Re: [MORPHMET] Help with surface scans

2019-05-08 Thread G Wrobe
Pablo — I use photogrammetry to create models from skulls and I’d be happy to 
share my workflow if you want to experiment with it.  It works really well in 
most cases. I’ve been curious about about the Spider scanner, so would love to 
hear about your experiences with that.  Feel free to drop me a line at 
wrob...@msu.edu .

Gabriel



> On May 7, 2019, at 5:40 PM, Pablo Fisichella  
> wrote:
> 
> Dear Ariadne
> 
> Thank you so much for your kind response and excuse my delayed reply. I´m 
> using an Artec Space Spide scanner. I´m doing some tests following several of 
> the guidelines here suggested. For lithic tools some reflecting surfaces 
> typical of some raw materials like chert produce some errors but is just a 
> matter of test. Thanks again for your advice.
> 
> All best,
> 
> Pablo
> 
>  
> 
> Libre de virus. www.avast.com 
> 
>  
> El sáb., 27 abr. 2019 a las 11:56, Ariadne Schulz ( >) escribió:
> I'm coming at this a bit late so I apologize if I've repeated anyone's point. 
> For your purposes photogrammetry is probably your best option particularly 
> for the lithics. Laser scanning works on bones and I used a NextEngine 
> scanner for human proximal long bones, but I think someone has already 
> mentioned that the laser doesn't capture the orbitals well and you might have 
> difficulty with tooth enamel. The photogrammetry software requires a decently 
> hefty laptop, but it's affordable and you'd be working with normal light 
> rather than lasers. I don't know that this clears up your concerns about 
> fusing scans though. If you are concerned you could do some error testing on 
> that comparing landmarks obtained on the scans to landmarks obtained 
> normally. I found the laser scans to be pretty decent, but I unfortunately 
> cannot speak to photogrammetry as I've never personally tried it.
> 
> On Mon, Apr 22, 2019 at 3:29 PM Pablo Fisichella  > wrote:
> Dear All
> 
> I´m trying to obtain surface scans from human skulls and lithic artifacts 
> (projectile points). I wonder how can I get the most complete possible scans, 
> I mean usually is not possibly to obtain a complete scan at once. I know that 
> several post-scan processing software have functions to fuse and/or align the 
> different surfaces obtained and then create one surface but perhaps several 
> of you have some tips to obtain the most complete possible surface scans.
> 
> Any suggestion and advice is more than welcome
> 
> All best,
> 
> Pablo
> 
> 
> -- 
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> 
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Re: [MORPHMET] Help with surface scans

2019-05-08 Thread Pablo Fisichella
Dear Ariadne

Thank you so much for your kind response and excuse my delayed reply. I´m
using an Artec Space Spide scanner. I´m doing some tests following several
of the guidelines here suggested. For lithic tools some reflecting surfaces
typical of some raw materials like chert produce some errors but is just a
matter of test. Thanks again for your advice.

All best,

Pablo


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El sáb., 27 abr. 2019 a las 11:56, Ariadne Schulz ()
escribió:

> I'm coming at this a bit late so I apologize if I've repeated anyone's
> point. For your purposes photogrammetry is probably your best option
> particularly for the lithics. Laser scanning works on bones and I used a
> NextEngine scanner for human proximal long bones, but I think someone has
> already mentioned that the laser doesn't capture the orbitals well and you
> might have difficulty with tooth enamel. The photogrammetry software
> requires a decently hefty laptop, but it's affordable and you'd be working
> with normal light rather than lasers. I don't know that this clears up your
> concerns about fusing scans though. If you are concerned you could do some
> error testing on that comparing landmarks obtained on the scans to
> landmarks obtained normally. I found the laser scans to be pretty decent,
> but I unfortunately cannot speak to photogrammetry as I've never personally
> tried it.
>
> On Mon, Apr 22, 2019 at 3:29 PM Pablo Fisichella <
> fisichellapa...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Dear All
>>
>> I´m trying to obtain surface scans from human skulls and lithic artifacts
>> (projectile points). I wonder how can I get the most complete possible
>> scans, I mean usually is not possibly to obtain a complete scan at once. I
>> know that several post-scan processing software have functions to fuse
>> and/or align the different surfaces obtained and then create one surface
>> but perhaps several of you have some tips to obtain the most complete
>> possible surface scans.
>>
>> Any suggestion and advice is more than welcome
>>
>> All best,
>>
>> Pablo
>>
>> --
>> MORPHMET may be accessed via its webpage at http://www.morphometrics.org
>> ---
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
>> "MORPHMET" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
>> email to morphmet+unsubscr...@morphometrics.org.
>>
>

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Re: [MORPHMET] Help with surface scans

2019-04-27 Thread Ariadne Schulz
I'm coming at this a bit late so I apologize if I've repeated anyone's
point. For your purposes photogrammetry is probably your best option
particularly for the lithics. Laser scanning works on bones and I used a
NextEngine scanner for human proximal long bones, but I think someone has
already mentioned that the laser doesn't capture the orbitals well and you
might have difficulty with tooth enamel. The photogrammetry software
requires a decently hefty laptop, but it's affordable and you'd be working
with normal light rather than lasers. I don't know that this clears up your
concerns about fusing scans though. If you are concerned you could do some
error testing on that comparing landmarks obtained on the scans to
landmarks obtained normally. I found the laser scans to be pretty decent,
but I unfortunately cannot speak to photogrammetry as I've never personally
tried it.

On Mon, Apr 22, 2019 at 3:29 PM Pablo Fisichella 
wrote:

> Dear All
>
> I´m trying to obtain surface scans from human skulls and lithic artifacts
> (projectile points). I wonder how can I get the most complete possible
> scans, I mean usually is not possibly to obtain a complete scan at once. I
> know that several post-scan processing software have functions to fuse
> and/or align the different surfaces obtained and then create one surface
> but perhaps several of you have some tips to obtain the most complete
> possible surface scans.
>
> Any suggestion and advice is more than welcome
>
> All best,
>
> Pablo
>
> --
> MORPHMET may be accessed via its webpage at http://www.morphometrics.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "MORPHMET" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to morphmet+unsubscr...@morphometrics.org.
>

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Re: [MORPHMET] Help with surface scans

2019-04-25 Thread Pablo Fisichella
Dear All,

Thank you very much for all of your suggestions. I really appreciate your
advice. I´ll chek in detail all of your suggestions and I'll communicate
again if needed.

with kind regards,

Pablo

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El mié., 24 abr. 2019 a las 0:41, Murat Maga () escribió:

> Dear Pablo,
>
>
>
> It has been a while I worked with surface scanners. When I was using a
> Konica/Minolta system (15 years ago), we will do a rotational scan (using a
> turntable), at specified interval (say every 20-30 degrees of rotation).
> Then the software will stitch them together and then we would evaluate the
> missed regions in 3D rendering, then reposition the specimen accordingly
> and capture missing portions as individual snapshots and patch the 3D
> reconstruction. So essentially it was a trial and error process.
>
>
>
> I think the quality of and the speed of the reconstruction software have
> improved tremendously (almost to the point of real-time in some cases), but
> I believe process is essentially the same. Perhaps someone with more recent
> knowledge of this technology can chime in.
>
>
>
> M
>
>
>
> *From:* Pablo Fisichella 
> *Sent:* Monday, April 22, 2019 7:29 AM
> *To:* morphmet@morphometrics.org; morphmet_modera...@morphometrics.org
> *Subject:* [MORPHMET] Help with surface scans
>
>
>
> Dear All
>
> I´m trying to obtain surface scans from human skulls and lithic artifacts
> (projectile points). I wonder how can I get the most complete possible
> scans, I mean usually is not possibly to obtain a complete scan at once. I
> know that several post-scan processing software have functions to fuse
> and/or align the different surfaces obtained and then create one surface
> but perhaps several of you have some tips to obtain the most complete
> possible surface scans.
>
> Any suggestion and advice is more than welcome
>
> All best,
>
> Pablo
>
> --
> MORPHMET may be accessed via its webpage at http://www.morphometrics.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "MORPHMET" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to morphmet+unsubscr...@morphometrics.org.
>

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Re: [MORPHMET] Help with surface scans

2019-04-24 Thread Abel Bosman
Dear Pablo,

While I am unsure about lithic artifacts (as I don't have much experience
in scanning these), I have personally succesfully used a NextEngine laser
scanner to scan human crania. As you say, while it is not possible to get a
complete scan in one go, it is usually possible to do it in two sittings.
In the first instance, you place the cranium so that it is resting on its
basicranium (more or less Frankfurt Horizontal) and complete a full 360
scan. Then, you fix the cranium in place so that its occipital bone is on
the plateau and frontal bone upwards. Then you perform the second scan.
Later down the line, you can stitch these two together quite easily using
the software that comes with the scanner (ScanStudio), or use something
like Meshlab. For this stitching, you just need to make sure that you have
homologous landmarks that you can use to tell the software which structures
should align.

Ofcourse, if you have a Breuckmann structured light scanner or similar with
a wider field of view, it will be a bit easier to scan the crania, although
you still need to do two sittings, since you are not capturing the area on
which your specimen is resting-
If it is available for you, I would advise looking into a handheld scanner,
like the Artec Spider. The newer models are super fast, easy to use, and
you scan in real time, meaning that you can quite easily turn your specimen
around, continue scanning and stitch everything together with the
accompanying software.

Note that with all of these, it will still be quite difficult to get some
of the more complex areas scanned. For example, the NextEngine sometimes
has trouble in scanning the oribital roofs, as the lasers cannot reach this
area easily. Something like the Artec has less issue with this, as you can
move the scanner around more freely (as opposed to conventional scanners,
where you move the specimen around and not the scanner). Lithic artifacts
might be easier, but their reflective surfaces (think obisidian) might give
you other issues since they can scatter the lasers projected by some of
this hardware.

Hope this helps and if you have any specific questions, please let me know.

With kind regards,
Abel

Op wo 24 apr. 2019 om 05:44 schreef Murat Maga :

> Dear Pablo,
>
>
>
> It has been a while I worked with surface scanners. When I was using a
> Konica/Minolta system (15 years ago), we will do a rotational scan (using a
> turntable), at specified interval (say every 20-30 degrees of rotation).
> Then the software will stitch them together and then we would evaluate the
> missed regions in 3D rendering, then reposition the specimen accordingly
> and capture missing portions as individual snapshots and patch the 3D
> reconstruction. So essentially it was a trial and error process.
>
>
>
> I think the quality of and the speed of the reconstruction software have
> improved tremendously (almost to the point of real-time in some cases), but
> I believe process is essentially the same. Perhaps someone with more recent
> knowledge of this technology can chime in.
>
>
>
> M
>
>
>
> *From:* Pablo Fisichella 
> *Sent:* Monday, April 22, 2019 7:29 AM
> *To:* morphmet@morphometrics.org; morphmet_modera...@morphometrics.org
> *Subject:* [MORPHMET] Help with surface scans
>
>
>
> Dear All
>
> I´m trying to obtain surface scans from human skulls and lithic artifacts
> (projectile points). I wonder how can I get the most complete possible
> scans, I mean usually is not possibly to obtain a complete scan at once. I
> know that several post-scan processing software have functions to fuse
> and/or align the different surfaces obtained and then create one surface
> but perhaps several of you have some tips to obtain the most complete
> possible surface scans.
>
> Any suggestion and advice is more than welcome
>
> All best,
>
> Pablo
>
> --
> MORPHMET may be accessed via its webpage at http://www.morphometrics.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "MORPHMET" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to morphmet+unsubscr...@morphometrics.org.
>
> --
> MORPHMET may be accessed via its webpage at http://www.morphometrics.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "MORPHMET" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to morphmet+unsubscr...@morphometrics.org.
>

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RE: [MORPHMET] Help with surface scans

2019-04-23 Thread Murat Maga
ce New
X-MXTHUNDER-Scan-Result:  0
X-MXTHUNDER-Rules: 
0-0-0-26041-c
X-MXTHUNDER-Clean:  Yes
X-MXTHUNDER-Group:  OK

--_000_CY4PR08MB24706D6ED1953E7E9AED1F25A83C0CY4PR08MB2470namp_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Dear Pablo,

It has been a while I worked with surface scanners. When I was using a Koni=
ca/Minolta system (15 years ago), we will do a rotational scan (using a tur=
ntable), at specified interval (say every 20-30 degrees of rotation). Then =
the software will stitch them together and then we would evaluate the misse=
d regions in 3D rendering, then reposition the specimen accordingly and cap=
ture missing portions as individual snapshots and patch the 3D reconstructi=
on. So essentially it was a trial and error process.

I think the quality of and the speed of the reconstruction software have im=
proved tremendously (almost to the point of real-time in some cases), but I=
 believe process is essentially the same. Perhaps someone with more recent =
knowledge of this technology can chime in.

M

From: Pablo Fisichella 
Sent: Monday, April 22, 2019 7:29 AM
To: morphmet@morphometrics.org; morphmet_modera...@morphometrics.org
Subject: [MORPHMET] Help with surface scans

Dear All
I=C2=B4m trying to obtain surface scans from human skulls and lithic artifa=
cts (projectile points). I wonder how can I get the most complete possible =
scans, I mean usually is not possibly to obtain a complete scan at once. I =
know that several post-scan processing software have functions to fuse and/=
or align the different surfaces obtained and then create one surface but pe=
rhaps several of you have some tips to obtain the most complete possible su=
rface scans.
Any suggestion and advice is more than welcome
All best,
Pablo
--
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Dear Pablo, 

It has been a while I worked with surface scanners. =
When I was using a Konica/Minolta system (15 years ago), we will do a rotat=
ional scan (using a turntable), at specified interval (say every 20-30 degr=
ees of rotation). Then the software
 will stitch them together and then we would evaluate the missed regions in=
 3D rendering, then reposition the specimen accordingly and capture missing=
 portions as individual snapshots and patch the 3D reconstruction. So essen=
tially it was a trial and error
 process.

I think the quality of and the speed of the reconstr=
uction software have improved tremendously (almost to the point of real-tim=
e in some cases), but I believe process is essentially the same. Perhaps so=
meone with more recent knowledge of
 this technology can chime in.

M

From: Pablo Fisichella fisichellapablo@gm=
ail.com 
Sent: Monday, April 22, 2019 7:29 AM
To: morphmet@morphom

[MORPHMET] Help with surface scans

2019-04-22 Thread Pablo Fisichella
Dear All

I´m trying to obtain surface scans from human skulls and lithic artifacts
(projectile points). I wonder how can I get the most complete possible
scans, I mean usually is not possibly to obtain a complete scan at once. I
know that several post-scan processing software have functions to fuse
and/or align the different surfaces obtained and then create one surface
but perhaps several of you have some tips to obtain the most complete
possible surface scans.

Any suggestion and advice is more than welcome

All best,

Pablo

-- 
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