Re: Perhaps it's time to think about enhancements to the NANOG list...?

2021-03-20 Thread Rod Beck
The Jews in the 19th century were given a neighborhood in each European city. 
It was called the Ghetto. Some of us would prefer to live in a Ghetto where 
people can ask for specific assistance on network capacity or route problems 
and the like. An affiliated, but separate list.

Many of us who have no interest in programming routers (my interests include 
physics and Medieval music) would gladly never post again in the main forum. 
The Ghetto would allow people to post articles about new networks or pose 
questions for help on finding capacity. I would not have delete each day 99% of 
NANOG messages or be subjected to flame fights. Moderators could keep their 
main constituency happy by maintaining a very narrow focus. The Purists would 
be delighted. The overworked IT guy or gal would never see any other post about 
how to extend a 100 gig wave to Mars.

But there would be no marketing of boxes or networks in the Ghetto. No posting 
of I got $1500 wave available between 1 Wilshire and 60 Hudson. Marketing 
simply drives good people out. Just a place where people sourcing can ask 
questions and people who want to help can do so without breaking rules and 
being threatened.

NANOG does depend on telecom sales to finance its real conferences. So, a 
complete divorce is unnecessary and counterproductive given that sales already 
moved for the most part to Linkedin. But there is a wealth of knowledge among 
engineers and network managers on who has what and how to get from point A to 
point Z. Some of those people are willing to share it and there should be a 
dedicated place to do so. For example, Mehmet provided valuable assistance 
which will benefit some of my customers.

-R.



From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Eric Kuhnke 
Sent: Friday, March 19, 2021 12:43 AM
To: Matthew Petach 
Cc: NANOG ; adm...@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Perhaps it's time to think about enhancements to the NANOG list...?

Perhaps the sales, marketing and 'business development' people who've never 
typed "enable" or "configure" into a router a single day in their lives might 
be better served with a dedicated list that is mission focused on bizdev, and 
not operational issues.



On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 3:29 PM Matthew Petach 
mailto:mpet...@netflight.com>> wrote:

On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 10:37 AM Tom Beecher  wrote:
CC back to the mailing list for visibility, since I ate the CC list.

On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 1:31 PM Tom Beecher  wrote:
Rod-

Please refer to the usage guidelines found here. 
https://nanog.org/resources/usage-guidelines/

14. Posts that encourage or facilitate an agreement about the following 
subjects are inappropriate: prices, discounts, or terms or conditions of sale; 
salaries; benefits, profits, profit margins, or cost data; market shares, sales 
territories, or markets; allocation of customers or territories; or selection, 
rejection, or termination of customers or suppliers.

 I would tend to agree that while most of your posts to the list are within the 
guidelines, there have been occasions where a reasonable person could think you 
might be skirting the line a bit. In this case :

- Your company works as a broker to procure capacity for others.
- You sent an email to the list that wording wise would be exactly the same as 
many of us might send to someone they were looking for capacity from.

I think most would agree this is pretty clearly against both the usage 
guidelines and the spirit of what this mailing list is about.

I would also like to remind you that this list is administered by the NANOG 
organization. You have no authority to tell others to 'cease and desist', and 
insult someone as 'underemployed' is also not well tolerated here.

I have looped in the list admins here. It would probably be a good idea to 
refrain from future messages that are clearly commercial in nature, or that 
contain unnecessary insults.



If only we had some way to segregate out different topics
of interest or disinterest, so that people who weren't interested
in questions about bandwidth availability could unsubscribe
from those topics, and only subscribe to the topics that *did*
interest them...

#AFewDaysTooEarly

^_^;;

Matt




Starhub Sales

2021-03-19 Thread Rod Beck
Please contact me off list.

Thanks.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: APG: 100 Gig Wave: Singapore/TY3

2021-03-18 Thread Rod Beck
Thanks, Mehmet, you are the champ! 


From: Mehmet Akcin 
Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2021 9:40 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: APG: 100 Gig Wave: Singapore/TY3

There is no capacity issue on this cable. The way this cable operates is that 
it’s segmented and not everyone has access to every segment. For Singapore to 
TY3 Starhub is your best choice (and possibly only) to work with. NTT has also 
capacity but they are extremely hard to get in touch and get paperwork (like 
kmz, etc) with. Starhub is simple(r-ish)..



On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 07:56 Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:
Again, capacity is really due to video providers snapping everything up left 
and right.

Need help. Off list, please.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com<http://www.unitedcablecompany.com>
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com<mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]

--
Mehmet
+1-424-298-1903


Re: ASE - 100 Gig Wave

2021-03-18 Thread Rod Beck
And by the way, it would not be making these requests if there was not a severe 
capacity shortage in the Pacific. I don't like telegraph what I am doing, Shane.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Rod Beck 
Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2021 4:27 PM
To: sro...@ronan-online.com ; NANOG Operators' Group 

Cc: Shane Ronan 
Subject: Re: ASE - 100 Gig Wave

Actually, that language was intended to prohibit soliciting business and not 
asking for help. I have some hard words to describe like Shane Ronan, but I 
will forbear.

I suggest you cease and desist before this gets ugly. Obviously you are 
underemployed.

Get some work to do.

Best,

-R.




From: sro...@ronan-online.com 
Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2021 4:24 PM
To: Rod Beck ; NANOG Operators' Group 

Cc: Shane Ronan 
Subject: Re: ASE - 100 Gig Wave

Please review the Mailing List policies which specifically prohibit commercial 
discussions on the list. I would ask the list moderators to chime in here please

Shane

On Mar 18, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Rod Beck  wrote:


People post requests all the time. You are free to block me. And I know the 
majority of uses disagree with you.


From: Shane Ronan 
Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2021 4:11 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: ASE - 100 Gig Wave

NANOG is not a service for receiving details on cable paths for commercial 
purposes. Please find somewhere else to collect this information.

On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 10:54 AM Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:
This cable is tapped out and I need a 100 gig wave from Hong Kong to Singapore. 
3 year term.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com<http://www.unitedcablecompany.com>
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com<mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: ASE - 100 Gig Wave

2021-03-18 Thread Rod Beck
Actually, that language was intended to prohibit soliciting business and not 
asking for help. I have some hard words to describe like Shane Ronan, but I 
will forbear.

I suggest you cease and desist before this gets ugly. Obviously you are 
underemployed.

Get some work to do.

Best,

-R.




From: sro...@ronan-online.com 
Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2021 4:24 PM
To: Rod Beck ; NANOG Operators' Group 

Cc: Shane Ronan 
Subject: Re: ASE - 100 Gig Wave

Please review the Mailing List policies which specifically prohibit commercial 
discussions on the list. I would ask the list moderators to chime in here please

Shane

On Mar 18, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Rod Beck  wrote:


People post requests all the time. You are free to block me. And I know the 
majority of uses disagree with you.


From: Shane Ronan 
Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2021 4:11 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: ASE - 100 Gig Wave

NANOG is not a service for receiving details on cable paths for commercial 
purposes. Please find somewhere else to collect this information.

On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 10:54 AM Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:
This cable is tapped out and I need a 100 gig wave from Hong Kong to Singapore. 
3 year term.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com<http://www.unitedcablecompany.com>
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com<mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


APG: 100 Gig Wave: Singapore/TY3

2021-03-18 Thread Rod Beck
Again, capacity is really due to video providers snapping everything up left 
and right.

Need help. Off list, please.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


ASE - 100 Gig Wave

2021-03-18 Thread Rod Beck
This cable is tapped out and I need a 100 gig wave from Hong Kong to Singapore. 
3 year term.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Saudi Arabia

2021-03-18 Thread Rod Beck
Thanks, Mehmet. That is very helpful.

-R.


From: Mehmet Akcin 
Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2021 3:14 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Saudi Arabia

https://www.itc.sa/en/

They are great to work with.

On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 03:24 Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:
Hi,

I've received a request to put a circuit into a Riyadh financial exchange. Any 
thoughts on how to get back haul from the AAE1 cable landing station would be 
appreciated.

Off-list is best. 


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com<http://www.unitedcablecompany.com>
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com<mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]

--
Mehmet
+1-424-298-1903


Saudi Arabia

2021-03-18 Thread Rod Beck
Hi,

I've received a request to put a circuit into a Riyadh financial exchange. Any 
thoughts on how to get back haul from the AAE1 cable landing station would be 
appreciated.

Off-list is best. 


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: SFI/SBI/Transit - Dumping

2021-03-16 Thread Rod Beck
I was an Erols customer during that time. What's the story?


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of William Herrin 
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2021 1:01 AM
To: Douglas Fischer 
Cc: NANOG 
Subject: Re: SFI/SBI/Transit - Dumping

On Mon, Mar 15, 2021 at 11:35 AM Douglas Fischer
 wrote:
> I'm going a bit deeper into the study of Peering Relationships...
> And one of the possibilities that I'm trying to understand better on the 
> Peering Relationships on the Internet been considered dumping(economy).
>
> The matter here is more on the economic and commercial aspects than on the 
> technical side.

Hi Douglas,

I'm not aware of any examples of Dumping (in the economics sense)
involving backbone BGP peering. Usually the problem is collusive
exclusion.

If you want to cast a wider net, Erols Internet of the 1990s offers an
interesting case study in driving competition out with extended
below-cost pricing. But this was dialup and DSL service, not backbone
peering.

Regards,
Bill Herrin


--
William Herrin
b...@herrin.us
https://bill.herrin.us/


Re: SFI/SBI/Transit - Dumping

2021-03-15 Thread Rod Beck
Can you explain to us amoeba-like salesmen what is dumping? I assume it 
involves highly unbalanced traffic flows.

-R.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Douglas Fischer 
Sent: Monday, March 15, 2021 7:33 PM
To: NANOG 
Subject: SFI/SBI/Transit - Dumping

Hello all!

I'm going a bit deeper into the study of Peering Relationships...
And one of the possibilities that I'm trying to understand better on the 
Peering Relationships on the Internet been considered dumping(economy).

The matter here is more on the economic and commercial aspects than on the 
technical side.

On the scope of Internet Peering Interconnections(Transit, Settlement Free, 
Settlement Based.):
- There are any public papers, or even judicial processes, about situations 
that the possibility of Dumping(economic) was supposed? Independently if de 
dumping argument was accepted or not.
- Does any colleague could remember some memorable case about that?
- How does it affect the Big-Traffic-Guys (OTTs, Hosting/Colo/Cloud 
Datacenters, CDNs) and their routing policy on PNI/MPLA, SFI/SBI?

--
Douglas Fernando Fischer
Engº de Controle e Automação


Seattle/LA 100 Gig Wave

2021-03-12 Thread Rod Beck
A point: Westin House, Seattle.
Z point: 1 Wilshire, LA.
Routing: Seattle/Boise/Ogden/Salt Lake City/LA.
Term: 3 years.

Need help on this circuit. Contact me off-list.

Regards,

Roderick.



Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire ????

2021-03-11 Thread Rod Beck
There are plenty of websites still down: https://www.centrepompidou.fr/en/.

It surprises that important sites don't do mirroring.

-R.


From: Johann 
Sent: Friday, March 12, 2021 12:41 AM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Randy Bush ; Lukas Tribus ; Eilers, Laura via 
NANOG 
Subject: Re: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire 

Several government websites have been impacted by fire. But >90% was 
operationnel during the same day after the incident.
There are DRP (seems to be working) and backups in other datacenters. There 
must remain exceptions or minor things broken.
But I think it's a pretty good result.

Johann

Le ven. 12 mars 2021 à 00:24, Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> a 
écrit :
It is terrible timing with the company planning an IPO and also because the 
French government has heavily backed OVH. I think some government websites went 
down. France has a statist tradition that leads it to get involved in 
industries where has no expertise.




From: NANOG 
mailto:unitedcablecompany@nanog.org>>
 on behalf of Randy Bush mailto:ra...@psg.com>>
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 9:43 PM
To: Lukas Tribus mailto:lu...@ltri.eu>>
Cc: Eilers, Laura via NANOG mailto:nanog@nanog.org>>
Subject: Re: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire 

>> Statement (in French) from Octave Klaba, containing some discussion
>> of the development of the fire (starts at ~ 4:30):
>> https://www.ovh.com/fr/images/sbg/index-fr.html
> English:
> https://www.ovh.com/fr/images/sbg/index-en.html

and a few hundred of us hoping we never have to stand in front of that
camera to explain a similar incident

a few things stood out: where backups are located, the ability to build
a lot of new servers and the supporting infra, ...  but in a week or two
i hope he can tell us results of more analysis.

randy

---
ra...@psg.com<mailto:ra...@psg.com>
`gpg --locate-external-keys --auto-key-locate wkd 
ra...@psg.com<mailto:ra...@psg.com>`
signatures are back, thanks to dmarc header butchery


Re: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire ????

2021-03-11 Thread Rod Beck
It is terrible timing with the company planning an IPO and also because the 
French government has heavily backed OVH. I think some government websites went 
down. France has a statist tradition that leads it to get involved in 
industries where has no expertise.




From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Randy Bush 
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 9:43 PM
To: Lukas Tribus 
Cc: Eilers, Laura via NANOG 
Subject: Re: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire 

>> Statement (in French) from Octave Klaba, containing some discussion
>> of the development of the fire (starts at ~ 4:30):
>> https://www.ovh.com/fr/images/sbg/index-fr.html
> English:
> https://www.ovh.com/fr/images/sbg/index-en.html

and a few hundred of us hoping we never have to stand in front of that
camera to explain a similar incident

a few things stood out: where backups are located, the ability to build
a lot of new servers and the supporting infra, ...  but in a week or two
i hope he can tell us results of more analysis.

randy

---
ra...@psg.com
`gpg --locate-external-keys --auto-key-locate wkd ra...@psg.com`
signatures are back, thanks to dmarc header butchery


Re: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire 

2021-03-11 Thread Rod Beck
It is amazing that they can burn so well. Would never have imagined it.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of George Herbert 
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 11:37 AM
To: Andy Ringsmuth 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org list 
Subject: Re: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire 

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 10, 2021, at 7:45 AM, Andy Ringsmuth 
mailto:a...@andyring.com>> wrote:

Sad to see of course, but also a little surprising that fire suppression 
systems didn’t, well, suppress the fire.

Unless they didn’t exist?


I am assuming you haven’t had a real datacenter fire before.

I’ve had one fire, seen another, and had an accidental system firing of the gas 
system.

In the actual fire, caused by cooling system partial failure, there was no gas 
and it turned out the system to disable power on sprinkler discharge failed, 
then the power circuit breakers stayed live despite significant electrical 
short circuiting in the room as sprinklers fired, and then after 5 minutes the 
fire department arrived and sprayed water in for over 10 minutes without 
reducing arcing and fire before building power was successfully disabled and 
they could put the rest of the fire out.  This one could easily have destroyed 
its building, also the building Palo Alto Frys was in.

Fun fact: a rack of burning servers displaces sprinkler water around the rack, 
if it has a top on it, and even if not a vertical stack of burning servers 
pushes water down the front and back and slightly to the sides of burning 
servers, not through the systems themselves.

Fun fact: motherboards burn, as does chip encapsulation epoxy and all the 
wiring, the fan frames, board standoffs, essentially all the RAM and PCI board 
slots, some capacitors and surface mount devices... hard drives melt and the 
aluminum casings burn, SSD plastic casings generally burn.  GBICs and other 
laser diodes smell awful after they catch fire, though it can be hard to tell 
with everything else that smells.

Fun fact: It does not necessarily take many burning servers to put the room 
integrity at risk, even with sprinklers going and the fire department spraying 
water in.

Fun fact: All the servers that get wet but don’t burn will rust.  And 
everything in the room near the sprinklers that are going off will get wet.  
This is very sad as you watch many millions of dollars of brand new 42U racks 
prestuffed with HP enterprise servers oxidizing away while you wait for the 
garbage truck.

Fun fact: Combustion soot is conductive and even things that didn’t get wet 
probably are dead.

Fun fact: late era Sun Microsystems server boxes were very nice waxed 
cardboard, very well made, apparently fire resistant more than anyone would 
have thought but that were also water resistant enough that you’d have a new in 
box server submerged in a box still full to the brim with water days later.

Fun engineering advice: The window for critical data recovery from hard drives 
that are visibly corroding from water damage short of immersion is probably 
48-72 hours, but run them outside any casing on a fire resistant table and have 
all of CO2 and dry chemical fire extinguishers ready... and a fire hose, and 
handy building fire alarm.  Corroding water damaged SSDs are lower power draw 
and somewhat less likely to start another fire, but take the same precautions.


The fire I saw but that wasn’t mine burned a building with halon and pre action 
sprinklers more or less to the steel columns and roof beams, despite the fire 
department arriving in 5 minutes and trying to actively suppress.  Not enough 
openings for them to safely get to the fire before it was out of control, and 
not enough water flow available in all the sprinklers once it took off.

That one had evidently burned aluminum rack posts by the time it was over, not 
just melted them...


Systems and datacenters aren’t built to eliminate fire risk.  They just aren’t. 
 You can contain or control most office fires with sprinklers, and certainly 
evacuate.  Datacenters with emergency power batteries in the envelope often 
have enough stored energy to set the room on fire despite sprinklers.  If AC 
cutoffs fail and circuit breakers don’t trip mains power will as well.  Too 
many systems and storage and networking hardware components can burn.


-george



Australian Dark Fibre Providers - Sydney

2021-03-10 Thread Rod Beck
Anyone besides Superloop?

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: AW: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire 

2021-03-10 Thread Rod Beck
No, French Superheroes flew in from Le Café du Peintre near the Bastille in 
under 30 nanoseconds. However, it was still futile.

-R.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Jeff Shultz 
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:41 PM
To: North American Network Operators' Group 
Subject: Re: AW: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire 

Report I saw had the fire department on site in 3 minutes of the call. They 
even had a German-manned fireboat "Europa 1" working the fire from the water 
side.

On Wed, Mar 10, 2021 at 11:37 AM Sabri Berisha 
mailto:sa...@cluecentral.net>> wrote:
- On Mar 10, 2021, at 11:28 AM, Bryan Holloway 
br...@shout.net wrote:

Hi,

> Fire Department was there in under five minutes.

I assume your Enron DC was in the U.S.?

The OVH datacenter is (was) in France. I bet you 10 bucks that the
fire department was on strike.

Thanks,

Sabri


--
Jeff Shultz


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Re: AW: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire 

2021-03-10 Thread Rod Beck
Sounds like France. 


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Sabri Berisha 
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 8:34 PM
To: Bryan Holloway 
Cc: nanog 
Subject: Re: AW: OVH datacenter SBG2 in Strasbourg on fire 

- On Mar 10, 2021, at 11:28 AM, Bryan Holloway br...@shout.net wrote:

Hi,

> Fire Department was there in under five minutes.

I assume your Enron DC was in the U.S.?

The OVH datacenter is (was) in France. I bet you 10 bucks that the
fire department was on strike.

Thanks,

Sabri


Re: Cable Landing Station Address

2021-03-10 Thread Rod Beck
I found it. 

And it is probably not a coincidence that the staff at the facility are posed 
on the beach. The cable goes into a bore pipe on the beach and into the 
facility. Infrapedia was useful because it allowed me to pinpoint the building. 
Then I used the building's owner to get the street address.

https://www.infrapedia.com/app/cls/vung-tau-viettel

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Viettel+B%C3%A0+R%E1%BB%8Ba+V%C5%A9ng+T%C3%A0u+(Ch%C3%ADnh+th%E1%BB%A9c)/@10.3647686,107.0847827,19z/data=!4m8!1m2!2m1!1zdmlldHRlbCBjYWJsZSBsYW5kaW5nIHN0YXRpb24gbmVhciBQaMOzIMSQ4bupYyBDaMOtbmgsIFRo4bqvbmcgVGFtLCBUaMOgbmggcGjhu5EgVsWpbmcgVOG6p3UsIEJhIFJpYSAtIFZ1bmcgVGF1LCBWaWV0bmFt!3m4!1s0x31756f4c2a612769:0x45739089e004af9d!8m2!3d10.3646899!4d107.0848851
[https://maps.google.com/maps/api/staticmap?center=10.3647686%2C107.0847827=19=256x256=en=false=google-maps-frontend=137iZu4LKaOj31oD8UdXOrZzkPc]<https://www.google.com/maps/place/Viettel+B%C3%A0+R%E1%BB%8Ba+V%C5%A9ng+T%C3%A0u+(Ch%C3%ADnh+th%E1%BB%A9c)/@10.3647686,107.0847827,19z/data=!4m8!1m2!2m1!1zdmlldHRlbCBjYWJsZSBsYW5kaW5nIHN0YXRpb24gbmVhciBQaMOzIMSQ4bupYyBDaMOtbmgsIFRo4bqvbmcgVGFtLCBUaMOgbmggcGjhu5EgVsWpbmcgVOG6p3UsIEJhIFJpYSAtIFZ1bmcgVGF1LCBWaWV0bmFt!3m4!1s0x31756f4c2a612769:0x45739089e004af9d!8m2!3d10.3646899!4d107.0848851>
Google 
Maps<https://www.google.com/maps/place/Viettel+B%C3%A0+R%E1%BB%8Ba+V%C5%A9ng+T%C3%A0u+(Ch%C3%ADnh+th%E1%BB%A9c)/@10.3647686,107.0847827,19z/data=!4m8!1m2!2m1!1zdmlldHRlbCBjYWJsZSBsYW5kaW5nIHN0YXRpb24gbmVhciBQaMOzIMSQ4bupYyBDaMOtbmgsIFRo4bqvbmcgVGFtLCBUaMOgbmggcGjhu5EgVsWpbmcgVOG6p3UsIEJhIFJpYSAtIFZ1bmcgVGF1LCBWaWV0bmFt!3m4!1s0x31756f4c2a612769:0x45739089e004af9d!8m2!3d10.3646899!4d107.0848851>
Find local businesses, view maps and get driving directions in Google Maps.
www.google.com




From: Sean Donelan 
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 4:38 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Mehmet Akcin ; North American Network Operators Group 

Subject: Re: Cable Landing Station Address


Street addresses aren't universal in all countries.

On Wed, 10 Mar 2021, Rod Beck wrote:
> That little blue dot is the target. 
>
> https://www.infrapedia.com/app/cls/vung-tau-viettel


Re: Cable Landing Station Address

2021-03-10 Thread Rod Beck
That little blue dot is the target. 

https://www.infrapedia.com/app/cls/vung-tau-viettel


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Rod Beck 
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 3:57 PM
To: Mehmet Akcin 
Cc: North American Network Operators Group 
Subject: Re: Cable Landing Station Address

The cable system landing there is SMW3.

Vung Tau is the city and the system is AAE1.


From: Mehmet Akcin 
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 3:47 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: J. Hellenthal ; North American Network Operators 
Group 
Subject: Re: Cable Landing Station Address

Danang International Cable Landing Station
https://goo.gl/maps/N7NJBAZc6iesdhBA8

On Wed, Mar 10, 2021 at 06:42 Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:
I did and no street address, just the city.



From: Mehmet Akcin mailto:meh...@akcin.net>>
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 3:41 PM
To: J. Hellenthal mailto:jhellent...@dataix.net>>
Cc: North American Network Operators Group 
mailto:nanog@nanog.org>>; Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>>
Subject: Re: Cable Landing Station Address

Did you google the address? If you did , it would have been very easy to find 
out.

On Wed, Mar 10, 2021 at 06:29 J. Hellenthal 
mailto:jhellent...@dataix.net>> wrote:
Can you talk to …. Mehmet Akcin meh...@akcin.net<mailto:meh...@akcin.net> 
“copied in” or someone he may be able to refer you to ?



https://www.infrapedia.com/app/cls/vung-tau-vnpt



> On Mar 10, 2021, at 08:13, Rod Beck 
> mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> 
> wrote:
>
> Vung Tau


--

J. Hellenthal

The fact that there's a highway to Hell but only a stairway to Heaven says a 
lot about anticipated traffic volume.






--
Mehmet
+1-424-298-1903
--
Mehmet
+1-424-298-1903


Re: Cable Landing Station Address

2021-03-10 Thread Rod Beck
The cable system landing there is SMW3.

Vung Tau is the city and the system is AAE1.


From: Mehmet Akcin 
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 3:47 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: J. Hellenthal ; North American Network Operators 
Group 
Subject: Re: Cable Landing Station Address

Danang International Cable Landing Station
https://goo.gl/maps/N7NJBAZc6iesdhBA8

On Wed, Mar 10, 2021 at 06:42 Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:
I did and no street address, just the city.



From: Mehmet Akcin mailto:meh...@akcin.net>>
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 3:41 PM
To: J. Hellenthal mailto:jhellent...@dataix.net>>
Cc: North American Network Operators Group 
mailto:nanog@nanog.org>>; Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>>
Subject: Re: Cable Landing Station Address

Did you google the address? If you did , it would have been very easy to find 
out.

On Wed, Mar 10, 2021 at 06:29 J. Hellenthal 
mailto:jhellent...@dataix.net>> wrote:
Can you talk to …. Mehmet Akcin meh...@akcin.net<mailto:meh...@akcin.net> 
“copied in” or someone he may be able to refer you to ?



https://www.infrapedia.com/app/cls/vung-tau-vnpt



> On Mar 10, 2021, at 08:13, Rod Beck 
> mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> 
> wrote:
>
> Vung Tau


--

J. Hellenthal

The fact that there's a highway to Hell but only a stairway to Heaven says a 
lot about anticipated traffic volume.






--
Mehmet
+1-424-298-1903
--
Mehmet
+1-424-298-1903


Re: Cable Landing Station Address

2021-03-10 Thread Rod Beck
I did and no street address, just the city.



From: Mehmet Akcin 
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 3:41 PM
To: J. Hellenthal 
Cc: North American Network Operators Group ; Rod Beck 

Subject: Re: Cable Landing Station Address

Did you google the address? If you did , it would have been very easy to find 
out.

On Wed, Mar 10, 2021 at 06:29 J. Hellenthal 
mailto:jhellent...@dataix.net>> wrote:
Can you talk to …. Mehmet Akcin meh...@akcin.net<mailto:meh...@akcin.net> 
“copied in” or someone he may be able to refer you to ?



https://www.infrapedia.com/app/cls/vung-tau-vnpt



> On Mar 10, 2021, at 08:13, Rod Beck 
> mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> 
> wrote:
>
> Vung Tau


--

J. Hellenthal

The fact that there's a highway to Hell but only a stairway to Heaven says a 
lot about anticipated traffic volume.






--
Mehmet
+1-424-298-1903


Cable Landing Station Address

2021-03-10 Thread Rod Beck
Vung Tau cable landing station - 3 cables include AAE1.

I want the street address which many not even exist given PTT paranoia.



Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


25 Broadway

2021-03-08 Thread Rod Beck
Hey Folks,

This site used to be part of the Holy Trinity: 25 Broadway, 111 8th Avenue and 
60 Hudson Telx. But I don't see many requests for it today and know at least 
one metro provider that pulled out.

Can anyone shed some light on its current importance and any issues. My 
recollection is that it was owned by Telehouse.

Best,

R.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: London Interxion Data Centers

2021-03-01 Thread Rod Beck
I am pretty sure it is a campus environment. In most cases you bring the long 
haul to one of three buildings and then run a campus cross connect to your 
trading server which is in the same building and hopefully very close to the 
trading engine server (these folks are fighting to reduce latency by 
nanoseconds).

So evading Colt I believe quite feasible. 

-R.


From: Matthew Petach 
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2021 8:05 PM
To: Töma Gavrichenkov 
Cc: Rod Beck ; NANOG 
Subject: Re: London Interxion Data Centers



On Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 4:56 AM Töma Gavrichenkov 
mailto:xima...@gmail.com>> wrote:
Peace

On Fri, Feb 26, 2021, 3:06 PM Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:
My understanding is that there are three London Interxion data centers (I 
thought Equinix was the Borg and had assimilated pretty everything at this 
point).

Trying to get the address where the facility where the London Metal Exchange 
houses its trading engine.

Aren't they (LME) in Savvis, though?

--
Töma

That was certainly true in 2003, at least:

https://zynap.com/savvis-gains-ground-in-u-k-managed-hosting-services-market-with-six-new-customer-wins/

and this list seems to corroborate that:

https://trends.builtwith.com/websitelist/Savvis/United-Kingdom/London

Though, it looks like LME has strict limits on which networks they will
allow to connect into it:

https://www.lme.com/Trading/Access-the-market/ISVs-and-connectivity-providers

and it looks like at the moment, Colt is the favoured provider for LMEnet:

https://www.lme.com/Trading/Systems/LMEnet#tabIndex=0

Best of luck getting a toe in the door!^_^;;

Matt



London Interxion Data Centers

2021-02-26 Thread Rod Beck
Hi Folks,

My understanding is that there are three London Interxion data centers (I 
thought Equinix was the Borg and had assimilated pretty everything at this 
point).

Trying to get the address where the facility where the London Metal Exchange 
houses its trading engine. No, financial institutions don't like to give this 
info to transport providers. The trading engine is the heart of electronic 
trading - it matches buy and sell offers.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

2021-02-22 Thread Rod Beck
Mel, just please remove yourself from this conversation if you don't accept the 
basic premise. Go and find those missing votes in Georgia.

Best,

-R.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Brandon Svec via NANOG 
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 7:16 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts



> On Feb 22, 2021, at 9:56 AM, Mel Beckman  wrote:
>
> Sorry Global Warmists,


Stopped taking you seriously or reading further right there.  Well, that and 
linking to Forbes for something related to science.

Best.


Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

2021-02-22 Thread Rod Beck
Exactly. The weather is not a stationary time series. The moments of the 
probability distribution are not time invariant.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Rich Kulawiec 
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 6:18 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

On Tue, Feb 16, 2021 at 12:23:22PM +, Bret Clark wrote:
> Texas doesn't generally experience this type of extreme cold.

That was then; this is now.

As scientist Jeff Masters put it most of a decade ago:

The atmosphere I grew up with no longer exists.  My new motto
with regards to the weather is, "expect the unprecedented."

In the years since he's said that we've seen a number of unprecedented
events: Sandy, Harvey, California wildfires, last year's midwest derecho,
and so on.  This event in Texas is just another one; there will be more;
they'll get worse.

We should probably get ready for that.

---rsk


Re: Carrier Neutral Site - Freetown, Sierra Leone?

2021-02-19 Thread Rod Beck
I am sure South Africa is better. I am really referring to French speaking 
Western Africa.

-R.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Mark Tinka 
Sent: Friday, February 19, 2021 5:09 AM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Carrier Neutral Site - Freetown, Sierra Leone?



On 2/18/21 19:45, Rod Beck wrote:

Every time I try to bring a circuit into Africa it is like a complete tour of 
Dante's Hell.

A broad brush for such a large place.

Mark.


Carrier Neutral Site - Freetown, Sierra Leone?

2021-02-18 Thread Rod Beck
Every time I try to bring a circuit into Africa it is like a complete tour of 
Dante's Hell.



Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Viable Third Option?

2021-02-17 Thread Rod Beck
I have seen pricing as low as ten US cents on a full 100 GigE port. In other 
words, $10K. Tier 1 provider for what it's worth. I think there are Tier 2 
providers that can compete with Cogent and Hurricane on price.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Mike Hammett 
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 7:49 PM
To: NANOG list 
Subject: Viable Third Option?

This is from the perspective of an eyeball network. I understand that content 
networks would have different objectives and reasons. For instance, I have 
little to no reason as an eyeball network to exchange traffic with any other 
eyeball network (aside from P2P games). For a content network, getting into the 
eyeball networks is their objective.

My crystal ball tells me this thread will spiral out of control because people 
won't be able to keep it on topic, but it is a question that I hear VERY often. 
I also expect a lot of purely bad or outdated information to get thrown out.

Please try to keep it on topic and not being pedantic over relatively 
unimportant details.

There are two major low-cost providers, Cogent and HE.

Cogent

  *   Refuses to peer IPv6 with HE
  *   Refuses to peer IPv6 with Google
  *   Aggressive sales tactics

Hurricane

  *   Doesn't have Cogent IPv6 because of Cogent's refusal
  *   Lack of communities for anything other than blackholes

I know there are a variety of other providers such as Fusion Network that 
operate at similar price points, but are available in way fewer locations.

What else is out there? Anyone else that isn't 5x, 10x the cost?

Cogent and HE get looked down upon (and sometimes deservedly so), but when I 
talk to someone trying to sell me a port in 350 Cermak for 8x the cost of 
Cogent and HE, you better have a very good argument for why you're worth it...  
and they never do. "We're not Cogent." "and?" Many times I'm quoted transit 
that costs more than Cogent + IX + HE and they don't really have a good 
argument for it.

As an eyeball, I join an IX and there goes 50% - 85% of my traffic and almost 
all of my traffic that anyone is going to notice or complain about if there are 
issues (video streaming).

I do understand that enterprise eyeballs may have different requirements.



-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/fbicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/googleicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/linkedinicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/twittericon.png]
Midwest Internet Exchange
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/fbicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/linkedinicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/twittericon.png]
The Brothers WISP
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/fbicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/youtubeicon.png]


Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

2021-02-17 Thread Rod Beck
Using residential pricing for a data center is a bit odd, isn't? Remember, 
European businesses can reclaim VAT and a European data center would access 
much lower tariffs than a European household. And residential pricing includes 
VAT. Germany is an outlier because about 50% of the 30 cents is taxes and 
surcharges.


From: Sean Donelan 
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 4:15 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts


The price of electricity is a major component of the decision where data
centers operators choose to build large data centers.


Total electric price to end consumer (residential).  Although industrial
electric prices are usually lower, its easier to compare residential
prices across countries.

Europe (Residential):
Lowest Bulgaria: EU 9.97 cents/kWh (USD 12.0 cents/kWh)
Highest Germany: EU 30.88 cents/kWh (USD 37.33 cents/kWh)

Average: EU 20.5 cents/kWh (USD 25.2 cents/kWh)

USA (Residential):
Lowest Idaho: USD 9.67 cents/kWh (EU 8.3 cents/kWh)
Highest Hawaii: USD 28.84 cents/kWh (EU 24.07 cents/kWh)

Average: USD 13.25 cents/kWh (EU 10.79 cents/kWh)


Texas is slightly below the US average at
Texas: USD 12.2 cents/kWh (EU 9.96 cents/kWh)


Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

2021-02-17 Thread Rod Beck
And by the way, your 41% figure is misleading because it is an average over a 
continent where Western Europe has twice the standard of living as the East. 
Rich side of the tracks, poor side of the tracks.

In Germany about 80% of power cables are buried. Nearly 87% of low voltage 
cables are buried and the German grid virtually never goes down despite all 
that flaky and unpredictable wind and solar power.

Yes, population density is very high in Germany, but the reason power cables 
are above ground in Eastern Eastern is low GDP.

And those high percentages buried in Western Europe are remarkable when you 
consider Europe is not subject to severe storms like the States.

There are no severe storms comparable to the Atlantic disturbances or even this 
cold spell.

As I said, it is "time to make America great again".  Capital investment, not 
big cars. 




From: Peter Beckman 
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 6:27 AM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Sean Donelan ; Mikael Abrahamsson ; 
nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

On Tue, 16 Feb 2021, Rod Beck wrote:

> Are the power lines buried like in Europe where I live?
>
> I really think using poles is crazy and global warming guarantees enough
> atmospheric turbulence to make it untenable. Florida is moving to bury
> power lines.

 Only 41% of European lines are underground [1]. Population density is
 higher in the UK, 280 per sq km, versus the US, 34 per sq km [2].

 Netherlands: 423 per sq km
 Belgium: 376 per sq km
 Germany: 233 per sq km
 Switzerland: 208 per sq km
 Italy: 200 per sq km

 When population density is low, the cost to install buried lines does
 not make financial sense, even considering the outages.

 In major cities, lines are buried in the US.

 Granted, there are several US States that individually are similar to
 Europe:

 New Jersey: 467 per sq km
 Massachussetts: 331 per sq km
 New York: 161 per sq km (despite having NYC, largest city in the US)
 California: 95 per sq km (despite having LA, 2nd largest city in the US)
 Texas: 39 per sq km

 Buried lines makes sense where it makes sense. Comparing Europe to the
 US is way too broad, and I don't know where you live.


[1] 
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-03-05/why-europe-pays-less-than-u-s-to-put-power-lines-underground
[2] 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_and_dependencies_by_population_density

> 
> From: NANOG  on 
> behalf of Mikael Abrahamsson via NANOG 
> Sent: Tuesday, February 16, 2021 9:06 AM
> To: Sean Donelan 
> Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
> Subject: RE: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts
>
> On Mon, 15 Feb 2021, Sean Donelan wrote:
>
>> Strange the massive shortages and failures are only in one state.
>>
>> The extreme cold weather extends northwards across many states, which aren't
>> reporting rolling blackouts.
>
> https://www.texastribune.org/2011/02/08/texplainer-why-does-texas-have-its-own-power-grid/
>
> Going at it alone can be beneficial sometimes, sometimes it's not.
>
> --
> Mikael Abrahamssonemail: swm...@swm.pp.se
>

---
Peter Beckman  Internet Guy
beck...@angryox.com http://www.angryox.com/
---


Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

2021-02-17 Thread Rod Beck
I have lived in France and now Hungary. I have never seen power lines above 
ground, but I have heard there are some in rural France.

I disagree with your conclusion - essential infrastructure should be buried if 
possible. The US makes too many excuses for second rate performance. Level3 
buried its infrastructure. This is a case where sacrificing short term profits 
for better long term performance is well worth it.

Both California and Florida will end up burying their power lines. In 
California the wildfires make exposed cables just too dangerous and it is 
cheaper long term in Florida to bury than to repair pole infrastructure every 
year.

Drama like Texas is not just an exception that will face away into memory. We 
Americans can expect to see the country pounded this century with storms and 
rising waters. NYC alone will need to spend over $150 billion to preserve its 
existing living zones from storm surges.

I do acknowledge the cost may be too high for less densely populated ares, but 
at least some of the telecom and energy infrastructure linking large cities to 
each other and to energy generation and water supplies should better protected.

This is just the beginning as any climate scientist will tell you.

-R.


From: Peter Beckman 
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 6:27 AM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Sean Donelan ; Mikael Abrahamsson ; 
nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

On Tue, 16 Feb 2021, Rod Beck wrote:

> Are the power lines buried like in Europe where I live?
>
> I really think using poles is crazy and global warming guarantees enough
> atmospheric turbulence to make it untenable. Florida is moving to bury
> power lines.

 Only 41% of European lines are underground [1]. Population density is
 higher in the UK, 280 per sq km, versus the US, 34 per sq km [2].

 Netherlands: 423 per sq km
 Belgium: 376 per sq km
 Germany: 233 per sq km
 Switzerland: 208 per sq km
 Italy: 200 per sq km

 When population density is low, the cost to install buried lines does
 not make financial sense, even considering the outages.

 In major cities, lines are buried in the US.

 Granted, there are several US States that individually are similar to
 Europe:

 New Jersey: 467 per sq km
 Massachussetts: 331 per sq km
 New York: 161 per sq km (despite having NYC, largest city in the US)
 California: 95 per sq km (despite having LA, 2nd largest city in the US)
 Texas: 39 per sq km

 Buried lines makes sense where it makes sense. Comparing Europe to the
 US is way too broad, and I don't know where you live.


[1] 
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-03-05/why-europe-pays-less-than-u-s-to-put-power-lines-underground
[2] 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_and_dependencies_by_population_density

> 
> From: NANOG  on 
> behalf of Mikael Abrahamsson via NANOG 
> Sent: Tuesday, February 16, 2021 9:06 AM
> To: Sean Donelan 
> Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
> Subject: RE: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts
>
> On Mon, 15 Feb 2021, Sean Donelan wrote:
>
>> Strange the massive shortages and failures are only in one state.
>>
>> The extreme cold weather extends northwards across many states, which aren't
>> reporting rolling blackouts.
>
> https://www.texastribune.org/2011/02/08/texplainer-why-does-texas-have-its-own-power-grid/
>
> Going at it alone can be beneficial sometimes, sometimes it's not.
>
> --
> Mikael Abrahamssonemail: swm...@swm.pp.se
>

---
Peter Beckman  Internet Guy
beck...@angryox.com http://www.angryox.com/
---


Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

2021-02-16 Thread Rod Beck
It will happen because storm frequency and outages will rise throughout the 
century. It is a capital investment that will sharply reduce outages. Florida 
is on the verge of putting their long-haul power underground. Texas is primed 
for storms due to the high and growing humidity in the Gulf. Finally, capital 
costs - interest - is low. Both governments and big corporates pay very little 
to borrow so it is not onerous. May be it is time to make America great again. 

Nor does it have to be mandatory for all systems. But there should be at least 
one power network in the ground as well as one telco network.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: Jared Mauch 
Sent: Tuesday, February 16, 2021 3:38 PM
To: Mike Hammett 
Cc: Rod Beck ; nanog@nanog.org 

Subject: Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts



> On Feb 16, 2021, at 8:25 AM, Mike Hammett  wrote:
>
> It's cheaper to build 2x, 3x, 4x the aerial plant than to build 1x the 
> underground plant.
>
> The actual cost per foot is more like 10x difference, but there are right of 
> way, maintenance, etc. costs to factor in as well.
>

Labor is something in 8x but the permit/engineering cost is usually the same 
per foot, but the make-ready on poles can make underground competitive or more 
like 1.5x when you fully bake the costs.  Really depends on pole distances and 
quality.  O long-term is lower on underground vs aerial.

- Jared


Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

2021-02-16 Thread Rod Beck
I agree. Germany spent well over 200 billion Euros on wind and solar subsidies 
and over 85% of the country's energy consumption is still non-renewable. Wind 
power is randomly generated. I really don't to depend it for either personal or 
business needs.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Robert Jacobs 
Sent: Tuesday, February 16, 2021 5:17 AM
To: Mark Tinka ; nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: RE: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

How about letting us Texans have more natural gas power plants or even let the 
gas be delivered to the plants we have so they can provide more power in an 
emergency. Did not help that 20% of our power is now wind which of course in an 
ice storm like we are having is shut off... Lots of issues and plenty of 
politics involved here..

Robert Jacobs​
 |  Data Center Manager
[http://www.pslightwave.com/emailsig/plwlogo.jpg]
Direct: 832-615-7742
Mobile: 281-830-2092
Main:   832‑615‑8000
Fax:713-510-1650
5959 Corporate Dr. Suite 3300; Houston, TX 77036
[Facebook]
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[Twitter]
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 [http://www.pslightwave.com/emailsig/plw-wbenc.jpg] A Certified 
Woman‑Owned Business
24x7x365 Customer Support: 832-615-8000 | supp...@pslightwave.com

​This electronic message contains information from PS Lightwave which may be 
privileged and confidential. The information is intended to be for the use of 
individual(s) or entity named above. If you are not the intended recipient, any 
disclosure, copying, distribution or use of the contents of this information is 
prohibited. If you have received this electronic message in error, please 
notify me by telephone or e-mail immediately.
-Original Message-
From: NANOG  On Behalf Of Mark 
Tinka
Sent: Monday, February 15, 2021 10:06 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org
Subject: Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts



On 2/16/21 04:14, Sean Donelan wrote:
>
> Poweroutage.us posted a terrific map, showing the jurisdictional
> borders of the Texas power outages versus the storm related power
> outages elsewhere in the country.
>
> https://twitter.com/PowerOutage_us/status/1361493394070118402
>
>
> Sometimes infrastructure planning failures are not due to "natural
> hazards."

I suppose having some kind of home backup solution wouldn't be too bad right 
now, even though you may still not get access to services. But at least, you 
can brew some coffee, and charge your pulse oximetre.

Mark.



Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

2021-02-16 Thread Rod Beck
The problems with renewables is that you can't switch on or off and there is no 
good storage solution.

However, the issue in Texas is probably exposed power cables. In Europe they 
are buried and we have far milder weather than the States.

Anyone wants to provide some details on where the system has faltered? It is 
transmission? Or generation? Or just everything in general? 


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Cory Sell via NANOG 
Sent: Tuesday, February 16, 2021 5:34 AM
To: Robert Jacobs ; Mark Tinka ; 
nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: RE: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

Ercot has already released actual documentation of the outputs. Wind is NOT the 
biggest loss here. Even if wind was operating at 100% capacity, we’d be in the 
same boat due to gas and fossil fuel-related generation being decimated. 
Estimated 4GW lost for wind doesn’t make up for the 30GW+ estimated being lost 
from fossil fuels.

I only interject because people are already pointing their fingers at 
renewables being the cause here and trying to pawn off the blame to wind/solar 
to further their agendas to reduce renewable energy R and adoption. Sure, 
wind isn’t perfect, but looks like solution relied on failed in a massive way.

Sent from ProtonMail Mobile


On Mon, Feb 15, 2021 at 10:17 PM, Robert Jacobs 
mailto:rjac...@pslightwave.com>> wrote:
How about letting us Texans have more natural gas power plants or even let the 
gas be delivered to the plants we have so they can provide more power in an 
emergency. Did not help that 20% of our power is now wind which of course in an 
ice storm like we are having is shut off... Lots of issues and plenty of 
politics involved here..

Robert Jacobs​
 |  Data Center Manager
[http://www.pslightwave.com/emailsig/plwlogo.jpg]
Direct: 832-615-7742
Mobile: 281-830-2092
Main:   832‑615‑8000
Fax:713-510-1650
5959 Corporate Dr. Suite 3300; Houston, TX 77036
[Facebook]
[LinkedIn]
[Twitter]
[http://www.pslightwave.com/emailsig/2020TopWorkplace.png]
 [http://www.pslightwave.com/emailsig/plw-wbenc.jpg] A Certified 
Woman‑Owned Business
24x7x365 Customer Support: 832-615-8000 | supp...@pslightwave.com

​This electronic message contains information from PS Lightwave which may be 
privileged and confidential. The information is intended to be for the use of 
individual(s) or entity named above. If you are not the intended recipient, any 
disclosure, copying, distribution or use of the contents of this information is 
prohibited. If you have received this electronic message in error, please 
notify me by telephone or e-mail immediately.
-Original Message-
From: NANOG  On Behalf Of Mark 
Tinka
Sent: Monday, February 15, 2021 10:06 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org
Subject: Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts



On 2/16/21 04:14, Sean Donelan wrote:
>
> Poweroutage.us posted a terrific map, showing the jurisdictional
> borders of the Texas power outages versus the storm related power
> outages elsewhere in the country.
>
> https://twitter.com/PowerOutage_us/status/1361493394070118402
>
>
> Sometimes infrastructure planning failures are not due to "natural
> hazards."

I suppose having some kind of home backup solution wouldn't be too bad right 
now, even though you may still not get access to services. But at least, you 
can brew some coffee, and charge your pulse oximetre.

Mark.





Re: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

2021-02-16 Thread Rod Beck
Are the power lines buried like in Europe where I live?

I really think using poles is crazy and global warming guarantees enough 
atmospheric turbulence to make it untenable. Florida is moving to bury power 
lines.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Mikael Abrahamsson via NANOG 
Sent: Tuesday, February 16, 2021 9:06 AM
To: Sean Donelan 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: RE: Texas internet connectivity declining due to blackouts

On Mon, 15 Feb 2021, Sean Donelan wrote:

> Strange the massive shortages and failures are only in one state.
>
> The extreme cold weather extends northwards across many states, which aren't
> reporting rolling blackouts.

https://www.texastribune.org/2011/02/08/texplainer-why-does-texas-have-its-own-power-grid/

Going at it alone can be beneficial sometimes, sometimes it's not.

--
Mikael Abrahamssonemail: swm...@swm.pp.se


London/Moscow

2021-02-13 Thread Rod Beck
Hey Gang,

What is the lowest latency anyone has seen on this route? All-fibre. Or hybrid 
fibre/microwave.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


New York Carrier Hotels

2021-02-11 Thread Rod Beck
Hey Folks,

I am looking for a list of the ten most important NYC telecom hotels. Over the 
last 15 years carrier business has shifted to a large extent to Secaucus 
Equinix & Google has taken over a big part of 111 8th Avenue. What the 
important sites today and are any new facilities on the horizon?


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Procurement

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com
https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/
New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183



[1467221477350_image005.png]


Paris Dark Fiber Providers

2021-02-05 Thread Rod Beck
Please contact off list. Looking to understand the competitive landscape. I 
used to live there, but it was over ten years ago. Particularly in commercial 
flexible and nimble players with unique physical assets like rights of way 
diverse to the usual suspects.

Best,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

Global Network Capacity Sourcing

United Cable Company

https://unitedcablecompany.com/video/

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Amsterdam Dark Fiber

2021-02-04 Thread Rod Beck
Please contact offlist.

Looking for dark fiber in Amsterdam. Eurofiber has traditionally dominated this 
market. Who else competes in this market?


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: NANOG Digest, Vol 157, Issue 3

2021-02-04 Thread Rod Beck
It sounds interesting.

-R.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Jakob Heitz (jheitz) via NANOG 
Sent: Thursday, February 4, 2021 6:00 AM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: RE: NANOG Digest, Vol 157, Issue 3

I couldn't put down Bill Norton's book.
https://drpeering.net/core/bookOutline.html
When a cheapskate like me pays the $10, it means something.

Regards,
Jakob.

-Original Message-
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2021 11:35:34 +0100
From: Casey Callendrello 
To: nanog@nanog.org
Subject: BGP / routing paper recommendations?
Message-ID: <5f47b46e-d43b-a60e-42ef-84149a5a6...@caseyc.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed

Hi all,

I'm part of a paper reading club, and the group's interest has turned to
BGP and Internet routing in general. As the only person in the group who
even knows what an AS is, I've been tasked with finding interesting
papers on the subject. Any papers or presentations that you found
valuable or interesting?

My list, so far:

- ARTEMIS: Neutralizing BGP Hijacking Within a Minute
(https://www.inspire.edu.gr/wp-content/pdfs/artemis_TON2018.pdf)
- Securing BGP - A Literature Survey
(https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/5473881)
- Stable Internet routing without global coordination
(https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/974523)
- A Survey on Approaches to Reduce BGP Interdomain Routing Convergence
Delay on the Internet (https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7964680)

I would particularly appreciate papers that focus on the
distributed-systems aspect of routing, such as convergence times,
stability, and security. Happy to take responses off-list, will
summarize in due time.

TIA,
-- Casey Callendrello


Re: New High Fiber Count Deep Sea Cables

2021-02-01 Thread Rod Beck
I think that report is a summary of the thinking that led to the new higher 
count cables. In fact, those researchers work for the companies that laid those 
cables.

The new cables are based on the ideas outlined in that paper? spacing regen 
farther apart, putting fewer waves on each fiber pair so nonlinearities can be 
avoided, etc.

-R.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Mark Tinka 
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 3:22 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: New High Fiber Count Deep Sea Cables



On 2/1/21 12:30, Rod Beck wrote:
Here is the intellectual foundation or underpinnings of the  new deep sea 
design which are enabling fiber pair counts as high as 24.

I think the engineers might enjoy this.

https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8369356

This is from 2018 - the submarine cable industry has come a long way since then 
:-).

Channel spacing on marine systems has always been the game. Adding intelligence 
into branching units (BU's), as well as improvements in amplifier design has 
been a contributory factor as well.

What is interesting, now, is that in lieu of copper, aluminium is being 
preferred as a conductor, to lower build costs.

Mark.


Question About Marea Cable

2021-02-01 Thread Rod Beck
Off list, please. Anyone know the RTD of this cable from its Ashburn POP to its 
Bilboa cable landing station. A 2018 press release brags it is one of the 
lowest latency Trans-Atlantic cables.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


New High Fiber Count Deep Sea Cables

2021-02-01 Thread Rod Beck
Here is the intellectual foundation or underpinnings of the  new deep sea 
design which are enabling fiber pair counts as high as 24.

I think the engineers might enjoy this.

https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8369356
[https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/assets/img/ieee_logo_smedia_200X200.png]
Cost-Optimized Submarine Cables Using Massive Spatial 
Parallelism
ieeexplore.ieee.org



Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Zurich Data Center

2021-01-31 Thread Rod Beck
Off list, what can someone tell me about the data center at


Aargauerstrasse 10

8048 Zürich

Regards,

Roderick.





Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: [**EXTERNAL**] Re: Half Fibre Pair

2021-01-27 Thread Rod Beck
What is interesting is this new deep sea design. In the old days cables had 4 
to 8 pairs max. Now I am seeing Orange talking about 18 pairs and 24 pairs. 
With more widely regeneration.

https://www.orange.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2021/orange-takes-leading-role-us-europe-route-two-new-generation-submarine
[https://www.orange.com/sites/orangecom/files/styles/crop_4_3_large/public/2021-01/Amiti%C3%A9%20Dunant.jpg?h=dcad9be9=ZFfo2VK1]<https://www.orange.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2021/orange-takes-leading-role-us-europe-route-two-new-generation-submarine>
Orange takes a leading role in the US to Europe route with two new generation 
submarine cables linking the East Coast to France | Orange 
Com<https://www.orange.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2021/orange-takes-leading-role-us-europe-route-two-new-generation-submarine>
After the landing of the Dunant cable, a Google project announced back in March 
2020, Orange announces it is now ready for service for its wholesale and 
business customers. With 12 fibre pairs with over 30 Tbps of capacity each, 
multiplying by three the previous generation of transatlantic submarine cables 
capacity. Orange also announces the signature of a partnership on the AMITIÉ 
cable ...
www.orange.com


Regards,

Rdoerick.



From: Fox, Barbara 
Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2021 3:52 PM
To: Mark Tinka ; Rod Beck 
; nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: RE: [**EXTERNAL**] Re: Half Fibre Pair


I asked a submarine guy how much the fibers can carry because this sounded low 
to me.  His response:



it depends on the type of cable. Older cables (with embedded dispersion 
compensation) have a lot less capacity and I have seen some as low as 1Tb/s per 
fiber pair and some as high as 10Tb/s per fiber pair. All newer D+ Cables that 
have been deployed in the last 5 years and will be the only cables deployed 
going forward can easily carry 20Tb/s of capacity per fiber pair. Something 
Like Havfrue can support 22T per fiber pair and there are 8 fiber pairs for a 
total of 176T.



Barbara



From: NANOG  On Behalf Of Mark Tinka
Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2021 7:13 AM
To: Rod Beck ; nanog@nanog.org
Subject: [**EXTERNAL**] Re: Half Fibre Pair





On 1/27/21 13:39, Rod Beck wrote:

How much spectrum is a half fibre? It must be standardized in some fashion.

It would be based on the amount of capacity each fibre in the overall system 
can carry across a given line system span.

So say a cable system is able to carry 960Gbps per fibre pair, and it has 5 
fibre pairs, that means a half fibre pair purchased by one of the consortium 
members would be 480Gbps.

It is also possible for a consortium member to own a full + a fractional fibre 
pair, e.g., two and a-half fibre pairs. In such a contract, for example, say a 
24 fibre-pair system could carry 1.2Tbps per fibre pair, that member would have 
3Tbps of capacity.

Mark.


Re: Half Fibre Pair

2021-01-27 Thread Rod Beck
How much spectrum is a half fibre? It must be standardized in some fashion.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Mark Tinka 
Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2021 12:33 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Half Fibre Pair



On 1/26/21 22:51, Rod Beck wrote:

Can someone explain to me what is a half fibre pair? I took it literally to 
mean a single fibre strand but someone insisted it was a large quantity of 
spectrum. Please illuminate. On or off list as you please.

It is language used in the submarine world, where a member of the consortium 
may not be able to afford a full fibre pair on the system.

Don't take it literally :-).

Mark.


Re: Half Fibre Pair

2021-01-26 Thread Rod Beck
Actually it is standard language in the undersea cable world for a large 
spectrum purchase. Sometimes a fiber pair on a system may be too much, but the 
buyer still wants many terabits of capacity. "

The Half Fiber Pair is the same as 10*MSUs in a virtual fiber pair, either in 
C-band or L-band. I believe these are primarily used in transocean routes."


This is what I have learned so far.


Now that deep sea cables are being deployed with as many as 24 pairs, there 
will be more players doing fractional purchases.





From: William Herrin 
Sent: Tuesday, January 26, 2021 10:56 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Half Fibre Pair

On Tue, Jan 26, 2021 at 12:52 PM Rod Beck
 wrote:
> Can someone explain to me what is a half fibre pair? I took it
> literally to mean a single fibre strand but someone insisted it
> was a large quantity of spectrum. Please illuminate.


Maybe it's like half a pair of glasses, the perfect accessory for the
one-eyed man who's king.

Seriously though, it sounds like a bad language construction. If a
vendor is offering you that, I'd ask for clarification. Are they
leasing a dedicated strand of fiber end-to-end? Dedicated wavelength
directions delivered by fiber? Something else?

If you're thinking of offering it, find better words.

Regards,
Bill Herrin


Half Fibre Pair

2021-01-26 Thread Rod Beck
Can someone explain to me what is a half fibre pair? I took it literally to 
mean a single fibre strand but someone insisted it was a large quantity of 
spectrum. Please illuminate. On or off list as you please.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Re Parler

2021-01-14 Thread Rod Beck
Folks,

There is a political dimension here. Sedition. Parlet is a hornets nest of 
right wing extremism.

The courts will take that into account.

Moreover, Parlet's financial resources will evaporate very quickly and with it 
any lawsuit.

I think it is time to bury this issue as a discussion topic.

Regards,

Roderick.






From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Keith Medcalf 
Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2021 7:01 PM
To: Mel Beckman ; adamv0...@netconsultings.com 

Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: RE: Re Parler


On Thursday, 14 January, 2021 10:02, Mel Beckman  wrote:

>I, however, do know that this is the contract that was in force. Because
>I read the lawsuit, and the contract, which I’ve verified is identical to
>the one posted online, is included as an exhibit (although the courts
>managed to get the pages out of order).

>And yes, Amazon had a duty to provide 30 days notice in advance of
>termination. Amazon says they are calling this a “suspension”, but that’s
>weaselwording, because they told Parler that they had secured Parler’s
>data so that Parler could “move to another provider.” You would only do
>that in a termination.

>Parler also has an excellent antitrust case, as the idea that three
>companies would simultaneously pull the plug on their services for a
>single common customer is going to be hard to explain to a judge.

>Right now I think Amazon’s safest escape from this mess is to restore
>Parlor’s services, and pay them damages. Otherwise, why would anyone do
>business with Amazon if they can pull the rug out with zero advance
>notice (Parler learned of Amazon’s termination from the news, since
>Amazon gave the media a scoop before notifying its customers).

>However you look at this, Amazon’s actions have huge implications for
>anyone using them for operational networking.

This result will only come to pass if Parler wins their lawsuit (which is 
likely) *AND* the FTC imposes a billion dollar fine against Amazon for their 
Fraudulent business practices.

Otherwise, Amazon will not change their Fraudulent Business Practices because 
they will determine that the COST associated with Fraudulent Business Practices 
is negligible, and there continues to be no shortage of stupid customers who, 
for some reason, insist on placing TRUST in the inherently UNTRUSTWORTHY, even 
when it that UNTRUSTWORTHYNESS has already been demonstrated as fact.

--
Be decisive.  Make a decision, right or wrong.  The road of life is paved with 
flat squirrels who could not make a decision.





Re: not a utility, was Parler

2021-01-11 Thread Rod Beck
Declare Facebook a public utility and eliminate advertising by replacing with a 
fee or what you call a tariff. Breaking up does not always work. Facebook is 
like a natural monopoly - people want one site to connect with all their 
'friends'. No one is going to use several Facebooks as social media platform. 
They want one.

Regards,

Roderick.




From: John Levine 
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 11:57 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Cc: Rod Beck 
Subject: Re: not a utility, was Parler

In article 

 you write:
>-=-=-=-=-=-
>Unless the courts rule or the legislators enact legislation making them a 
>public utility. In legal circles there is a theory that
>platforms like Facebook, messaging services, etc. might achieve such 
>importance to public life and discourse as to merit regulation
>under the grounds they are an essential utility. I am neutral regarding this 
>idea - I have not studied it and also realize that Amazon
>is not strictly speaking a social media. So my point is tangential.

That is a dream of some factions, but it is not realistic.

You can certainly make an argument that Google and Facebook are
monopolies, but the remedies for that are to break them up or to
require them to provide access to their competitors to some of their
internal facilities, e.g., allow other ad networks to bid on and
provide the ads that show up with your Google search or Facebook page.

Utilities have tariffs under which everyone who orders the same kind
of service gets the same service at the same price. I understand how
to apply that to a railroad or a power company or a telephone company,
but I do not understand how to apply it to a search engine or social
media provider or online megastore and neither does anyone else.

R's,
John


Re: Parler

2021-01-10 Thread Rod Beck
The Courts have never interpreted the free speech rights to be totally without 
limits. I am pretty sure sedition defined as a concrete threat to take back the 
country by blocking the vote certification of the incoming President is not 
protected speech. Just because one does not moderate all content does not mean 
one cannot moderate some content. Mostly hands off does not imply totally hands 
off.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Matt Hoppes 
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 4:10 PM
To: sro...@ronan-online.com 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Parler

Is that illegal though?

> On Jan 10, 2021, at 10:07 AM, sro...@ronan-online.com wrote:
>
> Another interesting angle here is that it as ruled President couldn’t block 
> people, because his Tweets were government communication. So has Twitter now 
> blocked government communication?
>
>
>> On Jan 10, 2021, at 9:51 AM, Michael Thomas  wrote:
>>
>> 
 On 1/10/21 5:42 AM, sro...@ronan-online.com wrote:
>>> While Amazon is absolutely within their rights to suspend anyone they want 
>>> for violation of their TOS, it does create an interesting problem. Amazon 
>>> is now in the content moderation business, which could potentially open 
>>> them up to liability if they fail to suspend any other customer who hosts 
>>> objectionable content.
>>>
>>> When I actively hosted USENET servers, I was repeatedly warned by in-house 
>>> and external counsel, not to moderate which groups I hosted based on 
>>> content, less I become responsible for moderating all groups, shouldn’t 
>>> that same principal apply to platforms like AWS and Twitter?
>>
>>
>> Is it content moderation, or just giving the boot to enabling criminal 
>> activity? Would that more providers be given the boot for enabling voice 
>> spam scams, for example. Didn't one of the $n-chan's get the boot a while 
>> back? I don't seem to recall a lot of push back about that and it was pretty 
>> much the same situation, iirc.
>>
>> Mike
>>


Re: Parler

2021-01-10 Thread Rod Beck
Unless the courts rule or the legislators enact legislation making them a 
public utility. In legal circles there is a theory that platforms like 
Facebook, messaging services, etc. might achieve such importance to public life 
and discourse as to merit regulation under the grounds they are an essential 
utility. I am neutral regarding this idea - I have not studied it and also 
realize that Amazon is not strictly speaking a social media. So my point is 
tangential.

As a big fan of the 1st amendment, but someone deeply appalled by the riot last 
week and keenly aware of how social media are letting the mud to the surface, I 
am very perplexed how to reconcile free speech and the garbage flowing through 
our social streets.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Brielle 
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 5:20 PM
To: sro...@ronan-online.com 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Parler

They’re a private company.  The same statues that give providers the right to 
refuse spam and block abuse give them the right to fire customers for whatever 
reason they want.

If their contract with Parler says they can be terminated for violations of TOS 
/ AUP or (more likely) for any reason Amazon decides, then it’s a done deal.

‘Frea Speeks’ as we liked to joking call it when spammers made the claim, is a 
govt thing.  Private businesses aren’t bound by the 1st amendment.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 10, 2021, at 6:44 AM, sro...@ronan-online.com wrote:
>
> While Amazon is absolutely within their rights to suspend anyone they want 
> for violation of their TOS, it does create an interesting problem. Amazon is 
> now in the content moderation business, which could potentially open them up 
> to liability if they fail to suspend any other customer who hosts 
> objectionable content.
>
> When I actively hosted USENET servers, I was repeatedly warned by in-house 
> and external counsel, not to moderate which groups I hosted based on content, 
> less I become responsible for moderating all groups, shouldn’t that same 
> principal apply to platforms like AWS and Twitter?
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jan 10, 2021, at 3:24 AM, William Herrin  wrote:
>> Anybody looking for a new customer opportunity? It seems Parler is in
>> search of a new service provider. Vendors need only provide all the
>> proprietary AWS APIs that Parler depends upon to function.
>> https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2021/01/09/amazon-parler-suspension/
>> Regards,
>> Bill HErrin



Gasline Telecom DE Contact

2021-01-07 Thread Rod Beck
Please provide your details. I need a good sales rep.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Germany Long Haul Providers

2021-01-06 Thread Rod Beck
Looking for a niche provider - not one of the usual suspects like Colt or GTT 
or Deutsche Telekom. A carrier with a dense German network hitting the smaller 
cities like Nürnberg. Wholesale mentality. Gige, 10 and 100 gig waves. DF.

The big guys don't cut it.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Cable Company Hotspots

2020-11-23 Thread Rod Beck
It is a lifesaver. It is a good back up to have if primary services fails as my 
telco service did Friday. Transmission rates up and down vary dramatically from 
as high as 40 megs down to as low 500K down. It is definitely shared bandwidth 
in the Last Mile. 

-R.


From: Rob Seastrom 
Sent: Monday, November 23, 2020 2:55 PM
To: Lady Benjamin PD Cannon 
Cc: Rod Beck ; NANOG Operators' Group 

Subject: Re: Cable Company Hotspots

On Nov 22, 2020, at 12:42, Lady Benjamin PD Cannon  wrote:
>
> Rod, that’s exactly how they are delivering it. Unclear wether it’s over a 
> separately provisioned bandwidth channel, or wether it shares the aggregate 
> capacity of the HFC.

It shares the aggregate bandwidth of the HFC but not your contracted bandwidth. 
 Itmight be possible, but its extremely unlikely, to dedicate downstream or 
particularly upstream DOCSIS channels for this, and if you’re running docsis 
3.1 “channel” takes on a rather different shade of meaning anyway.

This is done with “service flows” which are part of the docsis spec.  They’re 
more like CAR with an ACL than DSCP.  Your cable modem already has at least 
four service flows defined in its profile:  one each for upstream and 
downstream, cablemodem management and contracted-bandwidth commodity internet.  
 If there is a built in phone jack (NANOG would call this an ATA, but the 
cablelabs term for it is an MTA or eMTA) then add a couple of more flows to it 
for the voip.  There could be still more; uses are up to your imagination.

I haven’t seen better than 10-20m service flows for guest wifi...

Shared vs dedicated wifi radio for guest would be dependent on the CPE.  I 
believe they are mostly shared, but my information is dated at this point and 
radios have gotten stupid cheap in the meantime.

Likewise, backhaul technology is implementation dependent; L2TP is what I’ve 
generally seen, not GRE, but again that info is five years out of date at this 
point.

So in short, assuming minimal interference and good wifi config (which may be a 
lot to ask in some environments) someone running speedtest on the guest wifi 
should have almost no effect on your contracted network performance, modulo any 
timing effects of the docsis channel transmission time slot allocator.

HTH,
-r

Sent from my iPad



Re: Cable Company Hotspots

2020-11-23 Thread Rod Beck
The dual purpose does explain why the gateways are so big relative to what the 
incumbent phone companies provide. It is great redundancy. My telco DSL 
Internet went down and I hopped onto free wireless cable service that I am 
entitled since most of properties have cable Internet.

-R.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Jay Hennigan 
Sent: Sunday, November 22, 2020 9:48 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Cable Company Hotspots

On 11/22/20 11:50, J. Hellenthal via NANOG wrote:
> Sad that in some cases the extra WiFi usage results in higher electric bills 
> for the consumer and cannot be opted out of.

Power consumption is going to be miniscule, especially if the consumer
opts to use the cable company's built-in wi-fi themselves. If someone is
really that concerned about their electric bill they can unplug it when
not in use. Not practical if there's an ATA in it used for landline or
you have devices requiring Internet access 24/7 like security systems or
IoT. Of more practical concern is RF interference.

Typically the cable company puts their box in a convenient location for
access, either near where the cable comes in to the house or maybe
behind the TV. This often isn't the best place for radio coverage but
can create strong interference near the box.

If the customer doesn't use the cable box's wi-fi and installs their own
access point(s), there is no convenient way for them to turn off this
functionality. Many customers don't even know it exists. Most front-line
cable support techs don't either.

--
Jay Hennigan - j...@west.net
Network Engineering - CCIE #7880
503 897-8550 - WB6RDV


Cable Company Hotspots

2020-11-20 Thread Rod Beck
Hey Gang,

How do the cable companies generally deliver this service? A friend insists it 
piggybacks off the WIFI radios of existing cable company subscribers. In other 
words, the cable company WIFI router in a flat is providing both a private link 
for the flat's subscriber, but also a public hotspot service.

I concede it is possible, but I am skeptical that the high quality of hotspot 
service we get here in Budapest could be achieved that way.




Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Brazil Transit

2020-11-02 Thread Rod Beck
Hey Folks,

I would be interested in understanding 100 GigE transit pricing in Sao Paulo. 
If you have any insight, contact me off line.

Thanks.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Data Center Address

2020-10-28 Thread Rod Beck
Can anyone familiar with SG2 Equinix tell me if that is where the trading 
engine for the Singapore Stock Exchange is located?


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Vint Cerf & Interplanetary Internet

2020-10-22 Thread Rod Beck
SPACOG. C'mon guys. Think Big!


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Mark Andrews 
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2020 5:56 AM
To: scott weeks 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Vint Cerf & Interplanetary Internet

It wouldn’t be NANOG.  Perhaps LUNOG or MOONOG.

> On 22 Oct 2020, at 14:07, scott weeks  wrote:
>
>
> *From:* NANOG  on behalf of Rod 
> Beck 
>> https://www.quantamagazine.org/vint-cerfs-plan-for-building-an-internet-in-space-20201021/
> 
>
> On 10/21/20 2:27 PM, Suresh Ramasubramanian wrote:
>
> Right. This means we are going to catch a spaceship for a future nanog / have
> interplanetary governance federation debates with space aliens from Andromeda,
> and we will finally run out of v6 and ipv9 will rule the roost while there’s a
> substantial aftermarket + hijack scene going on for the last remaining v6 
> blocks.
> 
>
>
> More like IP to Nokia's new cell network on the moon:
>
> https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/oct/20/talking-on-the-moon-nasa-and-nokia-to-install-4g-on-lunar-surface
> (Everyone on the moon will want to have access to LOL cats!)
>
> Or... using DTN (https://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/dtn/about) to reach Mars and 
> other
> planets by being relayed through communications relay satellites similar to 
> the
> Mars Telecommunication Orbiter (canceled),  Mars Odyssey or Mars
> Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft.
>
> Or... IP to robots visiting other non-planet objects in the solar system like
> comets/asteroids:
> https://spacenews.com/osiris-rex-touches-down-on-asteroid
> https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47293317
>
> Or... 
>
> The IPI idea has been around for a long time now:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interplanetary_Internet
>
> The main question is will NANOG On The Road meet on the moon?  I missed
> the only Hawaii one, so maybe I could make the moon one!
>
> scott

--
Mark Andrews, ISC
1 Seymour St., Dundas Valley, NSW 2117, Australia
PHONE: +61 2 9871 4742  INTERNET: ma...@isc.org



Vint Cerf & Interplanetary Internet

2020-10-21 Thread Rod Beck
https://www.quantamagazine.org/vint-cerfs-plan-for-building-an-internet-in-space-20201021/


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Ohio - Telecom Construction

2020-10-17 Thread Rod Beck
Please contact me off-list if you have knowledge regarding this subject.

Thanks and Be Well,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Cogent Layer 2

2020-10-14 Thread Rod Beck
Look, you are looking for a fight, in which I have no interest. And no, a 
provider can't overbook a packet over SDH circuit. It is SDH performance. Pure 
dedicated bandwidth. You are correct that if you have to carve it up into a 
lots of VLANs, it would be a nightmare. But Hibernia was a true wholesale 
carrier providing backbone to clients, not links distributing traffic to lots 
of user end points.


From: Ryan Hamel 
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 8:34 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Mike Hammett ; nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Cogent Layer 2

Hibernia's implementation must of made scaling in terms of VLAN allocations, 
and programming all the equipment in path (with possibly no redundancy), very 
difficult to manage. Any link can be saturated no matter if it is layer 2 or 3. 
If you want dedicated bandwidth with an SLA, you have to pay for it.

Ryan
On Oct 14 2020, at 11:28 am, Rod Beck  wrote:

Hibernia was offering Switched Ethernet 'everywhere' long before it had a Layer 
3 network. So I am a bit skeptical. In fact, in the 'old days' 2006-2011 we had 
a nice packet over SDH service that has all the performance of SDH with all the 
functionality of Ethernet. Very popular service. Unfortunately, management 
replaced with Switched Ethernet, which many customers distrusted because of 
potential overbooking issues.

From: Ryan Hamel 
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 8:22 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Mike Hammett ; nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Cogent Layer 2

All carrier Ethernet services are tunnels provided by VPLS Psuedowire or VXLAN 
services. Did you really expect a VLAN to be layer 2 switched everywhere?

Ryan

On Oct 14 2020, at 11:03 am, Rod Beck  wrote:

I always heard this service was really Layer 3 disguised as Layer 2.

From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Ryan Hamel 
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 7:54 PM
To: Mike Hammett 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Cogent Layer 2

Mike,

Layer 2 is fine once it works.


  *
You will have to put up with whatever VLAN tags they pick, if you plan on 
having multiple virtual circuits on a 10G hub.
  *
They do like to see into the flows of traffic, as they only allow up to 
2Gbits/flow, per there legacy infrastructure.
  *
If the circuit doesn't work on turn up (which is more than likely), you'll have 
to be abrasive with their NOC and demand escalations.

IMO, if it's 1Gbit or less per circuit and can deal with ^, you're fine, 
otherwise look for another carrier.

-

Below is what I got from Cogent about their layer 2:

We offer Ethernet over MPLS transport utilizing Cisco FAT Pseudowire (Flow 
Aware Transport). Our service is a fully protected service, so if we suffer a 
fiber cut or other disruption along the primary path, our IS-IS IP fast-reroute 
enabled MPLS backbone will swing all traffic over to another pre-determined 
path across our backbone with usually no packet loss or disruption in service.

In order for our service to work correctly and provide the automatic 
redundancy, we need to verify that the traffic traversing the network can be 
hashed correctly by our routers. For this to happen, Cogent has to see the 
src-dst IP address or if you are running MPLS over the circuit, we need to see 
your MPLS labels. The hashing works by placing each flow of data on a separate 
10GE or 100GE interface between the routers, so that traffic is evenly 
dispersed across all available capacity along the path. A flow is defined as a 
src-dst IP pair or a customer MPLS label, so the more IP pairs or MPLS labels, 
the better the traffic load-balances. Cogent has decided to impose a 2Gbps/flow 
restriction for our own traffic engineering purposes, which aim to make sure 
that no single customer can overrun a 10GE interface anywhere on our network 
(since we do not sell 10GE Wave services).

The reason we have the limitation in place is for our own traffic engineering 
purposes, which aims to make sure that no single customer can overrun a 10GE 
interface anywhere on our network (since we do not sell 10GE Wave services). 
Since most uplinks between routers are Nx10GE or Nx100GE, we want to make sure 
that all customer traffic can be load-balanced across the uplink capacity 
evenly, which makes it easier to reroute traffic in the event of a fiber cut or 
other disruption. One would think that with 100GE interfaces, it would not be 
possible to overrun the interface if we allowed full 10Gbps/flow, however most 
100GE interfaces, at the chip level are broken down into 10Gbps lanes and the 
interfaces do not have a way to easily determine that a lane through the 
interface is at capacity, so as new flows enter the interface, they could get 
allocated to a lane that is already full and therefore experience packet loss.

So that we can complete our technical review for this request, need the 
following questions answered:

1 - What equipment will be directly connected to Cogent interface?

2 - How are the servers/equipment behind the edge device

Re: Cogent Layer 2

2020-10-14 Thread Rod Beck
Hibernia was offering Switched Ethernet 'everywhere' long before it had a Layer 
3 network. So I am a bit skeptical. In fact, in the 'old days' 2006-2011 we had 
a nice packet over SDH service that has all the performance of SDH with all the 
functionality of Ethernet. Very popular service. Unfortunately, management 
replaced with Switched Ethernet, which many customers distrusted because of 
potential overbooking issues.


From: Ryan Hamel 
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 8:22 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Mike Hammett ; nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Cogent Layer 2

All carrier Ethernet services are tunnels provided by VPLS Psuedowire or VXLAN 
services. Did you really expect a VLAN to be layer 2 switched everywhere?

Ryan

On Oct 14 2020, at 11:03 am, Rod Beck  wrote:

I always heard this service was really Layer 3 disguised as Layer 2.

From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Ryan Hamel 
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 7:54 PM
To: Mike Hammett 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Cogent Layer 2

Mike,

Layer 2 is fine once it works.


  *
You will have to put up with whatever VLAN tags they pick, if you plan on 
having multiple virtual circuits on a 10G hub.
  *
They do like to see into the flows of traffic, as they only allow up to 
2Gbits/flow, per there legacy infrastructure.
  *
If the circuit doesn't work on turn up (which is more than likely), you'll have 
to be abrasive with their NOC and demand escalations.

IMO, if it's 1Gbit or less per circuit and can deal with ^, you're fine, 
otherwise look for another carrier.

-

Below is what I got from Cogent about their layer 2:

We offer Ethernet over MPLS transport utilizing Cisco FAT Pseudowire (Flow 
Aware Transport). Our service is a fully protected service, so if we suffer a 
fiber cut or other disruption along the primary path, our IS-IS IP fast-reroute 
enabled MPLS backbone will swing all traffic over to another pre-determined 
path across our backbone with usually no packet loss or disruption in service.

In order for our service to work correctly and provide the automatic 
redundancy, we need to verify that the traffic traversing the network can be 
hashed correctly by our routers. For this to happen, Cogent has to see the 
src-dst IP address or if you are running MPLS over the circuit, we need to see 
your MPLS labels. The hashing works by placing each flow of data on a separate 
10GE or 100GE interface between the routers, so that traffic is evenly 
dispersed across all available capacity along the path. A flow is defined as a 
src-dst IP pair or a customer MPLS label, so the more IP pairs or MPLS labels, 
the better the traffic load-balances. Cogent has decided to impose a 2Gbps/flow 
restriction for our own traffic engineering purposes, which aim to make sure 
that no single customer can overrun a 10GE interface anywhere on our network 
(since we do not sell 10GE Wave services).

The reason we have the limitation in place is for our own traffic engineering 
purposes, which aims to make sure that no single customer can overrun a 10GE 
interface anywhere on our network (since we do not sell 10GE Wave services). 
Since most uplinks between routers are Nx10GE or Nx100GE, we want to make sure 
that all customer traffic can be load-balanced across the uplink capacity 
evenly, which makes it easier to reroute traffic in the event of a fiber cut or 
other disruption. One would think that with 100GE interfaces, it would not be 
possible to overrun the interface if we allowed full 10Gbps/flow, however most 
100GE interfaces, at the chip level are broken down into 10Gbps lanes and the 
interfaces do not have a way to easily determine that a lane through the 
interface is at capacity, so as new flows enter the interface, they could get 
allocated to a lane that is already full and therefore experience packet loss.

So that we can complete our technical review for this request, need the 
following questions answered:

1 - What equipment will be directly connected to Cogent interface?

2 - How are the servers/equipment behind the edge device connected, GE or 10GE 
interfaces?

3 - Will you be doing any type of tunneling or load-balancing that would hide 
the src-dst IP addresses or MPLS labels of the servers/equipment?

4 - Will any single data flow (src-dst IP pair or MPLS label) be more than 
2Gbps?

5 – What is the purpose of the connection? (Internet traffic backhaul, data 
center connectivity, replication, extending point-of-presence, etc..)

6 – Will you be running MACSec over our L2 service?

7 – Will you need to pass multiple VLANs and/or Jumbo frames?

--

Ryan
On Oct 14 2020, at 10:36 am, Mike Hammett  wrote:
Are any legitimate beefs with Cogent limited to their IP policies, BGP session 
charges, and peering disputes? Meaning, would using them for layer 2 be 
reasonable?



-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions<http://www.ics-il.com/>
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/fbicon.png]
[http://www.ics-

Re: Cogent Layer 2

2020-10-14 Thread Rod Beck
I always heard this service was really Layer 3 disguised as Layer 2.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Ryan Hamel 
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 7:54 PM
To: Mike Hammett 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Cogent Layer 2

Mike,

Layer 2 is fine once it works.


  *
You will have to put up with whatever VLAN tags they pick, if you plan on 
having multiple virtual circuits on a 10G hub.
  *
They do like to see into the flows of traffic, as they only allow up to 
2Gbits/flow, per there legacy infrastructure.
  *
If the circuit doesn't work on turn up (which is more than likely), you'll have 
to be abrasive with their NOC and demand escalations.

IMO, if it's 1Gbit or less per circuit and can deal with ^, you're fine, 
otherwise look for another carrier.

-

Below is what I got from Cogent about their layer 2:

We offer Ethernet over MPLS transport utilizing Cisco FAT Pseudowire (Flow 
Aware Transport). Our service is a fully protected service, so if we suffer a 
fiber cut or other disruption along the primary path, our IS-IS IP fast-reroute 
enabled MPLS backbone will swing all traffic over to another pre-determined 
path across our backbone with usually no packet loss or disruption in service.

In order for our service to work correctly and provide the automatic 
redundancy, we need to verify that the traffic traversing the network can be 
hashed correctly by our routers. For this to happen, Cogent has to see the 
src-dst IP address or if you are running MPLS over the circuit, we need to see 
your MPLS labels. The hashing works by placing each flow of data on a separate 
10GE or 100GE interface between the routers, so that traffic is evenly 
dispersed across all available capacity along the path. A flow is defined as a 
src-dst IP pair or a customer MPLS label, so the more IP pairs or MPLS labels, 
the better the traffic load-balances. Cogent has decided to impose a 2Gbps/flow 
restriction for our own traffic engineering purposes, which aim to make sure 
that no single customer can overrun a 10GE interface anywhere on our network 
(since we do not sell 10GE Wave services).

The reason we have the limitation in place is for our own traffic engineering 
purposes, which aims to make sure that no single customer can overrun a 10GE 
interface anywhere on our network (since we do not sell 10GE Wave services). 
Since most uplinks between routers are Nx10GE or Nx100GE, we want to make sure 
that all customer traffic can be load-balanced across the uplink capacity 
evenly, which makes it easier to reroute traffic in the event of a fiber cut or 
other disruption. One would think that with 100GE interfaces, it would not be 
possible to overrun the interface if we allowed full 10Gbps/flow, however most 
100GE interfaces, at the chip level are broken down into 10Gbps lanes and the 
interfaces do not have a way to easily determine that a lane through the 
interface is at capacity, so as new flows enter the interface, they could get 
allocated to a lane that is already full and therefore experience packet loss.

So that we can complete our technical review for this request, need the 
following questions answered:

1 - What equipment will be directly connected to Cogent interface?

2 - How are the servers/equipment behind the edge device connected, GE or 10GE 
interfaces?

3 - Will you be doing any type of tunneling or load-balancing that would hide 
the src-dst IP addresses or MPLS labels of the servers/equipment?

4 - Will any single data flow (src-dst IP pair or MPLS label) be more than 
2Gbps?

5 – What is the purpose of the connection? (Internet traffic backhaul, data 
center connectivity, replication, extending point-of-presence, etc..)

6 – Will you be running MACSec over our L2 service?

7 – Will you need to pass multiple VLANs and/or Jumbo frames?

--

Ryan
On Oct 14 2020, at 10:36 am, Mike Hammett  wrote:
Are any legitimate beefs with Cogent limited to their IP policies, BGP session 
charges, and peering disputes? Meaning, would using them for layer 2 be 
reasonable?



-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/fbicon.png]
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/googleicon.png]
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/linkedinicon.png]
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/twittericon.png]

Midwest Internet Exchange
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/fbicon.png]
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/linkedinicon.png]
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/twittericon.png]

The Brothers WISP
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/fbicon.png]
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/youtubeicon.png]


Passive Wave Primer

2020-10-13 Thread Rod Beck
Dear Network Gurus,

Looking for a tutorial on passive waves. How it works. Pros and cons. .

Thanks.

Best,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Boston Telecom Hotels

2020-08-21 Thread Rod Beck
How bad have these fires been?


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com<http://www.unitedcablecompany.com>

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


From: Jason Kuehl 
Sent: Wednesday, August 19, 2020 10:32 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Boston Telecom Hotels

One Summer is overdue for its annual fire.

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020 at 4:14 PM Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:
Does everyone agree that the 4 most important data centers are 1 Summer, 
Coresite, INAP, and 300 Bent Street. Both 1 Summer and Coresite clearly below 
in that group. Not sure about INAP and 300 Bent Street.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com<http://www.unitedcablecompany.com>

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com<mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


--
Sincerely,

Jason W Kuehl
Cell 920-419-8983
jason.w.ku...@gmail.com<mailto:jason.w.ku...@gmail.com>


Boston Telecom Hotels

2020-08-19 Thread Rod Beck
Does everyone agree that the 4 most important data centers are 1 Summer, 
Coresite, INAP, and 300 Bent Street. Both 1 Summer and Coresite clearly below 
in that group. Not sure about INAP and 300 Bent Street.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


KMZ Terminology

2020-08-18 Thread Rod Beck
Hi,

I am looking at a dark fiber KMZ and uses the acronym "PPA". Physical Point of 
Attachment? And more importantly, what does it actually mean?

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: 60 ms cross-continent

2020-06-23 Thread Rod Beck
Many of the traders have set up their short wave radio transmitters for use 
across the Atlantic. Bandwidth is only 4 kliobits, but that is enough to send a 
message saying "buy the SPY Option contracts". It is quite a bit faster than 
fiber.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of adamv0...@netconsultings.com 
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 10:20 AM
To: nanog@nanog.org ; l...@satchell.net 
Subject: RE: 60 ms cross-continent

> Stephen Satchell via NANOG
> Sent: Monday, June 22, 2020 8:37 PM
>
> On 6/22/20 12:59 AM, adamv0...@netconsultings.com wrote:
> >> William Herrin
> >>
> >> Howdy,
> >>
> >> Why is latency between the east and west coasts so bad? Speed of
> >> light accounts for about 15ms each direction for a 30ms round trip.
> >> Where does the other 30ms come from and why haven't we gotten rid of
> it?
> >>
> > Wallstreet did :)
> > https://www.wired.com/2012/08/ff_wallstreet_trading/
>
> “Of course, you’d need a particle accelerator to make it work.”
>
> So THAT'S why CERN wants to build an even bigger accelerator than the LHC!
>
Yep, why to go around the planet chasing a perfect geodesic with as few relay 
towers or drones if you can go through (shortest distance is always a straight 
line as opposed to an arc).
While maintaining the speed of light in vacuum since neutrinos don't seem 
interact with regular matter, that's why they are so darn hard to detect.
All you need is an extremely powerful neutrino detector to get you above the 
51:49 success ratio. (49% packet loss is not what we're accustomed to, but for 
these guys it's low enough to start making money).
It's quite a fascinating networking world these guys live in, working for a HFT 
company would be my dream job, always pushing the envelope, racing to the 
bottom, it's like F1 of the networking world just without the safety and 
fairness BS to slow you down.

adam




Re: 60 ms cross-continent

2020-06-22 Thread Rod Beck
Microwave is used for long haul wireless transmission for the ultra-latency 
crowd. Free space laser has more bandwidth, but is sensitive to fog and at 
least until the last few years much less range. I sell ULL routes to financial 
players. A 10 meg microwave circuit CME/Secaucus Equinix ranges from $185K per 
month to $20K a month.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Joe Hamelin 
Sent: Saturday, June 20, 2020 10:19 PM
To: Alejandro Acosta 
Cc: NANOG list 
Subject: Re: 60 ms cross-continent

On Sat, Jun 20, 2020 at 12:56 PM Alejandro Acosta 
mailto:alejandroacostaal...@gmail.com>> wrote:

Hello,

  Taking advantage of this thread may I ask something?. I have heard of 
"wireless fiber optic", something like an antenna with a laser pointing from 
one building to the other, having said this I can assume this link with have 
lower RTT than a laser thru a fiber optic made of glass?

See: Terrabeam from about the year 2000.

--
Joe Hamelin, W7COM, Tulalip, WA, +1 (360) 474-7474





Re: 60 ms cross-continent

2020-06-22 Thread Rod Beck
Have you accounted for glass as opposed to vacuum? And the fact that fiber 
optic networks can't be straight lines if their purpose is to aggregate traffic 
along the way and they also need to follow some less-than-straight right of way.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: NANOG  on behalf 
of Stephen Satchell via NANOG 
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2020 9:37 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: 60 ms cross-continent

On 6/22/20 12:59 AM, adamv0...@netconsultings.com wrote:
>> William Herrin
>>
>> Howdy,
>>
>> Why is latency between the east and west coasts so bad? Speed of light
>> accounts for about 15ms each direction for a 30ms round trip. Where does
>> the other 30ms come from and why haven't we gotten rid of it?
>>
> Wallstreet did :)
> https://www.wired.com/2012/08/ff_wallstreet_trading/

“Of course, you’d need a particle accelerator to make it work.”

So THAT'S why CERN wants to build an even bigger accelerator than the LHC!


Re: Outsourced NOC Solutions

2020-06-08 Thread Rod Beck
Exactly. Thanks very much , Roel.

Just to clarify, this is a dark fiber network already built and will be 
repaired by the construction company that built it. I just a system to inform 
them as soon as the fibers are damaged.

It is definitely not a plane and does not need a pilot. 

Best,

Roderick.




From: Mike Hammett 
Sent: Monday, June 8, 2020 9:25 PM
To: Roel Parijs 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org ; Rod Beck 

Subject: Re: Outsourced NOC Solutions

Thank you for the most useful comment on the thread so far!

If I'm buying dark fiber, I'm expecting it to be a bunch of spliced glass from 
end to end. Maybe (maybe!) a connector or two for patching somewhere. However, 
something like this would be useful to sell "managed" dark fiber. You still get 
the strand, but I add these boxes (or something like them) to detect and locate 
failures non-intrusively.



-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions
http://www.ics-il.com

Midwest-IX
http://www.midwest-ix.com

- Original Message -
From: "Roel Parijs" 
To: "Rod Beck" 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org
Sent: Monday, June 8, 2020 1:44:39 PM
Subject: Re: Outsourced NOC Solutions


Hello,


Yes, you can install a permanent OTDR meter on the fiber.


Exfo used to have them but a very cost effective solution which we have been 
selling for years is the Adva ALM.
https://www.adva.com/en/products/network-infrastructure-assurance/alm

You can even monitor the actual customer fiber, since it uses wavelength 1650nm 
which does not interfere with Grey / CWDM / DWDM signals.
Up to 64 fibers per unit, with a maximum distance of 160km and it can even 
monitor PON networks behind the splitters.
The best part for troubleshooting is that it integrates with existing GIS 
systems which show you the location of the suspected cut on a map.


Regards
Roel


On Mon, Jun 8, 2020 at 8:25 PM Rod Beck < rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com > 
wrote:




Hi,



My colleague and I may be running a new dark fiber network in the Northeast.



We need an outsourced NOC to monitor for fiber cuts and serve as a contact 
point for customers.



Am I wrong in believing that there should be a way of lighting a single pair in 
the cable and then monitoring it for signal disruption? It is not a perfect 
solution, but arguably better than learning that the cable has been damaged 
from an irate customer.



Best to take any replies off the message board.



Thanks.



Regards,



Roderick.













Roderick Beck VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com<http://www.unitedcablecompany.com>



New York City & Budapest


rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183





1467221477350_image005.png


Re: Outsourced NOC Solutions

2020-06-08 Thread Rod Beck
I would calm down, Miles.  Dark fiber networks are built and usually 
maintained by the same construction company that installed them. And a dark 
fiber network does not even need a single full time optical engineer. If the 
cable is damaged, then the guys who installed it will repair it. All the 
expertise is there.

And no, I am not an executive at a undersea cable system. i was one of Hibernia 
Atlantic's top salesmen during the early years from 2004-2011 after which I 
retired.







From: NANOG  on behalf of Miles Fidelman 

Sent: Monday, June 8, 2020 9:00 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Outsourced NOC Solutions


without pilots... or a maintenance manager!

Speaking of which, seeing this kind of question, from a VP at a company in the 
submarine cable business, would sure make me leery of leasing fiber from them, 
if there's an alternative.  Now, one would not necessarily expect a VP of 
Business Development to know all the details of network management - but seems 
to me that he's basically advertising that he's learned about cable breaks from 
irate customers, rather than being forewarned by his operations team that 
"you're about to get a bunch of irate calls."

Heck, back in the old days (I was at BBN designing network management for the 
original Defense Data Network) - we knew how to instrument our networks, and 
design for redundancy & diverse routing.  Boy did we have egg on our face when 
a backhoe took out all the connectivity to the Northeast.  We detected the 
outage just fine - but we (and lots of other folks) were all caught short to 
discover that AT Long Lines routed all of our "redundant" circuits through 
the SAME fiber bundle.  I expect there are others here who remember that 
debacle.

Miles Fidelman

On 6/8/20 2:29 PM, Mel Beckman wrote:
It sounds like you don’t have an experienced fiber optic network engineer on 
the project yet. There is much more to facilities monitoring then just checking 
for disruption. I recommend that you either retain a consulting engineer or 
employ one during development. I’m sure operators here are happy to share their 
ideas, but you will need some expertise in fiber infrastructure to make 
intelligent decisions about optics, wavelengths, in-band versus out-of-band 
administration, and a slew of other topics.

Doing this without experienced engineering help is like starting an airline 
without pilots :-)

-mel via cell

On Jun 8, 2020, at 11:24 AM, Rod Beck 
<mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com> wrote:


Hi,

My colleague and I may be running a new dark fiber network in the Northeast.

We need an outsourced NOC to monitor for fiber cuts and serve as a contact 
point for customers.

Am I wrong in believing that there should be a way of lighting a single pair in 
the cable and then monitoring it for signal disruption? It is not a perfect 
solution, but arguably better than learning that the cable has been damaged 
from an irate customer.

Best to take any replies off the message board.

Thanks.

Regards,

Roderick.




Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com<http://www.unitedcablecompany.com>

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com<mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]

--
In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice.
In practice, there is.   Yogi Berra

Theory is when you know everything but nothing works.
Practice is when everything works but no one knows why.
In our lab, theory and practice are combined:
nothing works and no one knows why.  ... unknown


Outsourced NOC Solutions

2020-06-08 Thread Rod Beck
Hi,

My colleague and I may be running a new dark fiber network in the Northeast.

We need an outsourced NOC to monitor for fiber cuts and serve as a contact 
point for customers.

Am I wrong in believing that there should be a way of lighting a single pair in 
the cable and then monitoring it for signal disruption? It is not a perfect 
solution, but arguably better than learning that the cable has been damaged 
from an irate customer.

Best to take any replies off the message board.

Thanks.

Regards,

Roderick.




Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

Budapest: 36-70-605-5144

NJ: 908-452-8183


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Flow based architecture in data centers(more specifically Telco Clouds)

2020-02-09 Thread Rod Beck
They don't have to be related. 

I am curious about the distinction about the flow versus non-flow architecture 
for data centers and I am also fascinated by the separate issue of WAN 
architecture for these clouds.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: Christopher Morrow 
Sent: Sunday, February 9, 2020 9:24 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Glen Kent ; nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Flow based architecture in data centers(more specifically Telco 
Clouds)

(caution, I'm just a chemical engineer, but)

You appear to ask one question: "What is the difference between flow
and non-flow architectures?"
then sideline in some discussion about fiber/waves vs
layer-3/transit/peering/x-connect

I don't think the second part really relates to the first part of your message.
(I didn't put this content in-line because .. it's mostly trying to
clarify what you are asking Rod"

On Sun, Feb 9, 2020 at 3:19 AM Rod Beck  wrote:
>
> Please explain for us dumb sales guys the distinction between flow and 
> non-flow. My question is the fundamental architecture of these clouds. We all 
> know that Amazon is buying dark fiber and building a network based on 
> lighting 100 and 10 gig waves on IRU and titled fiber. Same for Microsoft (I 
> sold them in a past life some waves) and other large players.
>
> But there appear to be quite a few cloud players that rely heavily on Layer 3 
> purchased from Level3 (CenturyLink) and other members of the august Tier 1 
> club. And many CDN players are really transit + real estate operations as was 
> Akamai until recently.
>
> It seems the threshold for moving from purchased transit plus peering to a 
> Layer 1 and 2 network has risen over time. Many former Tier 2 ISPs pretty 
> much gutted their private line networks as transit prices continued 
> inexorable declines.
>
> Best,
>
> Roderick.
>
> 
> From: NANOG  on behalf of Glen Kent 
> 
> Sent: Sunday, February 9, 2020 11:02 AM
> To: nanog@nanog.org 
> Subject: Flow based architecture in data centers(more specifically Telco 
> Clouds)
>
> Hi,
>
> Are most of the Telco Cloud deployments envisioned to be modeled on a flow 
> based or a non flow based architecture? I am presuming that for deeper 
> insights into the traffic one would need a flow based architecture, but that 
> can have scale issues (# of flows, flow setup rates, etc) and was hence 
> checking.
>
> Thanks, Glen


Re: Flow based architecture in data centers(more specifically Telco Clouds)

2020-02-09 Thread Rod Beck
Please explain for us dumb sales guys the distinction between flow and 
non-flow. My question is the fundamental architecture of these clouds. We all 
know that Amazon is buying dark fiber and building a network based on lighting 
100 and 10 gig waves on IRU and titled fiber. Same for Microsoft (I sold them 
in a past life some waves) and other large players.

But there appear to be quite a few cloud players that rely heavily on Layer 3 
purchased from Level3 (CenturyLink) and other members of the august Tier 1 
club. And many CDN players are really transit + real estate operations as was 
Akamai until recently.

It seems the threshold for moving from purchased transit plus peering to a 
Layer 1 and 2 network has risen over time. Many former Tier 2 ISPs pretty much 
gutted their private line networks as transit prices continued inexorable 
declines.

Best,

Roderick.


From: NANOG  on behalf of Glen Kent 

Sent: Sunday, February 9, 2020 11:02 AM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Flow based architecture in data centers(more specifically Telco Clouds)

Hi,

Are most of the Telco Cloud deployments envisioned to be modeled on a flow 
based or a non flow based architecture? I am presuming that for deeper insights 
into the traffic one would need a flow based architecture, but that can have 
scale issues (# of flows, flow setup rates, etc) and was hence checking.

Thanks, Glen


Austin, San Antonio, Houston

2020-01-31 Thread Rod Beck
I am looking for a list of dark fiber providers in these cities. Particularly 
those who have conduit or aerial rights of way or relatively new fiber to sell 
(title, not IRUs or leases). Please contact off list with free advice or if you 
represent such a carrier and are authorized to sell its products. No old fiber. 
No leases.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

36-70-605-5144


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Carriers

2020-01-22 Thread Rod Beck
I tend to agree. Looks at least on the surface useful.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: NANOG  on behalf of Mick O'Donovan 

Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2020 1:04 PM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Carriers

Great resource Mehmit,

Many thanks for sharing.

Mick

On Tue, Jan 21, 2020 at 05:29:19PM -1000, Mehmet Akcin wrote:
> live.infrapedia.com shows various options
>
> On Tue, Jan 21, 2020 at 16:47 Brandon Svec 
> wrote:
>
> > I have a tool that tells me this at that address:
> >
> > *ACC Business*
> > Distance:On-Net
> > 222 W WASHINGTON AVE
> > <https://www.google.com/maps/search/222+W+WASHINGTON+AVE?entry=gmail=g>
> > *TPx*
> > Distance:On-Net
> > 222 W WASHINGTON AVE
> > <https://www.google.com/maps/search/222+W+WASHINGTON+AVE?entry=gmail=g>
> > *CenturyLink*
> > Distance:On-Net
> > 222 W WASHINGTON AVE
> > <https://www.google.com/maps/search/222+W+WASHINGTON+AVE?entry=gmail=g>
> > *Windstream*
> > Distance:On-Net
> > 222 W WASHINGTON AVE
> > <https://www.google.com/maps/search/222+W+WASHINGTON+AVE?entry=gmail=g>
> > *Spectrum Business*
> > Distance:On-Net
> > 222 W WASHINGTON AVE
> > <https://www.google.com/maps/search/222+W+WASHINGTON+AVE?entry=gmail=g>
> > *AT*
> > Distance:On-Net
> > 222 W WASHINGTON AVE
> > <https://www.google.com/maps/search/222+W+WASHINGTON+AVE?entry=gmail=g>
> > *CenturyLink*
> > Distance: 37 feet
> > 244 W WASHINGTON AVE
> > <https://www.google.com/maps/search/244+W+WASHINGTON+AVE?entry=gmail=g>
> > *TPx*
> > Distance: 37 feet
> > 244 W WASHINGTON AVE
> > <https://www.google.com/maps/search/244+W+WASHINGTON+AVE?entry=gmail=g>
> > *ACC Business*
> > Distance: 37 feet
> > 244 W WASHINGTON AVE
> > <https://www.google.com/maps/search/244+W+WASHINGTON+AVE?entry=gmail=g>
> > *Security Made Simple with Cisco Meraki: *http://bit.ly/MerakiSecure
> >
> > *Brandon Svec*
> > CA C-7 Lic. #822064
> > <https://www.cslb.ca.gov/OnlineServices/CheckLicenseII/LicenseDetail.aspx?LicNum=822064>
> > .ılı.ılı. Cisco Meraki CMNA
> >
> > *15106862204 <15106862204> voice | sms**teamonesolutions.com
> > <http://teamonesolutions.com/>*
> >
> >
> > *14729 Catalina St. San Leandro, CA 94577
> > <https://www.google.com/maps/search/14729+Catalina+St.+San+Leandro,+CA+94577?entry=gmail=g>*
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Jan 21, 2020 at 9:49 AM Rod Beck 
> > wrote:
> >
> >> Does anyone know who are the providers in this building? US Signal is
> >> there. Anyone else?
> >>
> >> 222 West Washington Ave, Madison
> >> <https://www.google.com/maps/search/222+West+Washington+Ave,+Madison?entry=gmail=g>.
> >>
> >>
> >> Roderick Beck
> >> VP of Business Development
> >>
> >> United Cable Company
> >>
> >> www.unitedcablecompany.com<http://www.unitedcablecompany.com>
> >>
> >> New York City & Budapest
> >>
> >> rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com
> >>
> >> 36-70-605-5144
> >>
> >>
> >> [image: 1467221477350_image005.png]
> >>
> > --
> Mehmet
> +1-424-298-1903


Re: Carriers

2020-01-22 Thread Rod Beck
Availability of dark fiber is limited. Pretty much limited to lit transport. 
Neither Zayo nor Crown Castle have metro networks.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: Neader, Brent 
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2020 4:10 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: 'nanog@nanog.org' 
Subject: RE: Carriers


5nines is in that building, they list available carriers on their spec sheet, 
it is a pretty respectable selection.  Unsure of how the MMR or cross connects 
work in building though.



https://datacenter.5nines.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/62/2019/10/5NINES-Data-Center-PDF.pdf







From: NANOG [mailto:nanog-boun...@nanog.org] On Behalf Of Mike Hammett
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2020 9:02 AM
To: Daniel Corbe 
Cc: Nanog@nanog.org
Subject: EXT_Re: Carriers



Maybe those with their own glass, but they wouldn't know anything about anyone 
coming in on IRUs.


-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions
http://www.ics-il.com

Midwest-IX
http://www.midwest-ix.com





From: "Daniel Corbe" mailto:dan...@corbe.net>>
To: "Rod Beck" 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>>
Cc: Nanog@nanog.org<mailto:Nanog@nanog.org>
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 2:30:00 PM
Subject: Re: Carriers





On Tue, Jan 21, 2020 at 12:47 PM Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:

Does anyone know who are the providers in this building? US Signal is there. 
Anyone else?



222 West Washington Ave, Madison.



Surely the landlord would have a list of carriers providing service into the 
property.




Carriers

2020-01-21 Thread Rod Beck
Does anyone know who are the providers in this building? US Signal is there. 
Anyone else?

222 West Washington Ave, Madison.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

36-70-605-5144


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: China Network Diversity

2020-01-16 Thread Rod Beck
I think the issue is mainland China, not Hong Kong or Singapore.


From: NANOG  on behalf of JASON BOTHE via NANOG 

Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 5:30 PM
To: Gabe Cole 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: China Network Diversity

I’ve had good luck with PCCW operating as my China liaison since we terminate a 
lot of circuits in Hong Kong and Singapore. It’s not cheap I’ll tell ya but 
they can get the info and deliver.

J~

On Jan 16, 2020, at 10:21, Gabe Cole  wrote:



We are trying to design a physically diverse network in China and have been 
challenged.  All of the major carriers say that they cannot provide us KMZs or 
similar detailed route information.  Has anyone been able to crack this code?

G. Gabriel Cole
RTE Group, Inc.
Strategic Consulting for Mission Critical Infrastructure
56 Woodridge Rd
Wellesley, MA 02482
US +1-617-303-8707
fax +1-781-209-5577
www.rtegroup.com
g...@rtegroup.com
skype:  ggabrielcole
Twitter:  @DataCenterGuru
Linked In:  http://www.linkedin.com/in/gabecole
Blog:  http://datacenterguru.blogspot.com/

The information contained herein is confidential and proprietary to RTE Group, 
Inc. It is intended for presentation to and permitted use solely by those 
person(s) to whom it has been transmitted by RTE Group, Inc. and it is 
transmitted to such person(s) solely for, conditional upon, and only to the 
extent necessary for use by such person(s) as part of their business 
relationship with RTE Group, Inc. or to further their respective evaluation(s) 
of a potential business relationship with RTE Group, Inc., and no other use, 
release, or reproduction of this information is permitted.

Sent via Superhuman



Re: China Network Diversity

2020-01-16 Thread Rod Beck
I have experienced the same thing. I think it is motivated by national security 
paranoia.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: NANOG  on behalf of Gabe Cole 
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 3:10 AM
To: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: China Network Diversity


We are trying to design a physically diverse network in China and have been 
challenged.  All of the major carriers say that they cannot provide us KMZs or 
similar detailed route information.  Has anyone been able to crack this code?

G. Gabriel Cole
RTE Group, Inc.
Strategic Consulting for Mission Critical Infrastructure
56 Woodridge Rd
Wellesley, MA 02482
US +1-617-303-8707
fax +1-781-209-5577
www.rtegroup.com
g...@rtegroup.com
skype:  ggabrielcole
Twitter:  @DataCenterGuru
Linked In:  http://www.linkedin.com/in/gabecole
Blog:  http://datacenterguru.blogspot.com/

The information contained herein is confidential and proprietary to RTE Group, 
Inc. It is intended for presentation to and permitted use solely by those 
person(s) to whom it has been transmitted by RTE Group, Inc. and it is 
transmitted to such person(s) solely for, conditional upon, and only to the 
extent necessary for use by such person(s) as part of their business 
relationship with RTE Group, Inc. or to further their respective evaluation(s) 
of a potential business relationship with RTE Group, Inc., and no other use, 
release, or reproduction of this information is permitted.

Sent via Superhuman



Chicago Conduit

2020-01-16 Thread Rod Beck
Hi,

My client is looking to buy conduit with coverage of the affluent parts of 
Chicago. Access to manholes, buildings on-net and near-net are important 
ingredients. Second best solution is to purchase fiber manufactured in the last 
five years. 144-846 pairs is the likely range.

Thanks.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

36-70-605-5144


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Energy Efficiency - Data Centers

2019-12-18 Thread Rod Beck
Well, the fact that a data center generates a lot of means it is consuming a 
lot of electricity. It is probably a major operating expense. And while it may 
be efficient given current technology standards, it naturally leads to the 
question of how we can do better.

Thermodynamics is only part of the picture. The other part is economics. If you 
see a lot of heat being produced and it is not the intended output, then it is 
anatural focus for improvement. My guess is that a lot of corporate research is 
going into trying to reduce chip electricity consumption.

So my gut feeling might still be relevant. It is about the level of energy 
consumption, not just the fact electricity becomes disorderly molecular 
gyrations.




From: Thomas Bellman
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2019 9:57 PM
To: Nanog@nanog.org
Cc: Rod Beck
Subject: Re: Energy Efficiency - Data Centers

On 2019-12-18 20:06 CET, Rod Beck wrote:

> I was reasoning from the analogy that an incandescent bulb is less
> efficient than a LED bulb because more it generates more heat - more
> of the electricity goes into the infrared spectrum than the useful
> visible spectrum. Similar to the way that an electric motor is more
> efficient than a combustion engine.

Still, you should not look at how much heat you get, but how much
utility you get.  Which for a lighting source would be measured in
lumens within the visible spectrum.

If you put in 300 watt of electricity into a computer server, you
will get somewhere between 290 and 299 watts of heat from the server
itself.  The second largest power output will be the kinetic energy
of the air the fans in the server pushes; I'm guestimating that to
be somewhere between 1 and 10 watts (and thus my uncertainty of the
direct heat output above).  Then you get maybe 0.1 watts of sound
energy (noise) and other vibrations in the rack.  And finally, less
than 0.01 watts of light in the network fibers from the server
(assuming dual 40G or dual 100G network connections, i.e. 8 lasers).

Every microwatt of electricity put into the server in order to toggle
bits, keeping bits at their current value, transporting bits within
and between CPU, RAM, motherboard, disks, and so on, will turn into
heat *before* leaving the server.  The only exception being the light
put into the network fibers, and that will be less than 10 milliwatts
for a server.

All inefficiencies in power supplies, power regulators, fans, and
other stuff in the server, will become heat, within the server.

So your estimate of 60% heat, i.e. 40% *non*-heat, is off by at
least a factor ten.  And the majority of the kinetic energy of
the air pushed by the server will have turned into heat after just
a few meters...

So, if you look at how much heat is given off by a server compared
to how much power is put into it, then it is 99.99% inefficient. :-)

But that's just the wrong way to look at it.

In a lighting source, you can measure the amount of visible light
given off in watts.  In an engine (electrical, combustion or other-
wise), you can measure the amount of output in watts.  So in those
cases, efficiency can be measured in percent, as the input and the
output are measured in the same units (watts).

But often a light source is better measured in lumens, not watts.
Sometimes, the torque, measured in Newton-meters, is more relevant
for an engine.  Or thrust, measured in Newtons, for a rocket engine.
Then, dividing the input (W) with the output (lm, Nm, N) does not
give a percentage.

Similarly, the relevant output of a computer is not measured in
watts, but in FLOPS, database transactions/second, or web pages
served per hour.

Basically, the only time the amount of heat given off by a computer
is relevant, is when you are designing and dimensioning the cooling
system.  And then the answer is always "exactly as much as the power
you put *into* the computer". :-)


/Bellman



Re: Energy Efficiency - Data Centers

2019-12-18 Thread Rod Beck
No doubt. Not trying to repeal the second law of thermodynamics. 

I visited Boltzman's grave in Vienna and this equation was on it: S=k*logW. 
Would not want to disturb his sleep. 


From: Ben Cannon 
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2019 8:11 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Thomas Bellman ; NANOG Operators' Group 

Subject: Re: Energy Efficiency - Data Centers

It is overwhelmingly disposed of as heat, even all useful work.  The amount of 
energy leaving a DC in fiber cables, etc is perhaps a millionth of one percent.

Even in your lightbulb example, if the light is used inside a room, it gets 
turned back into heat once it hits the walls.

So in a closed system, it’s all heat.

Now, power is lost before it can be used for compute/routing, mostly in power 
conversions.  Of which there are many in most DCs.  Companies like Facebook and 
Amazon have done a lot of work to remove excess power conversion steps, to 
chase better PUE (Power Unit Efficiency) and get more electricity to the 
computers before losing it as excess heat in voltage conversions.  There’s 
still room for improvement here, and the power wasted here goes directly to 
heat before doing any other useful work.

Source: I have a C-20 HVAC license and own and operate 2 datacenters.

-Ben.


-Ben Cannon
CEO 6x7 Networks & 6x7 Telecom, LLC
b...@6by7.net<mailto:b...@6by7.net>


[cid:245ADEA1-477E-4B5A-989E-9177BDB798AE]

On Dec 18, 2019, at 11:06 AM, Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:

I was reasoning from the analogy that an incandescent bulb is less efficient 
than a LED bulb because more it generates more heat - more of the electricity 
goes into the infrared spectrum than the useful visible spectrum. Similar to 
the way that an electric motor is more efficient than a combustion engine.




From: Thomas Bellman
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2019 7:47 PM
To: Nanog@nanog.org<mailto:Nanog@nanog.org>
Cc: Rod Beck
Subject: Re: Energy Efficiency - Data Centers

On 2019-12-18 15:57, Rod Beck wrote:

> This led me to wonder what is the inefficiency of these servers in data> 
> centers. Every time I am in a data center I am impressed by how much> heat 
> comes off these semiconductor chips. Looks to me may be 60% of the> 
> electricity ends up as heat.
What are you expecting the remaining 40% of the electricity ends up as?

In reality, at least 99% of the electricity input to a datacenter ends up
as heat within the DC.  The remaining <1% turns into things like:

 - electricity and light leaving the DC in network cables (but will
   turn into heat in the cable and at the receiving end)
 - sound energy (noise) that escapes the DC building (but will turn
   into heat later on as the sound attenuates)
 - electric and magnetic potential energy in the form of stored bits
   on flash memory, hard disks and tapes (but that will turn into heat
   as you store new bits over the old bits)

(I'm saying <1%, but I'm actually expecting it to be *much* less than
one percent.)

This is basic physics.  First law of thermodynamics: you can't destroy
(or create) energy, just convert it.  Second law: all energy turns into
heat energy in the end. :-)


You are really asking the wrong question.  Efficiency is not measured
in how little of the input energy is turned into heat, but in how much
*utility* you get out of a certain amount of input energy.  In case of
a datacenter, utility might be measured in number of database transac-
tions performed, floating point operations executed, scientific articles
published in Nature (by academic researchers using your HPC datacenter),
or advertisments pushed to the users of your search engine.


There is another efficiency number that many datacenters look at, which
is PUE, Power Usage Effectiveness.  That is a measure of the total energy
used by the DC compared to the energy used for "IT load".  The differece
being in cooling/ventilation, UPS:es, lighting, and similar stuff.
However, there are several deficiencies with this metric, for example:

 - IT load is just watts (or joules) pushed into your servers, and does
   not account for if you are using old, inefficient Cray 1 machines or
   modern AMD EPYC / Intel Skylake PCs.

 - Replace fans in servers with larger, more efficient fans in the rack
   doors, and the IT load decreases while the DC "losses" increase,
   leading to higher (worse) PUE, even though you might have lowered your
   total energy usage.

 - Get your cooling water as district cooling instead of running your own
   chillers, and you are no longer using electricity for the chillers,
   improving your PUE.  There are still chillers run, using energy, but
   that energy does not show up on your DC's electricity bill...

This doesn't mean that the PUE value is *entirely* worthless.  It did
help in putting efficiency into focus.  There used to be datacenters
that had PUE nu

Re: Energy Efficiency - Data Centers

2019-12-18 Thread Rod Beck
I was reasoning from the analogy that an incandescent bulb is less efficient 
than a LED bulb because more it generates more heat - more of the electricity 
goes into the infrared spectrum than the useful visible spectrum. Similar to 
the way that an electric motor is more efficient than a combustion engine.




From: Thomas Bellman
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2019 7:47 PM
To: Nanog@nanog.org
Cc: Rod Beck
Subject: Re: Energy Efficiency - Data Centers

On 2019-12-18 15:57, Rod Beck wrote:

> This led me to wonder what is the inefficiency of these servers in data> 
> centers. Every time I am in a data center I am impressed by how much> heat 
> comes off these semiconductor chips. Looks to me may be 60% of the> 
> electricity ends up as heat.
What are you expecting the remaining 40% of the electricity ends up as?

In reality, at least 99% of the electricity input to a datacenter ends up
as heat within the DC.  The remaining <1% turns into things like:

 - electricity and light leaving the DC in network cables (but will
   turn into heat in the cable and at the receiving end)
 - sound energy (noise) that escapes the DC building (but will turn
   into heat later on as the sound attenuates)
 - electric and magnetic potential energy in the form of stored bits
   on flash memory, hard disks and tapes (but that will turn into heat
   as you store new bits over the old bits)

(I'm saying <1%, but I'm actually expecting it to be *much* less than
one percent.)

This is basic physics.  First law of thermodynamics: you can't destroy
(or create) energy, just convert it.  Second law: all energy turns into
heat energy in the end. :-)


You are really asking the wrong question.  Efficiency is not measured
in how little of the input energy is turned into heat, but in how much
*utility* you get out of a certain amount of input energy.  In case of
a datacenter, utility might be measured in number of database transac-
tions performed, floating point operations executed, scientific articles
published in Nature (by academic researchers using your HPC datacenter),
or advertisments pushed to the users of your search engine.


There is another efficiency number that many datacenters look at, which
is PUE, Power Usage Effectiveness.  That is a measure of the total energy
used by the DC compared to the energy used for "IT load".  The differece
being in cooling/ventilation, UPS:es, lighting, and similar stuff.
However, there are several deficiencies with this metric, for example:

 - IT load is just watts (or joules) pushed into your servers, and does
   not account for if you are using old, inefficient Cray 1 machines or
   modern AMD EPYC / Intel Skylake PCs.

 - Replace fans in servers with larger, more efficient fans in the rack
   doors, and the IT load decreases while the DC "losses" increase,
   leading to higher (worse) PUE, even though you might have lowered your
   total energy usage.

 - Get your cooling water as district cooling instead of running your own
   chillers, and you are no longer using electricity for the chillers,
   improving your PUE.  There are still chillers run, using energy, but
   that energy does not show up on your DC's electricity bill...

This doesn't mean that the PUE value is *entirely* worthless.  It did
help in putting efficiency into focus.  There used to be datacenters
that had PUE numbers close to, or even over, 2.0, due to having horribly
inefficient cooling systems, UPS:es and so on.  But once you get down
to the 1.2-1.3 range or below, you really need to look at the details
of *how* the DC achieved the PUE number; a single number doesn't capture
the nuances.


/Bellman



Re: Energy Efficiency - Data Centers

2019-12-18 Thread Rod Beck
I guess that is one reason why Google built a huge data center in Finland. 
Access to very cool water. Not to mention good wholesale electricity rates. And 
yes, since the electricity is not converted into mechanical work, it must all 
end up as heat.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: William Herrin 
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2019 6:10 PM
To: me...@fiberhood.nl 
Cc: Rod Beck ; nanog@nanog.org 

Subject: Re: Energy Efficiency - Data Centers

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 8:32 AM me...@fiberhood.nl  wrote:
> The full talk by Amory Lovins of the Rocky Mountain View: 
> https://youtu.be/wY_js13AuRk?t=1343

Hi Merik,

This aligns with what I'd expect. Essentially every watt of
electricity in to the data center is a watt of heat that must be
removed from the data center. Did you know some computer room air
conditioners actually cool the air at fixed compression and then
re-heat it with a resistive electric element to reach the desired
cooling output? Insane!

Regards,
Bill Herrin


--
William Herrin
b...@herrin.us
https://bill.herrin.us/


Energy Efficiency - Data Centers

2019-12-18 Thread Rod Beck
Energy efficiency  is a hobby of mine and most of my properties embody Passive 
House Technology. This led me to wonder what is the inefficiency of these 
servers in data centers. Every time I am in a data center I am impressed by how 
much heat comes off these semiconductor chips. Looks to me may be 60% of the 
electricity ends up as heat.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

36-70-605-5144


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Dallas Dark Fiber

2019-12-17 Thread Rod Beck
Hi,

I want to understand the Dallas dark fiber market. Who are the major players? 
Who has done recent builds (2010 onward)? Who has 864 strand cables for sale? 
Who has dense coverage with good manhole access to buildings and utility 
structures?

Thanks in advance.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

36-70-605-5144


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Facebook's Middle Mile Infrastructure

2019-12-12 Thread Rod Beck
Can someone provide a link? I would like to learn more about it.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: NANOG  on behalf of Mike Hammett 

Sent: Thursday, December 12, 2019 7:57 PM
To: Drew Weaver 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Facebook's Middle Mile Infrastructure

I love it...

FB: Let's tell the presses about all the great things to help improve the 
regional Internet.
ISPs: let's talk.
FB: ...



-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/fbicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/googleicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/linkedinicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/twittericon.png]
Midwest Internet Exchange
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/fbicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/linkedinicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/twittericon.png]
The Brothers WISP
[http://www.ics-il.com/images/fbicon.png][http://www.ics-il.com/images/youtubeicon.png]

From: "Drew Weaver" 
To: "nanog@nanog.org" 
Sent: Thursday, December 12, 2019 12:53:44 PM
Subject: Facebook's Middle Mile Infrastructure

Does anyone have any contacts at Facebook that are working on their Middle Mile 
infrastructure project?

All attempts to figure out whom to talk to in that regard have been met with 
failure.

Thanks,
-Drew






Downtown Boston Dark Fiber Pricing

2019-12-11 Thread Rod Beck
Hi,

I have questions regarding IRU pricing in this market. Please contact off list.

Thanks gang.

Regards,

Roderick.


Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

36-70-605-5144


[1467221477350_image005.png]


Re: Elephant in the room - Akamai

2019-12-08 Thread Rod Beck
Last time I spoke with an Akamai engineer many years ago the network was purely 
transit. Is that evolving?


From: NANOG  on behalf of Jared Mauch 

Sent: Sunday, December 8, 2019 6:10 PM
To: Brandon Martin 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Elephant in the room - Akamai



> On Dec 8, 2019, at 11:48 AM, Brandon Martin  wrote:
>
> I guess what I'm getting at is that it sounds like, if you cannot source the 
> content locally to the peering link, there's not likely to be an internal 
> connection to the same site from somewhere else within the Akamai network to 
> deliver that content and, instead, the target network should expect it to 
> come in over the "public Internet" via some other connection.  Is that 
> accurate?
>
> Thanks for the clarifications.



I was hired at Akamai to design the network architecture for a global backbone. 
 This is proving to be an interesting challenge taking a diverse set of 
products with various requirements and interconnecting them in a way that saves 
costs and improves performance while my employers traffic continue to grow.





Akamai is built to use the paths available to deliver traffic and meet our 
customers and our business goals.  Not all our sites are interconnected and 
it’s extremely unlikely (read: possibly never, but who knows) you will see all 
your traffic come over a direct link or cache.  With any sufficiently complex 
system, plus the acquisitions we have made over my short tenure it’s almost 
impractical to integrate them all quickly or possibly at all.

I personally want to make sure that we deliver the traffic in a way that makes 
sense, and a few people have seen those efforts but there’s also many things in 
progress that are not yet complete or ready for public consumption.  I believe 
there’s room here to improve and each time we can turn a switch or dial a knob 
to better serve our customers and the end-users that we are paid to serve, 
everyone wins.


Enterprises vs consumer ISPs have very different traffic profiles, and I think 
the genesis of this thread was a direct result of a very consumer oriented 
traffic profile that was unexpected.  People have wondered why I would spend so 
much time watching things like Apple rumor websites in the past, it’s because 
that would lead to high traffic events.  You go to where the data is.  The same 
can be said for other large download events or OTT launches.  Everyone knows a 
live event can be big but generally bound by the target audience size.

As software is attacked within minutes or hours after security patches are 
released, I don’t find it surprising these days that systems automatically 
download whatever they can the moment it’s released from gaming consoles to IoT 
and server and OS patches.

If the traffic is causing you pain, I encourage you to reach out so we can look 
at what might be improved.

- Jared
(I swear I’ll stop responding.. off to make lunch)


Re: Elephant in the room - Akamai

2019-12-08 Thread Rod Beck
Yep. Real estate must be one of their largest expenses and unlike bandwidth it 
is not going down to price. 


From: Owen DeLong 
Sent: Sunday, December 8, 2019 6:07 PM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Jared Mauch ; nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Elephant in the room - Akamai

My guess (and it’s just this since I haven’t been inside Akamai for a couple of 
years now) is that they are culling the less effective AANPs (from Akamai’s 
perspective) in favor of redeploying the hardware to more effective locations 
and/or to eliminate the cost of supporting/refreshing said hardware.

I would guess that the traffic level required to justify the expense of 
maintaining an AANP (from Akamai’s perspective) probably depends on a great 
many factors not all of which would be obvious as viewed from the outside. I 
would guess that the density of AANPs and ISP interconnection in a given 
geography would be among the factors that would influence that number. I would 
also guess that the number would tend to rise over time.

Again, just external speculation on my part.

Owen


On Dec 8, 2019, at 06:39 , Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:

Taking boxes out of a network does not sound like 'emergent behavior' or 
unintended consequences. Sounds like a policy change. Perhaps they are being 
redeployed for better performance or perhaps shut down to lower costs. Or may 
be the cost of transit for Akamai at the margin is less than the cost of 
peering with 50 billion peers.

Disclaimer: Not picking a fight. Better things to do.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: Jared Mauch mailto:ja...@puck.nether.net>>
Sent: Sunday, December 8, 2019 1:19 AM
To: Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>>
Cc: Shawn L mailto:sha...@up.net>>; 
nanog@nanog.org<mailto:nanog@nanog.org> 
mailto:nanog@nanog.org>>
Subject: Re: Elephant in the room - Akamai

On Dec 7, 2019, at 5:34 PM, Rod Beck 
mailto:rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com>> wrote:
>
> Have there been any fundamental change in their network architecture that 
> might explain pulling these caches?


Please see my email on Friday where I outlined a few of the dynamics at play.  
Akamai isn’t just one thing, it’s an entire basket of products that all have 
their own resulting behaviors.  This is why even though you may peer with us 
directly you may not see 100% of the traffic from that interconnection.  (Take 
SSL for example, it’s often not served via the clusters in an ISP due to the 
security requirements we place on those racks, and this is something we treat 
very seriously!)

This is why I’m encouraging people to ping me off-list, because the dynamics at 
play for one provider don’t match across the board.  I know we have thousands 
of distinct sites that each have their own attributes and composition at play.

I’ve been working hard to provide value to our AANP partners as well.  I’ll try 
to stop responding to the list at this point but don’t hesitate to contact me 
here or via other means if you’re seeing something weird.  I know I resolved a 
problem a few days ago for someone quickly as there was a misconfiguration left 
around.. We all make mistakes and can all do better.

- jared

https://www.peeringdb.com/asn/20940



Re: Elephant in the room - Akamai

2019-12-08 Thread Rod Beck
Taking boxes out of a network does not sound like 'emergent behavior' or 
unintended consequences. Sounds like a policy change. Perhaps they are being 
redeployed for better performance or perhaps shut down to lower costs. Or may 
be the cost of transit for Akamai at the margin is less than the cost of 
peering with 50 billion peers.

Disclaimer: Not picking a fight. Better things to do.

Regards,

Roderick.


From: Jared Mauch 
Sent: Sunday, December 8, 2019 1:19 AM
To: Rod Beck 
Cc: Shawn L ; nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Elephant in the room - Akamai

On Dec 7, 2019, at 5:34 PM, Rod Beck  wrote:
>
> Have there been any fundamental change in their network architecture that 
> might explain pulling these caches?


Please see my email on Friday where I outlined a few of the dynamics at play.  
Akamai isn’t just one thing, it’s an entire basket of products that all have 
their own resulting behaviors.  This is why even though you may peer with us 
directly you may not see 100% of the traffic from that interconnection.  (Take 
SSL for example, it’s often not served via the clusters in an ISP due to the 
security requirements we place on those racks, and this is something we treat 
very seriously!)

This is why I’m encouraging people to ping me off-list, because the dynamics at 
play for one provider don’t match across the board.  I know we have thousands 
of distinct sites that each have their own attributes and composition at play.

I’ve been working hard to provide value to our AANP partners as well.  I’ll try 
to stop responding to the list at this point but don’t hesitate to contact me 
here or via other means if you’re seeing something weird.  I know I resolved a 
problem a few days ago for someone quickly as there was a misconfiguration left 
around.. We all make mistakes and can all do better.

- jared

https://www.peeringdb.com/asn/20940



Re: Elephant in the room - Akamai

2019-12-07 Thread Rod Beck
Have there been any fundamental change in their network architecture that might 
explain pulling these caches?


From: NANOG  on behalf of Shawn L via NANOG 

Sent: Saturday, December 7, 2019 8:20 PM
To: Jared Mauch 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org 
Subject: Re: Elephant in the room - Akamai


Same -- we had an Akamai cache for 15+ years.  Then we were notified that it 
was done and were sent boxes to pack our stuff up and send it back.





-Original Message-
From: "Jared Mauch" 
Sent: Saturday, December 7, 2019 2:05pm
To: "Seth Mattinen" 
Cc: nanog@nanog.org
Subject: Re: Elephant in the room - Akamai



> On Dec 7, 2019, at 12:06 PM, Seth Mattinen  wrote:
>
> On 12/6/19 06:46, Fawcett, Nick via NANOG wrote:
>> We had three onsite Akamai caches a few months ago. They called us up and 
>> said they are removing that service and sent us boxes to pack up the 
>> hardware and ship back. We’ve had quite the increase in DIA traffic as a 
>> result of it.
>
>
> Same here, removed last month, and no more Akamai traffic over peering since.

This last part doesn’t sound right.

Can you send me details in private?

Thanks,

- Jared


Software Defined Networks

2019-12-04 Thread Rod Beck
Can someone explain what is all the fuss? SDN is like the latest telecom craze 
but the articles do a poor job of explaining the advantages. I seek concrete 
examples.

Regards,

Roderick.



Roderick Beck

VP of Business Development

United Cable Company

www.unitedcablecompany.com

New York City & Budapest

rod.b...@unitedcablecompany.com

36-70-605-5144


[1467221477350_image005.png]


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