Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-17 Thread Margaret Morse

Dear Flick,

Nice of you to follow up on Hearts of Men. I see the era of
sexual revolution you find liberating for men--as it probably
was--problematic for women who were often left with responsibility for
the care, parenting and most of the financial support for the children
left behind. It was true that many wives were getting fed up with the
suburbs and an isolated life raising children by themselves-see Betty
Friedan's Feminine Mystique--though at least they had a provider in
the working man who did actually have a sacrificial role in bringing
home the bacon. However, it wasn't easy for women to become sole or
major providers when women were openly and explicitly barred from many
kinds of professions and positions in the business world at the time.
A significant number of women I knew were raising children in poverty,
working however they could and studying for some kind of profession. I
think it would be interesting to explore a child's perspective of this
period.

Raising children was considered a primary source of meaning in life;
wild sex was kept in the margins. Suddenly it was OK for a middle
or working class man to devote himself to the pursuit of wild sex
(like wild flowers, freely picked and they raise themselves), not
unlike the rou?s and playboys I read about the turn of the century
Viennese writer Schnitzler, but without coffee houses and publishing
and armies of prostitutes. Maybe more provided women found time for
wild sex and even found rich husbands doing it, as I remember reading
in Diane Middlebrook. I have outlined my own jaundiced experience of
this period in one of my posts in regard to Kittler's passing. I was
glad when it was over. Or maybe it has never ended, though I hope that
I and we have learned something in the meantime. That is what I would
call progress.

The Moral Majority apparently has at least a much wild sex as
professed playboys. (Has any man call himself a playboy since Hefner
and Porfirio Rubirosa?) Your comment about sexual exploitation
assumes that the sex worker keeps both the money and the pleasure.
When that is the case, then Alessandra can step in and take over from
there. I would note that the assumptions of this conversation are
heterosexual and based in a world prior to the augmented reality we
live in. I am bored with the old reality. I begin to fade when I read
about pseudo-feminists or the word feminist used like a pejorative
and judgmental stick. However, I am surprised and impressed that you
read or might scan Ehrenreich. I find Ehrenreich a heroic writer and
sociologist per se.

Best wishes,
MM






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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-16 Thread Alessandra Renzi

Dear Margaret and others,

I have been following this thread with interest and feel, that despite
some very insightful comments, something important is missing.
Something that still makes this discussion very abstract and far from
the real issues about sex work and consent. This is because we are
working from a very reductive definition of what sex work actually
is. I believe Dymitri's post on the importance of seeing sex work as
labour started a more nuanced discussion but probably did not go far
enough, leaving us to discuss the role of consent and violence on the
body (and/or mind).

There are many kinds of sex work and there are many kinds of sex
workers with varied degrees of social status, power and agency: street
prostitutes, escorts who work for exploitative agencies, webcam girls,
people employed in various kinds of porn industries (from Hollywood to
indie), self-employed dominas, educators, and many, many others. Let?s
also not forget issues of race and gender and how certain bodies, for
example marginalized trans bodies, complicate these distinctions. To
lump all these labourers together is problematic because it erases
the value that consent has for them and prevents us from finding
effective solutions to labour exploitation, something that, as many
have remarked, doesn?t only happen in sex work.

I agree with Dima that consent may not be a productive starting point
to fight capitalist exploitation but I also understand that for many
of my friends, who are very passionate about their sex work and about
the financial, social and political agency it affords them, to label
them all victims is actually offensive. This is where Liad?s comment
at Transmediale was coming from. I don?t think she was simply drawing
on the legal argument used to legalise sex work. She was stating her
own agency in life, not the fact that she was not being raped. She
also, often reiterated, that she considered hers a ?normal? job. For
some (unfortunately not all), sex work is a choice, an informed one.
It is also a job that many really enjoy, for as strange as it may
sound. So, the ?wear and tear? of the bodies that so much terrifies
some people, if it even takes place, is just part and parcel of their
job. Better than a CEO having a stroke at 40, some may say?

It is important to recognize that there is non-consensual or less-
consensual violence in some sex work. But it is also worth knowing
that someone like me has the agency (and luxury) to consent to work in
a safe and well paid dungeon over selling her soul to certain kinds of
academic institutions, if I decide (or like Mollock said, to refuse
to write inane papers). This is important because it acknowledges
the autonomy of certain practices, and the autonomy of sex workers
to fight for their own rights together with their allies. Many sex
workers don't feel more oppressed than all of us and are very engaged
in social justice activism.

To go back to the issue of precarious labour conditions and capitalist
exploitation, I feel it would be helpful to start including such
nuances in our discussion both of labour and of consent itself.
Someone already pointed out that we can see sex work as another form
of affective labour, in the tradition of Italian autonomist feminists.
This may help us find overlaps with other forms of exploitation, and
shape alliances with other groups fighting for recognition and/or
for safer and more equitable working conditions. I would go as far
as finding possible points for alliances among sex workers and
academics. In many cases, it may be the sex workers whose lives are
already freer from exploitation to help others fight for justice. The
notion of consent itself may help us expand this inquiry: ideally,
consent is not just about a yes or no, but about degrees of freedom
to negotiate something, to ask questions that shape informed choices,
to understand one?s own boundaries, to say ?stop? or ?I changed my
mind? if necessary and, especially, to create safe spaces within which
consent can be given and respected. How does consent inform our unpaid
daily sex lives? and our labour lives?

Sex work is many kinds of real work and we have a long way to go...

Be well,

Alessandra




On 15-Feb-12, at 2:54 AM, Margaret Morse wrote:



Dear John,

I agree that the mind and the body are flowing and intimately
intertwined. I resist the notion that it means that there is no
difference at any level and that everything just flows. When I
distinguished writing inane academic papers from sex work or
prostitution, I was thinking of the effects of daily physical effort
that tests the body's endurance; even wealthy athletes are not spared
the effects of such abuse. i grew up around people who were laborers;
when I attend my highschool reunion, I can tell the laborers by how
greatly they have aged compared to those with less arduous lives. It
may be hard to erase the effects of poverty and malnutrition from
burdensome labor; nonetheless, the corporeal marks 

Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-16 Thread Margaret Morse

Thanks to Alessandra for a far more nuanced and recently informed
post. I realize that my responses were from someone with armor.
Words like disrespect and stigma in connection with prostitution
reflect my experience of the suffering of someone with great dignity
and grace whom I adored. My instinct is to defend the rights of
sex workers to social legitimacy and choice. I don't consider sex
workers helpless victims; they may not need me on offense. I also
identify strongly with a different but related issue--ending human
trafficking and modern slavery. This is again a matter of choice and
autonomy--which may mean something more fluid here, but it is hard for
me to imagine how. However, I doubt if armor is the best way of going
about discussing these things with others who might be persuaded to
engage with these issues where they can make a difference.


Best wishes
MM

On Feb 15, 2012, at 4:22 PM, Alessandra Renzi wrote:

 
 Dear Margaret and others,
 
 I have been following this thread with interest and feel, that despite
 some very insightful comments, something important is missing.
 Something that still makes this discussion very abstract and far from
 the real issues about sex work and consent. This is because we are
 working from a very reductive definition of what sex work actually
 is. I believe Dymitri's post on the importance of seeing sex work as
 labour started a more nuanced discussion but probably did not go far
 enough, leaving us to discuss the role of consent and violence on the
 body (and/or mind).



 

Margaret Morse
Professor of Film and Digital Media
University of California Santa Cruz
memo...@comcast.net
mo...@ucsc.edu

1230 Colusa Ave.
Berkeley, CA 94707 
ph/fax 510 280 5774
Cell 510 316 1865



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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-16 Thread John Young

The main missing topic of sex work is marriage. No other institution
promotes as fiercely and mercilessly -- and religiously blesses by god -- 
the subjugation of women to men for work in sex, house, reproduction,
child care, health, education, second job for less pay, name change, 
financial dependency, social stigma of the unmarried and unchilded, 
forebearance of adultery, prostitution and disease inheritance, 
workplace and taxation bias, the list is easily extended and has
been by feminists to little avail against male (wife-stroked) conceit 
as seen here.

Focusing on paid sex work has always diverted attention from
marital exploitation, even to the extent of persuading women that
marriage provides safety from bugaboo prostitution. 

What goes on inside officially legalized households, dominated 
by males as if a birthright (and a singular responsibility), with 
societal affirmation of domestication of women is despicable despite
worldwide abuse typically sanctified by male-dominated
institutions -- philosophy, theology, language, education, military, 
government, medical, charitable -- across the gamut of societies 
in which the physically strong reign by male-privilege inheritance, 
by hook and crook of male favoritism and perquisites, by physical 
assault and femicide and by ingrained contempt for the male-flattering
weaker sex except for sado-masochism bought and paid for
in every case of marriage.

Love and marriage go together like horse and carriage. So young
women are force-fed from the beginning to dress, to speak, to
behave, to attend charm school and college for marriage
solicitation, to consume beautification products, to develop
an alluring vocabulary and mindset, to pretend men are
heroic and brilliant, to dream of princesses and princes,
to masturbate in loneliness or with a similarly abandoned
neighbor while the stud has to be allowed freedom to 
fornicate, how else to survive and raise kids (wanted or
not, loved or not, her own or not).

Fortunately the hatchet, the poison, the fire, the garrot,
the cancer, the heart attack awaits. And the nubile
youngsters delivery groceries, mowing the lawn,
singing the choir, how they offer delicious solace
from the intumescent bulls demanding sodomy,
prowling for pedophilic targets in all the dominant
institutions.

At 07:22 PM 2/15/2012 -0500, you wrote:

Dear Margaret and others,

I have been following this thread with interest and feel, that despite
some very insightful comments, something important is missing.
Something that still makes this discussion very abstract and far from
the real issues about sex work and consent. This is because we are
working from a very reductive definition of what sex work actually
is. I believe Dymitri's post on the importance of seeing sex work as

labour started a more nuanced discussion but probably did not go far
enough, leaving us to discuss the role of consent and violence on the
body (and/or mind).



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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-16 Thread Flick Harrison
Margaret,

I googled a bit about the Ehrenreich book and I will check it out in more 
detail.  But from my brief scan:

I think the impulse of the postwar male to escape the capitalist nuclear 
family, with its burden of breadwinning, physical domination of the loved ones, 
and strict conformity, is a smart instinct.  Western women had a foothold in 
autonomy with their war labour, and the roots that feminism laid in the 
previous 100 years were able to flower.  So if men started feeling trapped in 
an outdated fascist structure, which women were also starting to abandon, and 
so decided to live out their mid-life crises by abandoning familial 
responsibility for an impossible fantasy, that's a mixed result.  (John's post 
about marriage as prostitution, especially back then, rings true to me).

Not every shake of the tree loosens up ripe fruit, but in this case I'd argue 
it might have.

(Of course, the mid-life male's economic status allowed him to purchase some of 
this fantasy from women with less options - on the street corner, strip club or 
magazine rack - but not every male would consider this worth doing)

I don't have any illusion that Playboy was all good for everyone, but I think 
the conservative side of the sexual revolution was really disruptive, and a lot 
of progress continues to be made as a result.  

Playboy has consistently sided with free speech and sexual freedom of all 
kinds.  Their solid core is founded on capitalist patriarchy, but it just means 
that liberal aspects of their propaganda have been injected right into the 
heart of conservatism.  Both the wildly-libertarian right and the 
socially-liberal / fiscally-conservative centre-right can (with their lowered 
gender/class consciousness) enjoy the sexual exploitation of women, in plain 
defiance of the Moral Majority, who in matters like this sound dangerously 
close to radical feminism, at least to those barely listening to drive-time 
radio.
 
The rise of pseudo-feminist outposts like Suicide Girls serve to further 
confuse the issue.  Does a user-generated network that pays women to undress to 
their personal comfort level mean an increase in sexual freedom and feminine 
autonomy, or less?  I think it's less, because women's roles are once again 
reduced to the object, and the real power lies with the middlemen, as always.  
But it's also reflected in the rise of Burlesque as a locus of 
pseudo-empowerment, with loud salutes to the women of the frontier (seen as 
liberated by the wild lawlessness of the Klondike or or the Wild West).
 
It's all in stark contrast to the opposite pseudo-feminism of Sarah Palin or 
Barbara Bachman, who might be seen as better female role models because of 
their real political power, but whose stern finger-wagging holds little appeal 
to girls who just want to have fun.

I've never understood the Marxist view of sexual exploitation, because the 
means of production of value in sexual exploitation belongs to the exploited 
themselves.  That's a confusing aspect of the whole philosophy that I suppose i 
should study closer.  Most of what I've read on the subject has been 
philosophical pretzels that I couldn't untangle (i.e. biopolitics).





--
* WHERE'S MY ARTICLE, WORLD?
http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Flick_Harrison

* FLICK's WEBSITE  BLOG: http://www.flickharrison.com 


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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-11 Thread John Hopkins

Morlock, your comment is pithy, but it's a bullshit comparison.  Just
because it sounds good doesn't mean it's true.  Access to the body is much
more intimate than access to the brain.


since when is the brain *not* totally unified w/ the body and vice versa? 
[despite Descartes is pumping his fist in the air, yeah, keep 'em separate! it 
keeps ma dream alive] I'm waiting to see consciousness/brain/mind existing 
without said body in complete continuous connection... Entering the body occurs 
through any receptive field of the Self, and I'd call it the very definition of 
intimacy when one is expressing energies that are entering an Other's body *and 
changing the neurosensory system itself,* for that effect is to change how the 
Other experiences the world...


jh


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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-11 Thread Morlock Elloi
Several replies indicate wide-spread religious attitude towards intellect, a 
brain-body separation reminiscent of the traditional theories of language 
before biolinguistics put them out of business.

Writing inane papers involves very physical changes in the brain, some more 
some less permanent. On the tissue level they are comparable to changes in 
vaginal walls during commercial sex, but vaginal walls recover better than the 
brain (proof: it is easier to recall inane paper than a particular cock.)

Whether gray matter is more or less 'intimate' than nether regions depends on 
the individual sensitivity and is best left to individual preferences and 
finances. While I'd personally prefer to be fucked down there, it can't support 
my lifestyle.


 Do you actually not understand the difference between
 selling your physical body and choosing to write inane
 academic papers?  


 because it sounds good doesn't mean it's true.  Access
 to the body is much
 more intimate than access to the brain.


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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-11 Thread Margaret Morse
Dear John and Morlock,
You both jump immediately to the mind/body connection.  Does that mean that 
whether we think or do something, it is the same and has the same consequences 
on the body or the mind?  are there no distinctions or nuances at any level?  
Fiction works, for instance, because there are also checks and limits to action 
in our brain.  Is a neural pathway forged through corporeal motion exactly the 
same as one forged through following intellectual pursuits?  Are you ready to 
equate the consequences of mental and physical labor when it comes to aging and 
the life course?  

As for writing inane papers, I think it is wholly up to the writer whether he 
chooses to write something meaningless to himself.  (Even when writers and 
academics have been persecuted and censored, they find ways to express 
themselves.)  If it is the context per se that is inane (and possibly hateful) 
as far as he is concerned, then he needs to change the context.  It is painful 
to lose integrity and/or dignity; it is possible to chose to be a prostitute 
and maintain both.  I think the situation of the academic as represented here 
is more compromised ethically.  Depression could also be a significant problem 
for such a person, caught in a situation where he must perform and apparently 
doesn't have the mental and physical capacity to reconfigure the task into 
something meaningful to him.  

Best wishes,
MM

On Feb 10, 2012, at 10:01 PM, Morlock Elloi wrote:

 Several replies indicate wide-spread religious attitude towards intellect, a 
 brain-body separation reminiscent of the traditional theories of language 
 before biolinguistics put them out of business.

...


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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-11 Thread Carl McKinney
as my wrists, neck, shoulders, back, and butt remind me, writing (whether inane 
or not) is a profoundly embodied practice. academics sell their bodies as do 
day laborers and sex workers. see martha nussbaum's whether from reason or 
prejudice. which is not to suggest these activities are all the same, but to 
question what makes selling sex different from other ways we sell ourselves? 
and then we also have to consider different types of sex work (and indeed 
different types of sex - must it involve penetration??), and how these finer 
gradations tend to blur into other types of affective labor and other types of 
relationships that involve economic exchange.

-c

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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-10 Thread IR3ABF
 economical needs continue to force people to sell their body out of
 despair and not out of consent.

This expresses imo the issue at stake: the lack of a fundamental critic 
regarding the economics involved in 'sex workers', for defining the 'need' to 
sell once bodily 'labour' out of despair is examplary for a eco-system based on 
unilaterally defined master-slave relationships

Politics can influence things only within reach of  'commonly' felt 'consent' 
about socio-cultural related 'exchanges' and by embedding this 'consent' in a 
hierarchical ststem. 

Playing thus a dominant master-rol and 'control and lead' in order to subjogate 
its power-objects i.e. sex-workers/workers/intelectuals/individuals, the same 
individuals who consent, nolens volens, with their submissive roles

So to formulate a fundamental critique , one should take into account the 
politico-economical sphere in which the 'transactions' accompagning these ' 
exchanges' are situated

Not only the 'consent' about the bodily labour done in exchange for the 
abstract formulation power disguises itself: money, the translated effect in 
acquiring a 'desirable' financial equilibrium 

To built all these into a well organized and extremely functional 
financio-economical model acceptable for many people will eventually break at 
that particular border where fysical pain is involved.

Justice which translates another objectification of harm done not to only one 
person but, more importantly, to all persons and maintains forced labour/work, 
whether fysically or mentallly as a necessity to survive in that 
politico-economical sphere, will fail ultimately

So an intimate and inter-personal exchange where the financial equilibrium is 
not of primary interest will be preferable and leaves out the consential

Andreas

Sent from my eXtended BodY

On 8 feb. 2012, at 16:21, Jan Wildeboer jan.wildeb...@gmx.de wrote:

 On 02/08/2012 11:27 AM, Nick wrote:
 
 I'm not sure how comfortable I am with switching to
 discussing the value sex work brings to society. It does
 seem to be a step up from talk of 'consent,' but it still
 seems like an odd frame to me. Why do we need a framework
 deciding whether it's a valid form of work in order to
 discuss rights and conditions?
 
 Because in many places sex work is illegal and thus the sex workers do
 not get any form of protection. In germany, where sex work is not
 illegal, it means that sex workers can call the police for protection in
 case sth goes wrong. They can even take their customers to court in case
 they refuse to pay.
 ...


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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-10 Thread Morlock Elloi

And how exactly is selling access to the pussy fundamentally different
from selling access to the brain?

A precarious intellectual worker may have, out of dispair, to sell
access to his brain to do some inane academic papers to further the
official ideology, or to do some computer programming to track sheeple
behavior.

Both pussy and brain would prefer something bigger, and more noble.


--- On Thu, 2/9/12, IR3ABF aj...@xs4all.nl wrote:

 This expresses imo the issue at stake: the lack of a
 fundamental critic regarding the economics involved in 'sex
 workers', for defining the 'need' to sell once bodily
 'labour' out of despair is examplary for a eco-system based
 on unilaterally defined master-slave relationships




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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-10 Thread IR3ABF
Dear Margaret

You are absolutely right in not buying that last sentence

It should read:

-- So an intimate and inter-personal exchange where the financial
equilibrium is not of primary interest will be preferable and leaves out
the socially and economically consensual dogmatics and leave the actively
interacting 'consentents' in an exclusively autonomous, privately and
individually sphere --

Sorry for that

a politico-economical system without a 'moral' or 'ethical' ground
commodifying 'desires' as marketable goods is one of the more pervers
thriving impulses of much of contemporary politico-economical law-giving
and is too easily neglected or completely overlooked in the discussion
concerning 'sex-workers' as it is more often than not left to 'individual
freedom and individual responsibilty',  without a 'natural' respect for the
human body

The annexation of the hitherto semi-illegal practice of prostitution into
the realm of modern mercantilism and into mainstream economical 'culture'
is just another sign of the continuing ursurpation of the private to the
public - state/corporate policed - sphere and is harming the much needed
struggle for individual - non governemental regulated - economical freedom
and thereby cleverly perverting the 'human rights' of the frequently
(ab)used (sex) workers, who 'out of despair'  are being legally
incorporated into the bigger body of an already traumatized and deeply hurt
society. 

@Morlock

The same goes for other precarious workers, they too suffer from the
schizophrenic situation in which they have to sell their body/brain to the
highest bidder and at the same time have to maintain a self protecting
defense system not to cross the border between what is permitted to one's
self esteem and being lost and a toy in the hands of
traffickers/publishers/dealers/managers not equiped with that scarce sense
of 'nobility' 

Andreas

Sent from my eXtended BodY

On 10 feb. 2012, at 18:29, Margaret Morse memo...@comcast.net wrote:

 Your last sentence leaves out the consensual in a way that is  over my head.
 How can one have an exchange, intrinsically and by definition, without
 consent?


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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-10 Thread Flick Harrison
When I hear the word sex trade worker I'm reminded of the phrase
collateral damage.  Cleaning up the language doesn't change the
situation.  If the word prostitute hurts your feelings - it SHOULD.  It's
humiliating work.  I agree that it's master-slave, and that's what the
customer is buying - power over another person.

The people who pay for expensive prostitutes - the jet-set clientele - are
exactly the class of people that should disappear.  I don't know if we
should facilitate their master status by legalizing prostitution and
encouraging an open market.

I mean, really:

http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/04/08/jaffers-friends-in-low-places/

This attempt to dignify sex work is well-intentioned and sometimes
positive.  Bridgette Bardot was hardly a slave, but did she provide a
meaningful contribution to society?  I certainly enjoy contemplating her
red-hot persona, but does this benefit outweigh the gender roles which
her work reinforced?  Was her work consensual, or were her options more
limited than a man's?  

Other sexy-workers (eg Anna Nicole Smith) have had a harder time surviving
their role, of course.

Then again, Playboy smashed open doors for women by giving them good
paycheques and career paths that threw the barefoot-and-pregnant social
order into a tailspin.  It also helped undermine conservative support for
full-spectrum sexual repression, a development which continues to weaken
them overall.
 
http://www.torontosun.com/2012/02/01/is-the-cbc-paying-for-porn
 
Morlock, your comment is pithy, but it's a bullshit comparison.  Just
because it sounds good doesn't mean it's true.  Access to the body is much
more intimate than access to the brain.

Think about how desperate your economic situation would be before you let
someone - a stranger, bad breath, rude manners etc - penetrate your butt
with their cock.  I don't know what you do for a living, but picture your
average client / co-worker / customer and imagine you have to have sex with
them.  All of them.

Now think how hard-up you'd be before wasting the same hour writing a lame
paper or article.  Hell, you write here all the time - giving strangers
access to your brain.  There's a reason you aren't, instead, standing in
Time's Square holding open your butt cheeks.  (Or maybe you are -
blerg)

Michael Albert has a great experiment - he'd ask janitors how much you'd
have to pay them to be a doctor.  Would you refuse to be a doctor if they
didn't quadruple your wages?  How about triple?  Double?  The same?  Most
of the ones he asked would happily trade places with a doctor for even the
same wage.

Meanwhile, ask a doctor how much of a pay cut they'd accept to become a
janitor.  You'd pretty much have to pay them MORE to be a janitor, because
of the social status they'd lose.

The economics of labour is bullshit.  Labour only has exchange value (as
Stephen Leacock said), and exchange value is totally distorted by power and
privilege, legal frameworks etc.  Legalizing prostitution might lower its
exchange value, rather than raise it, as it would for drugs.  Maybe there's
already research on this.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/world-press-photo-2012-winners/2012/02/10/gIQA1EJ83Q_gallery.html?hpid=z6#photo=6
 

--
* WHERE'S MY ARTICLE, WORLD?
http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Flick_Harrison

* FLICK's WEBSITE  BLOG: http://www.flickharrison.com 




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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-10 Thread Margaret Morse
Dear Morlock,
Do you actually not understand the difference between selling your physical 
body and choosing to write inane academic papers?  
MM

On Feb 10, 2012, at 9:34 AM, Morlock Elloi wrote:

 
 And how exactly is selling access to the pussy fundamentally different
 from selling access to the brain?
 
 A precarious intellectual worker may have, out of dispair, to sell
 access to his brain to do some inane academic papers to further the
 official ideology, or to do some computer programming to track sheeple
 behavior.
 
 Both pussy and brain would prefer something bigger, and more noble.
 ...


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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-10 Thread Sam Dwyer
We must compassionately consider the plight of the inane and opinionated as not 
a choice, but as a sad, symptomatic consequence of the capricious capitalist 
mechanism. All too frequently, surplus idleness is thrust upon those who are 
ill-prepared to receive the burden. 

Can you not understand the pain?

It reminds me of this tragic tale that was shared with me several years ago by 
someone who suffered similarly:

One day, I was an intellectual worker, and I was free. I could wander around 
the garden, and watch the telly. The next day, the nice old man who let me live 
at his home died. I was very sad. Then, some other men, accompanied by a black 
poodle, came and told me that if I wanted to stay, I had to write a paper about 
what people on the other side of town were doing. I'd never been out of the 
house before. My world suddenly felt very uncertain, and I was unhappy. I began 
to quiver and quake with fear and despair. Tears streamed down my face; the 
poodle licked them. 'Damn you and your cur!' I screamed, though, truth be told 
I was comforted by it's thick, silky hair. One of the men took pity on me. He 
whispered a deal into my ear, and I accepted. Fifteen minutes later, sore, I 
walked, across a pond, and into the sky.






On Feb 10, 2012, at 7:06 PM, Margaret Morse wrote:

 Dear Morlock,
 Do you actually not understand the difference between selling your physical 
 body and choosing to write inane academic papers?  
 
...


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Re: nettime Sex Work and Consent at @transmediale

2012-02-08 Thread Jan Wildeboer
On 02/08/2012 11:27 AM, Nick wrote:

 I'm not sure how comfortable I am with switching to
 discussing the value sex work brings to society. It does
 seem to be a step up from talk of 'consent,' but it still
 seems like an odd frame to me. Why do we need a framework
 deciding whether it's a valid form of work in order to
 discuss rights and conditions?

Because in many places sex work is illegal and thus the sex workers do
not get any form of protection. In germany, where sex work is not
illegal, it means that sex workers can call the police for protection in
case sth goes wrong. They can even take their customers to court in case
they refuse to pay.

They also have to pay taxes. But they also can join the health insurance
system as they have an official employment.

These are just a few points to consider when discussing the status of
sex workers.

Now this doesn't mean that all sex workers in germany do it for the
lulz. Far from it. Trafficking still exists and economical needs
continue to force people to sell their body out of despair and not out
of consent.

Jan


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