***SPAM*** Re: What Happens Next Will Amaze You

2015-10-03 Thread morlockelloi

It's all about the economy, stupid, and the end game is straightforward:

1. All databases will be public

When there is more than N records on one machine, and the cost of a 
breach is less than the value of each record times N, then records will 
grow legs. Looking at pricing trends for 0days and 'security solutions', 
for records containing peoples names in the near future N will become 
less than 1000.


Therefore, all databases will be public, eventually.

2. Privacy will become common sense

When all databases with > N records are public, one will communicate 
details that should not be public only in ways that do not touch disks 
with more than N records - which means strongly protected P2P 
communications, from whispering to encryption.


Obviously, the proper course of action is to accelerate data collection.



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Re: VW

2015-10-03 Thread Clemens Apprich

> Am 27.09.15 um 23:09 schrieb Florian Cramer:
> 
>   There are other aspects in German media theory, cultural studies and
>   humanities academia that I find by far more objectionable. For example,
>   how the more or less biggest names of German media theory and cultural
>   studies - Friedrich Kittler, Peter Sloterdijk, Horst Bredekamp, Hans
>   Belting - got in bed with Germany's yellow press tycoon Hubert Burda
>   (owner of Hubert Burda Media, publisher of among others "Bunte",
>   "Focus", "Super-Illu", the German "Playboy" and minority shareholder of
>   German tv station RTL2) for Burda's conferences and publications on the
>   "iconic turn", as documented on the website
>   http://www.iconicturn.de . (The website itself 
> is run by the Hubert
>   Burda Foundation.) For those who can read German:
>   http://www.welt.de/print/die_welt/kultur/article10863152/Bilder-rasc 
> 
>   heln-nicht.html . Quick translation of the second paragraph:ย
>   "Bazon Brock isn't Hubert Burda's only dialogue partner and
>   intellectual friend. Peter Sloterdijk, Friedrich Kittler, Horst
>   Bredekamp, Wolfgang Ullrich, Hans Belting are also part of the circle;
>   top-notch art historians and cultural analysts, and reliable
>   contributors to academic criticism. In Karlsruhe, where Burda's book
>   was presented, they all sat in a half circle, an honorable club of men.
>   It was quite touching how politely they all demonstrated their respect
>   for the author. Wolfgang Ullrich, wonderfully insubordinate younger
>   generation art historian, called his colleague, the Ph.D. art historian
>   Hubert Burda, an 'embedded scientist' who had managed to infiltrate the
>   business world for espionage work. Horst Bredekamp, wonderfully
>   down-to-the-earth mid-career art historian, showed a reproduction of a
>   'Hรถrzu' (German 'TV Guide') double page to praise its structured view
>   on the world of television.“ย

Dear Florian, if this is your biggest concern, than you should at least mention 
that a large section of so called „critical net cultures“ in Europe has been 
close to Burda Foundation since a long time: 
http://www.akademie3000.de/content/mitglieder/start.htm 
. Now to pick at 
individual persons, who are considered to be German media theory (btw, an 
ascription mainly coming from the US/Canadian-discourse) is, begging your 
pardon, rather poor. Don’t get me wrong, I am the last who wants to defend the 
Bazon Brocks (a media theorist, really?) out there, and the first who is eager 
to dismantle the technicist argumentation of media theory in Germany, but I 
don’t think quoting an article by „Die Welt“ (!) really does the job. Instead 
we should use our brains and bring forward arguments.

@Centre for Digital Culture, Leuphana University: as one of the addressed, let 
me say that the Digital Cultures Research Lab (DCRL), which is the only (!) 
entity within the Centre for Digital Cultures at Leuphana University that is 
funded by the Volkswagen Foundation (through a program called 
„Niedersaechsisches Vorab“), has in the last two years tried hard to actually 
break with the tradition of „German Media Theory“ (and especially a male-white 
European/US-discourse, also to be found here on nettime) by bringing in fellows 
from different fields and also from different regions of the world (e.g. Kavita 
Philip, Orit Halpern, and currently Lawrence Liang; none of those really under 
the suspicion to have been close to German Media Theory). So in line with 
Andreas point, I would suggest that you first inform yourself about the actual 
funding structure and also a bit about the work done with that money (e.g. an 
international conference called „Terms of Media“ you have been part of).

Sorry, if this email comes off a bit harsh, but knowing most of the people and 
the hard work they are providing to make this transdisciplinary and 
transregional space possible, makes me a bit thin-skinned towards rather 
obscure allegations.

Clemens


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Re: VW

2015-10-03 Thread Florian Cramer
 Dear Florian, if this is your biggest concern, than you should at
 least mention that a large section of so called âcritical net
 culturesâ in Europe has been close to Burda Foundation since a long
 time: [1]http://www.akademie3000.de/content/mitglieder/start.htm
 <[2]http://www.akademie3000.de/content/mitglieder/start.htm>. Now to
 pick at individual persons, who are considered to be German media
 theory (btw, an ascription mainly coming from the
 US/Canadian-discourse) is, begging your pardon, rather poor.

   No, it is not poor at all if these are the particular people who have
   collaborated with Hubert Burda on a book and gave his writing their
   academic blessings. That's quite some different from just taking
   funding from a private foundation.
   Â

 @Centre for Digital Culture, Leuphana University: as one of the
 addressed, let me say that the Digital Cultures Research Lab (DCRL),
 which is the only (!) entity within the Centre for Digital Cultures
 at Leuphana University that is funded by the Volkswagen Foundation
 (through a program called âNiedersaechsisches Vorabâ),

   If you carefully read my points here on Nettime, then it shouldn't have
   escaped you that I defended this funding (against Ted) and actually
   consider it a good case of repurposing company profits for public
   research and education.
   Florian



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Re: VW

2015-10-03 Thread t byfield

On 3 Oct 2015, at 15:07, Florian Cramer wrote:


If you carefully read my points here on Nettime, then it shouldn't
have escaped you that I defended this funding (against Ted) and
actually consider it a good case of repurposing company profits for
public research and education.


No, I didn't say anything like that and wouldn't have. One of my 
favorite hobbyhorses is the problematic state of higher ed in the US, 
which is mostly a byproduct of the privatization of educational finance. 
The implied alternative of that privatization is public funding -- but 
even that will depends, at some point, on private economic activity. I 
don't know enough about the VW / Lower Saxony model to say much about 
it, but it's probably better than the dominant model we have in the US.


More generally, mechanistic ideas about how 'money buys influence' do 
too much violence to the mercurial and sometimes paradoxical ways 
influence can work. And in ~European contexts -- and German culture in 
particular, given its complicated play of historical dis/continuities 
over the twentieth century -- they're especially ill-suited. And, of 
course, there are times when a bit of quiet from Germanic media 
theorists might be seen as a feature not a bug, sort of like adblock. ;^)


Cheers,
T


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Digital Folklore, exhibition at HMKV, Dortmund (Germany), until 1 November 2015

2015-10-03 Thread Inke Arns
Dear Nettime,

our exhibition ?Digital Folklore?, curated by Olia Lialina (Stuttgart)
and Dragan Espenschied (New York), has been extended until 1 November
2015! If you happen to be in the region, please come by and check out
this amazing project.

All the best,
Inke

--


DIGITAL FOLKLORE
HMKV Dortmund (Germany)
25 July - 1 November 2015
http://www.hmkv.de

`Computer and net culture are only marginally determined by technological 
innovation. After all, it is irrelevant who has invented the microchip, the 
mouse, the TCP/IP protocol or the World Wide Web, or what was the rationale 
behind them. What matters, rather, is who is using them, and to what avail. If 
computer technology has any cultural significance, it is indeed solely owed to 
its users. Yet their own creative efforts, from shiny-stars live wallpapers to 
pictures of cute cats or rainbow gradients, are mostly derided as kitsch or 
general cultural waste. Digital Folklore argues that this apparent aesthetic 
clutter, created by users for users, is the most important, beautiful and 
widely misunderstood language of New Media.?
http://digitalfolklore.org/

The world?s first exhibition around ?digital folklore? is based on the archive 
One Terabyte of Kilobyte Age, which comprises the remains of 381,934 GeoCities 
homepages made by amateurs in the pre-industrial era of the World Wide Web. 
GeoCities, the first free web hosting service, was created in 1994. Only five 
years later, it sold to Yahoo!, then an Internet giant, which eventually shut 
it down in 2009. Although GeoCities holds an eminent place in the short history 
of the WWW as one of its most visited servers at one point, it was short-lived 
and has already fallen into oblivion. All that is left are the legends and 
rituals surrounding it.

Among the 28 million+ files ? which were hastily copied a few days before total 
deletion ? are user-built personal websites, fan, mourning, recipe, arts and 
crafts, computer game and domestic pet pages, rotating ?Welcome To My Homepage? 
and ?Under Construction? signs, shiny-stars wallpapers and jittery animated 
characters. For the purpose of this exhibition, these and many other 
manifestations have been digitally restored and reinterpreted by artists.

An exhibition by the GeoCities Research Institute and HMKV.

Digital Folklore is a sequel to the immensely popular exhibition ?Jetzt helfe 
ich mir selbst? (Now I Can Help Myself) - The 100 best Internet video tutorials 
shown at HMKV in 2014:
http://www.hmkv.de/_en/programm/programmpunkte/2014/Ausstellungen/2014_Jetzt_helfe_ich_mir_selbst.php

Digital Folklore gathers for the first time works inspired by GeoCities by the 
net artist and folklorist 
Olia Lialina (@GIFmodel), 
the artist and digital conservator Dragan Espenschied (@despens), 
and their students from Merz Akademie. 
They are supported by the head of the Archive Team 
Jason Scott (@textfiles), 
the US artist Joel Holmberg (@dotkalm) 
and the expert for Chinese net culture Gabriele de Seta (@SanNuvola).

CURATORS: 
Prof. Olia Lialina (Stuttgart) and Dragan Espenschied (New York)

Admission to the exhibition is free - as AOL-free minutes!

MORE INFORMATION:
http://www.hmkv.de/_en/programm/programmpunkte/2015/Ausstellungen/2015_DIGI_Digitale_Folklore.php

IN COOPERATION WITH:
Merz Akademie - Hochschule f?r Gestaltung, Kunst und Medien, Stuttgart

MAIN SPONSORS OF HMKV:
Dortmunder U ? Center for Art and Creativity
Cultural Department of the City of Dortmund
Ministry for Family, Children, Youth, Culture and Sport of the State of North 
Rhine-Westphalia

CULTURAL PARTNER:
WDR 3

MEDIA PARTNERS:
ARTE Creative
bodo
Ruhrgestalten



--
Dr. Inke Arns
Artistic Director
Hartware MedienKunstVerein (HMKV) at the Dortmunder U
Leonie-Reygers-Terrasse, 44137 Dortmund 
Office: Hoher Wall 15, 44137 Dortmund, Germany
T + 49 - 231 - 496642-0
F + 49 - 231 - 496642-29
www.hmkv.de
www.facebook.com/hartwaremedienkunstverein
twitter.com/hmkv_de

HMKV's Video of the Month
NEOZOON: Buck Fever (2012)
1 - 31 October 2015

Digital Folklore
HMKV, Dortmund
25 July - 1 November 2015 (extended!)


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Re: VW

2015-10-03 Thread Clemens Apprich
   Am 03.10.2015 um 21:07 schrieb Florian Cramer :

If you carefully read my points here on Nettime, then it shouldn't have
escaped you that I defended this funding (against Ted) and actually
consider it a good case of repurposing company profits for public
research and education.

   I was under a wrong impression then - as were other people I talked
   to.

   My apologies for that!

   Clemens


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Re: VW

2015-10-03 Thread Heiko Recktenwald
Am 25/09/15 um 21:01 schrieb t byfield:

> A few thoughts about the VW scandal
>
> The VW scandal may not seem very nettimish, but I'll argue that it is.
> This'll take a while, because it is, as they say now, #epic. If you're
> interested, read on.

I completely agree but for a completely different reason. Maybe the
German media theorists should look closer:

> In a nutshell, over a period of at least a decade, VW systematically
> set about designing, testing, implementing, maintaining, and upgrading
> an undisclosed system that enabled its diesel cars to deceive
> environmental regulators. The core of this system was software that
> enabled a car to 'know' when it was being tested for emissions and to
> dramatically reduce its emissions. VW claimed that it possessed some
> magical technology that allowed its diesels to achieve high mileage
> and low emissions without the need for a urea-based additive -- a
> liquid that, like gasoline or engine oil, requires its own special
> tank. Compared to diesels made by other manufacturers, VW's cars were
> cheaper and less of hassle to operate and maintain, and their resale
> value remained much higher.

My point and the US code and the needs of the environement is not what
VW did in the lab, but what it did later. It did what it did in the lab
and later It turned those filters off.

The US authorities did change parameters in the lab and found that
cheating device. Lets call it a bug and the manager who did it a hacker.
Things like this happen. My problem is that morals -- because I dont see
any fraud -- shall decide the nature of the device.

The US code says: Dont turn those filters off.

Details at www2.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2014-06/documents/defeat.pdf

The authorities say that they dont know anything of what cars are doing
on the road and the nature of the regulation software is the regulation
of filters.

Wrong?

IMHO there is a lot of confusion and legaly there may be nothing.

The problem is the nature of regulation. There have been cases of
cheating devices in the 90. See how those cases were solved in that
text. There must be some cooperation. This is the way regulation works.
We had holy rules but they were worth nothing. Everybody knew it and
nobody did care. You cannot change this overnight however nobel your
case may be.

All other questions depend on it. You had a wonderfull characterisation
of current Germany. Thanks you VW for the VW-library. Maybe "Das
Skandal" should be less dramatized too.

Please correct typos etc, thanks and

best, H.


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