[MORPHMET] HDI 3D Structured-Light Scanners

2015-02-02 Thread Starbuck, John Marlow
Hello everyone,



Do any of you (or anyone you know) have experience with one of the HDI 3D 
Structured-Light Scanners? I am curious how well they work for imaging objects 
(skulls, pots), people, and children who wont sit still for morphometric 
research. http://www.3d-microscribe.com/HDI%203D%20Scanner%20Page.htm



The videos and stats on these models make them look great, but I wanted to 
check with someone who has actually used one before.



Any advice or suggestions would be appreciated.



Thanks,



John





John Starbuck, PhD

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Indiana University Northwest

Lindenwood Hall, Room 209

3400 Broadway

Gary, IN 46408

Curriculum Vitaehttps://iupui.academia.edu/JohnStarbuck/CurriculumVitae
E-mail: jstar...@iu.edu

-- 
MORPHMET may be accessed via its webpage at http://www.morphometrics.org

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to morphmet+unsubscr...@morphometrics.org.


[MORPHMET] Re: Table-top 3D scanner recommendations

2015-02-02 Thread dslice
Thanks to all who have responded so quickly to my query. I will try to 
summarize and post the responses in the near future.

-ds


On Monday, February 2, 2015 at 3:56:43 PM UTC-5, dslice wrote:

 Does anyone have any experience or recommendations for a high-resolution, 
 table-top 3D scanner?

 I am wanting to apply for a university equipment grant to get a scanner 
 for my lab (and anyone else who might need to scan). This will be in 
 collaboration with bio and archaeological and art researchers. These grants 
 usually run about $40kUSD.

 It seems the popular NextEngine scanner (~6000USD with all the extras) has 
 a resolution of approx. 0.1-0.3mm. That would be fine for my stuff - method 
 development and human-sized bones, but my bio colleagues deem that 
 inadequate for their needs - mouse-sized bones. We can get high-res from 
 microCT, but that takes forever - about a day per scan and the files are 
 huge, e.g., 30GB.

 Similarly, the Artec Spider (22,600USD) has a resolution of 0.1 mm. It 
 promises some advantages of hand-held scanning, which would benefit my 
 archaeological colleagues, but I am hearing from users it might not be so 
 great in actual usage. Not sure if it supports a turntable/table-top 
 operation option.

 So, does anyone have any suggestions?
 high-resolution
 portable (might need to travel with it)
 fast, easy table-top operation
 $40kUSD

 -ds


-- 
MORPHMET may be accessed via its webpage at http://www.morphometrics.org

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to morphmet+unsubscr...@morphometrics.org.


Re: [MORPHMET] HDI 3D Structured-Light Scanners

2015-02-02 Thread Thomas O'Mahoney
Hi John,
Yes,  I have a lot of experience with the Hdi scanners, both the fixed
calibration and adjustable ones.  They are great for archaeological
material/bones (I've literally scanned thousands,  as have my colleagues at
Cambridge,  Bradford and TBI in Kenya)  and I've had good success with
scanning articulated skeletons too.
They're actually made by LMI technologies,  who are Canada based.

I'm more than happy to send through samples as well, if anyone needs.  I'm
in the process of sorting out a gallery got my website as well.

All the best,
Tom O'Mahoney
Faculty of Life Sciences
University of Manchester
On 2 Feb 2015 22:24, Starbuck, John Marlow jstar...@iu.edu wrote:

   Hello everyone,



 Do any of you (or anyone you know) have experience with one of the HDI 3D
 Structured-Light Scanners? I am curious how well they work for imaging
 objects (skulls, pots), people, and children who wont sit still for
 morphometric research.
 http://www.3d-microscribe.com/HDI%203D%20Scanner%20Page.htm



 The videos and stats on these models make them look great, but I wanted to
 check with someone who has actually used one before.



 Any advice or suggestions would be appreciated.



 Thanks,



 John



 --

 John Starbuck, PhD

 Department of Sociology and Anthropology

 Indiana University Northwest

 Lindenwood Hall, Room 209

 3400 Broadway

 Gary, IN 46408
  Curriculum Vitae
 https://iupui.academia.edu/JohnStarbuck/CurriculumVitae
 E-mail: jstar...@iu.edu

 --
 MORPHMET may be accessed via its webpage at http://www.morphometrics.org

 To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
 email to morphmet+unsubscr...@morphometrics.org.


-- 
MORPHMET may be accessed via its webpage at http://www.morphometrics.org

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to morphmet+unsubscr...@morphometrics.org.


[MORPHMET] Table-top 3D scanner recommendations

2015-02-02 Thread dslice
Does anyone have any experience or recommendations for a high-resolution, 
table-top 3D scanner?

I am wanting to apply for a university equipment grant to get a scanner for 
my lab (and anyone else who might need to scan). This will be in 
collaboration with bio and archaeological and art researchers. These grants 
usually run about $40kUSD.

It seems the popular NextEngine scanner (~6000USD with all the extras) has 
a resolution of approx. 0.1-0.3mm. That would be fine for my stuff - method 
development and human-sized bones, but my bio colleagues deem that 
inadequate for their needs - mouse-sized bones. We can get high-res from 
microCT, but that takes forever - about a day per scan and the files are 
huge, e.g., 30GB.

Similarly, the Artec Spider (22,600USD) has a resolution of 0.1 mm. It 
promises some advantages of hand-held scanning, which would benefit my 
archaeological colleagues, but I am hearing from users it might not be so 
great in actual usage. Not sure if it supports a turntable/table-top 
operation option.

So, does anyone have any suggestions?
high-resolution
portable (might need to travel with it)
fast, easy table-top operation
$40kUSD

-ds

-- 
MORPHMET may be accessed via its webpage at http://www.morphometrics.org

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to morphmet+unsubscr...@morphometrics.org.