore light, ‘fore dark -- before dawn, before dusk
Fox in the hen house -- conflict of interest
Fret -- worry
Funnies -- comic strips in the news paper
Galavanting -- out having a good time; carousing
Gangbuster or like gangbusters -- forceful, active, very effective
Gee, Haw - signal for mule to turn right, turn left
Get a hold of yourself. -- Calm down, relax, control yourself.
Gimmie -- give me
Git a holdt -- grasp firmly
Git up; chk, chk (sound made in cheek by quick, short air intake) -- signal or 
command for mule to go forward
Git -- get
Gitcha, gotcha -- get you, got you
Git!  Scat!  Skedaddle -- go quickly
Git ‘er dander up -- upset her, make her mad
Git ‘er done -- finish it
Goin’ bare-footed -- wearing no shoes
Goin’ like 60, goin’ like mad, goin’ like wildfire, really flyin’-- going very 
fast
Goin’ ta town -- movin’ along expeditiously, movin’ right along
Go to the pore house -- go home
Gone to the dogs -- gone bad
Gonna -- going to
Gosh onlyest -- a very special only one, exceptional
‘Gotta git home ‘fore dark -- we don’t have “lights”; ‘gotta feed the chickens, 
cows, mules, etc.
Grease monkey  -- automobile mechanic
Grinnin’ like a ‘possum eatin’ persimmons -- a really big grin.
Ground itch, foot itch -- an infection between little boys’ and girls’ toes 
from wading in puddles of water after a rain; probably related to soldier’s 
“jungle rot”
Hafta -- have to, must
Haint -- spook
Hain’t -- have not, 

[MBZ] OT - A COUNTRY BOY REMEMBERS - GLOSSARY

2015-05-30 Thread WILTON via Mercedes

Another one:

GLOSSARY
By Wilton Strickland

Following, with phonetic spellings, are some words and phrases in use in 
eastern North Carolina since the 1930’s.  Some of them surely must have been 
in use long before the ‘30’s, and a few of them have gradually faded from 
use.  Many are still in use here and elsewhere in this form or some 
variation of it.  I grew up hearing many of them and used some of them 
myself, of course, but Mama did not allow us to use several of them and 
discouraged the use of others - there are many listed that I have never 
used.  However, I often use some of them now in jest.


After each word or phrase is the standard, American English translation.

A bit dog hollers/barks first. -- He who speaks up first sounds/may be 
guilty.
A drank, a drink -- a carbonated beverage, i. e., Co-Cola, Pepsi, Nehi grape 
or orange, RC (Royal Crown cola) or a Dr. Pepper; best consumed while 
physically exhausted, wet with perspiration (sweat) and sometimes standing 
in the hot sun (but better in the shade) during a short break from priming 
tobacco

A differnt set a dogs -- A completely different family
Ag ‘im on -- aggravate him to action
A goin’ -- going
A goner -- expired, deceased
A helpin’ -- a serving of food, for example, a helpin’ of peas
A horse of a different color -- a different matter entirely
Ah reckon -- I think
Ail -- sickness, pain, what’s wrong with you
Aincha -- aren’t you
Aint -- Mama or Daddy’s sister
Ain’t -- am not, is not, are not
Ain’t got much in it -- I didn’t pay much for it.
Ain’t paid no notion -- I have not paid attention.
Ain’t worth squat, ain’t worth doodlie -- worthless
Airy -- either, as in “Airy one.”
A lick and a promise. -- a quick and cursory attempt, with a promise to be 
more thorough later

All -- oil
All the way -- hotdog or hamburger with all the “trimmings” - ketchup, 
mustard, chili, onions; can also mean having sex.

A minova time -- many times
Are ya with me? -- Do you understand what I’m saying?
Arsh ‘taters, eish ‘taters -- Irish potatoes
A sight for sore eyes -- I am very glad to see you!
Ast, astin’ -- ask, asking
Atall -- at all
A watched pot never boils. -- Time seems to go much more slowly when you’re 
waiting for a certain event.

Awite -- alright, OK, yes
Bad off -- quite ill
Bald-faced liar, bold-faced liar -- obviously lying
Bar’, bary -- borrow
Barnin’, housin’, puttin’ in d’backa -- harvesting tobacco
Bassackward -- backward
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.  What looks good to one may not look 
so good to another.
Beauty is only skin deep, ugly is to the bone; when the beauty leaves, the 
ugly holds on. What looks good now may not look so good later.

Bedroom suit -- bedroom suite, matching bedroom furniture
Between a rock and a hard place -- still in trouble no matter what I do
Beefed up -- gained weight
Biddies -- newly hatched baby chickens
Bidness, bizness -- business
Blagum -- black gum tree
Blind in one eye and can’t see with the other -- can’t grasp/understand it 
no matter how clear it is

B‘loney -- balogna
Blowout boot -- an oblong (maybe, 4 inches by 6 inches) piece of rubber with 
fabric embedded to add strength, usually an eighth of an inch or so in 
thickness.  His would be inserted inside a tire between a weakened place in 
the tire and the tube to keep the tube from bulging (blowing) out the 
weakened area.
Bobby-Q -- Barbeque, a pig cooked, usually all night, over a shallow hole in 
the ground (pit) filled with hot hardwood coals from the d’backa barn 
furnace, seasoned with peppers, other spices and vinegar and chopped into 
small pieces before being eaten with slaw, potato salad and cornbread sticks 
or hush puppies.
Bootleg, white ligthtnin’, moonshine, ‘shine -- illegal, non-tax-paid 
whiskey usually made at a still (distillery) hidden the woods.

Bootlegger -- one who makes ‘shine whisky
Branch -- very small river/stream
Bright-eyed and bushy-tailed.   Feeling very good.
Broom straw -- a tall, wild grass good for making brooms
Bub -- a light bulb
Bull in a china shop -- clumsy, not very well coordinated
Bum -- bomb - A B-52 can carry and drop many bums.
Bumfusseled -- confused
Bummer -- large military aircraft that drops bums - a bomber
Bust -- burst
Busted, busted up -- broken
Cahoots -- conspiracy
Cain’t -- can’t, can not
Candlestine -- clandestine
Can I? -- May I?
Can’t make ‘spenses -- not making enough money to cover expenses
Can’t see the forest for the trees -- bogged down with details
Carry me to town. -- Drive me to town.
Catterwampus -- askew, misaligned
Chadoin’ -- What are you doing?
Chainey ball tree  -- China Berry tree
Chet, dgew? -- not yet, did you?
Chicken koub -- chicken coop/house
Chillins, chilluns -- children
Chinchy -- cheap
Chitlin’s -- chitterlings - hog intestines appropriately cleaned, cooked and 
seasoned; served as a delicacy to those who have acquired a taste for them

Chompin’ at the bit -- aggressive, anxious, eager
Choppin’ d’backa, cotton, corn, etc. -- using a hand-held