nettime new radio product

2005-07-08 Thread Doug Henwood

*  N O W   P O D C A S T I N G *
*  *
*  subscribe to hi-fi version (64kbps):*
*http://shout.lbo-talk.org/lbo/RadioArchive/2005/dircaster.php   *
*  subscribe to low-fi version (16kbps):   *
*http://shout.lbo-talk.org/lbo/RadioArchive/2005/dircaster16.php *
*  see archive page for more details   *


Just added to my radio archive
http://www.leftbusinessobserver.com/Radio.html:

July 7, 2005 Laura Carlsen of IRC (and frequent Counterpunch 
contributor) on the Zapatista's new tack * Bill Fletcher of 
TransAfrica on Bush and aid and Africa in the world (and a bit about 
the AFL-CIO)

it joins


June 30, 2005 Devah Pager, a sociologist at Princeton, reports on 
experiments showing a white ex-con has an easier time in the job 
market than a black who's never done time * Jonathan Tasini, keeper 
of the Working Life blog, on the possible split in the AFL-CIO

June 23, 2005 Michael Eric Dyson, author of Is Bill Cosby Right?, on 
class tensions among black Americans * Christian Parenti on Bolivia 
and the state of the empire

June 9, 2005 Moustafa Bayoumi on the misunderstood, misnamed cedar 
revolution in Lebanon (which he wrote about in the LRB) * Joel 
Kovel, editor of Capitalism Nature Socialism, on the psychology and 
politics of Israel and Zionism

May 19, 2005 MARATHON SPECIAL: rock  roll sociologist Donna Gaines 
and Athena on the campaign to save CBGBs * Biju Mathew, author of 
Taxi!, and Rizwan Raja, on organizing cabbies in NYC

they join
-

Chalmers Johnson on the U.S. empire * Jagdish Bhatwati on 
globalization * Bill Fletcher on war and peace * Slavoj Zizek on war, 
imperialism, and fantasy * Naomi Klein on Argentina and the global 
justice movement * Susie Bright on sex and politics * Matt Taibbi on 
covering the 2004 campaign, and the dismal state of American politics 
and media * Anatol Lieven on Iraq, Chechnya, US nationalism * Cynthia 
Enloe on masculinity in the Bush administration (and oil) * Carlos 
Mejia, deserter from Iraq, on war, imperialism, dissent * Laura 
Flanders on Bushwomen * Steve Fraser on the cultural/political 
history of Wall Street * Jennifer Washburn on the corporate 
university * $pread magazine staffers on sex work * Norman Kelley on 
the crisis in black politics * Joseph Stiglitz on the IMF and the 
Wall St-Treasury axis * Nicola Kraus  Emma McLaughlin, authors of 
Citizen Girl and The Nanny Diaries, on gender, work, and the satiric 
novel * Jennifer Gordon on suburban sweatshops * Lisa Jervis on 
feminism  pop culture * Joel Schalit on anti-Semitism * Robert 
Fatton on Haiti * Elizabeth Warren on bankruptcy * Gary Younge on a 
foreign journalist's view of the U.S. * Simon Head on Wal-Mart * 
Ursula Huws on work and why capitalism has avoided crisis * Michael 
Albert on participatory economics (parecon) * Marta Russell on the UN 
conference on disability * Sara Roy on the Palestinian economy * 
Michael Hardt on Empire (several times) * Walden Bello on the World 
Social Forum and alternative development models



Doug Henwood
Left Business Observer
38 Greene St - 4th fl.
New York NY 10013-2505 USA
voice  +1-212-219-0010
fax+1-212-219-0098
cell   +1-917-865-2813
email  mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
webhttp://www.leftbusinessobserver.com


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Re: nettime Just do it! - Intellectual theft as a curatorial

2005-07-08 Thread John Young
There is nothing beyond happenstance convention which assures a creator
credit, recognition, monetary payment, praise, security from
appropriation. Much, perhaps all, of the argument in the exhortive post
is that used by commercial approriators, thieves and bandits, their
henchpersons and sharks, who invoke lop-sided convention to lay claim to
creative work, cloaked, as ever, in the mantle of defending
near-helpless creators, few of whom enjoy the fruits of convention, and
always much less than the upper levels of the copyright heirarchy
forever raving about the way things should be: like they want them to
be.

Blessed are those who defy this priestly argument for protection of
innocents unable to protect themselves without divine intervention from
rot-crotched belly-achers hoping to divert attention from their
back-channel predations.

To be sure, artists and ever more surely, curators, rip off creators. So
what. Rip them off in return. Diatribes against ripoff are capable of
being entertaining, in a dumb and dumber mode.

No artist deserves anything except what they can beg, borrow and steal.

Intellectuals deserve nothing except one another.

Defenders of artists and intellectuals are up to no good.


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nettime Magic 4

2005-07-08 Thread Ivo Skoric
Did anybody else also notice that Al Qaeda likes the number 4? They
always do 4 targets, 4 bombs, 4 airplanes - London, Madrid, New York /
Washington DC. It's like a signature. And there are often references on
attacks coming from East, West, North and South. What do they think they
are? Fifth element?  ivo


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nettime A pragmatic respone to a Critique of the Commons without Commonalty

2005-07-08 Thread Felix Stalder
Forwarded with the permission of the author. Felix

--  Forwarded Message  --

Subject: [ipr] A pragmatic respone to a Critique of the Commons without 
Commonalty
Date: Thursday, 7. July 2005 19:58
From: Andrew Rens [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: iprpublicdomain [EMAIL PROTECTED]

...

The article certainly provides a stimulating
theoretical critique of Creative Commons. There are a
number of places where the critique elides the complex
nature of issues most notably the characterisation of
Res Communes, and the analysis of precisely what
copyright constitutes as private and public. I am
however not going to address the theoretical critique
of Creative Commons at this point. There are a few
matters of pragmatic import, which the analysis seeks
to occlude. I address these as matters of strategy as
someone who has experienced political struggle, and
also has used law to effect rhizomatic change.

No-one at Creative Commons, certainly not Professor
Lessig is suggesting that Creative Commons is the only
or even primary model for creativity, nor that it
represents the ideal state of copyright. Rather it is
one working model amoung many. For those who believe
that Intellectual Property can be balanced; a healthy
creative ecosystem will include a multitude of
different models. For those who don't believe in
Intellectual Property at all Creative Commons is a
practical strategy of working towards an open culture
given real world conditions. It has already opened up
space for voices that would not otherwise have been
heard. The energy and excitement surrounding Creative
Commons stem in part because many people are for the
first time to see what open culture looks like, and so
imagine what it could be in the future. As such it is
a greater stimulant to libre culture than academic
critiques of late capitalist cultural production.

It is also a project which people and organisations of
all theoretical stripes and ideological flavours can
co-operate in, which is why both Jack Valenti and John
Perry Barlow spoke at the opening. One of the greatest
strengths of Creative Commons is this aspect of an
open project; people who may differ on many other
issues can all contribute to the common good.

A common project such as this can easily be
stigmatized as co-option, but only by the same logic
that human rights lawyers, using what law there is
within a repressive state to secure the freedom or
safety of prisoners, can be regarded as co-opted.
Participation in Creative Commons is not an exhaustive
index of who a person is. A person can support
Creative Commons and be committed to the long term
abolition of all Intellectual Property or work full
time for a corporate law firm or any of the whole
range of options in between.

The analysis rejects copyright law as an organising
strategy for creativity, yet does not develop an
alternative vision of a commons, specifying only what
it is not, it is thus difficult to imagine this
theoretical commons at all.

Andrew Rens
Legal Lead
Creative Commons South Africa



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