[NetBehaviour] the hungry ghosts take up space and time

2010-04-15 Thread Alan Sondheim


the hungry ghosts take up space and time

they gnaw at texts devour texts
they corrupt corrode texts, texts are food, texts are lost
hungry ghosts: texts are lost food
hungry ghosts: texts are loss of food

there is never enough of texts inscriptions writings
there is never enough of anything, scrabble-dirt inscriptions

hungry ghosts ourselves, irreal, unknowing to ourselves, forbidding and
among the ghosts of them, the spokes are hungry ghosts, they gnaw at
ghosts reborn as mendicants. They are hungry ghosts. They are red dust.
there are hungry ghosts after me, they know
and reborn as mendicants. They are hungry ghosts. They are red dust.
there are hungry ghosts after me, they know
the rule of hungry ghosts, speed-speed wounded biomes,
emptiness radiates outward between the spokes. now forget the
spokes, emptiness radiates among the ghosts of them, the spokes are hungry
ghosts, they gnaw at emptiness, they are wounded,
the rule of hungry ghosts, speed-speed wounded biomes
hungry ghosts without features
hungry ghosts without features
hungry ghosts without features
among hungry ghosts - fucking ghosts - mudra inversions of names - space
ghosts, written by ghosts, written by homing ghosts, hungry ghosts,
ghosts reborn as mendicants. They are hungry ghosts. They are red dust.
the rule of hungry ghosts, speed-speed wounded biomes
phenomena of hungry ghosts and emblems
phenomena of hungry ghosts and emblems
phenomena of hungry ghosts and emblems
here are hungry ghosts after me, they know
among the ghosts of them, the spokes are hungry ghosts, they gnaw at
hungry ghosts, murmurs almost gathered into words, the inchoate lost in
Yamantaka carrying prayer-wheels carrying Yamantaka, hungry ghosts reside
Yamantaka carrying prayer-wheels carrying Yamantaka, hungry ghosts reside
Yamantaka carrying prayerwheels carrying Yamantaka, hungry ghosts reside,
calling forth hungry ghosts, making things and
calling forth hungry ghosts making things and
among the ghosts of them, the spokes are hungry ghosts, they gnaw at
phenomena of hungry ghosts and emblems
phenomena of hungry ghosts and emblems
phenomena of hungry ghosts and emblems
there are hungry ghosts after me, they know

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Re: [NetBehaviour] Is Art Knowledge?

2010-04-15 Thread TOM CORBY
It's an interesting paper, but I think you'd really have to start with a 
thorough definition of knowledge.

Art does provide a way of knowing the world, it does through different routes 
to other forms of practice (e.g. Science) but it does ultimately produce 
knowledge. Bateson always said that art produces sensory knowledge that 
ultimately leads to cognitive knowledge. It's a useful distinction and one 
that would seem to overlap with Kant's ideas of the purposiveness or otherwise 
of the art experience (i.e. in my limited understanding, what is the function 
of the artwork as a generator of experience as opposed to a scientitic artefact 
that also seeks to produce insight into the world).




--- On Wed, 14/4/10, Mark Hancock mark.r.hanc...@googlemail.com wrote:

From: Mark Hancock mark.r.hanc...@googlemail.com
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Is Art Knowledge?
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity 
netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org
Date: Wednesday, 14 April, 2010, 23:56


I was lucky enough to have Steve Scrivener teach a module on my MA before he 
moved from Coventry University. Really nice chap and he presented some really 
interesting ideas about art research, some of which I see in this paper.





On 14 April 2010 23:37, Simon Biggs s.bi...@eca.ac.uk wrote:






Check out Practice-led Research, Research-led Practice in the Creative Arts 
(2009) as a starting place.



Also Scrivener (2002): The art object does not embody a form of knowledge. 
Working Papers in Art and Design 2, 
http://www.herts.ac.uk/artdes/research/papers/wpades/vol2/scrivenerfull.html




Good luck



Simon





Simon Biggs



s.bi...@eca.ac.uk  si...@littlepig.org.uk  Skype: simonbiggsuk  
http://www.littlepig.org.uk/


Research Professor  edinburgh college of art  http://www.eca.ac.uk/

Creative Interdisciplinary Research into CoLlaborative Environments  
http://www.eca.ac.uk/circle/


Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice  
http://www.elmcip.net/






From: Rob Myers r...@robmyers.org

Reply-To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity 
netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org

Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2010 21:44:12 +0100

To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity 
netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org

Subject: [NetBehaviour] Is Art Knowledge?



Are there any good arguments for or against the idea of art as a

kind/form/branch of knowledge? I'm after [citable] references to

philosophical or theoretical authorities, if anyone knows of any.



This isn't homework, it's research. ;-)



Thanks.



- Rob.

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SC009201










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Re: [NetBehaviour] Is Art Knowledge?

2010-04-15 Thread Simon Biggs
I think Scrivener satisfactorily address what knowledge is within the
context of the debate he elicits. He posits apprehension as a way of
understanding or comprehending, in distinction to knowledge within its
narrower cognitive sense. I think he does this so as to avoid arguments of
relative epistemological value whilst at the same time wishing his argument
to remain pragmatically engaged with the operation of UK academia. It would
be easy to slip into a philosophical musing where Kant, Heidegger and
Wittgenstein could become the cardinal points of the argument. Bateson¹s
distinctions here are useful but run that risk, although his concept of
sensory knowledge is close to what I think Scrivener is proposing as
apprehension. Simeon Nelson is looking at this sort of thing with his work
at Hertfordshire at the moment.

Best

Simon


Simon Biggs

s.bi...@eca.ac.uk  si...@littlepig.org.uk  Skype: simonbiggsuk
http://www.littlepig.org.uk/
Research Professor  edinburgh college of art  http://www.eca.ac.uk/
Creative Interdisciplinary Research into CoLlaborative Environments
http://www.eca.ac.uk/circle/
Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice
http://www.elmcip.net/



From: TOM CORBY tom.co...@btinternet.com
Reply-To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org
Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2010 08:30:30 + (GMT)
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Is Art Knowledge?

It's an interesting paper, but I think you'd really have to start with a
thorough definition of knowledge.

Art does provide a way of knowing the world, it does through different
routes to other forms of practice (e.g. Science) but it does ultimately
produce knowledge. Bateson always said that art produces sensory
knowledge that ultimately leads to cognitive knowledge. It's a useful
distinction and one that would seem to overlap with Kant's ideas of the
purposiveness or otherwise of the art experience (i.e. in my limited
understanding, what is the function of the artwork as a generator of
experience as opposed to a scientitic artefact that also seeks to produce
insight into the world).




--- On Wed, 14/4/10, Mark Hancock mark.r.hanc...@googlemail.com wrote:
 
 From: Mark Hancock mark.r.hanc...@googlemail.com
 Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Is Art Knowledge?
 To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
 netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org
 Date: Wednesday, 14 April, 2010, 23:56
 
 
 I was lucky enough to have Steve Scrivener teach a module on my MA before he
 moved from Coventry University. Really nice chap and he presented some really
 interesting ideas about art research, some of which I see in this paper.
 
 
 
 
 On 14 April 2010 23:37, Simon Biggs s.bi...@eca.ac.uk
 /mc/compose?to=s.bi...@eca.ac.uk  wrote:
 Check out Practice-led Research, Research-led Practice in the Creative Arts
 (2009) as a starting place.
 
 Also Scrivener (2002): The art object does not embody a form of knowledge.
 Working Papers in Art and Design 2,
 http://www.herts.ac.uk/artdes/research/papers/wpades/vol2/scrivenerfull.html
 http://www.herts.ac.uk/artdes/research/papers/wpades/vol2/scrivenerfull.html
  
 
 Good luck
 
 Simon
 
 
 Simon Biggs
 
 s.bi...@eca.ac.uk http://ac.uk   si...@littlepig.org.uk
 http://si...@littlepig.org.uk   Skype: simonbiggsuk
 http://www.littlepig.org.uk/ http://www.littlepig.org.uk/
 Research Professor  edinburgh college of art  http://www.eca.ac.uk/
 http://ac.uk/ 
 Creative Interdisciplinary Research into CoLlaborative Environments
 http://www.eca.ac.uk/circle/ http://ac.uk/circle/
 Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice
 http://www.elmcip.net/ http://www.elmcip.net/
 
 
 
 From: Rob Myers r...@robmyers.org http://r...@robmyers.org 
 Reply-To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
 netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org http://netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org 
 Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2010 21:44:12 +0100
 To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
 netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org http://netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org 
 Subject: [NetBehaviour] Is Art Knowledge?
 
 Are there any good arguments for or against the idea of art as a
 kind/form/branch of knowledge? I'm after [citable] references to
 philosophical or theoretical authorities, if anyone knows of any.
 
 This isn't homework, it's research. ;-)
 
 Thanks.
 
 - Rob.
 ___
 NetBehaviour mailing list
 NetBehaviour@netbehaviour.org http://NetBehaviour@netbehaviour.org
 http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
 
 Edinburgh College of Art (eca) is a charity registered in Scotland, number
 SC009201
 
 
 
 ___
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 NetBehaviour@netbehaviour.org /mc/compose?to=netbehavi...@netbehaviour.org
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[NetBehaviour] Greetings From Daddaland: Flux us, Mail Art and Rubber Stamps.

2010-04-15 Thread info
Greetings From Daddaland: Flux us, Mail Art and Rubber Stamps.

Stendhal Gallery
New York

April 15 - May 29, 2010

Opening and Artists Reception:
Thursday, April 15
6-9pm

Stendhal Gallery will present the exhibition, “Greetings from Daddaland: 
Flux us, Mail Art and

Rubber Stamps,” opening April 15 through May 29. The exhibition is drawn 
from the collections

of John Held, Jr. of San Francisco and Picasso (Daddaland) Gaglione of 
Chicago , collectively

known as The Fake Picabia Brothers.

The present Stendhal Gallery exhibition continues the exploration of 
avant-garde art Gaglione

and Held began tracing together in the 1970s. Gaglione and Held 
presented a showcase for

Flux us, Mail Art and rubber stamp art at The Stamp Art Gallery in San 
Francisco during the

mid-1990s. The current exhibition documents the gallery’s activities 
through posters, exhibition

catalogs, performance documentation, mail art, artist postage stamps, 
rubber stamp box sets

made to commemorate the various exhibitions and excerpts from past Stamp 
art Gallery exhibitions.

Coupling his passion for collecting sets of antique rubber stamps 
(dating from the 1920s), and

his penchant for Flux us inspired works, Gaglione began creating rubber 
stamp box sets to

accompany exhibitions by contemporary artists and to honor historic 
figures of the 20th Century

avant-garde, who had influenced his artistic practice.

In putting together the rubber stamp box sets, Gaglione and Held 
followed the example of Flux us

impresario George Maciunas in his production of Flux -Kits. These 
inexpensive yet elegant multiple

editions set the tone for the production of these post- Flux us editions.

In the production of the rubber stamp boxed sets and gallery 
exhibitions, Gaglione and Held,

worked closely with noted art historians. Their exploration of Yves 
Klein’s “Blue Stamp,” created

and mailed for a 1957 gallery exhibition, brought them into contact with 
the late Pierre Restany,

the French critic who formulated Nouveau Realism. Their work on the 
history of French/American

artist Arman, lead Held to the artist’s studio in New York City , where 
he not only was interviewed,

but created original drawings to be made into rubber stamps.

By the time the Stamp Art Gallery closed in late 1997, Flux us related 
rubber stamp box sets

produced included:

“George Maciunas: Passport Photographs by Peter Moore” (1996),

“ Belgium Flux us by Luce Fierens” (1996),

“Jeff Berner: Self Portrait Stamps” (1997),

 “ Flux us Commemorative” (1995),

“Ken Friedman: Faux Flux us West Edition” (1995),

“Geoffrey Hendricks: Cloudsmith” (1997),

“Geoffrey Hendricks: Identification Kit” (1997),

“Alison Knowles: St(r)ing Piece” (1996),

“Takako Saito: Enjoy Your Life” (1997),

“Mieko Shiomi: Endless Music” (1997).

In addition to Gaglione and Held’s interest in Flux us, other box sets 
mark their interest in Dada

(Bay Area Dadaists, Marcel Duchamp, Raoul Hausmann), Russian Futurism 
and Constructivism

(Zaum, Tatlin), Kurt Schwitters, Nouveau Realism (Klein, Arman, 
Tinguely), Conceptual Art

(Dieter Roth, Tom Marioni) and Mail Art (Ray Johnson, buZ blurr, Ruud 
Janssen, Richard Craven,

Ulises Carrion, Guglielmo Achille Cavellini, Robin Crozier, Ed Plunkett, 
Endre Tot and May Wilson ).

Stendahl Gallery exhibition will recreate some of the more notable shows 
Gaglione and Held

presented in the past, including the exhibition of Dutch artist, Ruud 
Janssen’s, Rubber Stamp

Archive, which includes rubber stamp impressions by Flux us artists. 
Janssen will lecture at

Stendhal Gallery with curator John Held, Jr.

Other artists shown in the exhibition include New York Correspondance 
School artists Ray Johnson

and May Wilson; Arman’s drawings produced for the Stamp Art Gallery to 
be made into rubber

stamps; postage stamp artist buZ blurr; a series of crop circle rubber 
stamps by Robert Rocola

and rubber stamps depicting pioneers of 20th Century avant-garde art by 
M. B. Corbett.

Several films will be shown during he exhibition, including a 1977 
interview with Ray Johnson by

curator John Held Jr., performances by The Fake Picabia Bros and 
documentaries on Mail Art.

A complete collection of over fifty Stamp Art Gallery catalogs were 
previously acquired by the

Museum of Modern Art Library, New York . Held has also compiled 
collections for the Getty Museum

and the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington 
D.C. The works on display

are drawn from his personal collection with new rubber stamp works 
produced by Gaglione, now

living and working in Chicago under the rubric of Stampland.

Curators: John Held Jr. and Picasso Gaglione

Lecture with Ruud Janssen and John Held Jr. at Stendhal Gallery
Saturday, April 17th, 1 pm.

One Night Only: Dada Machine Flux us Performance at Stendhal Gallery
Thursday, April 15 at 8:32 pm

Performers are :  Picasso Gaglione, Darlene Domel, Keith Buchholz, Reed 
Altemus, Melissa  McCarthy,

Ruud 

[NetBehaviour] update_3 | body sound

2010-04-15 Thread info
update_3 | body sound

Collection New Media Centre Pompidou 17th of April | 20th of June 2010

The exhibition, design and collection by Centre Pompidou Service New 
Media, Scenography by Bureau des Mésarchitectures is produced by 
Zebrastraat on the Initiative of the Liedts-Meesen Foundation.

The Liedts-Meesen Foundation is organising its biggest biennial, update, 
for the third time at the Zebrastraat. This third edition promises to be 
an intriguing cross-section of the most impressive works from Centre 
Pompidou’s Collection of New Media. Once again we are cooperating with 
an internationally renowned curator, giving New Media an exciting and 
contemporary edge. Following in the footsteps of illustrious 
artist-curators such as Jean-Marie Dallet (Fr) and Peter Weibel (Ger), 
curator Christine Van Assche endeavours to present a history of sound in 
the arts with ‘body sound’. Celebrated contemporary artists such as 
Bruce Nauman, Vito Acconci, Manon De Boer, Céleste Boursier-Mougenot, 
Casten Nicolai-Alva Noto, Anouk De Clercq, Didier Faustino, Mike 
Kelly/Scanner, Martin Creed, Adam Mc. Ewen, Keiko Owada, Mika Vaino, 
Chris Marker, Ugo Rondinone, Emmanuel Lagarrigue and Sémiconductor will 
be presented, both individually as well as in interaction with each 
other, on a course of shape and sound. This is realized by a specially 
designed lay-out of the exhibition, provided by the architects of 
Mésarchitecture (Paris).

The exhibition is given even more “body” through an additional 
exposition of the nominees for the Technological Art Award presented by 
the Liedts-Meesen Foundation. The jury selected these ten works from 
over 270 candidates: Perry Bard, USA, Man With A Movie Camera: The 
Global Remake, Félix Luque Sánchez, Spain , Chapter I : The Discovery 
Installation, Boris Debackere, Belgium, Probe, Peter Alwast, Australia, 
Everything, Peter Beyls, Belgium, Petri, Dominika Sobolewska, Poland, 
RGB 5red­Green-Blue, Im Go Eun, South-Korea, SEE(N), Christoph De Boeck, 
Belgium, Staalhemel, Arthur Elsenaar, The Netherlands, Face Shift, 
Julien Gachadoat, France, Gravity. The artist will be juged by an 
international jury: Peter Weibel (Director of ZKM Karlsruhe), Jean-Marie 
Dallet (Professor and Commissioner of Update I), Philippe Van Cauteren 
(Director of SMAK Gent), Françoise Meesen (Fondation Liedts-Meesen), 
Dirk De Wit (Director of BAM, Flemish Institute for visual, audiovisual 
and media art), Stef Van Bellingen (Consultant for Zebrastraat-artistic 
leader VZW Warp), Christine Van Assche (Curator New Media Centre 
Pompidou-Paris), Art Yan (Organiser of the exhibition E-Arts Festival, 
Shangai), Nick Ervinck (artist), winner of the Update II public award), 
Julien Maire (artist), winner of the Update II jury’s award).
The artist that manages to win the jury over will be awarded with 5000 
euro. The winner of the Audience Award will secure a presentation in a 
European Museum. Anyone with a curious disposition, wondering how sound 
can be visualised, is in for a treat at the Zebrastraat, from the 17th 
of April until the 20th of June.
 

History of Update

The exhibition “Update I” (Interactive Digital Media Art) was first held 
in 2006, supervised by Curator Jean-Marie Dallet. The 2008 exhibition, 
“Update II”, was a cooperation with ZKM, Karlsruhe and curator Peter 
Weibel. It exhibited several works of ZKM’s (Zentrum für Kunst un 
Medientechnologie Karlsruhe) permanent collection. Update_3 sprang forth 
from a cooperation with Centre Pompidou, under the artistic guidance of 
exhibition commissioner Christine Van Assche.  ‘update’ strives to 
broaden the context of contemporary art practice and classical media 
with works that are creative and meaningful in their use of modern and 
new technologies. This entails incorporating sound and image, using new 
materials and new evolutions in communication, telecommunication and 
broadcasting. Information, communication and computer science, as well 
as interactivity are the main focuses.

17th of April- 20th of June 2010 Open Wednesday through Sunday from 14 
to 18hrs. Admissions: 2,50 € Catalogue: 25 € Zebrastraat 32/001 9000 Ghent
Fringe activities and info at www.zebrastraat.be


http://www.perrybard.net

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[NetBehaviour] Fwd: [CAS] 43 Dodgy Statements on Computer Art – Brian Reffin Smith

2010-04-15 Thread Rob Myers
 Original Message 
Subject: [CAS] 43 Dodgy Statements on Computer Art – Brian Reffin Smith
Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2010 08:20:40 +1000
From: Paul Brown p...@paul-brown.com
To: c...@jiscmail.ac.uk
Reply-To: Computer Arts Society c...@jiscmail.ac.uk, Paul Brown
p...@paul-brown.com

43 Dodgy Statements on Computer Art – Brian Reffin Smith

1. The sadness of most art is that it does not know its future. The
sadness of computer art is that it does not know its past.

2. Constraint is liberty; reduce to the maximum.

3. If it looks just like, you know, ‘art’…it probably isn't.

4. Using state-of-the-art technology merely produces
state-of-the-technology art.

5. Those who use computers to make art need to understand art as well as
computers.

6. Most participative art is deeply authoritarian.

7. The computer is best characterised not as an information processor but
as a general-purpose representation processor.

8. Marshall McLuhan, at least as filtered through his sound-bites, was
often wrong. The medium is not the message, which is more often determined
socially and psychologically by the recipient.

9. If your system costs 10 000 € and mine 30 000 €, it does not follow
that my art is thrice as good as yours.

10. In an ideal world, New Media institutions would employ at least one
non-technological artist.

11. Are you pushing the frontiers of computational representation, or of
contemporary art? Confusion rarely leads to success.

12. 99% of computer art is meretricious nonsense. But then 99% of
everything is meretricious nonsense.

13. Self-imposed formal requirements are not inhibitive of expression.

14. Post Modernism has never said that everything is of equal value, just
that the contexts in which we identify or attribute value should be open to
analysis.

15. You know your amazing new computer art, rich in metaphors and
analogies? It's been done. Years ago. Without a computer.

16. We lose dimensions and scale. The computer in art is immediate and
almost always, however global, local. Just as no well-found art school
would be complete without computers, so every such institution should have
a telescope and a microscope, connected to the computer or not.

17. Making computer art too dangerous to sponsor would be a good way to
go.

18. Just as everyone has a novel inside them, many believe they have an
artwork. The purpose of a good art school is to seek out these people and
stop them.

19. Using a computer merely to access the web is like using a Bugatti
Veyron to deliver the papers.

20. Many people think that graphic design is art. Art is undertaken for
art-like reasons, graphic design for graphic design-like reasons. There may
of course be overlap. There should never be confusion.

21. Making the (arts) information revolution consists not only in enabling
the control of the means of computer art production by art workers, but
also in being kind, non-gouging and relatively honest. Without the latter,
one may doubt commitment to the former.

22. The best interactive art always makes you look at the participants.

23. There is only one thing worse than studying art for the budding
computer artist, and that is to study computers. Or vice versa.

24. Art is not craft.

25. What would be pretentious or nonsensical if one said it oneself does
not become more worthy when spoken by a computer-generated avatar.

26. Seen in the light of Guy Debord's The Society of the Spectacle,
computer art is very spectacular indeed.

27. Beware of computer art as farce repeating itself as history.

28. There is no normal computer art, in the Kuhnian sense. It is in
constant revolution, hence constantly evading scrutiny.

29. When the first solitary Metro station was built in Paris, where could
people travel to? They just admired the station.

30. Bugs are good; as with fireflies, the fertile ones shed light.

31. The Prix Pierre Gutzman, 100 000 Francs, was offered by the Institut
de France in 1906 to the first person who could establish contact with
extra-terrestrials; except with Martians, which would be too easy.

32. ‘All that is solid floats into air’ is not a celebration of
virtuality, but Marx 'n' Engels' prediction for late capitalism.

33. A half developed Polaroid photo is different to half a digital photo.
A half-finished pen-plotter drawing is different to a half-finished inkjet
print.

34. When art processes happen near-instantaneously, doing art becomes
synonymous with correction and selection, later with celebration; rarely
with creativity.

35. Art is visual philosophy. But computer art is not visual computer
philosophy.

36. Revolutionary modes of interaction between humans and normative
structures do not a revolution make.

37. 'i', the imaginary square root of minus 1, is to the real numbers as
the computer is — or should be — to art.

38. The purpose of the computer in art is to render it difficult and
problematic, not easy.

39. We do not admire Picasso's Guernica or Goya's The Third of May 

Re: [NetBehaviour] Fwd: [CAS] 43 Dodgy Statements on Computer Art – Brian Reffin Smith

2010-04-15 Thread Alan Sondheim


Hi and thanks for the list - some comments interspersed - Alan


A few comments -

On Thu, 15 Apr 2010, Rob Myers wrote:

 43 Dodgy Statements on Computer Art ? Brian Reffin Smith

 1. The sadness of most art is that it does not know its future. The
 sadness of computer art is that it does not know its past.

Sadness for whom? And why should one know the past - unless art is 
necessarily based on irreproducible 'progress.'

 3. If it looks just like, you know, ?art??it probably isn't.

Why? - unless art is necessarily definition-based.

 4. Using state-of-the-art technology merely produces
 state-of-the-technology art.

This is just silly, unless the art is making a statement about the 
state-of-the-art of a bit of technology.

 5. Those who use computers to make art need to understand art as well as
 computers.

NO! They don't need to understand anything.
All these needs.


 6. Most participative art is deeply authoritarian.

Why? That hasn't been my experience at all.

 7. The computer is best characterised not as an information processor but
 as a general-purpose representation processor.

Literally, it's best not to characterize the computer.

 8. Marshall McLuhan, at least as filtered through his sound-bites, was
 often wrong. The medium is not the message, which is more often determined
 socially and psychologically by the recipient.

Yes, I think he was aware of that; it's not what was meant by the 
statement - it wasn't reduction, it was about the phenomenology of 
communications and its shaping by communications channels.

 11. Are you pushing the frontiers of computational representation, or of
 contemporary art? Confusion rarely leads to success.

Why should you push anything when you make art?

 14. Post Modernism has never said that everything is of equal value, just
 that the contexts in which we identify or attribute value should be open to
 analysis.

Yes - and this is an error a lot of paper make, also in relation to decon.

 15. You know your amazing new computer art, rich in metaphors and
 analogies? It's been done. Years ago. Without a computer.

But so what? Why this constant emphasis on 'progress'?

 16. We lose dimensions and scale. The computer in art is immediate and
 almost always, however global, local. Just as no well-found art school
 would be complete without computers, so every such institution should have
 a telescope and a microscope, connected to the computer or not.

As well as basic courses in physics and cosmology.

 17. Making computer art too dangerous to sponsor would be a good way to
 go.

For whom?

 18. Just as everyone has a novel inside them, many believe they have an
 artwork. The purpose of a good art school is to seek out these people and
 stop them.

This might be seen as a bit elitist; NSCAD had the opposite philosophy and 
the results were amazing.

 19. Using a computer merely to access the web is like using a Bugatti
 Veyron to deliver the papers.

No, it just means someone's using a computer to access the web.

 20. Many people think that graphic design is art. Art is undertaken for
 art-like reasons, graphic design for graphic design-like reasons. There may
 of course be overlap. There should never be confusion.

Personally, the confusion doesn't bother me - there are too many 'shoulds' 
and 'needs' in the list.

 21. Making the (arts) information revolution consists not only in enabling
 the control of the means of computer art production by art workers, but
 also in being kind, non-gouging and relatively honest. Without the latter,
 one may doubt commitment to the former.

Some of the best or worst art (by whose judgment?) might well be utterly 
dishonest.

 22. The best interactive art always makes you look at the participants.

There goes tetris!

 23. There is only one thing worse than studying art for the budding
 computer artist, and that is to study computers. Or vice versa.

I have no idea why - in fact we held a conference in West Virginia 
precisely on the mix and how to do the opposite.

 24. Art is not craft.

Another stricture. Of course it can be.

 25. What would be pretentious or nonsensical if one said it oneself does
 not become more worthy when spoken by a computer-generated avatar.

Totally agree here!

 28. There is no normal computer art, in the Kuhnian sense. It is in
 constant revolution, hence constantly evading scrutiny.

It seems overly scrutinized to me, and in the list here, overly 
determined.

 29. When the first solitary Metro station was built in Paris, where could
 people travel to? They just admired the station.

Is this true? Were there tracks?

 30. Bugs are good; as with fireflies, the fertile ones shed light.

Yes. (Fireflies aren't bugs btw.)

 34. When art processes happen near-instantaneously, doing art becomes
 synonymous with correction and selection, later with celebration; rarely
 with creativity.

This leaves out every musical improvisation in the world.

 38. The purpose of the computer in art is to 

[NetBehaviour] hungry ghosts, starvation and unforgetting.

2010-04-15 Thread Alan Sondheim


hungry ghosts, starvation and unforgetting.

let us never forget that other economics of the feasible, of starvation.

wall of fire and thirst, wall of starvation,

side, in my stomach. prisoners of starvation. the whole trouble started.

ange, ange,

ange, weapon distribution, religious fanaticisms, starvation,
desertification - the unsupportive world.

against the exigencies of starvation, geopolitics, militarisms of all.

those close to starvation; those in the midst of wars and famine.

the goal is starvation - our means, these mouths portending rich and poor,
surplus and starvation, all within a single starvation and misery among
tyrants worse than promised hell itself.

The whole trouble started bottom; starvation's kept out of it.

starvation mountain. Julu tends me with a kind and tender hand.
line up, leave starvation.

liquids; skeins and flood-plains, woe, woe to desiccation and starvation;
liquids; starvation; skeins liquids, woe; flood-plains and flood-plains
woe, desiccation to starvation, woe; and to the rusted machinery rusted
subject, the subject of knives and starvation, the subject of starvation,
woe, alas.

with every death from starvation in this country, the statue of liberty.
with every death from starvation in this country, the statue of liberty.

witness the extinction of species, starvations, and that i cannot bring
myself to starvation.

against the avalanches and starvation against the cold and damp.

those close to starvation; those in the midst of wars and famine; those
producing these equations in dirt-poor factories around the world.

let us never forget that other economics of the feasible, of starvation,
economics feasible, starvation here, understood absence,

the walls of fire and thirst, wall of starvation,

mate change, weapon distribution, religious fanaticisms, starvation,
liquids, starvation, skeins liquids, flood-plains and flood plains,
'the wobbling pivot.'

and the walls of fire and thirst, wall of starvation,
and the walls of fire and thirst, wall of starvation,

after this: deterioration, gangs, spam, hacks, starvations, local wars,

starvation, woe, alas.


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[NetBehaviour] Call for participants: TINTarts Lab

2010-04-15 Thread TINT
Call for artists and theorists to engage in a new collaborative media  
arts lab.


TINT opens its Arts Lab in May 2010 to provide an online platform for  
artists to present and develop ideas through critical feedback and  
open discourse. Based on a framework of constructive critique and  
knowledgeable support, participating artists are invited to explore  
their work within the boundaries of media art. Participating artists  
will be required that they develop their project in their own  
workspace, documenting their progress thoroughly at all stages from  
conceptional to realisation in a dedicated blog. With the labs focus  
on the documentation of these usually opaque processes we enable a  
dedicated team of artists, theorist and practitioners as well as the  
wider community to respond to the project and provide thereby the  
possibility for artistic development. Once all the first round  
projects are completed, they will be jointly presented in a TINT  
curated event in a London based venue.


Call for artists projects
Project proposals from artists and art groups that wish to realize an  
experimental media art projects, such as sonic, digital, code based,  
custom or hacked electronics art, and want to submit their projects to  
the arts lab's supportive platform of constructive critique.


Begin: Mid of May 2010.
Duration: 4-6 Weeks.

Learn more about the labs structure on http://lab.tintarts.org/about/.

Please send a project outline (with sketches) and a CV to: l...@tintarts.org

Call for feedback by art historians, media theorists, artists,  
technicians, and all the others who might want to raise a voice.
The lab's projects needs a continuous flow of comments and feedback to  
support the participating artists in their development. We're looking  
for a small group of people to set up a team of regular commentators  
on all projects but also wish to establish a data base of interested  
people we could contact to give feedback on specific issues. All  
regular commentators will be promoted prominently on the lab's web site.


Please send a short summary of your field of interests and a CV to: 
l...@tintarts.org

Deadline for proposals and expressions of interest: 09 May 2010.

For more information consult http://lab.tintarts.org or contact: l...@tintarts.org 
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[NetBehaviour] My sound files are in a new archive - please check it out!

2010-04-15 Thread Alan Sondheim


Hi -

My sound files are in a new archive - please check it out!

ESP-Disk has given me server space for my sound/music works (solos and
collaborations). I won't have them any longer at - www.alansondheim.org,
but do check out -

http://www.espdisk.com/alansondheim/

The following has the latest at the top - at this point, however, it
depends only on upload order -

http://www.espdisk.com/alansondheim/?M=D

Eventually there will be about 550 or more files up. They're almost all
mp3s. Please enjoy, and let me know if you have questions about individual
works. (There are about 240 up now; it's a long upload.)

When I make newer pieces, I'll announce them with the new URL; they'll be
at the top of the list. Note this work is all for free, but you can still 
support the musicians!

I want to thank everyone at espdisk.com for giving me this space. Needless
to say, ESP-Disk, like every alternative recording company, needs your
support!

Thanks, Alan

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