Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day (and a week)

2015-06-15 Thread WILTON via Mercedes

Thanks, Scott.

BTW, John Gallagher, mentioned in my write-up, is the man in upper right of 
slide 71 with face covered by bandages and hair exposed.


Wilton

- Original Message - 
From: Scott Ritchey via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com

To: 'Mercedes Discussion List' mercedes@okiebenz.com
Cc: Scott Ritchey ritche...@nc.rr.com
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2015 4:57 PM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day (and a week)




Wilton,  Thanks for that first-hand account of D-day from ground level.

All: Maybe folks have already seen this (and I should have posted it a 
week

ago) but here is (IMO) a very interesting slide-show of D-day (and beyond)
events:   http://pt709.synology.me/NormandyLanding1.pps.  Left click on 
the
link should download the 6M pps file to your machine where you can play 
it.
I think there is value in seeing the scope of this effort; I certainly 
don't

have the words that would do it justice.

Scott





___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com




___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day (and a week)

2015-06-14 Thread Scott Ritchey via Mercedes

Wilton,  Thanks for that first-hand account of D-day from ground level.

All: Maybe folks have already seen this (and I should have posted it a week
ago) but here is (IMO) a very interesting slide-show of D-day (and beyond)
events:   http://pt709.synology.me/NormandyLanding1.pps.  Left click on the
link should download the 6M pps file to your machine where you can play it.
I think there is value in seeing the scope of this effort; I certainly don't
have the words that would do it justice.

Scott





___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

2015-06-11 Thread Rich Thomas via Mercedes
You can find those shows on the PBS web site and if you have an AppleTV 
(and maybe other streaming devices) there is a PBS app that has them for 
viewing.  You can pause and check them out.  If you watch on your 
computer you can get a screen shot to save and study.


Amazing writeup BTW.  I can't even imagine what that must have been like.

--R



On 6/10/15 11:22 PM, WILTON via Mercedes wrote:
I saw most of that show, too, though I missed first few minutes.  
'Could be, if the craft were an LCI(L) with infantry ramps that come 
down on each side near the bow (not a Higgins boat).  Whenever I see 
one of those scenes now, I try to study the person(s) for recognition; 
so far, 'haven't recognized one as my brother, Lewis (Little 
Boats).  They're not usually in view long enough, unless one just by 
chance matches my memory of him 70+ years ago.


Wilton

- Original Message - From: Curly McLain via Mercedes 
mercedes@okiebenz.com

To: Mercedes Discussion List mercedes@okiebenz.com
Cc: Curly McLain 126die...@gmail.com
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2015 10:07 PM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day


Watching part of a Nova program tonight about D Day.  One of the 
first scenes I saw had guys in a landing craft.  The helmets had 
white arcs on them.  Maybe it is little Boats and his group!




Thanks Wilton!

Greg

-Original Message-
From: Mercedes [mailto:mercedes-boun...@okiebenz.com] On Behalf Of 
WILTON

via Mercedes
Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2015 11:36 AM
To: Mercedes Discussion List
Cc: WILTON
Subject: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

And we should never florget.  I wrote the folllowing several years ago.
Some of you may hjave seen it before.

LITTLE BOATS AND 6 JUN 1944
By Wilton W. Strickland

My brother, Lewis Clyde Strickland, then 21 and with 3 1/2 yrs in 
the US

Navy, was the senior noncommissioned officer (NCO)/leader of a 48-man
platoon of the 6th Naval Beach Battalion that went ashore on Omaha 
Beach,
France, at 0730 on the 6th of June, 1944, to clear obstacles, secure 
the
beach and control traffic to, from and on the beach.  The unit was 
composed
of many specialties, including demolition, signalmen, radiomen, 
riflemen,

doctors, medical corpsmen (medics), bulldozer operators and others -
whatever necessary to manage the beach.  They wore army combat 
uniforms and

trained with the Army for the invasion.  The only thing visible to
distinguish them from army troops was an arc painted across the 
front of
their helmets.  Most of the men in his platoon were teenagers just 
17, 18

and 19 years old.

Several of the older men had been in the invasion of Sicily and a 
few, such
as Lewis, had been in the invasion of North Africa, where his ship 
had been
sunk just offshore in Oct '42.  Though small in stature, Lewis was a 
giant
in courage, dedication to accomplishing the mission, determination 
and care

for the men in his platoon.  He served as their mentor, their mother,
their father, their leader.  They affectionately called him, Little
Boats, in honor of his Navy specialty, boatswain's or boson's mate. 
Ensign

Joe Vaghi, just out of college and new to the Navy when he became the
platoon's Officer-In-Command (OIC) in late '43, said of Little Boats in
2001, He taught me everything I ever needed to know about the Navy.
Little Boats died of pneumonia in 1997.

The platoon had trained extensively for several months with army 
troops at
Camp Bradford, VA, Fort Pierce, FL, and Swansea, Wales.  They were 
delivered
to Omaha beach on LCI(L) 88, (an infantry landing craft) operated by 
members
of the US Coast Guard, as were many of the vessels in the invasion 
fleet.


In 2001, I had the very distinct honor and pleasure of interviewing 
several
of Little Boats' men and several of the equally brave Coasties (US 
Coast
Guard) who delivered them to the beach on that fateful day of June 
6, 1944,
the memory of which should make all Americans, British, Canadians 
and other
allies stand tall with pride.  Most of the following is excerpted 
from those

interviews:

One of the seventeen-year-old riflemen, Seaman John Hanley, 
remembers, We
formed up on the main deck of the LCI at the top of the port (left) 
ramp.
Ensign Vaghi was # 1, and his assistants, Ensign Wright # 2, BM/1C 
Little

Boats Strickland was # 3, I was # 4, and several of the other young
riflemen were immediately behind me.  As we approached the line of
departure, we could see smoke from the shelling rising from the beach.
About that time, an LCT coming out of the smoke off the beach on our 
port
side let off a barrage of rockets.  The German 88's had him 
straddled; you
could see the shells hitting the water 8 to 10 feet behind 'im.  She 
was at

battle speed - 8 or 9 knots, and that's the last I saw of the LCT - we
started passing 'im - we were coming up on the beach for the landing.

Ensign Vaghi adds, On the beach were multiple rows of different 
types of
obstacles, some with mines on them - tank traps, landing craft traps

Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

2015-06-11 Thread Curly McLain via Mercedes
The photo was up for only a second, but I clearly saw 2 helmets with 
white arcs in the center.


You can find those shows on the PBS web site and if you have an 
AppleTV (and maybe other streaming devices) there is a PBS app that 
has them for viewing.  You can pause and check them out.  If you 
watch on your computer you can get a screen shot to save and study.


Amazing writeup BTW.  I can't even imagine what that must have been like.

--R



On 6/10/15 11:22 PM, WILTON via Mercedes wrote:
I saw most of that show, too, though I missed first few minutes. 
'Could be, if the craft were an LCI(L) with infantry ramps that 
come down on each side near the bow (not a Higgins boat).  Whenever 
I see one of those scenes now, I try to study the person(s) for 
recognition; so far, 'haven't recognized one as my brother, Lewis 
(Little Boats).  They're not usually in view long enough, unless 
one just by chance matches my memory of him 70+ years ago.


Wilton

- Original Message - From: Curly McLain via Mercedes 
mercedes@okiebenz.com

To: Mercedes Discussion List mercedes@okiebenz.com
Cc: Curly McLain 126die...@gmail.com
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2015 10:07 PM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

Watching part of a Nova program tonight about D Day.  One of the 
first scenes I saw had guys in a landing craft.  The helmets had 
white arcs on them.  Maybe it is little Boats and his group!



Thanks Wilton!

Greg

-Original Message-
From: Mercedes [mailto:mercedes-boun...@okiebenz.com] On Behalf Of WILTON
via Mercedes
Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2015 11:36 AM
To: Mercedes Discussion List
Cc: WILTON
Subject: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

And we should never florget.  I wrote the folllowing several years ago.
Some of you may hjave seen it before.

LITTLE BOATS AND 6 JUN 1944
By Wilton W. Strickland

My brother, Lewis Clyde Strickland, then 21 and with 3 1/2 yrs in the US
Navy, was the senior noncommissioned officer (NCO)/leader of a 48-man
platoon of the 6th Naval Beach Battalion that went ashore on Omaha Beach,
France, at 0730 on the 6th of June, 1944, to clear obstacles, secure the
beach and control traffic to, from and on the beach.  The unit was composed
of many specialties, including demolition, signalmen, radiomen, riflemen,
doctors, medical corpsmen (medics), bulldozer operators and others -
whatever necessary to manage the beach.  They wore army combat uniforms and
trained with the Army for the invasion.  The only thing visible to
distinguish them from army troops was an arc painted across the front of
their helmets.  Most of the men in his platoon were teenagers just 17, 18
and 19 years old.

Several of the older men had been in the invasion of Sicily and a few, such
as Lewis, had been in the invasion of North Africa, where his ship had been
sunk just offshore in Oct '42.  Though small in stature, Lewis was a giant
in courage, dedication to accomplishing the mission, determination and care
for the men in his platoon.  He served as their mentor, their mother,
their father, their leader.  They affectionately called him, Little
Boats, in honor of his Navy specialty, boatswain's or boson's mate. Ensign
Joe Vaghi, just out of college and new to the Navy when he became the
platoon's Officer-In-Command (OIC) in late '43, said of Little Boats in
2001, He taught me everything I ever needed to know about the Navy.
Little Boats died of pneumonia in 1997.

The platoon had trained extensively for several months with army troops at
Camp Bradford, VA, Fort Pierce, FL, and Swansea, Wales.  They 
were delivered
to Omaha beach on LCI(L) 88, (an infantry landing craft) operated 
by members

of the US Coast Guard, as were many of the vessels in the invasion fleet.

In 2001, I had the very distinct honor and pleasure of interviewing several
of Little Boats' men and several of the equally brave Coasties (US Coast
Guard) who delivered them to the beach on that fateful day of June 6, 1944,
the memory of which should make all Americans, British, Canadians and other
allies stand tall with pride.  Most of the following is excerpted 
from those

interviews:

One of the seventeen-year-old riflemen, Seaman John Hanley, remembers, We
formed up on the main deck of the LCI at the top of the port (left) ramp.
Ensign Vaghi was # 1, and his assistants, Ensign Wright # 2, BM/1C Little
Boats Strickland was # 3, I was # 4, and several of the other young
riflemen were immediately behind me.  As we approached the line of
departure, we could see smoke from the shelling rising from the beach.
About that time, an LCT coming out of the smoke off the beach on our port
side let off a barrage of rockets.  The German 88's had him straddled; you
could see the shells hitting the water 8 to 10 feet behind 'im.  She was at
battle speed - 8 or 9 knots, and that's the last I saw of the LCT - we
started passing 'im - we were coming up on the beach for the landing.

Ensign Vaghi adds, On the beach were multiple rows of different types of
obstacles, some

Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

2015-06-10 Thread Greg Fiorentino via Mercedes
Thanks Wilton!

Greg

-Original Message-
From: Mercedes [mailto:mercedes-boun...@okiebenz.com] On Behalf Of WILTON
via Mercedes
Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2015 11:36 AM
To: Mercedes Discussion List
Cc: WILTON
Subject: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

And we should never florget.  I wrote the folllowing several years ago. 
Some of you may hjave seen it before.

LITTLE BOATS AND 6 JUN 1944
By Wilton W. Strickland

My brother, Lewis Clyde Strickland, then 21 and with 3 1/2 yrs in the US
Navy, was the senior noncommissioned officer (NCO)/leader of a 48-man
platoon of the 6th Naval Beach Battalion that went ashore on Omaha Beach,
France, at 0730 on the 6th of June, 1944, to clear obstacles, secure the
beach and control traffic to, from and on the beach.  The unit was composed
of many specialties, including demolition, signalmen, radiomen, riflemen,
doctors, medical corpsmen (medics), bulldozer operators and others -
whatever necessary to manage the beach.  They wore army combat uniforms and
trained with the Army for the invasion.  The only thing visible to
distinguish them from army troops was an arc painted across the front of
their helmets.  Most of the men in his platoon were teenagers just 17, 18
and 19 years old.

Several of the older men had been in the invasion of Sicily and a few, such
as Lewis, had been in the invasion of North Africa, where his ship had been
sunk just offshore in Oct '42.  Though small in stature, Lewis was a giant
in courage, dedication to accomplishing the mission, determination and care
for the men in his platoon.  He served as their mentor, their mother, 
their father, their leader.  They affectionately called him, Little
Boats, in honor of his Navy specialty, boatswain's or boson's mate.  Ensign
Joe Vaghi, just out of college and new to the Navy when he became the
platoon's Officer-In-Command (OIC) in late '43, said of Little Boats in
2001, He taught me everything I ever needed to know about the Navy. 
Little Boats died of pneumonia in 1997.

The platoon had trained extensively for several months with army troops at
Camp Bradford, VA, Fort Pierce, FL, and Swansea, Wales.  They were delivered
to Omaha beach on LCI(L) 88, (an infantry landing craft) operated by members
of the US Coast Guard, as were many of the vessels in the invasion fleet.

In 2001, I had the very distinct honor and pleasure of interviewing several
of Little Boats' men and several of the equally brave Coasties (US Coast
Guard) who delivered them to the beach on that fateful day of June 6, 1944,
the memory of which should make all Americans, British, Canadians and other
allies stand tall with pride.  Most of the following is excerpted from those
interviews:

One of the seventeen-year-old riflemen, Seaman John Hanley, remembers, We
formed up on the main deck of the LCI at the top of the port (left) ramp. 
Ensign Vaghi was # 1, and his assistants, Ensign Wright # 2, BM/1C Little
Boats Strickland was # 3, I was # 4, and several of the other young
riflemen were immediately behind me.  As we approached the line of
departure, we could see smoke from the shelling rising from the beach. 
About that time, an LCT coming out of the smoke off the beach on our port
side let off a barrage of rockets.  The German 88's had him straddled; you
could see the shells hitting the water 8 to 10 feet behind 'im.  She was at
battle speed - 8 or 9 knots, and that's the last I saw of the LCT - we
started passing 'im - we were coming up on the beach for the landing.

Ensign Vaghi adds, On the beach were multiple rows of different types of
obstacles, some with mines on them - tank traps, landing craft traps and
amphibious truck (DUKW) traps.  Later I learned that where we landed was the
widest opening on the beach.  The Underwater Demolition Teams (UDT)
certainly did their jobs well.  We lucked out by off-loading at low tide,
too.  If we had gone in at mid or high tide amid all those obstacles and
mines, we would have been in serious trouble.  Other landing craft, LCI(L)
#85, for example, took quite a beating - a direct hit on the bow and on the
starboard side, but we were lucky, we made our landing, and all of our
platoon got ashore.

Hanley:  Yeah, we were surrounded by those mines on poles, but the Skipper
found his way through an opening, or we were just lucky.  As soon as I heard
and felt the LCI hit bottom, the ramps on both sides went down.  Vaghi was
already going when the ramp hit the water.  The seamen behind me were
yelling, Go, Go, Go!  I was trying to keep up with Vaghi and Little Boats
as we flew down that ramp!  It seemed like a long way down, too.  When I saw
that Vaghi and Little Boats were in the water, I threw my pack over the side
and took just my rifle.  When I hit the water, Ensign Vaghi and Little Boats
were still right ahead of me.  Two or three other seamen were with me. 
Little Boats and I were immediately in water up to our chins.  There were
dead infantrymen in the water all around me, and dead and wounded all around

Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

2015-06-10 Thread Curly McLain via Mercedes
Watching part of a Nova program tonight about D Day.  One of the 
first scenes I saw had guys in a landing craft.  The helmets had 
white arcs on them.  Maybe it is little Boats and his group!




Thanks Wilton!

Greg

-Original Message-
From: Mercedes [mailto:mercedes-boun...@okiebenz.com] On Behalf Of WILTON
via Mercedes
Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2015 11:36 AM
To: Mercedes Discussion List
Cc: WILTON
Subject: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

And we should never florget.  I wrote the folllowing several years ago.
Some of you may hjave seen it before.

LITTLE BOATS AND 6 JUN 1944
By Wilton W. Strickland

My brother, Lewis Clyde Strickland, then 21 and with 3 1/2 yrs in the US
Navy, was the senior noncommissioned officer (NCO)/leader of a 48-man
platoon of the 6th Naval Beach Battalion that went ashore on Omaha Beach,
France, at 0730 on the 6th of June, 1944, to clear obstacles, secure the
beach and control traffic to, from and on the beach.  The unit was composed
of many specialties, including demolition, signalmen, radiomen, riflemen,
doctors, medical corpsmen (medics), bulldozer operators and others -
whatever necessary to manage the beach.  They wore army combat uniforms and
trained with the Army for the invasion.  The only thing visible to
distinguish them from army troops was an arc painted across the front of
their helmets.  Most of the men in his platoon were teenagers just 17, 18
and 19 years old.

Several of the older men had been in the invasion of Sicily and a few, such
as Lewis, had been in the invasion of North Africa, where his ship had been
sunk just offshore in Oct '42.  Though small in stature, Lewis was a giant
in courage, dedication to accomplishing the mission, determination and care
for the men in his platoon.  He served as their mentor, their mother,
their father, their leader.  They affectionately called him, Little
Boats, in honor of his Navy specialty, boatswain's or boson's mate.  Ensign
Joe Vaghi, just out of college and new to the Navy when he became the
platoon's Officer-In-Command (OIC) in late '43, said of Little Boats in
2001, He taught me everything I ever needed to know about the Navy.
Little Boats died of pneumonia in 1997.

The platoon had trained extensively for several months with army troops at
Camp Bradford, VA, Fort Pierce, FL, and Swansea, Wales.  They were delivered
to Omaha beach on LCI(L) 88, (an infantry landing craft) operated by members
of the US Coast Guard, as were many of the vessels in the invasion fleet.

In 2001, I had the very distinct honor and pleasure of interviewing several
of Little Boats' men and several of the equally brave Coasties (US Coast
Guard) who delivered them to the beach on that fateful day of June 6, 1944,
the memory of which should make all Americans, British, Canadians and other
allies stand tall with pride.  Most of the following is excerpted from those
interviews:

One of the seventeen-year-old riflemen, Seaman John Hanley, remembers, We
formed up on the main deck of the LCI at the top of the port (left) ramp.
Ensign Vaghi was # 1, and his assistants, Ensign Wright # 2, BM/1C Little
Boats Strickland was # 3, I was # 4, and several of the other young
riflemen were immediately behind me.  As we approached the line of
departure, we could see smoke from the shelling rising from the beach.
About that time, an LCT coming out of the smoke off the beach on our port
side let off a barrage of rockets.  The German 88's had him straddled; you
could see the shells hitting the water 8 to 10 feet behind 'im.  She was at
battle speed - 8 or 9 knots, and that's the last I saw of the LCT - we
started passing 'im - we were coming up on the beach for the landing.

Ensign Vaghi adds, On the beach were multiple rows of different types of
obstacles, some with mines on them - tank traps, landing craft traps and
amphibious truck (DUKW) traps.  Later I learned that where we landed was the
widest opening on the beach.  The Underwater Demolition Teams (UDT)
certainly did their jobs well.  We lucked out by off-loading at low tide,
too.  If we had gone in at mid or high tide amid all those obstacles and
mines, we would have been in serious trouble.  Other landing craft, LCI(L)
#85, for example, took quite a beating - a direct hit on the bow and on the
starboard side, but we were lucky, we made our landing, and all of our
platoon got ashore.

Hanley:  Yeah, we were surrounded by those mines on poles, but the Skipper
found his way through an opening, or we were just lucky.  As soon as I heard
and felt the LCI hit bottom, the ramps on both sides went down.  Vaghi was
already going when the ramp hit the water.  The seamen behind me were
yelling, Go, Go, Go!  I was trying to keep up with Vaghi and Little Boats
as we flew down that ramp!  It seemed like a long way down, too.  When I saw
that Vaghi and Little Boats were in the water, I threw my pack over the side
and took just my rifle.  When I hit the water, Ensign Vaghi and Little Boats
were still right ahead of me.  

Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

2015-06-10 Thread WILTON via Mercedes
I saw most of that show, too, though I missed first few minutes.  'Could be, 
if the craft were an LCI(L) with infantry ramps that come down on each side 
near the bow (not a Higgins boat).  Whenever I see one of those scenes now, 
I try to study the person(s) for recognition; so far, 'haven't recognized 
one as my brother, Lewis (Little Boats).  They're not usually in view long 
enough, unless one just by chance matches my memory of him 70+ years ago.


Wilton

- Original Message - 
From: Curly McLain via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com

To: Mercedes Discussion List mercedes@okiebenz.com
Cc: Curly McLain 126die...@gmail.com
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2015 10:07 PM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day


Watching part of a Nova program tonight about D Day.  One of the first 
scenes I saw had guys in a landing craft.  The helmets had white arcs on 
them.  Maybe it is little Boats and his group!




Thanks Wilton!

Greg

-Original Message-
From: Mercedes [mailto:mercedes-boun...@okiebenz.com] On Behalf Of WILTON
via Mercedes
Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2015 11:36 AM
To: Mercedes Discussion List
Cc: WILTON
Subject: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

And we should never florget.  I wrote the folllowing several years ago.
Some of you may hjave seen it before.

LITTLE BOATS AND 6 JUN 1944
By Wilton W. Strickland

My brother, Lewis Clyde Strickland, then 21 and with 3 1/2 yrs in the US
Navy, was the senior noncommissioned officer (NCO)/leader of a 48-man
platoon of the 6th Naval Beach Battalion that went ashore on Omaha Beach,
France, at 0730 on the 6th of June, 1944, to clear obstacles, secure the
beach and control traffic to, from and on the beach.  The unit was 
composed

of many specialties, including demolition, signalmen, radiomen, riflemen,
doctors, medical corpsmen (medics), bulldozer operators and others -
whatever necessary to manage the beach.  They wore army combat uniforms 
and

trained with the Army for the invasion.  The only thing visible to
distinguish them from army troops was an arc painted across the front of
their helmets.  Most of the men in his platoon were teenagers just 17, 18
and 19 years old.

Several of the older men had been in the invasion of Sicily and a few, 
such
as Lewis, had been in the invasion of North Africa, where his ship had 
been

sunk just offshore in Oct '42.  Though small in stature, Lewis was a giant
in courage, dedication to accomplishing the mission, determination and 
care

for the men in his platoon.  He served as their mentor, their mother,
their father, their leader.  They affectionately called him, Little
Boats, in honor of his Navy specialty, boatswain's or boson's mate. 
Ensign

Joe Vaghi, just out of college and new to the Navy when he became the
platoon's Officer-In-Command (OIC) in late '43, said of Little Boats in
2001, He taught me everything I ever needed to know about the Navy.
Little Boats died of pneumonia in 1997.

The platoon had trained extensively for several months with army troops at
Camp Bradford, VA, Fort Pierce, FL, and Swansea, Wales.  They were 
delivered
to Omaha beach on LCI(L) 88, (an infantry landing craft) operated by 
members

of the US Coast Guard, as were many of the vessels in the invasion fleet.

In 2001, I had the very distinct honor and pleasure of interviewing 
several

of Little Boats' men and several of the equally brave Coasties (US Coast
Guard) who delivered them to the beach on that fateful day of June 6, 
1944,
the memory of which should make all Americans, British, Canadians and 
other
allies stand tall with pride.  Most of the following is excerpted from 
those

interviews:

One of the seventeen-year-old riflemen, Seaman John Hanley, remembers, We
formed up on the main deck of the LCI at the top of the port (left) ramp.
Ensign Vaghi was # 1, and his assistants, Ensign Wright # 2, BM/1C Little
Boats Strickland was # 3, I was # 4, and several of the other young
riflemen were immediately behind me.  As we approached the line of
departure, we could see smoke from the shelling rising from the beach.
About that time, an LCT coming out of the smoke off the beach on our port
side let off a barrage of rockets.  The German 88's had him straddled; you
could see the shells hitting the water 8 to 10 feet behind 'im.  She was 
at

battle speed - 8 or 9 knots, and that's the last I saw of the LCT - we
started passing 'im - we were coming up on the beach for the landing.

Ensign Vaghi adds, On the beach were multiple rows of different types of
obstacles, some with mines on them - tank traps, landing craft traps and
amphibious truck (DUKW) traps.  Later I learned that where we landed was 
the

widest opening on the beach.  The Underwater Demolition Teams (UDT)
certainly did their jobs well.  We lucked out by off-loading at low tide,
too.  If we had gone in at mid or high tide amid all those obstacles and
mines, we would have been in serious trouble.  Other landing craft, LCI(L)
#85, for example, took quite a beating - a direct hit

Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

2015-06-07 Thread Curly McLain via Mercedes
No matter now, I sent the link to the video and if anyone wants they 
can find the picture.  It was weird though...  My computer said it 
was under 150 Kb, and the message from the okie mail said it was some 
huge number in the Gb range.  I tried it over after I reduced the 
size of the picture to about 70k with the same result.  I didn't 
think the picture would be worth seeing in the 40 size.




Just a reminder:

If you get a needs approval message from the list, drop me a 
private message so I know it's there.  I try to check the incoming 
queue at least once a day, since if I don't it gets unbelievably 
backed up with all sorts of things you don't want to know about.


If the spam that was sent to us got through, you would be seeing 
several hundred messages a day. Ugh.


Dan



 On Jun 7, 2015, at 1:03 PM, Curly McLain via Mercedes 
mercedes@okiebenz.com wrote:


 I sent a post with a photo last night, but it has not cleared the 
listmom.  so, without the photo:


 Today is D-Day plus 1

 Remembering the monumental efforts of 1944.


 Defeat tyranny.  Viva la liberte!

 The photo shows people on the beach below a cemetary.  Never 
having been there, I'm guessing it is omaha beach.  Can you imagine 
how people would freak out now if 120 men in each state were KIA?


 The people on the beach spell out in double rows France will 
never forget.  I have my doubts, but I do believe the French in 
rural Normady will have a long memory.  There are also people 
holding large US and french flags.  I am guessing the flags are 
100' long and 60' tall.It is an interesting picture from the US 
embassy in France website.


 Here is a link to a video version:


http://www.thefrenchwillneverforget.com/index.php?go=Photos%26amp%3BVideos 
Looks like the stunt was done in 2007.


 And they desecrated the American flag by letting it touch the ground.

 We did a halftime show with a similar size American flag a few 
years ago, and people were staged under the flag to be sure it 
never touched the ground.


 Respect to all Allied Forces who were there during that time 71 years ago.

 ___
 http://www.okiebenz.com

 To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

 To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
 http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com




___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com



Re: [MBZ] 71 years and a day

2015-06-07 Thread Dan Penoff via Mercedes
Just a reminder:

If you get a “needs approval” message from the list, drop me a private message 
so I know it’s there.  I try to check the incoming queue at least once a day, 
since if I don’t it gets unbelievably backed up with all sorts of things you 
don’t want to know about.

If the spam that was sent to us got through, you would be seeing several 
hundred messages a day. Ugh.

Dan


 
 On Jun 7, 2015, at 1:03 PM, Curly McLain via Mercedes mercedes@okiebenz.com 
 wrote:
 
 I sent a post with a photo last night, but it has not cleared the listmom.  
 so, without the photo:
 
 Today is D-Day plus 1
 
 Remembering the monumental efforts of 1944.
 
 
 Defeat tyranny.  Viva la liberte!
 
 The photo shows people on the beach below a cemetary.  Never having been 
 there, I'm guessing it is omaha beach.  Can you imagine how people would 
 freak out now if 120 men in each state were KIA?
 
 The people on the beach spell out in double rows France will never forget.  
 I have my doubts, but I do believe the French in rural Normady will have a 
 long memory.  There are also people holding large US and french flags.  I am 
 guessing the flags are 100' long and 60' tall.It is an interesting 
 picture from the US embassy in France website.
 
 Here is a link to a video version:
 
 http://www.thefrenchwillneverforget.com/index.php?go=Photos%26amp%3BVideos 
 Looks like the stunt was done in 2007.
 
 And they desecrated the American flag by letting it touch the ground.
 
 We did a halftime show with a similar size American flag a few years ago, and 
 people were staged under the flag to be sure it never touched the ground.
 
 Respect to all Allied Forces who were there during that time 71 years ago.
 
 ___
 http://www.okiebenz.com
 
 To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/
 
 To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
 http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com
 


___
http://www.okiebenz.com

To search list archives http://www.okiebenz.com/archive/

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://mail.okiebenz.com/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_okiebenz.com