[nfc-l] Etna, NY - Barn Owl

2012-08-02 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
After looking into the recordings of Barn Owl (BAOW) at All About Birds (second 
example, "Territorial scream or advertising call"), I have done a bit of 
comparative spectrographic analysis using Raven (by the way, thanks to Matt 
MacGillivray for pointing out this recording).

I hope the table below displays properly for everyone:

LocationEtna, NY (8/1/12)   All About Birds
Measurement DescriptionsPresumptive BAOWKnown BAOW  
Measured Difference Percentage Difference
Call duration   0.597 seconds   0.977 seconds   0.38 seconds38.8% shorter 
in duration than known BAOW example
Low frequency   1626.9 Hz   1792.6 Hz   165.7 Hz9.2% lower LF 
than known BAOW example
High frequency  2400.9 Hz   2490.5 Hz   89.6 Hz 3.6% lower HF than 
known BAOW example
Terminal call note frequency2165 Hz 2333 Hz 168 Hz  7.2% lower in frequency 
than in known BAOW example

Attached are two frame grabs of the same comparative spectrograms. The first 
image is with measurement boxes drawn and the second image is with the 
measurement boxes removed. In each image, the spectrogram on the left in the 
frame grab is the known BAOW, while the one on the right is the presumed BAOW 
from Etna, NY, last night.

What I found of interest in several of the examples was the visible and 
distinctive terminal call note to the raspy screech call. Although the 
frequency of this terminal call note is quite variable, this could be a useful 
feature in identification of distantly recorded presumed screeches of 
nocturnally migrating BAOWs.

I thought I would also mention that the only definitive screech recorded last 
night, that was very likely from this same bird, was recorded more faintly 69 
seconds prior to the latter, louder call.

Any additional input is welcomed.

[cid:8FEA03D3-B842-4AA4-BD12-D77B7AEE9E1A@twcny.rr.com][cid:24D1C6AC-C61F-4CE2-A7A5-588FFC29ED88@twcny.rr.com]

Thanks!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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Re: [nfc-l] Barn Owl Candidate - Etna, NY

2012-08-02 Thread Jay McGowan
Very cool, Chris! Here is my eBird report from Friday night with details of
my owl, for those interested. No recordings, unfortunately.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S11248369

-Jay

On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 9:06 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

>  Last night, I recorded a few distant unusual-sounding screams
> (unfamiliar to me at my recording location), the loudest and closest of
> which sounds and spectrographically looks like a very near match for BARN
> OWL. This is an extremely rare migrant through Upstate, NY. I would
> appreciate any input from other NFC listeners.
>
>  What is interesting is that Jay McGowan heard a likely Barn Owl over his
> place in Ithaca on 27 July.
>
>  This bird was calling at 23:54 last night (1 August). It is possible
> that birds are passing through the area, or that there is a single bird
> moving around the area. Not knowing much about their behavior at this time
> of year, as far as local movement, makes me think more the former, that
> there were two coincidental migrants a few days apart.
>
>  This sound is more evenly raspy sounding and less "question-like"
> sounding than an immature Great Horned Owl call. The sound also falls
> nicely around the 2kHz frequency band, which is consistent with the
> examples provided on the Evans and O'Brien CD-ROM.
>
>  Attached is a clip of the best sound (thus far � I am still going
> through data) as well as a screen grab of the call.
>
>  Thanks for any input!
>
>
>  Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
>--
>  Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
>  Field Applications Engineer
>  Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
>  159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
>  W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
>  http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp
>
>
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-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jw...@cornell.edu

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[nfc-l] Barn Owl Candidate - Etna, NY

2012-08-02 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Last night, I recorded a few distant unusual-sounding screams (unfamiliar to me 
at my recording location), the loudest and closest of which sounds and 
spectrographically looks like a very near match for BARN OWL. This is an 
extremely rare migrant through Upstate, NY. I would appreciate any input from 
other NFC listeners.

What is interesting is that Jay McGowan heard a likely Barn Owl over his place 
in Ithaca on 27 July.

This bird was calling at 23:54 last night (1 August). It is possible that birds 
are passing through the area, or that there is a single bird moving around the 
area. Not knowing much about their behavior at this time of year, as far as 
local movement, makes me think more the former, that there were two 
coincidental migrants a few days apart.

This sound is more evenly raspy sounding and less "question-like" sounding than 
an immature Great Horned Owl call. The sound also falls nicely around the 2kHz 
frequency band, which is consistent with the examples provided on the Evans and 
O'Brien CD-ROM.

Attached is a clip of the best sound (thus far � I am still going through data) 
as well as a screen grab of the call.

Thanks for any input!

[cid:f9b74dc5-1cfe-4f93-bbb1-8ba4d1e36253@cornell.edu]

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp



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ETNA_NY_20120801.235435_Barn Owl.wav
Description: ETNA_NY_20120801.235435_Barn Owl.wav