Re: NANOG 70 network diagram and upstream

2017-06-02 Thread Jared Mauch

> On Jun 2, 2017, at 5:34 PM, Eric Dugas  wrote:
> 
> And the 4x100G. That's four times the capacity of the network I work for.
> ~100k subs.

Disclaimer: Not an employee of NTT, but I was last Bellevue NANOG.

Last time in Bellevue with the Comcast (dark) and Wave (dim) fiber we had 220G 
with diverse building entrances.  Many people made fun of me for the overkill.  
It peaked at 1.1Gb/s as WWDC was at the same time and at least one person 
plugged in to the wired station to download the latest developer tools.

WWDC overlaps this time as well, and I believe there will be some additional 
wired ports available, so bring your thunderbolt and USB to Ethernet adapters. 
:-)

- Jared

RE: NANOG 70 network diagram and upstream

2017-06-02 Thread Eric Dugas
And the 4x100G. That's four times the capacity of the network I work for.
~100k subs.

On Jun 2, 2017 16:54, "Aaron Gould"  wrote:

> Btw
>
> Wow, a ~2 million dollar boundary (dual PTX1000's) for the NANOG 70
> conference geez
>
> -aaron
>
> -Original Message-
> From: NANOG [mailto:nanog-boun...@nanog.org] On Behalf Of Eric Kuhnke
> Sent: Friday, June 2, 2017 1:43 PM
> To: nanog@nanog.org list 
> Subject: NANOG 70 network diagram and upstream
>
> Just a small thing, but as one of the folks who used to work on the core
> network gear of AS11404, the network diagram has something in it that might
> confuse attendees as to who is really sponsoring the upstream:
>
> https://www.nanog.org/meetings/nanog70/diagram
>
> AS11404 was formerly known as Spectrum Networks, acquired in 2013 by
> Wavedivision Holdings LLC (Wave Broadband) and became the backbone of the
> Wave network. It's a totally different thing than the Charter service which
> is trademarked as as Spectrum.
>
> https://www.peeringdb.com/asn/11404
>
> The logo in the right side bubble there shouldn't be the Charter/Spectrum
> trademarked font, but rather should be Wave, who built the dark fiber into
> the hotel and are providing the upstream. The last mile fiber into the
> hotel is Wave.
>
>
> -Eric
>
>


RE: NANOG 70 network diagram and upstream

2017-06-02 Thread Aaron Gould
Btw

Wow, a ~2 million dollar boundary (dual PTX1000's) for the NANOG 70 
conference geez

-aaron

-Original Message-
From: NANOG [mailto:nanog-boun...@nanog.org] On Behalf Of Eric Kuhnke
Sent: Friday, June 2, 2017 1:43 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org list 
Subject: NANOG 70 network diagram and upstream

Just a small thing, but as one of the folks who used to work on the core 
network gear of AS11404, the network diagram has something in it that might 
confuse attendees as to who is really sponsoring the upstream:

https://www.nanog.org/meetings/nanog70/diagram

AS11404 was formerly known as Spectrum Networks, acquired in 2013 by 
Wavedivision Holdings LLC (Wave Broadband) and became the backbone of the Wave 
network. It's a totally different thing than the Charter service which is 
trademarked as as Spectrum.

https://www.peeringdb.com/asn/11404

The logo in the right side bubble there shouldn't be the Charter/Spectrum 
trademarked font, but rather should be Wave, who built the dark fiber into the 
hotel and are providing the upstream. The last mile fiber into the hotel is 
Wave.


-Eric



Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Rod Beck
The plan is to decommission TAT-14 in 2024. That is long before the next 
Biblical Flood due the ice caps melting. The Trans-Atlantic systems have a life 
span at best of 30 years. When the next set of systems is built rising waters 
will be taken into account.


From: Valdis Kletnieks  on behalf of valdis.kletni...@vt.edu 

Sent: Friday, June 2, 2017 8:40 PM
To: Christopher Morrow
Cc: Rod Beck; nanog@nanog.org
Subject: Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

On Fri, 02 Jun 2017 13:23:26 -0400, Christopher Morrow said:
> is this a case of 'wherer the cable gets dry' vs 'where the electronics
> doing cable things lives' ?
> aren't (normally) the dry equipment locations a bit inland and then have
> last-mile services from the consortium members headed inland to their
> respective network pops?

Well, I'd be willing to buy that logic, except the specific buildings called
out look pretty damned big for just drying off a cable.  For example, this
is claimed to be the US landing point for TAT-14 - looks around 4K square feet?

http://virtualglobetrotting.com/map/tuckerton-cable-landing-station/view/google/
[http://khm0.googleapis.com/kh?v=726=en-US=307790=398428=20]

Tuckerton Cable Landing Station in Tuckerton, NJ (Google 
...
virtualglobetrotting.com
Tuckerton Cable Landing Station (Google Maps). Tuckerton Cable Landing Station 
hosts the TAT-14 fibre cable which runs 15,000km to...



Though I admit I'm foggy on how much gear is needed to stuff however many amps
at 4,000 volts down the cable core to power the repeaters.  But again - if
there's gear stuffing that many amps at that many volts down a cable, salt
water could be the start of a bad day...

(And note - I'm not saying that *everybody* who built a cable landing station
managed to get it wrong.  I'm saying that with the number of landing stations
in existence, the chance that *somebody* got it wrong is probably scarily high.
Telco and internet experiences in New Orleans during Katrina and NYC during
Sandy suggest there's a lot of infrastructure built with "we never had storm
surge in this building before so it can't happen" planning)


NANOG 70 network diagram and upstream

2017-06-02 Thread Eric Kuhnke
Just a small thing, but as one of the folks who used to work on the core
network gear of AS11404, the network diagram has something in it that might
confuse attendees as to who is really sponsoring the upstream:

https://www.nanog.org/meetings/nanog70/diagram

AS11404 was formerly known as Spectrum Networks, acquired in 2013 by
Wavedivision Holdings LLC (Wave Broadband) and became the backbone of the
Wave network. It's a totally different thing than the Charter service which
is trademarked as as Spectrum.

https://www.peeringdb.com/asn/11404

The logo in the right side bubble there shouldn't be the Charter/Spectrum
trademarked font, but rather should be Wave, who built the dark fiber into
the hotel and are providing the upstream. The last mile fiber into the
hotel is Wave.


-Eric


Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread valdis . kletnieks
On Fri, 02 Jun 2017 13:23:26 -0400, Christopher Morrow said:
> is this a case of 'wherer the cable gets dry' vs 'where the electronics
> doing cable things lives' ?
> aren't (normally) the dry equipment locations a bit inland and then have
> last-mile services from the consortium members headed inland to their
> respective network pops?

Well, I'd be willing to buy that logic, except the specific buildings called
out look pretty damned big for just drying off a cable.  For example, this
is claimed to be the US landing point for TAT-14 - looks around 4K square feet?

http://virtualglobetrotting.com/map/tuckerton-cable-landing-station/view/google/

Though I admit I'm foggy on how much gear is needed to stuff however many amps
at 4,000 volts down the cable core to power the repeaters.  But again - if
there's gear stuffing that many amps at that many volts down a cable, salt
water could be the start of a bad day...

(And note - I'm not saying that *everybody* who built a cable landing station
managed to get it wrong.  I'm saying that with the number of landing stations
in existence, the chance that *somebody* got it wrong is probably scarily high.
Telco and internet experiences in New Orleans during Katrina and NYC during
Sandy suggest there's a lot of infrastructure built with "we never had storm
surge in this building before so it can't happen" planning)


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Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Eric Kuhnke
It is no longer in the Westin, or if they've kept an office space it is not
the public facing consulate. The security desk at the lobby frequently has
to deal with confused Russian consular-service seeking people who don't
want to take "no" for an answer when they're told that the consulate has
moved.

new address: 600 University St #2510, Seattle, WA 98101

On Thu, Jun 1, 2017 at 7:15 PM, Joe Hamelin  wrote:

> The Seattle Russian Embassy is in the Westin Building just 4 floors above
> the fiber meet-me-room and five floors above the NRO tap room.  They use to
> come ask us (an ISP) for IT help back in '96 when they would drag an icon
> too far off the screen in Windows 3.11. We were on the same floor.
>
> --
> Joe Hamelin, W7COM, Tulalip, WA, +1 (360) 474-7474
>
> On Thu, Jun 1, 2017 at 6:08 PM, Brandon Vincent 
> wrote:
>
> > On Thu, Jun 1, 2017 at 6:07 PM, Matt Palmer  wrote:
> > > I think regardless of what you appear to be interested in, hanging
> > around a
> > > beach with a big DSLR is likely to get you on one list or another.
> >
> > "Excuse me, sir! Can you direct us to the naval base in Alameda? It's
> > where they keep the nuclear wessels."
> >
>


Weekly Routing Table Report

2017-06-02 Thread Routing Analysis Role Account
This is an automated weekly mailing describing the state of the Internet
Routing Table as seen from APNIC's router in Japan.

The posting is sent to APOPS, NANOG, AfNOG, AusNOG, SANOG, PacNOG,
MENOG, SAFNOG, SdNOG, BJNOG, CaribNOG and the RIPE Routing WG.

Daily listings are sent to bgp-st...@lists.apnic.net

For historical data, please see http://thyme.rand.apnic.net.

If you have any comments please contact Philip Smith .

Routing Table Report   04:00 +10GMT Sat 03 Jun, 2017

Report Website: http://thyme.rand.apnic.net
Detailed Analysis:  http://thyme.rand.apnic.net/current/

Analysis Summary


BGP routing table entries examined:  650075
Prefixes after maximum aggregation (per Origin AS):  253371
Deaggregation factor:  2.57
Unique aggregates announced (without unneeded subnets):  313766
Total ASes present in the Internet Routing Table: 57397
Prefixes per ASN: 11.33
Origin-only ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:   49676
Origin ASes announcing only one prefix:   21966
Transit ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:7721
Transit-only ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:223
Average AS path length visible in the Internet Routing Table:   4.3
Max AS path length visible:  45
Max AS path prepend of ASN ( 55644)  41
Prefixes from unregistered ASNs in the Routing Table:75
Numnber of instances of unregistered ASNs:   79
Number of 32-bit ASNs allocated by the RIRs:  18845
Number of 32-bit ASNs visible in the Routing Table:   14651
Prefixes from 32-bit ASNs in the Routing Table:   59470
Number of bogon 32-bit ASNs visible in the Routing Table:62
Special use prefixes present in the Routing Table:0
Prefixes being announced from unallocated address space:371
Number of addresses announced to Internet:   2848498020
Equivalent to 169 /8s, 200 /16s and 161 /24s
Percentage of available address space announced:   76.9
Percentage of allocated address space announced:   76.9
Percentage of available address space allocated:  100.0
Percentage of address space in use by end-sites:   98.6
Total number of prefixes smaller than registry allocations:  216741

APNIC Region Analysis Summary
-

Prefixes being announced by APNIC Region ASes:   178319
Total APNIC prefixes after maximum aggregation:   51254
APNIC Deaggregation factor:3.48
Prefixes being announced from the APNIC address blocks:  177534
Unique aggregates announced from the APNIC address blocks:73377
APNIC Region origin ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:8157
APNIC Prefixes per ASN:   21.76
APNIC Region origin ASes announcing only one prefix:   2280
APNIC Region transit ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:   1158
Average APNIC Region AS path length visible:4.4
Max APNIC Region AS path length visible: 45
Number of APNIC region 32-bit ASNs visible in the Routing Table:   2982
Number of APNIC addresses announced to Internet:  763338596
Equivalent to 45 /8s, 127 /16s and 159 /24s
APNIC AS Blocks4608-4864, 7467-7722, 9216-10239, 17408-18431
(pre-ERX allocations)  23552-24575, 37888-38911, 45056-46079, 55296-56319,
   58368-59391, 63488-64098, 64297-64395, 131072-137529
APNIC Address Blocks 1/8,  14/8,  27/8,  36/8,  39/8,  42/8,  43/8,
49/8,  58/8,  59/8,  60/8,  61/8, 101/8, 103/8,
   106/8, 110/8, 111/8, 112/8, 113/8, 114/8, 115/8,
   116/8, 117/8, 118/8, 119/8, 120/8, 121/8, 122/8,
   123/8, 124/8, 125/8, 126/8, 133/8, 150/8, 153/8,
   163/8, 171/8, 175/8, 180/8, 182/8, 183/8, 202/8,
   203/8, 210/8, 211/8, 218/8, 219/8, 220/8, 221/8,
   222/8, 223/8,

ARIN Region Analysis Summary


Prefixes being announced by ARIN Region ASes:197726
Total ARIN prefixes after maximum aggregation:94486
ARIN Deaggregation factor: 2.09
Prefixes being announced from the ARIN address blocks:   199729
Unique aggregates announced from the ARIN address blocks: 91822
ARIN Region origin ASes present in the Internet Routing Table:17896
ARIN Prefixes per ASN:  

Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Ben McGinnes
On Fri, Jun 02, 2017 at 05:52:43PM +0300, Denys Fedoryshchenko wrote:
>
> https://www.nanog.org/list
> 6. Postings of political, philosophical, and legal nature are prohibited.
> It is quite clear.

That's a fair point.

The crypto dev world does have a tendency to veer into two of those
three (political and legal) with a little more regularity, usually by
necessity.  So I do tend to weave in and out of those "off" topics
without getting too hung up on the creeping FUD in some quarters.  At
times they'll even have practical requirements which need addressing;
which is why somewhere in one of my GPGME branches there's a completed
ITAR questionairre - definitely political, very legal and absolutely
required in order to continue the technical work at all.

I'd be surprised if there were not similar types of issues affecting
some aspects of various networks.  Most likely pertaining to
international routes and even more likely subject to confidentiality
agreements of various types (not just everyone's favourite bugbear of
national security).

> I do not deny networks sometimes are deeply affected by political
> factors, but current discussion is pure FUD, based on very
> questionable MSM source.  IMHO any sane person wont like to receive
> this trash in his mailbox in list, that supposed to be
> politics-free, as there is enough of this garbage in internet.

And it's the role of NANOG to make sure all that FUD gets where the
conspiracists intended it to go.  Isn't it great ... :)

> Thanks for the hint, fixed, i use this domain only for old maillist
> subscriptions,
> so i missed that, after i migrated SMTP to my private server.

I entirely understand, I've been tweaking mine a fair bit recently,
weighing up the local Postfix instance vs. not having as great a
control over the network as I'd like and ultimately deciding to run it
all through the MX.  I noticed it because I was double-checking return
headers to be sure my own systems are doing, more or less, what
they're supposed to.  Especially since the current MX is set the way
it is for technical, legal and political reasons (basically the mail
server is in a jurisdiction with *far* greater privacy protections
than my own country).


Regards,
Ben


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Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Christopher Morrow
On Fri, Jun 2, 2017 at 12:46 PM,  wrote:

> On Fri, 02 Jun 2017 15:11:36 -, Rod Beck said:
>
> > Landing stations can be 10 to 30 kilometers from the beach manhole. I
> don't
> > think it is big concern. Hibernia Atlantic dublin landing station is a
> good
> > example.
>
> So 100% of those beach manholes are watertight and safe from flooding, and
> don't contain any gear that will get upset if it does in fact end up with
> salt water in there?
>
> This listing for landing points in Japan seems to call out a hell of a lot
> of
> specific buildings that are nowhere near 10 to 30 km inland:
> https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1Siy5qBMoFyBUlSFNHdHDpGAkIR0
>
> Singapore: Right on the water.
> http://www.streetdirectory.com/sg/singapore-cable-
> landing-station/1-changi-north-rise-498817/8118_79569.html
>
> Hong Kong:  More of same (though with its hills, some of the 8 sites may
> actually be a bit above sea level even though they're 2 blocks from water)
> http://www.ofca.gov.hk/en/industry_focus/telecommunications/facility_
> based/infrastructures/submarine_cables/index.html
>
> Cryptome has a bunch of older images that tend to indicate that a lot of
> buildings right on the water in New Jersey and Long Island are involved:
> https://cryptome.org/eyeball/cable/cable-eyeball.htm
>
>
is this a case of 'wherer the cable gets dry' vs 'where the electronics
doing cable things lives' ?
aren't (normally) the dry equipment locations a bit inland and then have
last-mile services from the consortium members headed inland to their
respective network pops?


> And that's just in the first 3 pages returned by Google for "cable landing
> station
> map".
>
> The experience of the Manhattan phone system when the conduits and
> basements
> flooded during Sandy tends to indicate that we *are* in for similar
> surprises over the coming decades.
>


Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Christopher Morrow
On Fri, Jun 2, 2017 at 12:49 AM, Joe Hamelin  wrote:

> Christopher asks: 'nro tap room' ... what's the expansion of NRO here?
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Reconnaissance_Office
>
>
I'm unsure why the NRO would have a room doing tap things in anyone's
network.
that is not their remit. Certianly we can FUD all day long about black
helicopters, but in this case the NRO is a red herring.

perhaps you meant NSA? and something akin to the ATT SF room-2
thing?

-chris


Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread valdis . kletnieks
On Fri, 02 Jun 2017 15:11:36 -, Rod Beck said:

> Landing stations can be 10 to 30 kilometers from the beach manhole. I don't
> think it is big concern. Hibernia Atlantic dublin landing station is a good
> example.

So 100% of those beach manholes are watertight and safe from flooding, and
don't contain any gear that will get upset if it does in fact end up with
salt water in there?

This listing for landing points in Japan seems to call out a hell of a lot of
specific buildings that are nowhere near 10 to 30 km inland:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1Siy5qBMoFyBUlSFNHdHDpGAkIR0

Singapore: Right on the water.
http://www.streetdirectory.com/sg/singapore-cable-landing-station/1-changi-north-rise-498817/8118_79569.html

Hong Kong:  More of same (though with its hills, some of the 8 sites may
actually be a bit above sea level even though they're 2 blocks from water)
http://www.ofca.gov.hk/en/industry_focus/telecommunications/facility_based/infrastructures/submarine_cables/index.html

Cryptome has a bunch of older images that tend to indicate that a lot of
buildings right on the water in New Jersey and Long Island are involved:
https://cryptome.org/eyeball/cable/cable-eyeball.htm

And that's just in the first 3 pages returned by Google for "cable landing 
station
map".

The experience of the Manhattan phone system when the conduits and basements
flooded during Sandy tends to indicate that we *are* in for similar
surprises over the coming decades.


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Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Rod Beck
Landing stations can be 10 to 30 kilometers from the beach manhole. I don't 
think it is big concern. Hibernia Atlantic dublin landing station is a good 
example.



From: NANOG  on behalf of valdis.kletni...@vt.edu 

Sent: Friday, June 2, 2017 5:04 PM
To: aheb...@pubnix.net
Cc: nanog@nanog.org
Subject: Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

On Fri, 02 Jun 2017 10:14:12 -0400, Alain Hebert said:
>  It will if the Ocean level change drastically.

Raising the question - how well protected against sea level rise *is* the
average cable landing/termination station, given that most landing stations in
particular are probably fairly near the beach and not very high above sea
level?   Are there any in particular that we need to worry if another Hurricane
Sandy or local equivalent wanders by?



Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread valdis . kletnieks
On Fri, 02 Jun 2017 10:14:12 -0400, Alain Hebert said:
>  It will if the Ocean level change drastically.

Raising the question - how well protected against sea level rise *is* the
average cable landing/termination station, given that most landing stations in
particular are probably fairly near the beach and not very high above sea
level?   Are there any in particular that we need to worry if another Hurricane
Sandy or local equivalent wanders by?



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Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Denys Fedoryshchenko

On 2017-06-02 12:19, Ben McGinnes wrote:

On Fri, Jun 02, 2017 at 10:28:38AM +0300, Denys Fedoryshchenko wrote:


American diplomats are doing also all sort of nasty stuff in
Russia(and not only),


Yes they have and for a very long time.


but that's a concern of the equivalent of FBI/NSA/etc, not operators
public discussion places, unless it really affect operators anyhow.
Just amazing, how NANOG slipped into pure politics.


The network(s) have been political for a very long time and will only
become more so as time passes.  Remember, the engineers wishing for
the purity of technical discussion are usually the same ones crying
that, "information wants to be free."

https://www.nanog.org/list
6. Postings of political, philosophical, and legal nature are 
prohibited.

It is quite clear.

I do not deny networks sometimes are deeply affected by political 
factors,
but current discussion is pure FUD, based on very questionable MSM 
source.
IMHO any sane person wont like to receive this trash in his mailbox in 
list,
that supposed to be politics-free, as there is enough of this garbage in 
internet.
I do discuss such things too, when i have mood for that, but in 
designated places only.




Well, no matter.  You want purely technical, okay, let's start with
authorised mail hosts.

You need to add 144.76.183.226/32 to the SPF record for visp.net.lb,
which is currently triggering softfails everywhere.  It might be wise
to explicitly state whether or not it is just 144.76.183.226/32 in the
SPF record for nuclearcat.com given the deny all instruction for that
domain.
Thanks for the hint, fixed, i use this domain only for old maillist 
subscriptions,

so i missed that, after i migrated SMTP to my private server.


Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Alain Hebert

It will if the Ocean level change drastically.

Which with this week news cycle...  might not be that far fetched =D>

-
Alain Hebertaheb...@pubnix.net
PubNIX Inc.
50 boul. St-Charles
P.O. Box 26770 Beaconsfield, Quebec H9W 6G7
Tel: 514-990-5911  http://www.pubnix.netFax: 514-990-9443

On 06/01/17 15:54, Sean Donelan wrote:

On Thu, 1 Jun 2017, Rod Beck wrote:
As someone who has sold a lot of capacity on Hibernia Atlantic, I 
must concur. There is a website showing where most of the 
Trans-Atlantic cables land on the West Coast of Britain at towns like 
Bude in Wales. Hiding is not an option.


As far as I know, there are no cable landing stations in Kansas.

Has US geography changed recently?







Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Donald Eastlake
On Thu, Jun 1, 2017 at 10:15 PM, Joe Hamelin  wrote:
>
> The Seattle Russian Embassy is in the Westin Building just 4 floors above
> the fiber meet-me-room ...

The only real Russian Embassy in the US is in Washington where their
Ambassador is stationed, although arguably their UN Office in NYC has
the status of am Embassy. Embassies have to do with international
diplomacy. Their Seattle office is a consulate, which is what most
people deal with for passports, visas, import/export permits, and
similar personal/commercial stuff rather than diplomatic stuff.
Commonly the Embassy of a country is also a consulate or, as it is
sometimes described, has a consular affairs branch.
See http://www.russianembassy.org/page/russian-consulates-in-the-u-s

Thanks,
Donald
=
 Donald E. Eastlake 3rd   +1-508-333-2270 (cell)
 155 Beaver Street, Milford, MA 01757 USA
 d3e...@gmail.com

> --
> Joe Hamelin, W7COM, Tulalip, WA, +1 (360) 474-7474


Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Joe Hamelin
Christopher asks: 'nro tap room' ... what's the expansion of NRO here?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Reconnaissance_Office

--
Joe Hamelin, W7COM, Tulalip, WA, +1 (360) 474-7474


Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Ben McGinnes
On Fri, Jun 02, 2017 at 10:28:38AM +0300, Denys Fedoryshchenko wrote:
>
> American diplomats are doing also all sort of nasty stuff in
> Russia(and not only),

Yes they have and for a very long time.

> but that's a concern of the equivalent of FBI/NSA/etc, not operators
> public discussion places, unless it really affect operators anyhow.
> Just amazing, how NANOG slipped into pure politics.

The network(s) have been political for a very long time and will only
become more so as time passes.  Remember, the engineers wishing for
the purity of technical discussion are usually the same ones crying
that, "information wants to be free."

Well, no matter.  You want purely technical, okay, let's start with
authorised mail hosts.

You need to add 144.76.183.226/32 to the SPF record for visp.net.lb,
which is currently triggering softfails everywhere.  It might be wise
to explicitly state whether or not it is just 144.76.183.226/32 in the
SPF record for nuclearcat.com given the deny all instruction for that
domain.


Regards,
Ben

-- 
|  GPG Made Easy (GPGME) Python 3 API Maintainer, GNU Privacy Guard |
| GPG key: 0x321E4E2373590E5D  http://www.adversary.org/ben-key.asc |
| GPG key fpr:  DB47 24E6 FA42 86C9 2B4E  55C4 321E 4E23 7359 0E5D  |
| https://www.gnupg.org/  https://securetheinternet.org/|
| - |


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Re: RFC2544 Testing Equipment

2017-06-02 Thread James Bensley
On 30 May 2017 at 16:41, James Harrison  wrote:
> On 30/05/17 16:22, Nick Olsen wrote:
>>  Looking to test up to 1Gb/s at various packet sizes, Measure Packet loss,
>> Jitter..etc. Primarily Copper, But if it had some form of optical port, I
>> wouldn't complain. Outputting a report that we can provide to the customer
>> would be useful, But isn't mandatory. Doesn't need anything fancy, Like
>> MPLS awareness, VLAN ID's..etc.

...
> if
> you have a VPLS setup then probably you'd go from a 1U box next to your
> VPLS box through the VPLS pipe through to the endpoint.

If you are using VPLS then you need to send 1Gbs of broadcast traffic
and see how that cripples your network and send 1Gbps of BPDUs and ARP
requests/responses etc. to see how that ruins everything, as your
customer will loop it at some point. Also to check how your PEs work
and if storm-control or similar is working.

We had an issue with a VPLS instance where different model edge PEs
had their core facing interfaces built in different ways; some had a
physical interface configured facing the core, some a sub-interface,
some an SVI/BVI/BDI etc, it turned out that device X won't tunnel PPP
packets over VPLS/pseudowires when the core facing interface is an
SVI, model Y will but not when using EVCs etc.

People usually test TCP/UDP over IPv4 which doesn't tell you much
about what your equipment/service can or can't do and how it will
fail.

Cheers,
James.


Re: Russian diplomats lingering near fiber optic cables

2017-06-02 Thread Denys Fedoryshchenko

On 2017-06-02 05:42, Ben McGinnes wrote:

On Thu, Jun 01, 2017 at 07:15:12PM -0700, Joe Hamelin wrote:


The Seattle Russian Embassy is in the Westin Building just 4 floors
above the fiber meet-me-room and five floors above the NRO tap room.
They use to come ask us (an ISP) for IT help back in '96 when they
would drag an icon too far off the screen in Windows 3.11. We were
on the same floor.


So when Flynn & Friends in the Trump Transition Team were trying to
establish that back channel link to Vladimir Putin they should've just
wandered into the nearest colo facility ... okay, then.  I guess they
did it the other way because they wanted the trench coats.


Regards,
Ben
American diplomats are doing also all sort of nasty stuff in Russia(and 
not only),

but that's a concern of the equivalent of FBI/NSA/etc, not operators
public discussion places, unless it really affect operators anyhow.
Just amazing, how NANOG slipped into pure politics.


Re: Internet connectivity in Ghana

2017-06-02 Thread Michael Bullut
I would definitely recommend *Internet Solutions Ghana.
 *

‚Äč
On 31 May 2017 at 17:40, Rishi Singh  wrote:

> Has anyone dealt with getting internet connectivity in Ghana? I've been
> doing a lot of research and saw some peering plans with Nigeria but nothing
> solid there yet. Currently a financial client of mine is paying quite a bit
> every quarter on satellite up link fees.
>
> Do any of the major carriers have any direct connectivity into Ghana?
>
> Thank you,
>