RE: [nfc-l] Bicknell's Thrush - More Classic Example

2016-09-26 Thread John Kearney
Hi Chris, I was hoping someone else would give you some feedback on your nice series of thrush calls. Not only have I been talking too much lately but this topic can be a special quagmire. I want to note that I have one monitoring station that is the first landfall directly southwest of the

Re: [nfc-l] Interesting Savannah Sparrow Call

2016-09-26 Thread Andrew Horn
Hi all, In the recent tagging study, the first juvenile Ipswich was detected on the mainland on 17 September (Crysler et al. 2016, Movement Ecology DOI 10.1186/s40462-016-0067-8), and you’d expect a lower frequency call from this bigger subspecies (its song is slightly lower, too), so this all

RE: [nfc-l] Unknown Warbler

2016-09-26 Thread John Kearney
Hi Jerald, This is a tough one. I agree it is too high for Palm Warbler. It could be a high Yellow-rumped Warbler. It might also be an odd Ovenbird. I would lean toward Ovenbird but should probably go with warbler species? John From: bounce-120824283-28417...@list.cornell.edu

RE: [nfc-l] Interesting Savannah Sparrow Call

2016-09-26 Thread John Kearney
Hi All, As an update to my response to Preston’s post yesterday, Jerald sent me offline a copy of a blog entry by Paul Driver on Ipswich Sparrow flight calls (http://pjdeye.blogspot.ca/2009/12/ipswich-sparrow-flight-calls.html). Recordings of the flight calls of Ipswich Sparrows in NJ show

[nfc-l] Bicknell's Thrush - More Classic Example

2016-09-26 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Albeit soft and slightly distant, this bird was recorded over Etna, NY on 23 September 2016 at 23:25. I would consider this to be a classic example because its peak frequency is above the 5kHz “safety” demarkation line. This bird peaks around 5.25 kHz and has an overall duration of about 250