Re: [nfc-l] good/good enough for Northern Parula?

2019-10-26 Thread Bill Evans
This is an interesting call, but I think not from Northern Parula. That species 
typically does not have this much broad waviness along the main trunk of the 
call, and there is no sign of the ~4 ms finer modulations - though playing 
around with spectrogram parameters would be necessary to rule that out. My best 
guess is this could be a flat variant of the descending “zeep” Yellow Warbler 
regularly gives in fall migration (at least in eastern NA). There is no example 
of the descending YEWA nfc in the original flight call guide - the 2nd ed. will 
have it.

Bill Evans

From: Wim van Dam 
Sent: Saturday, October 26, 2019 2:38 AM
To: Night Flight Call Discussions 
Subject: [nfc-l] good/good enough for Northern Parula?

On October 19, in Solvang, California, I recorded the following night call, 
which I consider a possible Northern Parula. The 7 second WAV recording, 
spectrogram, and written description are all in this eBird report:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S60930344 


I'm curious to hear if people agree with this ID, or if I should consider 
another (more common) species. 

Thanks
Wim van Dam 
Solvang, CA, USA


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Re: [nfc-l] good/good enough for Northern Parula?

2019-10-26 Thread Bill Evans
This is an interesting call, but I think not from Northern Parula. That species 
typically does not have this much broad waviness along the main trunk of the 
call, and there is no sign of the ~4 ms finer modulations - though playing 
around with spectrogram parameters would be necessary to rule that out. My best 
guess is this could be a flat variant of the descending “zeep” Yellow Warbler 
regularly gives in fall migration (at least in eastern NA). There is no example 
of the descending YEWA nfc in the original flight call guide - the 2nd ed. will 
have it.

Bill Evans

From: Wim van Dam 
Sent: Saturday, October 26, 2019 2:38 AM
To: Night Flight Call Discussions 
Subject: [nfc-l] good/good enough for Northern Parula?

On October 19, in Solvang, California, I recorded the following night call, 
which I consider a possible Northern Parula. The 7 second WAV recording, 
spectrogram, and written description are all in this eBird report:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S60930344 


I'm curious to hear if people agree with this ID, or if I should consider 
another (more common) species. 

Thanks
Wim van Dam 
Solvang, CA, USA


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[nfc-l] Re: [nfc-l] Nocturnal Flight Calls – Prothonotary Warbler?

2019-04-24 Thread Bill Evans
Looks like Chipping Sparrow to me, perhaps two calls from the same bird - a 
clue is the 80+ ms duration, but also there is a faint initial downsweep that 
is structurally more in line with CHSP.

Bill 

From: Preston Lust 
Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 4:39 PM
To: Night Flight Call Discussions 
Subject: [nfc-l] Nocturnal Flight Calls – Prothonotary Warbler?

Last night I recorded two calls in my yard that I believe may be prothonotary. 
I was wondering what anyone else thought, or what the criteria are for 
prothonotary warbler in the first place. I have attached a spectrogram of the 
call, as well as the recording. Thank you very much!

Preston Lust, Westport, CT
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[nfc-l] Re: [nfc-l] Nocturnal Flight Calls – Prothonotary Warbler?

2019-04-24 Thread Bill Evans
Looks like Chipping Sparrow to me, perhaps two calls from the same bird - a 
clue is the 80+ ms duration, but also there is a faint initial downsweep that 
is structurally more in line with CHSP.

Bill 

From: Preston Lust 
Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 4:39 PM
To: Night Flight Call Discussions 
Subject: [nfc-l] Nocturnal Flight Calls – Prothonotary Warbler?

Last night I recorded two calls in my yard that I believe may be prothonotary. 
I was wondering what anyone else thought, or what the criteria are for 
prothonotary warbler in the first place. I have attached a spectrogram of the 
call, as well as the recording. Thank you very much!

Preston Lust, Westport, CT
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Re: [nfc-l] NFC yesterday night

2018-08-13 Thread Bill Evans
I’d guess a Swainson’s Thrush making non-symmetric sounds with its syrinx. The 
upper track doesn’t fit well for any other species, so I don’t think it is two 
birds calling coincidentally. The lower track fits well for SWTH.

Bill


From: Meena Madhav Haribal 
Sent: Monday, August 13, 2018 5:12 PM
To: NFC-L 
Subject: [nfc-l] NFC yesterday night

Hi all, 

I cant decide what this bird is. Any suggestions? 

Meena 



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111

http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
Dragonfly book sample pages:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B1ngrZelDNo5QnFDMl9BdVNlLXc




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Re: [nfc-l] flight call guide update

2017-11-07 Thread Bill Evans
Dioni-

The microphone for sale produces an analog signal.  It is the audio recorder 
not the microphone that determines the bit rate -- the microphone could be used 
with a 24-bit recorder to produce audio recordings.

Bill

From: Dioni Loïc Sauvé 
Sent: Tuesday, November 07, 2017 7:58 PM
To: Night Flight Call Discussions 
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] flight call guide update

Hi, can your microphones for sale record at 24 bit?

Is it possible to have more info !?

Thank you!


Dioni Loïc Sauvé
Laval, Québec

2017-11-07 0:16 GMT-05:00 Dioni Loïc Sauvé :


  Hello, regarding the remaining material Old Bird 21c Micros, is it possible 
to have more info !?

  Can the microphone record at 24 bit?

  Thank you!

  Great news!


  Dioni Loïc Sauvé
  Laval, Québec

  2017-11-06 23:55 GMT-05:00 Bill Evans :

Greetings all,

I'm happy to report that the old Evans & O'Brien Flight Call CDRom material 
is now freely accessible online at http://oldbird.org/pubs/EvansOBrien2002.html


A new edition will begin to appear online in early 2018 with content 
rolling out over the coming years. 

Michael O’Brien and I will serve as initial editors 

and the scope will expand to all species in North America.



Also wanted to let folks know that this week only I'm offering an 
off-season discount on my remaining stock (3) of Old Bird 21c mics -- $250 plus 
shipping, first come first serve.



Bill Evans





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[nfc-l] flight call guide update

2017-11-06 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings all,

I'm happy to report that the old Evans & O'Brien Flight Call CDRom material is 
now freely accessible online at http://oldbird.org/pubs/EvansOBrien2002.html


A new edition will begin to appear online in early 2018 with content rolling 
out over the coming years. 
Michael O’Brien and I will serve as initial editors 
and the scope will expand to all species in North America.


Also wanted to let folks know that this week only I'm offering an off-season 
discount on my remaining stock (3) of Old Bird 21c mics -- $250 plus shipping, 
first come first serve.


Bill Evans



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Re: [nfc-l] Flight Call Help

2017-10-05 Thread Bill Evans

Welcome Hal,
You have plenty of company here in that I'm pretty sure everyone on this 
listserv who has monitored nfcs has a pile of unknowns and a large cache of 
calls waiting to be classified. We are all in the same boat with the 
difficult nfc learning curve...and the problem of certainty with a large 
percentage of the calls we tag with an ID.  It's a fascinating intellectual 
quagmire.


Regarding your attached unknown, an argument could be made for American 
Pipit.


Bill Evans
Danby, NY

-Original Message- 
From: Hal Mitchell

Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 7:39 PM
To: NFC-L
Subject: [nfc-l] Flight Call Help

Hey All,

First time to post here.  I just got into recording NFCs this past Spring. 
I monitored a local Audubon Nature Center in North MS.  The learning curve 
is pretty steep for me at the moment, and I am coming across numerous calls 
I cannot figure out on my own.  I am manually vetting each call I come 
across while scanning a spectrogram in Adobe Audition. If it is good example 
I am clipping it out to add to my personal library.  I am hoping some good 
folks from this listserv may be able to help me out in the near future to 
double check my IDs and help with the unknown calls.  If anyone is 
interested please let me know.  In the meantime attached is my most recent 
unknown call from ~11pm on 4/20/2017 in North MS.


Hope all is well,

Hal Mitchell
Southaven, MS


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Re: [nfc-l] Big Double-up

2017-01-28 Thread Bill Evans
Follow-up manuscript:
Evans, W. R., M. Grosselet, and G. Ruiz Michael. An unidentified nocturnal 
flight call from southern Mexico. Huitzal 18(1):131-140. 
http://huitzil.net/blog/?p=1826



From: Bill Evans 
Sent: Friday, September 23, 2016 11:40 AM
To: NFC- L 
Subject: [nfc-l] Big Double-up

Dear NFCers,
My colleague Manuel Grosselet and I recorded an unidentified night flight call 
in southern Mexico (near Minatitlan) in fall 2012.  We call it “the big 
double-up” for obvious reasons as one can see in the attached spectrograms. We 
recorded 32 of the calls near Minatitlan from Oct 16-Dec 3, 2012.  What 
distinguishes it from other “double-ups” one commonly encounters in eastern US 
is the combination of the call’s broad frequency expanse (~5 kHz on average), 
the relatively large maximum frequency gap between its component tones (~ 2 kHz 
on average), and its much longer overall duration, ~85 mS on average, which is 
roughly twice as long as the Tennessee, Orange-crowned, Nashville , and 
Black-throated Green double-up complex.
Based on my not seeing this call type in 25+ years of spectrographic night 
flight call study across eastern US, I conclude that it is a species that does 
not likely migrate across eastern US.  To support this contention, I’m 
soliciting feedback from the untamed multitude of others monitoring nfcs these 
days as to whether you have encountered this big double-up call type in the 
eastern US, or anywhere in North America.  A short audio clip of the call is 
also attached.   Many thanks,  Bill Evans











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Re: [nfc-l] Possible Dickcissel NFC

2016-11-06 Thread Bill Evans
Yes, that’s a Dickcissel. Congrats!

Bill E

From: Jerald 
Sent: Sunday, November 06, 2016 1:53 PM
To: nfc-l 
Subject: [nfc-l] Possible Dickcissel NFC

Hello all, 

Could someone with a bit more experience please confirm whether or not this is 
a Dickcissel? It's getting kind of late for them, and the call sounds a bit 
off. It was picked up by the Oldbird DICK detector at 0218, 11-2-16 over Dover, 
DE.

Thanks,

Jerald
Dover, DE


-- 

Jerald


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Re: [nfc-l] Virtual Meet and Greet

2016-09-28 Thread Bill Evans
Thanks Chris.

There is a lot happening with night flight calls these days. Another action 
that would be useful is having folks on this list with recent publications 
involving night flight calls post their citations. Or, if anyone on this list 
is aware of recent nfc publications by folks not on this list, posting those 
citations would I’m sure be of interest.  For example here is one I just became 
aware of this morning:

Coastal and offshore counts of migratory sparrows and warblers as revealed by 
recordings of nocturnal flight calls along the Ohio coast of Lake Erie 
David V. Gesicki , Mohsin M. Jamali , and Verner P. Bingman 
The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 128:503-509 (2016) 
http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1676/1559-4491-128.3.503 


-Bill E

From: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
Sent: Wednesday, September 28, 2016 10:44 AM
To: NFC-L 
Subject: [nfc-l] Virtual Meet and Greet

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Re: [nfc-l] Huge flight over NY, VT

2016-09-24 Thread Bill Evans
Same large flight down the Hudson River Valley last night with 2930 warbler and 
sparrow calls recorded with a 21c mic between 9pm-5am at a station in Chatham, 
NY (~20 miles southeast of Albany).  

Hourly record as follows:

9-1088
10-11127
11-12151
12-1  211
1-2402
2-3726
3-4765
4-5460

Anyone interested in tackling the IDs can can download the calls at:  
http://oldbird.org/Data/2016/CLC/23-24Sep16CLC.zip (27 mb)

Also, for anyone interested in getting in on the action this season I have six 
newly refurbished 21c mics for sale at ~half price.

Bill


-Original Message- 
From: Kenneth V. Rosenberg 
Sent: Friday, September 23, 2016 11:52 PM 
To: NFC-L 
Subject: [nfc-l] Huge flight over NY, VT 

There is s huge flight of thrushes over White Lake NY and Bennington VT tonight 
- I counted 300 plus thrushes in 30 minutes of nearly continuous layered 
calling. Mostly Swainsons but quite a few Gray-cheeked. All of which got 
flagged. Also 3 Am Bitterns

Ken (visiting Bennington College)

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[nfc-l] Big Double-up

2016-09-23 Thread Bill Evans
Dear NFCers,
My colleague Manuel Grosselet and I recorded an unidentified night flight call 
in southern Mexico (near Minatitlan) in fall 2012.  We call it “the big 
double-up” for obvious reasons as one can see in the attached spectrograms. We 
recorded 32 of the calls near Minatitlan from Oct 16-Dec 3, 2012.  What 
distinguishes it from other “double-ups” one commonly encounters in eastern US 
is the combination of the call’s broad frequency expanse (~5 kHz on average), 
the relatively large maximum frequency gap between its component tones (~ 2 kHz 
on average), and its much longer overall duration, ~85 mS on average, which is 
roughly twice as long as the Tennessee, Orange-crowned, Nashville , and 
Black-throated Green double-up complex.
Based on my not seeing this call type in 25+ years of spectrographic night 
flight call study across eastern US, I conclude that it is a species that does 
not likely migrate across eastern US.  To support this contention, I’m 
soliciting feedback from the untamed multitude of others monitoring nfcs these 
days as to whether you have encountered this big double-up call type in the 
eastern US, or anywhere in North America.  A short audio clip of the call is 
also attached.   Many thanks,  Bill Evans











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Tseep_2012-10-16_00.42.36_00.wav
Description: Wave audio


Re: [nfc-l] missing first few milliseconds of spectrograms made in Raven

2015-01-22 Thread Bill Evans
Thanks for the explanation Dean and Laura, and to everyone else for chiming in. 
 I haven’t made spectrograms of short call notes for publication since the 
Flight Call Guide back in 2001. I used Canary back then and the method for 
generating spectrograms must have been different because there was no such 
delay apparent.

Bill



From: Bill Evans 
Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2015 7:40 AM
To: Night Flight Call List 
Subject: [nfc-l] missing first few milliseconds of spectrograms made in Raven

When I open a short night flight call wav file in Raven, the waveform window 
begins at 0 sec but the accompanying spectrogram window doesn't begin at zero 
-- it begins after a few milliseconds. See attached example.

It’s not something that one would note unless they are working with very short 
sound files, and perhaps wish to use such a short spectrogram in a publication.

Anyone else notice this possible bug in Raven?

Bill Evans
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[nfc-l] missing first few milliseconds of spectrograms made in Raven

2015-01-22 Thread Bill Evans
When I open a short night flight call wav file in Raven, the waveform window 
begins at 0 sec but the accompanying spectrogram window doesn't begin at zero 
-- it begins after a few milliseconds. See attached example.

It’s not something that one would note unless they are working with very short 
sound files, and perhaps wish to use such a short spectrogram in a publication.

Anyone else notice this possible bug in Raven?

Bill Evans
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Re: [nfc-l] Blue Grosbeak?

2014-10-31 Thread Bill Evans
Sounds like a possibility to me too – at least something in the Blue 
Grosbeak/Indigo/Lazuli/Varied/Painted complex.  The spectrogram indicates it is 
lower in frequency than typical for Indigo, but that doesn’t rule it out.

Bill E
  
From: Spahr, Timothy 
Sent: Friday, October 31, 2014 10:22 AM
To: NFC-L 
Subject: [nfc-l] Blue Grosbeak?


Hi birders,


Anyone care to venture an opinion on this call, recorded last night, in eastern 
Massachusetts?  The sound is unedited other than trimming down to a few seconds 
around the call.  I expect you'll need to amplify it a bit.  


Sorta sounds like a Blue Grosbeak to me, but that would be a pretty unusual 
bird to have as a night flyover here.

Best,

Tim


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[nfc-l] European flight call guide

2014-10-27 Thread Bill Evans
Anyone had a chance to peruse this new European flight call CD?  Wondering if 
it is simply a CD version of the old Chappuis cassette tape set or whether it 
contains new info?

Bird Sounds in Flight - MP3 CD
350 Species, 348 minutes running time, 850 Recordings. This MP3-DISC features 
850 sound recordings of 350 European bird species. These include sounds heard 
during local or long distance flights - both flight songs and calls, as well as 
instrumental sounds. At a total running time of nearly 6 hours, you will find 
here the most comprehensive and rarest sound documents of this kind. The bird 
species are listed according to the current state of research. The booklet 
contains 124 pages and lists vernacular bird names in German, English and 
French, as well as their scientific names. The texts give detailed information 
on recording data, recordists and other interesting facts. Welcome to the 
fascinating world of birds in flight! Includes a 124 page booklet. Highly 
recommended for all European birders interested in migrating birds. 
Vogelstimmen im Flug / Voix des oiseaux en vol.

http://www.buteobooks.com/product/14459.html


-Bill E


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Re: [nfc-l] NFC ID Help, Maryland Eastern Shore

2014-10-11 Thread Bill Evans
Pretty sure it’s not a bird sound.  

Good that you got the sampling rate switched. Also, I think it would help you 
in your ID process to make the spectrograms with higher resolution.

Looks like a north wind and good migration potential for you tonight if you are 
still in MD.  

From: Diana Doyle 
Sent: Saturday, October 11, 2014 7:45 AM
To: Bill Evans 
Cc: NFC-L@cornell.edu 
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] NFC ID Help, Maryland Eastern Shore

Hi Bill, 

I inadvertently had the setting on 16 kHz, messing around with some i-mics and 
recording apps, so I missed checking the default rate and figured it was all 
set from last time. So this one was recorded at 16 kHz. (I've now switched to 
22,050 and hope it sticks in the preference settings.)

Here's one last spectrogram of the call, with different X-Y ranges displayed, 
but nothing above 8k, sorry.

Thanks,

Diana

__

On Oct 10, 2014, at 11:03 PM, Bill Evans  wrote:

Tough to tell from the spectrogram Diane. It shows a ~5 ms section of a steeply 
descending call. It appears a higher pitched portion above 8 kHz is chopped 
off.  Perhaps in the territory of flying squirrel chirps with this one.  Can 
you make a spectrogram showing the frequencies above 8 kHz or does your system 
just use a 16 kHz sampling rate?

Bill E

p.s. very nice flight occurring tonight across the northeastern sector of the 
USA.
http://weather.rap.ucar.edu/radar/displayRad.php?icao=KUSA=bref1=black=20141011=-1=0

 




From: Diana Doyle 
Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 8:13 PM
To: NFC-L@cornell.edu 
Subject: [nfc-l] NFC ID Help, Maryland Eastern Shore

Hi night-listeners,

I'm slowly picking my way through a couple of recording sessions from about a 
week ago, done from a very quiet wooded cove anchorage on the Eastern Shore of 
Maryland.

I have one occurrence of one call that is stumping me. I'm a novice at this, so 
would like some expert opinions.

What I'm seeing here is the "lightning bolt" pattern. The Evans and O'Brien CD 
talks about Lark Sparrow having a "irregular squiggle in the middle" and having 
quite a bit of variation in the placement of the other component (such as 
across the top, forming a "T").

Could this be a Lark Sparrow? (A handful were reported from the region on 
eBird.) Or is it something really simple and obvious that I'm missing in my 
beginner's hunt-and-peck search of the CD?

So far in the rest of the recording I've picked out American Redstart, Northern 
Parula, Palm Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, and Chipping Sparrow.

It's fun to be on the really steep part of the learning curve!

Diana Doyle
Recording from m/v Semi-Local
Annapolis, Maryland



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Re: [nfc-l] NFC ID Help, Maryland Eastern Shore

2014-10-10 Thread Bill Evans
Tough to tell from the spectrogram Diane. It shows a ~5 ms section of a steeply 
descending call. It appears a higher pitched portion above 8 kHz is chopped 
off.  Perhaps in the territory of flying squirrel chirps with this one.  Can 
you make a spectrogram showing the frequencies above 8 kHz or does your system 
just use a 16 kHz sampling rate?

Bill E

p.s. very nice flight occurring tonight across the northeastern sector of the 
USA.
http://weather.rap.ucar.edu/radar/displayRad.php?icao=KUSA=bref1=black=20141011=-1=0




From: Diana Doyle 
Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 8:13 PM
To: NFC-L@cornell.edu 
Subject: [nfc-l] NFC ID Help, Maryland Eastern Shore

Hi night-listeners,

I'm slowly picking my way through a couple of recording sessions from about a 
week ago, done from a very quiet wooded cove anchorage on the Eastern Shore of 
Maryland.

I have one occurrence of one call that is stumping me. I'm a novice at this, so 
would like some expert opinions.

What I'm seeing here is the "lightning bolt" pattern. The Evans and O'Brien CD 
talks about Lark Sparrow having a "irregular squiggle in the middle" and having 
quite a bit of variation in the placement of the other component (such as 
across the top, forming a "T").

Could this be a Lark Sparrow? (A handful were reported from the region on 
eBird.) Or is it something really simple and obvious that I'm missing in my 
beginner's hunt-and-peck search of the CD?

So far in the rest of the recording I've picked out American Redstart, Northern 
Parula, Palm Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, and Chipping Sparrow.

It's fun to be on the really steep part of the learning curve!

Diana Doyle
Recording from m/v Semi-Local
Annapolis, Maryland


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Hi night-listeners,

I'm slowly picking my way through a couple of recording sessions from about a 
week ago, done from a very quiet wooded cove anchorage on the Eastern Shore of 
Maryland.

I have one occurrence of one call that is stumping me. I'm a novice at this, so 
would like some expert opinions.

What I'm seeing here is the "lightning bolt" pattern. The Evans and O'Brien CD 
talks about Lark Sparrow having a "irregular squiggle in the middle" and having 
quite a bit of variation in the placement of the other component (such as 
across the top, forming a "T").

Could this be a Lark Sparrow? (A handful were reported from the region on 
eBird.) Or is it something really simple and obvious that I'm missing in my 
beginner's hunt-and-peck search of the CD?

So far in the rest of the recording I've picked out American Redstart, Northern 
Parula, Palm Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, and Chipping Sparrow.

It's fun to be on the really steep part of the learning curve!

Diana Doyle
Recording from m/v Semi-Local
Annapolis, Maryland







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Re: [nfc-l] anyone know if Old Bird 21c mic still available?

2014-02-18 Thread Bill Evans
Hi Andy,
The 21c is currently sold out. I’ll have 10 to offer in late March and a 
tentative plan to have 30 more available by August 1st.  These latter 30 mics 
would be an advance group order to keep costs down -- anyone interested, 
contact me by June 1.  In the meantime Andy, I’m happy to send you one for your 
event on March 6.

Also, anyone who has a 21c can send it in for free maintenance and repairs 
before May 1 this year.  I’ll be updating the webpage for the 21c this week 
with details: http://oldbird.org/21c.htm

Bill

From: Andy Martin 
Sent: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 9:34 AM
To: nf...@list.cornell.edu 
Subject: [nfc-l] anyone know if Old Bird 21c mic still available?

I recently visited Old Bird website in hopes of ordering 21C mic both to use 
for the upcoming migration season and also to show some folks at local bird 
club during a talk I am giving on March 6.


I recollect that there was a specific page on website with both price and 
ordering instructions but cannot seem to find it. Anyone know if this mic setup 
is still available?


Thanks,


Andy Martin

Gaithersburg, MD

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[nfc-l] nocturnal movements

2013-09-08 Thread Bill Evans
Some patterns of songbird nocturnal migration across NY the past few weeks as 
indicated by nocturnal flight calls:
http://www.oldbird.org/Data/2013/TransNE2013/NETransect-2013.html

-Bill E

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Re: [nfc-l] Big flight last night in NJ

2013-05-21 Thread Bill Evans
583 warbler and sparrow calls logged in west-central NY (Alfred, NY) last night 
– this may be a high nightly tally for that station in spring (n= 5). 

Zeep ~50%
Double-up ~10%
American Redstart ~5%
Canada Warbler ~4%
Common Yellowthroat ~3%
Chestnut-sided ~2%
Savannah Sparrow ~2%
Cape May ~1%

Black-throated Blue, Ovenbird, Mourning Warbler, & Northern Waterthrush  <1%

Calls downloadable at: 
http://www.oldbird.org/Data/2013/Alfred/alfred_station.htm

-Bill E





From: Rob Fergus 
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 8:32 AM
To: nf...@list.cornell.edu 
Subject: [nfc-l] Big flight last night in NJ

I listened through my OldBird 21c mic last night from 10pm-12:30am, and just 
finished running the Thrush-X and Tseep-X detectors on the recording from 
10pm--3:30am (at which point for some reason my recorder shut off).  598 
Thrush-X detections and 891 Tseep-X detections.  I will process the file 
visually in RavenPro later, but some highlights... 

Lesser Yellowlegs (new yard bird)
Black-crowned Night Heron (new year bird)
Sora (new yard bird, new year bird, local rarity on ground--though probably had 
one last week and haven't processed the recording yet)
Bobolink
Black-billed Cuckoo--at least 5 detected while I was listening
Yellow-billed Cuckoo--2, including one I heard at 2:30am through an open window 
as I was getting in bed
Gray-cheeked Thrush--at least 8, will check a couple to see if they are 
actually high enough to be Bicknell's

Lots of yellowthroats, redstarts, and yellow/blackpoll type calls.

It's been a tough migration, with lots of bad nights, but last night was one of 
the better nights!

Rob Fergus

Hunterdon County, NJ 
http://birdchaser.blogspot.com
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[nfc-l] On the utility of avian acoustic study at wind energy facilities

2013-02-21 Thread Bill Evans
NFCers,

In the course of trying to win a competitive research contract sometimes one 
offers an in-kind (pro bono) study to sweeten the proposal. That's the case 
with the acoustic study at a NY wind energy project reported at the link below. 
The data was gathered ~5 years ago but the report was delayed in publication 
due to complications with other associated research projects I wasn't involved 
with.

This acoustic study was initially just going to involve data from a single 
monitoring station, but various bumps along the road led me to include data 
from other avian acoustic monitoring stations I had running in the region. This 
turned out to facilitate discussion on a number of interesting questions 
regarding the application of avian acoustic monitoring at industrial wind 
energy projects.

The report is currently listed first on the following webpage. I welcome any 
feedback or discussion:

http://www.nyserda.ny.gov/Publications/Research-and-Development-Technical-Reports/Environmental-Reports.aspx

The 20,000+ calls collected from the study will eventually be put online at 
oldbird.org, but I need to go through them again to update species 
classifications.

Bill E






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[nfc-l] Breaking news: man who crunched too much data found impaled by parula warbler flight call

2012-09-18 Thread Bill Evans

Avian night flight calling by species/species-group across northeastern US last 
week:
http://www.oldbird.org/Data/TransNE/9-16Sep12/9-16Sep12.html

-Bill E


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Re: [nfc-l] Northeast US: Night Migration Tonight

2012-09-10 Thread Bill Evans
I just crunched last night’s flight calls from my station in the Town Danby NY 
- a few miles south of Ithaca. 487 warbler and sparrow flight calls from 
9PM-5AM (21c/tseep-x). This is the high nightly total since this station began 
in mid-August.

Getting late for Mourning Warbler but I did have three probables as well as a 
few late Canadas. Three out of every hundred calls were from Wilson’s Warbler, 
which is about as good as it gets for this species in central NY. Calls 
available for download at: http://www.oldbird.org/Data/Daily.htm 

Also of note last night was another solid flight down the Hudson and 
Connecticut River valleys, including the first ripple of White-throated 
Sparrows (down both valleys after midnight).

Bill E
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[nfc-l] rainbow

2012-09-07 Thread Bill Evans
Sometimes the simple things in life get lost in all the commotion, so I thought 
I’d share with you all my last 15 minutes or so:

I was classifying a batch of night flight calls extracted from nature last 
night over the visitor center of the Jamestown Audubon Society in western NY. 
Problems with internet transmission (a story on its own) delayed me receiving 
the data until this afternoon. In the process of using GlassOFire (thank you 
Steve Mitchell) to discard 2018 noise detections from a catch of 747 flight 
calls, and then classifying these calls to species groups in a complex tactile 
process with my keyboard, I came across a spectrogram of a double-down that 
screamed it was not a Savannah. I want to say this call is from an individual 
in a population of Nelson’s Sharp-tailed Sparrows, but it seems early for this 
migrant species in western NY. If there are Savannahs that give such a call, I 
will be even more blown away by nocturnal flight call phenomenon that I am!

Bill E

p.s. for those on this listserv who recently expressed and thusly desire an 
updated version of GlassOFire, I suggest we write Steve Mitchell (the program’s 
foresighted author) and tell him how much we appreciate his programming effort 
back in late 1990s -- I’m thinking a shelling of qualitative snail mail. Anyone 
interested can email me for his address. Of course, after that we’d need to 
acknowledge Cornell for its bioacoustics research program (BRP) that fostered 
Steve’s acoustic programming acumen as well as Harold Mill’s who carried on 
Steve’s work at at BRP and initiated Raven, the program I used to make the 
possible NESP time-frequency energy plot below. 20 years ago these tools for 
night flight call study didn’t exist. To be fair, I guess we need to 
acknowledge all the advances in computer technology that make night flight call 
analysis possible, but that gets us into a nebulous territory.
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Re: [nfc-l] Red-headed Woodpecker?

2012-08-07 Thread Bill Evans
Oops, I overlooked that the call was from May 12, which would be in the window 
for a spring migrant in NY, though the call sounds doesn’t sound like it is 
from a bird in flight.

Bill E


From: Bill Evans 
Sent: Tuesday, August 07, 2012 9:38 AM
To: Benjamin Van Doren ; Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
Cc: NFC-L 
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Red-headed Woodpecker?

My first impression was a scream from a girl on a swing set. I then quickly 
came around to agreeing with Ben’s first impression and Chris. Pretty early for 
migrant RHWO though, as based on my experience their southbound migration in NY 
is the latter half of September and early October – perhaps it’s a wandering 
bird. 

The only caveat on the ID comes up for me when I went back to listen to the 
RHWO calls on the Flight Call Guide. I noticed a similarity with Virginia Rail 
“McGreer” type calls, though RHWO sounds lower-pitched. But the question arises 
whether we can 100% rule out a rail vocalization?

Bill E

From: Benjamin Van Doren 
Sent: Monday, August 06, 2012 7:36 PM
To: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
Cc: NFC-L 
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Red-headed Woodpecker?

Hi Chris, 

Thanks for the feedback. Never recorded an NFC of one before--very cool. This 
was recorded at 9:18 PM, just over an hour after sunset (8:04 PM), with the 
Song Meter 2 setup by Wildlife Acoustics, Inc. (with the NFC plate mic). The 
whole thing was on a sandbar in a saltmarsh, and I built a wooden contraption 
that slides onto a rebar to hold both the SM2 and mic (can't have anything 
resting on the ground in case there is a very high tide). Has worked very well.

Benjamin

On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 7:19 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 wrote:

  I, personally, see no hesitation with assigning the ID as that of Red-headed 
Woodpecker. Nice clean recording, too. What time of night was this? What is 
your microphone and recorder setup?

  Thanks, Ben!

  Sincerely,
  Chris T-H



  Sent from my iPhone 



  On Aug 6, 2012, at 18:25, "Benjamin Van Doren"  wrote:


Hi All, 

The attached recording is from 12 May 2012. My first thought is that it 
sounds pretty good for Red-headed Woodpecker, although not exactly right for 
what I'm used to (diurnally). In the Flight Call Guide (Evans & O'Brien), 
however, the presumed RHWO nocturnal recordings do show a good amount of 
variation, so perhaps this does best fit that species. Red-headed Woodpeckers 
are very uncommon in my area but do occasionally occur as migrants and 
sometimes winter residents. In the recording there seems to be a soft 
cluck-like sound right before the call, too soft for me to really make out but 
American Robin-like. I don't really see the main vocalization being a robin, 
though, unless it is a very weird one...

The microphone was located along the coast in a saltmarsh, but not too far 
from woods (and people). 

Thoughts welcome!

Benjamin Van Doren
White Plains, NY


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Re: [nfc-l] Red-headed Woodpecker?

2012-08-07 Thread Bill Evans
My first impression was a scream from a girl on a swing set. I then quickly 
came around to agreeing with Ben’s first impression and Chris. Pretty early for 
migrant RHWO though, as based on my experience their southbound migration in NY 
is the latter half of September and early October – perhaps it’s a wandering 
bird. 

The only caveat on the ID comes up for me when I went back to listen to the 
RHWO calls on the Flight Call Guide. I noticed a similarity with Virginia Rail 
“McGreer” type calls, though RHWO sounds lower-pitched. But the question arises 
whether we can 100% rule out a rail vocalization?

Bill E

From: Benjamin Van Doren 
Sent: Monday, August 06, 2012 7:36 PM
To: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
Cc: NFC-L 
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Red-headed Woodpecker?

Hi Chris, 

Thanks for the feedback. Never recorded an NFC of one before--very cool. This 
was recorded at 9:18 PM, just over an hour after sunset (8:04 PM), with the 
Song Meter 2 setup by Wildlife Acoustics, Inc. (with the NFC plate mic). The 
whole thing was on a sandbar in a saltmarsh, and I built a wooden contraption 
that slides onto a rebar to hold both the SM2 and mic (can't have anything 
resting on the ground in case there is a very high tide). Has worked very well.

Benjamin

On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 7:19 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 wrote:

  I, personally, see no hesitation with assigning the ID as that of Red-headed 
Woodpecker. Nice clean recording, too. What time of night was this? What is 
your microphone and recorder setup?

  Thanks, Ben!

  Sincerely,
  Chris T-H



  Sent from my iPhone 



  On Aug 6, 2012, at 18:25, "Benjamin Van Doren"  wrote:


Hi All, 

The attached recording is from 12 May 2012. My first thought is that it 
sounds pretty good for Red-headed Woodpecker, although not exactly right for 
what I'm used to (diurnally). In the Flight Call Guide (Evans & O'Brien), 
however, the presumed RHWO nocturnal recordings do show a good amount of 
variation, so perhaps this does best fit that species. Red-headed Woodpeckers 
are very uncommon in my area but do occasionally occur as migrants and 
sometimes winter residents. In the recording there seems to be a soft 
cluck-like sound right before the call, too soft for me to really make out but 
American Robin-like. I don't really see the main vocalization being a robin, 
though, unless it is a very weird one...

The microphone was located along the coast in a saltmarsh, but not too far 
from woods (and people). 

Thoughts welcome!

Benjamin Van Doren
White Plains, NY


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Re: [nfc-l] First Big Southbound push of fall migrants next few days in northern U.S??

2012-08-07 Thread Bill Evans
Dave,
Your prediction was pretty good. There were mixed results Sunday night 
depending on whether one was listening to the east or west of the cold front, 
and as it turned out, last night was the biggest night flight calling event of 
the season across northeastern US.
Bill E

From: david nicosia 
Sent: Friday, August 03, 2012 6:25 PM
To: NFC- L 
Subject: [nfc-l] First Big Southbound push of fall migrants next few days in 
northern U.S??

All, 

I have noticed every night that the radar bird echoes are picking up more and 
more
even when the winds are not that favorable. A significant cold front, the first
of this budding upcoming "cold" season, will be upon the northern U.S soon. It 
will first cross the 
upper Plains Saturday and by Saturday Night the mid to upper Plains should be 
really good 
and by Sunday night...Great Lakes will have post frontal northwest winds.  By 
Monday 
night...front  clears the east coast but the winds will be lighter and not have 
as
much of a northerly component. Nevertheless, I wouldn't be surprised to see 
increasing
nocturnal migration in the northeast Monday Night too.   

Good listening (and birding) to all... 

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY  
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Re: [nfc-l] First Big Southbound push of fall migrants next few days in northern U.S??

2012-08-04 Thread Bill Evans
I’ve noticed via flight call monitoring at this time of year (in NY and 
vicinity) that songbirds tend to move every night regardless of cold fronts -- 
unless there are strong southerly winds or substantial rain events. Later in 
the season (mid-September – October) the flights seem more tied to coldfront 
passage. I have a transect of acoustic monitoring stations across NY this fall, 
repeating my 1992 VCR effort. As with the Alfred, NY acoustic station last 
fall, I’m putting the previous night’s warbler and sparrow flight call tallies 
and tentative species IDs online in the morning at http://www.oldbird.org. By 
browsing the data you can see that substantial nocturnal migration has been 
underway in NY over the past three weeks, and there are already interesting 
species patterns apparent. For example, while Black-and-white Warbler flight 
calls are just beginning to be detected across eastern NY in the past week, a 
small but steady pulse of Black-and-white Warbler night flight calling has been 
occurring over south Texas for the past three weeks. Btw, for anyone 
interested, the whole audio archive from the Old Bird acoustic stations this 
season will be available early next year on a ~5 TB external drive.  This will 
have the raw audio files, extracted flight calls, and contributed analyses. 
Anyone out there recording with the 21c or comparable mic in a relatively clean 
acoustic environment is welcome to merge their work into this evolving public 
archive. 

Many lifetimes needed to get a handle on all this!

Bill E

From: david nicosia 
Sent: Friday, August 03, 2012 6:25 PM
To: NFC- L 
Subject: [nfc-l] First Big Southbound push of fall migrants next few days in 
northern U.S??

All, 

I have noticed every night that the radar bird echoes are picking up more and 
more
even when the winds are not that favorable. 
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Re: [nfc-l] Etna, NY - Barn Owl

2012-08-03 Thread Bill Evans
>From 1991-1994 during fall migration I had a line of 3-7 (depending on year) 
>acoustic monitoring stations in an east-west transect across of NY.  
>Recordings were made using VCRs in long-play mode (9 hrs) on nights with good 
>migration conditions. I listened back to the tapes and catalogued the calls I 
>heard. During that period I recorded five Barn Owl calling events – one or 
>more calls from a single passing individual. All were in the last week of 
>August and first week of September (see graph attached) and two were on the 
>same night within an hour of one another at stations 300 km apart. It seemed 
>like the acoustic data was revealing a migration window, especially because a 
>substantial body of recordings earlier in August and later in September and 
>October (over four years) revealed no COBO calls. Although a small dataset, 
>what else could account for such a clumped temporal distribution if not due to 
>a migration or dispersing behavior pattern? If it was due to local breeding 
>birds and their young, then why was only one call recorded at each site?

In 1994, my collaboration with Cornell Lab of O led to the first software for 
extracting flight calls written by Harold Mills, and in the late 1990s the Old 
Bird detectors were developed by Steve Mitchell. So, since 1994 I haven’t 
listened to long audio files much but have focused on analyzing sounds 
extracted by software -- primarily songbird flight calls above 3 kHz as that 
frequency stratum typically has less insect interference and is more easily 
automatically scanned for flight calls. The Barn Owl hissy screech has a 
frequency around 2 KHz and as such has not been surveyed in most of my night 
flight call recording efforts since 1994. I have recorded two Barn Owls in 
night flight outside of the mentioned late summer period: one was in mid-June 
1990 (Enfield, NY) and the other last year as Chris noted on April 29th.

Of note is that Barn Owl numbers may be increasing in NY due to a release 
program since the late 1990s in western NY (I’m not sure if it is still in 
operation).
http://www.hawkcreek.org/whitepages/barn-owl-project

Bill E










From: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2012 8:56 PM
To: NFC-L 
Subject: [nfc-l] Etna, NY - Barn Owl


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Re: [nfc-l] Etna, NY: Possible Nightjar?

2012-07-06 Thread Bill Evans
Sounds mammalish to me Chris – somewhat like a whistle pig (aka Woodchuck) 
though their calls are typically a bit higher-pitched and I’ve never heard one 
vocalize at night.

From: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
Sent: Friday, July 06, 2012 10:06 AM
To: NFC-L 
Subject: [nfc-l] Etna, NY: Possible Nightjar?

I recorded an unusual loud note last night, 5 July 2012, at 10:54PM EDT. This 
is a sound that I have not heard in any of my nightly recordings since starting 
on 6 May. Whip-poor-will is extremely uncommon here and Chuck-will's-widow 
would be extremely rare. Yet, the frequency range and the timbre of this call 
both point toward some kind of Nightjar. The foliage reverberation of this 
sound suggests a ground-based call, as opposed to a flyover. Do Whips or Chucks 
produce individual notes like this, different from notes produced during a 
stereotypical song sequence? Any ideas? 

Attached is the sound and a frame grab of the spectrogram.


 


Thanks!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

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Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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Re: [nfc-l] Mystery NFC recording

2012-06-08 Thread Bill Evans
Interesting call Rob, and hard to pin down as it appears to be a muttering 
instead of a full announcement. I've ranged in considering Virginia or Black 
Rail, Osprey, and Whimbrel. Perhaps those more freshly afield can weigh in.


Bill E


-Original Message- 
From: Jay K

Sent: Saturday, June 02, 2012 9:28 PM
To: Rob Fergus ; Night Flight Call List
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Mystery NFC recording

Rob,

This may not be it, but what about the possibility of American 
Oystercatcher?  Flight call from xeno-canto:


http://www.xeno-canto.org/sounds/uploaded/HBPPUDOMJI/Pilpilen2%20-%20Haematopus%20palliatus.mp3

I considered Whimbrel as well, but it doesn't seem quite high/shrill enough. 
At any rate, seems like a shorebird of some type.


Jay Keller,
San Diego, Ca


-Original Message- 
From: Rob Fergus

Sent: Jun 2, 2012 5:35 AM
To: nf...@list.cornell.edu
Subject: [nfc-l] Mystery NFC recording




As migration winds down, I'm having fun trying to identify some of the more 
unusual recordings from this past season.  I could use some input on this 
recording made early in the evening of May 25 in Hunterdon County, NJ. 
Thanks!


Rob Fergus
Union Township, Hunterdon Co, NJ
http://birdchaser.blogspot.com
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Re: [nfc-l] migrating cuckoos

2012-06-07 Thread Bill Evans
There’s a delightful old paper by Gerald Thayer describing "the mid-summer, 
mid-night, mid-sky gyrations of the Black-billed Cuckoo, as noted by my father 
and me for three consecutive seasons in the southwestern corner of New 
Hampshire":

”Several years before we discovered the nocturnal-flight phenomenon, we began 
to be puzzled by the extreme frequency of Cuckoo calls on summer nights. 
***They uttered both the cow-row notes and the rolling guttural call; but the 
guttural was much the commoner of the two, except on dark, foggy nights, when 
the case was usually reversed. ***The birds were often so far up as to be only 
faintly audible when directly overhead, with no obstructions interposed; and 
this on a still night would seem to mean an elevation of at least a hundred and 
fifty yards. They sometimes flew lower, however, and on cloudy nights often 
moved about barely above the tree-tops.”

“On the evening of July 11-a pitch-dark evening with a thundershower 
lowering,-they were remarkably noisy, both sitting in trees and flying high in 
air. The seated ones, of which I heard only two, made the Cowcow notes, while 
all the flying ones made the liquid gurgle. I heard this note overhead between 
thirty and forty times in the course of about three hours, during half of which 
time I was afoot on the road.”

-- Thayer, G. H. 1903. The Mystery of the Black-billed Cuckoo. Bird Lore 
5:143-145. 

In a big nocturnal flight I heard moving up the St. Croix River (MN/WI) in late 
May of 1985, I estimated a rate of passage of Black-billed Cuckoos in the range 
of 100 per hour for at least a few hours in the middle of the night. This was 
not a call total but a rate of vocal birds estimated by following multiple 
calls from apparently the same individual, and it was clear that these birds 
were migrants heading northbound. In 1988-1990 I began recording nocturnal 
flight calls each fall migration period in early July around Ithaca, NY and was 
surprised that in each season the highest rate of BBCU calling was in July 
through early August. There seemed to be a lot of variability in the number of 
calls I recorded between proximal nights, which could be a function of 
weather/wind and microphone pickup dynamics or that the birds tended to prefer 
some nights over others. In the big passerine push from mid –August through 
mid-September across central NY, BBCU flight calls are less common than one 
might expect. Using a Sennheiser shotgun mic back in those days, my rates of 
BBCU nocturnal flight call detection in the latter half of August were in the 
1-2 per hour range (averaged over whole night). In the first half of September 
rates dropped to the range of one call every four hours. Whereas in July 
through early August it was common to record sustained rate through the night 
of 4-5 per hour. But as I mentioned there was a lot of variability from night 
to night.

I haven’t recorded much in June in central NY, but my impression has been that 
the breeding ground flight calling,  the “mid-summer, mid-night, mid-sky, 
gyrations”,  is a phenomenon that increases in July.

Bill E  
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Re: [nfc-l] Ajo, AZ flight last night

2012-05-26 Thread Bill Evans
Thanks Mike. So Red-faced does give a zeep! And it appears to have a wider 
frequency span than Yellow. Perhaps the wider-frequencied series of zeeps from 
Ajo around 2:29AM last night was from a Red-faced. 


Bill






From: "Michael Lanzone" 
Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2012 9:13 AM
To: "NFC List" 
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Ajo, AZ flight last night


Bill and others interested, 


Here is a PDF reprint of a paper from the Auk (Vol. 126, Number 3) that shows 
Red-faced and Graces flight-calls Andrew and I recorded several years back.


Best,
Mike


Michael Lanzone
Somerset, PA
mlanz...@gmail.com


  Nice flight across the Mexican-Arizona border region last night. It always 
amazes me how late spring migrants are crossing the border in the west (and 
probably the east as well). I recall camping along the border in Cabeza Prieta 
NWR back in ~1997 and hearing a steady flight of Swainson's Thrush on several 
nights in early June. What's intriguing to me about last night's flight is the 
variation in bandwidth of the "zeep" notes. As far as I know, Yellow Warbler is 
the only migrant small passerine in the west that gives a classic zeep flight 
note. The psychedelic warbler flight call poster that Andy Farnsworth put 
together back in 2006 tends to support this, though the Painted Redstart call 
portrayed is suggestive of a zeep. Not shown in that poster are the flight 
calls of Grace's and Red-faced Warblers, but my recollection on hearing flight 
notes from those species back in the early 90s is that they give high thin 
notes and not zeeps. 
  The flight calls from Ajo, AZ last night can be downloaded from oldbird.org 
and viewed with GlassOfire or Raven.
  Bill E
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[nfc-l] Ajo, AZ flight last night

2012-05-26 Thread Bill Evans
Nice flight across the Mexican–Arizona border region last night. It always 
amazes me how late spring migrants are crossing the border in the west (and 
probably the east as well). I recall camping along the border in Cabeza Prieta 
NWR back in ~1997 and hearing a steady flight of Swainson’s Thrush on several 
nights in early June. What’s intriguing to me about last night’s flight is the 
variation in bandwidth of the “zeep” notes.  As far as I know, Yellow Warbler 
is the only migrant small passerine in the west that gives a classic zeep 
flight note. The psychedelic warbler flight call poster that Andy Farnsworth 
put together back in 2006 tends to support this, though the Painted Redstart 
call portrayed is suggestive of a zeep. Not shown in that poster are the flight 
calls of Grace’s and Red-faced Warblers, but my recollection on hearing flight 
notes from those species back in the early 90s is that they give high thin 
notes and not zeeps.  

The flight calls from Ajo, AZ last night can be downloaded from oldbird.org and 
viewed with GlassOfire or Raven.

Bill E

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Re: [nfc-l] Potentially Interesting NFC for Upstate NY

2012-05-16 Thread Bill Evans
Wow Chris, you have a good ear! I wouldn’t have been able to call that a 
species in the bunting complex simply based on the spectrogram, but I agree on 
listening that is likely what it is. Based on the apparent spectrographic 
frequency envelope of the call, it would be a lowish bunting type that 
qualifies for Blue Grosbeak consideration.  But this is another case like 
Bicknell’s versus Gray-cheeked in that we (as far as I know) don’t know the 
potential overlap of low INBUs and high BLGRs.  In a quick look at a hundred or 
so bunting types I’ve recorded in New York and northern Ohio this spring, most 
are double-banded (presumed syrinx action) and the higher bands are well above 
7 kHz while the lower band ranges down into the 5.5 kHz range.  But there are a 
few cases in these data when loud calls show only one band. In one from central 
NY a few nights ago, the whole single-banded call is contained within the 
5.6-6.6 kHz envelop. 

Your call is a low one and your BLGR speculation is warranted. However, at the 
rate progress in flight call IDs is going, and like your martin siting from a 
decade or so ago, I suspect you won’t find an answer in your present 
incarnation.

Bill E




From: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:12 PM
To: NFC-L 
Subject: [nfc-l] Potentially Interesting NFC for Upstate NY

I encountered the following NFC while going through data (manual browsing - low 
call count nights...not bad) from the night of 12-13 May. This bird called once 
somewhat distant from my listening station in Etna, NY, at approximately 
01:52AM. 

This is very intriguing to me, because it is noticeably lower in frequency than 
Indigo Bunting and is slightly descending in frequency over the duration of the 
call. This is suggestive of Blue Grosbeak, but I am curious to know what others 
think. This is the first time I have encountered such a low frequency "Indigo 
Bunting"... 

As labeled, one file is amplified and filtered, while the other is the original 
unfiltered clip.

Comments? Thoughts?

Thanks!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
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TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp
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Re: [nfc-l] Another empid (Alder?)

2012-02-14 Thread Bill Evans
Benjamin,

I get a few calls like your first example every year in central NY -- see two 
examples on the hypothetical Yellow-bellied nfc page in the Flight Calls CD. I 
concur with Michael's assessment and also keeping an open mind for Alder and 
other empids. This is a tough group to make ID progress on because they 
apparently call so infrequently in nocturnal migration.

The interesting thing about your example is that the bird calls multiple times. 
This suggests to me that perhaps the bird just took off or that it was 
disoriented due to lights and low cloud.

Regarding your second example, my first impression was not of an empid but of a 
rail.

Bill E


  - Original Message - 
  From: Benjamin Van Doren 
  To: nfc-l 
  Cc: Andrew Farnsworth ; Michael O'Brien 
  Sent: Monday, February 13, 2012 4:23 PM
  Subject: [nfc-l] Another empid (Alder?)


  Hi All,


  Looks like there's another one...a soft "pwip" note that has me thinking 
Alder Flycatcher. I went back to the original file and it unfortunately seems 
to have called only once. The date is 9/26/10, at 2:22 AM. Thoughts?


  Again, Evans and O'Brien note: "Not known to call in nocturnal migration but 
presumed to do so occasionally based on the behavior of Least Flycatcher."


  Benjamin Van Doren
  White Plains, NY
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Re: [nfc-l] Austin, TX - Listening Stations - 24 Nov to 31 Dec

2012-01-04 Thread Bill Evans
Hey Mike,

There is no such CD that you refer to. Would appreciate it you could refer to 
both authors or simply the Flight Call CD (at least until someone else 
publishes a flight call cd).

Regarding Harris' Sparrow flight call, I suspect they would be in with your 
Song Sparrows if you have them. The sample size we had to work with for the CD 
was small, only a few individuals, so perhaps there is substantial overlap in 
frequency with Song -- the shape of the call certainly looks similar.

Best,

Bill E




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[nfc-l] Unknown

2011-12-01 Thread Bill Evans
All:

This call was recorded last night at 11:40PM near Alfred, NY.  Any ideas on 
species?

~Bill E



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Tseep_2011-11-30_23.40.29_00.wav
Description: Wave audio


Re: [nfc-l] American Bittern NFC

2011-10-06 Thread Bill Evans
The original recording was from south-central Alabama in the early morning 
(~4AM) of October 8, 1989. Andy cut out the dead space between calls. The 
actual sequence is over a minute long and one can interpret the bird 
approaching and then flying away. This is the only time I've heard a double 
croak from American Bittern -- all other occasions have been single croak 
events. I think on most of my night flight call recordings there is usually 
only a single call detected from a passing individual. Uncommon but regular 
flight call here in central NY.


Bill E


- Original Message - 
From: "Andrew Farnsworth" 

To: 
Cc: ; "Bill Evans" 
Sent: Thursday, October 06, 2011 1:38 PM
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] American Bittern NFC


Hi all,
I've certainly heard American Bittern produce isolated notes more
often than not when I've heard them migrating at night, both in the
field and in the lab from recordings; I'd hazard a guess to say that
the single note call is more likely to be encountered . . . but this
is really pure speculation, when it comes down to it, because I've not
heard a tremendous number of bitterns in flight at night!

Best,
Andrew

On Thu, Oct 6, 2011 at 12:11, Chris Tessaglia-Hymes  
wrote:

Andrew,

Thanks for pulling this together, and thanks Bill, for providing these 
clips!


Is it most typical for American Bitterns to produce these paired calls 
during migration, or do they often just do single isolated notes?


This is very helpful!

Thanks again!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

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-Original Message-
From: Andrew Farnsworth [mailto:andrew.farnswo...@gmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, October 06, 2011 11:59 AM
To: Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
Cc: NFC-L@cornell.edu; Bill Evans
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] American Bittern NFC

Hi all,
With Bill Evans's permission, I attach a heavily edited cut of American 
Bittern flight calls that Bill recorded and sent to me - I believe these 
recordings come from Minnesota, though I cannot say for sure without some 
further investigation. This is certainly the best recording I have, I am 
not sure and have not yet checked if others exist in Macaulay or 
Xeno-Canto.


Best,
Andrew

On Thu, Oct 6, 2011 at 09:59, Chris Tessaglia-Hymes  
wrote:

Does anyone have an example of an American Bittern NFC they could
attach and post to the List?



Thanks!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H








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[nfc-l] Alfred, NY last night

2011-09-23 Thread Bill Evans
676 warbler and sparrow calls logged at the Alfred, NY station last night 
(8:30PM-5:30AM).


Data up at: 
http://www.oldbird.org/Data/States/NY/Alfred/fall2011/Alfred2011f.htm


A solid flight with typical species composition for the date.

Bill E 





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Re: [nfc-l] big night flight tonight

2011-09-21 Thread Bill Evans

Ken,
I'm not confident in separting Lincoln's and Swamp either, but last night 
was the first night this season that such calls were fairly abundant and I 
presume they were Lincoln's due to that species' earlier fall migration 
pattern in the region (based on diurnal records).


Your listening site is over 100 miles east of the Alfred Station microphone, 
so you undoubtedly had somewhat different species composition -- in the case 
of Black-throated Blue one might expect higher proportionate calling rate as 
one proceeds eastward in the state.


That said, there were also a lot of short Vermivora calls in the mix last 
night, perhaps the first substantial wave of Nashville's. All the calls from 
last night are downloadable at:

http://www.oldbird.org/Data/States/NY/Alfred/fall2011/Alfred2011f.htm

Bill



- Original Message - 
From: "Kenneth Victor Rosenberg" 

To: "Bill Evans" 
Cc: "CAYUGABIRDS-L" ; "NFC-L" 


Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2011 11:18 AM
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] big night flight tonight


Thanks Bill. I did hear a few typical "Lincoln's/Swamp sparrow" "dt"s 
but was not confident enough to report. If there were that few 
Black-throated Blues, I'm curious what most of the abrupt "tsip" notes might 
have been? There were certainly way fewer of what I would consider typical 
buzzy Dendroica-type "zeet" notes than what I'm used to hearing on most 
nights.


KEN


Ken Rosenberg
Conservation Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2412
607-342-4594 (cell)
k...@cornell.edu

On Sep 21, 2011, at 9:55 AM, Bill Evans wrote:

Ken appears to have tuned into one of the biggest calling night of the 
season so far in central NY.  The acoustic station at Alfred Station, NY 
logged its season high number (988) of warbler and sparrow flight calls 
last night between 8:30PM-5:30AM. Based on spectrographic analysis roughly 
4 out of 100 were Common Yellowthroat, 2 out of 100 were Black-throated 
Blue, and 2 out of 100 were Chestnut-sided. Also notably in the mix were 
good numbers of presumed Lincoln's Sparrow calls.


Bill E





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Re: [nfc-l] big night flight tonight

2011-09-21 Thread Bill Evans
Ken appears to have tuned into one of the biggest calling night of the 
season so far in central NY.  The acoustic station at Alfred Station, NY 
logged its season high number (988) of warbler and sparrow flight calls last 
night between 8:30PM-5:30AM. Based on spectrographic analysis roughly 4 out 
of 100 were Common Yellowthroat, 2 out of 100 were Black-throated Blue, and 
2 out of 100 were Chestnut-sided. Also notably in the mix were good numbers 
of presumed Lincoln's Sparrow calls.


Bill E





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Re: [nfc-l] Gray-Cheeked or Bicknell's Thrush?

2011-09-20 Thread Bill Evans

Andrew,

I like your investigative approach.

Right now the primary evidence suggesting the characteristics of Bicknell's 
thrush flight call is still tentative and based largely on the 
distinctiveness of "Gray-cheeked" type flight calls recorded in east-central 
Florida during spring migration -- a time and place where Bicknell's is 
thought to be the more frequent & consistent "Gray-cheeked".


From what I've seen in my collection of presumed eastern Florida Bicknell's 
flight calls, your call is not from Bicknell's but fits in the typical 
Gray-cheeked (C. m. aliciae) category.  Looking at your spectrogram, if you 
are measuring a high frequency point at over 4.5 kHz you are using the upper 
edge of the time-frequency contour as your measuring point and this high 
point is near the center of the length of the call. You'll note in my paper 
on Bicknell's nfc (Table 1) that the MN birds had a mid-point mean high 
frequency of 4.2 kHz with a .18 standard deviation - and this data was 
measured from the middle of the time-frequency contour (not upper edge). So 
this evidence suggests it is not uncommon for C. m. aliciae to reach 4.5, or 
a bit above, near its mid-point. Also, keep in mind that the frequency of 
Gray-cheeked calls may vary perhaps +/-100 Hz depending on whether the bird 
is recorded on approach or flying away from a recording station (Doppler 
shift).


The evidence from Florida also suggests that you will not find the high 
point of a Bicknell's flight call at its mid-point, but rather near the 
beginning. The catch here is that it appears some Gray-cheeked calls have 
their high point near the beginning of the call ...so there may be overlap 
between high Gray-cheekeds and low Bicknell's in this regard.


Still lots to learn here but your call suggests Gray-cheeked and not 
Bicknell's to me.


Bill E

p.s. Perhaps worth noting that some taxonomists believe there is another 
small subspecies of Gray-cheeked up there somewhere.



- Original Message - 
From: "Andrew Albright" 

To: "nfc-l" 
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 11:13 PM
Subject: [nfc-l] Gray-Cheeked or Bicknell's Thrush?



Early this morning, I recorded a nfc that's seems in between
Gray-Cheeked or Bicknell's Thrush. I checked through the archives of
this list and this topic doesn't seem to have been discussed to death.

BAYESIAN INFERENCE
With several days of nice Northeast winds, I figured that Bicknell's
Thrush was possible to record in southeastern PA. Pennsylvania doesn't
have any ebird records of Bicknell's but New Jersey and Maryland seem
to be all in early October.   Wilson and Watts, 1997 show that
Bicknell's is possible in the general area, but unlikely on Sept 19th.
 Same with Birds of Pennsylvania with banding records starting on
Sept 20th.


SONAGRAM ANALYSIS
Gray-cheeked Thrush is much more common in general and on September 19th.

The main sonagram of interest peaks over 4.5 kHz and nothing I can
find for Gray-cheeked are much more than 4.0 kHz.
Shape - seems to suggest Bicknell's from most published recordings
(except for the nocturnal page on the nfc CD)

In the second set of sonagrams, I made a composite of 4 nfcs
1) A nfc that looks like Gray-Cheeked Thrush, especially if I increase
the "y" axis of time.
2) The main sonagram of interest (shown above).
3) This call was right after the possible Bicknell's and I didn't cut
it out.  It was weak but sounded like a Swainson's and maybe looks
more like Wood Thrush.
4) Lastly is another higher pitched call that's seems like it may be
Gray-cheeked (except for the "M" shape).


EAR ANALYSIS
Listening to the nfc CD's recordings of Bicknell's and Gray-Cheeked
has me leaning toward Bicknell's.  But this is pretty subjective and
maybe only because of the higher pitched recording.


Sincerely,
Andrew Albright
Maple Glen, PA


Weblinks to sonagrams of Gray-Cheeked and/or Bicknell's
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/birdcalls/species/Thrushes/Gray-cheeked%20Thrush%20%28Catharus%20minimus%29/
http://www.nightmigrants.com/main/page_species_calls_graycheeked_thrush.html
http://pjdeye.blogspot.com/2009/02/thrush-calls.html   (Recording of
Bicknell's in S.E. Pennsylvania)

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[nfc-l] nfc season update: west-central NY USA

2011-09-18 Thread Bill Evans

Greetings nfcers,

Over the past 10 nights the acoustic station in Alfred Station, NY has 
logged an average of 303 warbler and sparrow calls per night, with a 
standard deviation of only 77. In other words, there has been a very 
consistent pattern of calling each night in contrast to the more typical 
pulsed migration pattern. Details at: 
http://www.oldbird.org/Data/States/NY/Alfred/fall2011/Alfred2011f.htm


Old and in the bird,

Bill E 





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Re: [nfc-l] Upland Sandpiper in Portugal?

2011-09-18 Thread Bill Evans

Magnus & list,

I think if I heard this over NA I would log it as an Upland, but the jigsaw 
puzzle in these matters involves which piece it is as well as which piece it 
isn't. We really don't have anything else Uppie calls can be confused in the 
US. I don't have a sense for what else it might be in the European flyway.


The call is a bit unusual in that, as I recall from memory, Uppie more often 
gives a three noted call in night migration. I'd have to go back and see if 
I have any instances of two-noted Uppie night flight calls. I'll look into 
this further when I get a chance.


I made a spectrogram of the call but it doesn't provide enough detail to 
help ascertain the ID other than that the frequency, time between notes, and 
basic time-frequency contour appear to generally match.


Bill Evans

- Original Message - 
From: "Magnus Robb" 

To: 
Sent: Sunday, September 18, 2011 5:06 AM
Subject: [nfc-l] Upland Sandpiper in Portugal?


While recording the other night at Sintra, Portugal, I heard a single call 
that seems to me to be spot on for an Upland Sandpiper. I should explain 
that this is a species that has only been recorded twice in Portugal. We 
have been having a major influx of Nearctic waders in Europe, so now would 
be a good time for one to show up.


Anyway, the question is whether this really sounds as good for Upland as I 
think it does. I've only seen and heard one before, though I've listened to 
recordings many times. So I'd be very grateful for some feedback about this 
call. If you heard it over North America, would it go down as an Upland, and 
does it still stand up to scrutiny on closer analysis? I've compared it with 
examples on www.xeno-canto.org and find that it is particularly close to the 
last two examples from Argentina. But nothing beats field experience, which 
I hardly have for this species. I'd love to know your opinions and if 
possible hear some night migration examples from North America.


I'm sending the recording to the list via yousendit, so that only those who 
are interested need to download it. Let me know if there are any problems. 
If this doesn't work then I'll have to think of something else. I don't have 
my own website.


best regards,

Magnus



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[cayugabirds-l] migration through night air

2011-08-15 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings Birders!

We are at that time of year when one can hear the interesting phenomenon of 
avian night migration calls. I hope to host two listening sessions this season 
in the vicinity of Cornell's Hartung Boothroyd Astronomical Observatory on 
Mount Pleasant ~
http://coursewiki.astro.cornell.edu/Astro4410/HartungBoothroydObservatory

One listening session sometime in the next two weeks targets a substantial wave 
of migrant Bobolinks & Veerys, and another toward mid-September centers on 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Swainson's Thrush & early Gray-cheeked Thrushes. We'll 
aim for Friday or Saturday nights (9PM-midnight) and I'll post a note to 
cayugabirds, nysbirds-L, natural-history-L, and cny-naturalhistory a day or two 
in advance. If you are not a regular reader of these listservs and would like 
to be notified directly, send me an email. We'll have microphones set up for 
amplified group listening and a large-screen computer showing airborne 
biological targets via the Binghamton weather radar (NEXRAD).

In the meantime, for those who'd like to tune in to these mind-expanding 
natural events from their homes, Oldbird.org offers instructions for building a 
simple avian night flight call monitoring system and now also offers a 
fully-built, plug and play, avian flight call monitoring system (installed at 
discount for central New York residents - contact me for details).

Anyone living in central New York can still hear Upland Sandpiper flying over 
their homes at night in migration to South America. That likely won't be 
possible in 10 years. The species is in steep decline in NY as commercial wind 
energy threatens the last remaining NY breeding stronghold (Jefferson County).

Bill Evans


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[nfc-l] hardware question from a beginner, recorder, preamp, etc

2011-06-14 Thread Bill Evans

Hello Laurent,
I would not recommend any preamp for less than $50 USD -- in fact the Rolls, 
while it works, is not really that great in the sound quality department. At 
the time I mentioned it on the Old Bird website, it was just the cheapest 
functional preamp I could find offered online. It is convenient in that it 
offers multiple input and output connector-type options (i.e., XLR, phone 
plug, miniplug). The better overall option I think now is to bypass your 
computer's sound card and use a USB audio interface, such as: Creative Labs 
E-MU 8740A 0204 USB 2.0 Audio Interface. However, these devices are geared 
toward music and have bells and whistles beyond what is necessary for night 
flight call monitoring. By the time you factor in their added cost (~$130) 
with the parts for microphone & your labor, you might be better off buying a 
fully-built, ready-to-go, microphone system specifically designed for 
monitoring night flight calls. If you are on a tight budget, the cheapest 
preamps are those contained within old cassette decks -- you simply use the 
cassette deck in the pause-record mode as a preamp, running the signal from 
your mic into the cassette player's microphone input and out its line-level 
output to your computer's audio input. With a little searching around one 
can find an old cassette deck for free or <$10 at a garage sale or junk 
shop.


Regarding recording system, yes folks use digital recorders and transfer to 
computer for later analysis. This is typically done if you are just 
monitoring on a night-to-night basis. If your intentions are to record 
nightly for a whole migration season, then it is much more convenient to set 
up a computer in a permanent location so it can automatically record each 
night -- you are then hands-free until you choose to analyze your data.

Bill Evans



- Original Message - 
From: "laurent fournier" 

To: 
Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 10:15 AM
Subject: [nfc-l] hardware question from a beginner, recorder, preamp, etc


Hi All

I am currently in the process of building the "flower pot mic" described in 
the

"oldbird" website.

2 questions :

- any tip about which preamp I should use? (does everyone uses one?). The 
old

bird website only mention the Rolls MP13 preamp ($70 on Amazon.com), but I
noticed others available for a much lower price ($20).


- Does everyone here does their own recording using a laptop, as suggested 
in
the oldbird? Does anyone use a digital recorder, and later transfer their 
files

on their computer for further analysis?


Any comment or advice would be greatly appreciated!


Laurent in Michigan

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Re: [nfc-l] Nocturnal Calls This morning

2011-05-16 Thread Bill Evans
>From 10PM-4AM last night I only recorded two "chips" (Chestnut-sided and 
>Canada types) from my residence ~6 miles south of Ithaca, so I suspect that 
>few of the migrants indicated on PA NEXRADs last night were making it this far 
>north -- perhaps a complex fallout zone across the southern tier of NY and 
>northern PA this morning.

Bill E
  - Original Message - 
  From: david nicosia 
  To: NFC-L@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Monday, May 16, 2011 8:53 AM
  Subject: [nfc-l] Nocturnal Calls This morning


  Woke up at 4 am this morning and was not that tired
  so decided to sit out on my deck and see what kind of
  migration was taking place. I checked the radar and there
  was fairly heavy migration south of my location with
  much less farther north. Cloud ceilings were very low
  as occasional fog clipped the top of the trees on
  the hill where I live. Winds were from the north as
  we were north of a frontal system. Migrants were
  likely descending as they ran into lower cloud ceilings
  and north winds? Anyway, the calls were  low and
  quite loud but the numbers were not that impressive
  at least compared to fall. 

  I had the following in 40 minutes of listening:

  4 veeries, 4 swainson's thrushes, 3 wood thrushes,
  1 bobolink, 2 solitary sandpipers and 19 unidentified
  zeeps, chips and zitswarblers/sparrows?? That is
  a total of  33 calls in 40 minutes...almost 1 per minute. 

  Dave Nicosia
  Johnson City, NY 




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[nfc-l] NEXRAD interpretation

2011-05-13 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings NFC,

I received a comment suggesting that it might be useful for the listserv to 
review how one knows when NEXRAD reflectivity is birds, insects, and when it is 
other phenomena. 

I think a lot of this comes with field experience over time -- associating 
nocturnal observations of birds (via acoustic, radar, thermal, moonwatching 
methods, etc.) with certain types of reflectivity portrayed by NEXRAD. But a 
good tutorial with some basic examples is found at the Clemson Radar 
Ornithology Lab's website http://virtual.clemson.edu/groups/birdrad/  This was 
the first such NEXRAD ornithology website and there may now be other didactic 
web resources to assist in investigating biotargets on NEXRAD.

I'm not as adept at others on this list at understanding NEXRAD and, to be 
accurate, my earlier post should refer to biotarget activity and not assume 
targets are birds -- the latter determination of the source of reflectivity is 
thought to be possible by analyzing speed of targets in relation to wind speed 
and direction (discussed within the Clemson radar page).  For me, in this case, 
my particular interest involves the isolation of the Montana event (& 
previously noted NE event) and the fact that I don't recall seeing such 
isolated NEXRAD blooms in the eastern US.

Bill E
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Re: [nfc-l] odd NEXRAD pattern

2011-05-02 Thread Bill Evans
Thanks David, I misunderstood and thought you were talking about bird movment 
just after sunset previously.  

Nevertheless, I don't recall seeing such an isolated area of broad-scale 
movement before. I can theorize how it might happen, I've just never noticed it.

Bill


  - Original Message - 
  From: David La Puma 
  To: Bill Evans 
  Cc: NFC-L@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Monday, May 02, 2011 4:45 PM
  Subject: Re: [nfc-l] odd NEXRAD pattern


  Bill

  That was my point. Clear air isn't an issue. I think the combined 
reflectivity and velocity suggest bird migration. You ask "what was going on" 
and my response to that was that the wind conditions were such that 
migration-ready birds did exactly what you'd expect in the absence of strong 
opposing winds and precipitation... they migrated. The winds elsewhere around 
KUEX were stronger and northerly. 

  cheers

  D


  On Mon, May 2, 2011 at 4:28 PM, Bill Evans  wrote:

Chris, David,

Thanks for your responses -- but the fact that KUEX was in clear air mode 
doesn't solve the mystery for me. Many other midwestern NEXRAD stations were in 
clear air mode at 11PM last night. If the reflectivity shown was due to the 
clear air setting then one would expect other stations in the region operating 
in clear air mode would have shown similar activity. For me this appears like 
an unusually localized broad-scale region of biotargets in the atmosphere -- 
the NEXRAD stations at North Platte and Valley, NE appear to be on the 
periphery, showing less, of whatever activity this was.

Bill E




- Original Message - 
  From: David La Puma 
  To: Bill Evans 
  Cc: NFC-L@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Monday, May 02, 2011 3:25 PM
  Subject: Re: [nfc-l] odd NEXRAD pattern


  After reviewing the archive it looks like the KUEX radar was set on 
clear-air mode
  (here's the inventory color coded by mode: 
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/nexradinv/displaygraphs.jsp?=2011=05=01=KUEX=AAL2)
  but I don't think that explains the burst of activity after sunset. Based 
on the velocity (20+ kts) and the direction of travel (SE->NW), those are most 
likely birds. I can't pull an archived radiosonde map for the area at 8pm last 
night, but I suspect (based on the more current radiosonde data) that the winds 
between the surface and ~2-3k feet were light enough to allow migration to 
occur... so I think this is just a case of locally good migration conditions 
during the period when the highest densities of migrants are likely to fly.

  If the meteorologists want to chime in with some archived wind data, that 
would be cool too! 

  Also, Jeff Buler at U Delaware (also doing some really cool radar 
ornithology work) pointed me to this very cool website: http://soar.ou.edu/  
where you  can view the unfiltered NEXRAD data back to 2008 (they are working 
backwards from 2011 to fill in the missing years). Just make sure you're 
viewing the non-QC'd mosaic to include biological targets.


  Cheers

  David


  On Mon, May 2, 2011 at 1:17 PM, Bill Evans  
wrote:

Interesting NEXRAD image from last: substantial migration to the east 
of a front in the eastern US, nothing unusual about that, but strange is one 
isolated radar lighting up in south-central Nebraska.  -Bill E


http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/radar/displayRad.php?icao=KUSA=bref1=black=20110502=4=0
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Re: [nfc-l] odd NEXRAD pattern

2011-05-02 Thread Bill Evans
Chris, David,

Thanks for your responses -- but the fact that KUEX was in clear air mode 
doesn't solve the mystery for me. Many other midwestern NEXRAD stations were in 
clear air mode at 11PM last night. If the reflectivity shown was due to the 
clear air setting then one would expect other stations in the region operating 
in clear air mode would have shown similar activity. For me this appears like 
an unusually localized broad-scale region of biotargets in the atmosphere -- 
the NEXRAD stations at North Platte and Valley, NE appear to be on the 
periphery, showing less, of whatever activity this was.

Bill E




- Original Message - 
  From: David La Puma 
  To: Bill Evans 
  Cc: NFC-L@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Monday, May 02, 2011 3:25 PM
  Subject: Re: [nfc-l] odd NEXRAD pattern


  After reviewing the archive it looks like the KUEX radar was set on clear-air 
mode
  (here's the inventory color coded by mode: 
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/nexradinv/displaygraphs.jsp?=2011=05=01=KUEX=AAL2)
  but I don't think that explains the burst of activity after sunset. Based on 
the velocity (20+ kts) and the direction of travel (SE->NW), those are most 
likely birds. I can't pull an archived radiosonde map for the area at 8pm last 
night, but I suspect (based on the more current radiosonde data) that the winds 
between the surface and ~2-3k feet were light enough to allow migration to 
occur... so I think this is just a case of locally good migration conditions 
during the period when the highest densities of migrants are likely to fly.

  If the meteorologists want to chime in with some archived wind data, that 
would be cool too! 

  Also, Jeff Buler at U Delaware (also doing some really cool radar ornithology 
work) pointed me to this very cool website: http://soar.ou.edu/  where you  can 
view the unfiltered NEXRAD data back to 2008 (they are working backwards from 
2011 to fill in the missing years). Just make sure you're viewing the non-QC'd 
mosaic to include biological targets.


  Cheers

  David


  On Mon, May 2, 2011 at 1:17 PM, Bill Evans  wrote:

Interesting NEXRAD image from last: substantial migration to the east of a 
front in the eastern US, nothing unusual about that, but strange is one 
isolated radar lighting up in south-central Nebraska.  -Bill E


http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/radar/displayRad.php?icao=KUSA=bref1=black=20110502=4=0
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[nfc-l] odd NEXRAD pattern

2011-05-02 Thread Bill Evans
Interesting NEXRAD image from last: substantial migration to the east of a 
front in the eastern US, nothing unusual about that, but strange is one 
isolated radar lighting up in south-central Nebraska.  -Bill E

http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/radar/displayRad.php?icao=KUSA=bref1=black=20110502=4=0
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[nfc-l] Avian towerkill mitigation

2011-01-05 Thread Bill Evans

Greetings Nfcers,

While the phenomenon of avian towerkill is not directly related to night 
flight calls, it does involve night migration. I started to get involved in 
the avian towerkill issue back in 1996. I had been contracted to do an 
acoustic study of avian nocturnal migration at a proposed commercial wind 
energy facility in the prairie region of north-central Nebraska. I put one 
of my acoustic stations near the base of a 317-ft guyed radio tower, 
primarily to take advantage of the AC power at the site. Got lots of 
interesting flight calls but unexpectedly in spring 1997 I also recorded a 
number of avian collision sounds with the tower. This really began to open 
my eyes to the potential collision hazards of even short tower structures to 
night migrating birds.


There has been an ongoing effort to mitigate mortality of nocturnal migrant 
songbirds at communications towers for the past decade. The Federal 
Communications Commission (FCC) is currently holding another public comment 
period on the towerkill issue. This stems from a lawsuit led by the American 
Bird Conservancy & Forest Conservation Council, and a decision by the D.C. 
Circuit Court that prevented the FCC (under pressure from corporate 
lobbying) from dismissing the avian towerkill issue. While comments 
submitted during the previous FCC comment periods regarding this issue are 
still in play, this current comment period regards input on whether the FCC 
should conduct a programmatic Environmental Impact Assessment (EIS) on its 
Antennae Structure Registration program. The answer is clearly yes, because 
the avian towerkill issue is not as much site specific as it involves all 
towers -- the impact to birds is cumulative as well as site specific and the 
primary mitigation would involve a change in aviation obstruction lighting 
regulations for all towers. The FCC currently abides by an Environmental 
Assessment (EA) program on a tower by tower basis, but this does not address 
cumulative impacts. Elevating the environmental review of the FCC's antennae 
structure regulation program to an EIS would help assure that the avian 
towerkill issue gets the appropriate mitigative attention for cumulative 
impacts. [e.g., by some estimates, more than 1% of the Cerulean Warbler 
population is killed at towers annually]


One of the more significant direct conservation actions for songbirds is 
before us right now and the comment period ends in 9 days. An easy way to 
support this effort is to sign the petition at the Defenders of Wildlife 
webpage

https://secure.defenders.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display=UserAction=1769

As with other issues involving federal agencies and big corporations, 
success in instituting strong environmental regulations is dependent upon 
the teamwork of large conservation organizations -- in this case American 
Bird Conservancy, Defenders of Wildlife, Forest Conservation Council, and 
National Audubon Society are all worthy of our support.


For those with more time you can find out more information and submit your 
own comments directly to the FCC at: http://www.fcc.gov/pea  All comments
submitted to the FCC on this issue since 2003 are available on the FCC 
webpage http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/prod/ecfs/comsrch_v2.cgi entering 03-187 in 
box #1, and then clicking the Retrieve Document List button.


Yours in bird,

Bill Evans 





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Re: [nfc-l] nocturnal blackbird fatalities in Arkansas

2011-01-03 Thread Bill Evans
Erin and all,

The video linked below shows part of the kill site as a residential area, which 
doesn't suggest towers were involved. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5P-ay2qaPI=related

The three species of blackbirds involved in the kill do not typically partake 
in nocturnal flight, so this strongly suggests that something spooked the flock 
to flight -- perhaps fireworks or lightning. The Little Rock NEXRAD does show 
some small thunderstorm activity in the Beebe area around the time the birds 
were seen falling (circa 10:30PM according to guy on the video). Whether 
lightning or fireworks caused them to take flight, the lights of the 
residential area nearest the roost may have been their easiest cue for the 
birds to try to maintain orientation in nocturnal flight -- resulting in a 
dense aggregation of blackbirds in mixed direction flight and associated 
collisions.

By the way, there are some pretty bizarre youtube videos out there on this bird 
kill. I personally don't think the event had anything to do with the end times 
or is punishment from above for all the Ivory-billed burgers Arkansonians have 
cooked over the years. ;)

Bill E 


  - Original Message - 
  From: Erin Macchia 
  To: Bill Evans 
  Cc: nfc-l@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Monday, January 03, 2011 11:55 AM
  Subject: Re: [nfc-l] nocturnal blackbird fatalities in Arkansas


  Beebe, AR is a good-sized city, relative to most communities in northeast 
Arkansas.  There is a large, well-lit water tower just to the west of Highway 
67, which I thought might have contributed to the fatalities.  However, a 
Little Rock news broadcast available on YouTube names Windwood Drive as within 
the area affected (estimated 1-mile square), and this is due east of the water 
tower on the other side of the highway.  


  As a researcher investigating avian collisions at communication towers, I did 
a quick search and found seven towers within five miles of Windwood Dr.  The 
towers range from 63 to 107 meters.  Two have white lighting systems, and the 
remaining have dual lighting systems which employ red lights at night.  I can't 
be sure which of these towers have supporting guy wires, but I think it's a 
safe bet that the two towers exceeding 100m in height are probably guyed 
structures.  It would be interesting to know if any towers were in the area in 
which birds were recovered, and if more birds were found near these structures 
than elsewhere in the area where birds were collected.


  -Erin
  -- 
  Erin Tighe Macchia, PhD Candidate
  Graduate Program in Environmental Sciences
  Arkansas State University
  P.O. Box 599
  State University, AR 72467
  870-275-8480
  erin.macc...@smail.astate.edu  
  http://evs.astate.edu/macchia
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Re: [nfc-l] nocturnal blackbird fatalities in Arkansas

2011-01-03 Thread Bill Evans
That's my guess too Dave -- birds colliding with birds in the dark of the 
night. I think the tight orderly flight that flocks of redwings maintain during 
the day is at least partially sight dependent. I'm not aware of any evidence 
that blackbirds (e.g., Bobolinks) fly in tight flocks at night.  If a dense 
night roost gets spooked there's likely to be birds flying in every direction 
and mid-air collisions would seem unavoidable, perhaps especially so for 
dark-colored birds. 

But the weird thing is that no dead birds were found at the roost site. Why 
wouldn't collisions have occurred there as well? Perhaps it took more time for 
the different directions of flight to maximize. Maybe a chunk of the flock 
started to return to the roost while another chunk was still moving away and 
these two streams collided?

Quick check of the weather for Beebe, AR on the night of Dec 31 indicates 100% 
overcast and NW winds about 10 mph -- a cold front had passed earlier in the 
day. Would be interesting to know what the artificial light situation is in 
Beebe.

Regarding Christian's idea of potential ear damage, hopefully the 
pathologist(s) will assess this possibility in their analysis.

Bill Evans




- Original Message - 
  From: Dave Slager 
  To: nfc-l@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Sunday, January 02, 2011 7:43 PM
  Subject: [nfc-l] nocturnal blackbird fatalities in Arkansas


  http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/01/02/arkansas.falling.birds/index.html

  I would guess a very large blackbird flock got spooked during the night, 
causing birds to collide with each other in mid-air above this town.  Any other 
ideas?

  Dave Slager
  Graduate Student
  Terrestrial Wildlife Ecology Lab
  School of Environment and Natural Resources
  The Ohio State University
  210 Kottman Hall, 2021 Coffey Road
  Columbus, OH 43210-1085
  slage...@osu.edu

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[nfc-l] reflections on a monumental nocturnal migration

2010-09-15 Thread Bill Evans

Nfcers,

I begin by stating simply that if anyone ever substantiates a future 
nocturnal vertebrate migration over interior northeastern US (in the first 
two weeks of September) bigger than what occurred the night of Sep 10-11, 
2010.I will buy fine ale for the whole nfc listserv membership at a pub 
of consensual choice somewhere on the planet. So, for those who have an ear 
to hear and an eye to see in this manner, take note of future fall 
migrations over northeastern US in case of cashing in on my offer. I wager, 
given the rarity of such large nocturnal migrations in the past 20 years, 
and the crushing inertia of human civilisation, that a flight the density 
and breadth of Sep 10-11 2010 will not happen again in our lives across 
interior northeastern USA.  If so, I will be singing "kumbaya" in reverance.


As I recall, it was about a week in advance that I began preparations to 
surf the then subtley-evident behemoth wave. Allocation of spousal attention 
was reduced; the kids welfare rationalized circularly by my pending 
documentary actions. We walk a thin line of sanity in this nocturnal 
migration preoccupation, especially so during wartime and amidst other human 
tragedies on our nerve within a keystroke. But we prevail in the bigger 
picture, imprinting earth with our natural history activities, respectfully 
& nonetheless.


The pulse of migration over central New York State on the night of Sep 10-11 
rocked the relative historic framework. My initial calculations were off 
(http://www.birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NFCL.html#1283970775), but you 
only lose in such events when you miss them. The flight happened two nights 
later than I thought, and Catharus fuscescens y Wilsonia pusilla flight 
calling turned out to be normal for the time of year, instead of the higher 
numbers and proportions I had guessed. But the number of migrants aloft 
burst forth with full remnant ebullience. That density was nature-born and 
the species composition a delightfully telling ancient echo. The flight is 
now just a memory for a few of us, but indicative records remain:


Radar reflectivity and velocity images from the night are available for 
download for another 24 hours or so at: 
http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/radar/.  Specifically, the NEXRAD records 
from Albany, Watertown, Binghamton, and Buffalo, NY along with State 
College, PA show sign of sustained 28+ dBZ biological reflectivity crossing 
the breadth of interior NY (Albany to Buffalo) and moving southward across 
central PA.


The link below leads to a thermal image video I made during a period of peak 
passage in the flight (11:15-12:00 EDT) from 610 m asl at the Connecticut 
Hill Wildlife Management Area (15 km east of Ithaca, NY, US). The flight 
activity shown in the video likely represents the lower portion of 28+ dBz 
radar reflectivity that was occurring on this clear sky night -- targets 
were noted passing at a rate >100 per 5 minute period. This thermal video 
was made with a rented FLIR P65 camera with a 23-degree lens. The camera was 
pointed vertically toward the sky and positioned so that birds heading from 
the NNE toward the SSW would appear heading in straight line vertical motion 
from the bottom to the top of the screen of view. 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wpv4OVYDz0


Anne Klingensmith & family operated an acoustic monitoring station in 
Alfred, NY during the flight from 8PM to 6AM. Anne indicated to me that the 
Old Bird tseep detector extracted more than 1000 flight calls of warblers 
and sparrows during the ten hours. This is one of the highest clear night 
tseep call totals ever documented by this station, which has been in 
operation for 20 fall migration seasons. This calling is estimated to be 
largely from birds migrating within 300 m of the ground. Anne carried out a 
preliminary species analysis and reported 15 Wilson's Warbler flight calls 
among the 1000+ tseep notes (~1.5%). The acoustic data from this Alfred, NY 
station are planned to be put online at Oldbird.org in the near future.


I ran an acoustic monitoring station for five hours from 9PM-2AM at my house 
near Ithaca, NY (~500 m asl), which is not the best location in the area to 
record flight calls during such relatively high altitude migration events. I 
logged 219 tseep notes of which 5 were from Wilson's Warblers (~2.3%). I 
also ran the Old Bird Thrush detector and in spectrographic analysis using 
GlassOFire I noted the following species' flight calls: Swainsons Thrush 38, 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 28, Veery 14, Gray-cheeked Thrush 0, and about 30 
unknown thrush type flight calls. This composition is typical for Sep 10 in 
central NY except that I would have expected a few Gray-cheekeds in the mix.


In signing off I reiterate that for the diligently tuned I offer a chance, 
albeit I think a very small one, for free beer & a joyous occasion.


Regards and best wishes for the remainder of the fall 2010 migration season,

Bill E 





--


Re: [nfc-l] Aug 27-Sep 3, 2010

2010-09-03 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings nfcers,

I've been on travel to the midwest this past 10 days and am just catching up on 
recent nfc-l news:

Browsing the NCAR NEXRAD archive, I see that Dave Nicosia was right in that 
there doesn't appear to have been any major push of nocturnal migrants in the 
interior northeastern US this past week. However, contrary to Dave's 
prediction, it doesn't appear we will get a northerly wind over the region any 
time soon.

The typical direction of nocturnal migrants in interior northeastern US at this 
time of year is southwesterly and the forecast for much of this area (e.g., 
central and western NY/PA) is for winds opposing this primary migration 
direction with winds generally FROM the southwest through Sunday. The next cold 
front and northerly winds isn't forecast until Wednesday night, and I think 
Dave is right that there could be a huge flight when this dam finally releases. 
To have nearly two weeks at this time of year without a major nocturnal 
migration event is unusual in the northeastern US and my guess is such may only 
happen once every 15-20 years.

But under these circumstances I'd expect migration urges to push birds to move 
at low altititudes in the coming nights into opposing winds of < 10 mph or so. 
This might be noted in increased reflectivity close to NEXRAD radar stations 
(e.g., Binghamton NY, Watertown NY, State College PA, Pittsburgh PA) especially 
later in the night when winds die down. In other words, substantial movements 
may occur at night in this region before next Wednesday. Such flights would be 
at low altitudes "under radar". Flight call monitoring could be good, 
especially after midnight, as birds fly low to minimize wind impedance. As 
birds contend with the uneven terrain of interior northeastern US I'd expect 
montane channeling dynamics down the Finger Lakes and similar north-south 
running valleys.

Regarding Ted's interesting post on Barn Swallow night flight call, I do not 
recall noting a regularly given flight call from Barn Swallow at night in 
eastern North America -- there are huge diurnal flights of this species up the 
southern coast of Texas in spring but in lots of concurrent nocturnal listening 
I don't recall hearing any regular nocturnal flight call that might be from 
Barn Swallow. They certainly migrate at night across the Gulf of Mexico and I'd 
expect they might call during such flights. I have no knowledge that they 
migrate at night regularly over interior North America. It will be interesting 
to see if Ted has uncovered another uniquely mid-continent nocturnal migration 
behavior. My mind would be really "blown away" if this is the case.

Thanks to Chris for posting the subscribers to this list -- it is nice to know 
who one is writing to on nfc-l. Now all we need is to facilitate submitting 
spectrograms and sound clips for the group's discussion.

Bill E

  - Original Message - 
  From: david nicosia 
  To: NFC-L@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Monday, August 30, 2010 9:52 PM
  Subject: [nfc-l] Big Nocturnal Migration possible this holiday weekend in the 
Northeast/Middle Atlantic States


  The unusual warmth will remain with us most of the week in the northeast.
  This could stall any major migratory push for a time. But...
  a strong cold front will pass through the eastern
  seaboard by Friday night after Hurricane Earl passes to 
  the northeast. Northerly winds will prevail beginning late Friday night
  and continue Saturday night and linger into Sunday night. Could be
  a great early fall nocturnal flight in the northeast/Mid Atlantic. 

  Dave Nicosia 
  Johnson City NY 


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Re: [nfc-l] Dusk flight of White-winged Scoters and Brant over Boston, MA

2010-06-01 Thread Bill Evans
David- 
Thanks for providing the links referencing the Binghamton NEXRAD target I noted 
10 days or so ago (early on to the near ENE in the Binghamton reflectivity 
movie you provided below). In hindsight, I agree with your assessment that this 
doesn't fit well for a flock of birds. For one, it would seem the reflectivity 
would have been much greater for a flock of Brant. But in my understanding it 
doesn't fit well for a weather dynamic either. The only thing I can think of 
that might possibly explain this as birds is perhaps there were just a few 
birds, perhaps descending in altitude, moving westward across a broad N-S 
running -- theoretically for example from small numbers of Whimbrels that had 
been sprinkled along the MA coastline. If there were only small numbers moving 
and they were widely dispersed, relectivity and velocity might not have 
contributed much to the pixel sums. Feels like I've strayed into wild 
speculation -- this is a case where we need a small plane with a small radar, 
thermal imaging, and physical sensors to go up and sample what the heck causes 
such mystery targets.

Curiously,

Bill E

- Original Message -  
  From: David La Puma 
  To: nfc-L@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Saturday, May 22, 2010 10:04 AM
  Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Dusk flight of White-winged Scoters and Brant over 
Boston, MA


  Marshall, Bill, Richard, et al.

  Binghamton Velocity
  
http://www.woodcreeper.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/BGM_Vel_052210-Computer.m4v

  Binghamton Reflectivity
  
http://www.woodcreeper.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/BGM_BR_22May10-Computer.m4v

  David A. La Puma
  Postdoctoral Associate
  New Jersey Audubon Society
  600 Route 47 North
  Cape May Court House, NJ 08210
  Office: 609.861.1608 x33
  Fax:609.861.1651

  Websites: 
  http://www.woodcreeper.com
  http://badbirdz2.wordpress.com

  Photos: 
  http://www.flickr.com/photos/woodcreeper


  On Fri, May 21, 2010 at 10:51 PM, Richard Guthrie  wrote:

A flock of about 150 Brant flew north at dusk, low over the Hudson River in 
New Baltimore, Greene County, NY.

This mid-May mass movement of Brant is an annual event witnessed by many 
Stripe Bass fishermen out on the Hudson while the herring are running, and the 
stripers are hitting.

I’ve noticed NEXRAD patterns during daylight hours of what may have been 
raptor or large waterfowl (geese/swans?) movements along the Lake Ontario south 
shore in the spring. I tried to corroborate this with the hawk watches with no 
conclusive results.

Maybe next spring.

Rich Guthrie

New Baltimore,

The Greene County,

New York

gael...@capital.net




From: bounce-5852472-10071...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-5852472-10071...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of wrevans
Sent: Friday, May 21, 2010 10:33 PM
To: nfc-L@cornell.edu
Subject: re: [nfc-l] Dusk flight of White-winged Scoters and Brant over 
Boston, MA



Marshall,

Before the substantial songbird takeoff on the Binghamton NEXRAD tonight 
(somewhere perhaps between 8PM-8:30PM) I noted a large arch shaped fast moving 
blob in the northeast quadrant moving differently than the weather signatures 
-- at the time I thought it had to be a huge flock of waterfowl or shorebirds 
but I was perplexed by the direction of flight, which was WNW.  I'll see if I 
can find it on NCAR in the morning -- the other eastern NEXRAD may show similar 
targets.

Bill E





From: "Marshall Iliff" 
Sent: Friday, May 21, 2010 9:21 PM
To: bostonbi...@googlegroups.com, "Massbird" , 
nfc-l@cornell.edu
Subject: [nfc-l] Dusk flight of White-winged Scoters and Brant over Boston, 
MA

All,

This evening I visited my local patch on the south side of Boston and was
surprised and pleased to notice one flock, then another, and then another
etc. of White-winged Scoters passing high overhead. This site is about 10
miles inland and so this clearly represented a departure from coastal
staging areas and the beginnings of an overland nocturnal migration. They
passed over in a tight window from 19:50-20:10 and a flock of 80 Brant was
soon to follow. Despite much scanning from 8:10-8:30 (at which point it was
effectively dark), I was unable to spot any other signs of movement.

In any event, I thought it would be worth getting the word out that tonight
seems to be a night for movement of coastal waterbirds. Perhaps Whimbrel or
other shorebirds will join as the night wears on. A full eBird list from my
dusk watch is below.

Best,

Marshall Iliff
West Roxbury, MA
--
Marshall J. Iliff
miliff AT aol.com
West Roxbury, MA
--
eBird/AKN Project Leader 
www.ebird.org
www.avianknowledge.net
Cornell 

Re: [nfc-l] plover flight call ID

2009-09-28 Thread Bill Evans
Dave -- rings like one of those calls I know I've heard but can't pin it to 
species. My first take is that this is not from a plover, certainly not from 
Black-bellied or Semipalmated. There is the possibility of a weird Golden 
perhaps but it is unlike any I've heard.


It is reminiscent of Long-billed Curlew, but seems on the short side and 
like it came from a smaller bird, and of course you recorded it in Ohio so 
the odds are extremely low.


Dropping down in size brings up the possibility of Whimbrel, but they don't 
give one-noted calls like this as far as I know -- still something resonant 
with Whimbrel for me.


The other possibility to consider might be American Avocet. The call is a 
bit low and stretched out compared to typical calls this species gives when 
flushed to flight, but perhaps in night migration individual calls are 
softer and longer. Maybe folks on this listserv in western US would have a 
better sense for the possibility of Avocet.


Final thought is the possibility of an extreme variant Sora.

In any case, interesting call and I'd look forward to hearing comments from 
others.


Bill E



*
From: "Dave Slager" 
To: 
Sent: Friday, September 25, 2009 11:55 PM
Subject: [nfc-l] plover flight call ID and migration volume last night in 
Ohio




Attached is a flight call, presumably from a plover, that I recorded
on September 10 at 12:48am over Columbus, Ohio.  My best guess is
Black-bellied Plover but I can't rule completely out American
Golden-plover or Semipalmated Plover.  Would any of you care to weigh
in on the ID?





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Re: [nfc-l] Finch NFCs/Flight Calls of Migratory Birds

2009-09-01 Thread Bill Evans

Matthew,

When Michael O'Brien and I put together the Flight Call Guide (circa 2001), 
the vast majority of people had slow internet connections and it didn't seem 
practical to put long sound cuts on the web -- distributing the guide on a 
data CD made more sense. But most birders today have fast internetand 
there are more people recording and studying flight calls. I think the 
successor to the current CD will likely be online with many contributors. 
There isn't currently a central depository for bird song recordings in North 
America, but the web brings the multiple archives together and allows an 
individual access to all. Same thing will likely happen for flight calls, 
this listserv is part of it, and ultimately it's a wild animal whose course 
is hard to predict -- but I wouldn't expect any comprehensive updates to the 
knowledge of landbird night flight call identity in eastern NA for at least 
three years. Of course, more specific clarification on particular pieces of 
the puzzle may emerge at any time.


The finch flight call information in the guide was based largely on 
Michael's and my field experience. My contribution was the fact that I 
hardly ever had recorded finch flight calls in a decade of nocturnal 
recording from interior US [note though that I had not extensively studied 
the period November through December]. We had both noted finch flight 
calling in the predawn period though it was interesting that Michael's finch 
nfcs from the Atlantic Coastal region were consistently earlier in the 
morning than my inland recordings. I had noted some finch flight calls from 
the middle of the night but there is the aspect David Martin pointed out 
that when you just get a few incidences of a species calling at night and 
you don't know whether it's true nocturnal migration behavior or whether 
it's a bird flushed by an owl, etc. What Michael and I conveyed in the guide 
was that finch flight calling in the hour or two before sunrise is a regular 
behavior -- and that finch flight calling in the middle of the night is 
unknown and that finches are thought to be largely diurnal migrants. As far 
as I know, that paradigm is still good until someone documents otherwise --  
note that I used the term night movements (not migration) in my prior email. 
There is a lot of weird bird movement that happens in artificially lit 
coastal regions at night.


BTW, the shallow end of the pool for night flight calls is northern Canada. 
Iowa is the deep end!


Bill E



Bill Evans wrote:
 but it is now thought that all finches are sometimes involved with night 
movements in the east, especially in coastal areas.



Mr. Evans,

As interest in NFCs grows and new information is gathered, portions of 
your Flight Calls CD will naturally become outdated, as this comment shows 
with respect to the finch species accounts. I hope to have a recording 
setup in place for the spring migration, so I've got a couple of questions 
about your CD reference as I begin wading into the shallow end of the 
pool:


Is there a revised or remodeled version of Flight Calls in the works?

Are the finches now considered presumed/hypothetical night migrants, or 
are there confirmed night flight calling for some of the species?


Are there other major family changes since the CD came out where, like 
finches, groups not previously known to call at night have been found to 
do so on occasion?


Thanks,

Matthew Kenne
Algona, Iowa
mke...@netamumail.com



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Re: [nfc-l] Black-headed Grosbeak NFCs and ID help

2009-08-31 Thread Bill Evans
Interesting calls Tayler. If your 3-call cut is unedited then it sounds like 
multiple birds may be involved. The calls don't sound like Western Meadowlark 
or Bobolink, and they don't fit the flight call descriptions of Black-headed 
Grosbeak or Western Tanager in Sibley. Bullock's Oriole might be a possibility 
but your calls are shorter than typical for that species, and in my experience 
orioles rarely give nocturnal flight calls. 

It is tough with the weak recording but the species that rings closest for me 
is House Finch. Not sure how that possibility might fit at your recording site 
(?) in Washington State, but it is now thought that all finches are sometimes 
involved with night movements in the east, especially in coastal areas.

I look forward to following your detective work on the identity of these calls 
and to hearing what others think.

Bill Evans
Danby, NY
  - Original Message - 
  From: Tayler Brooks 
  To: nfc-l@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2009 2:41 AM
  Subject: [nfc-l] Black-headed Grosbeak NFCs and ID help


  Hello all,


  I'd like to hear from those out there that have experience with the nocturnal 
flight calls of BHGR.  How different are they from those of Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak?  


  I set up my equipment for a night of recording in Brier, WA yesterday. At 
around the 1:30am mark, some interesting flight calls showed up on the 
spectrogram. Three FCs were recorded that I initially thought could be those of 
a Bobolink, as they were somewhat brief (79, 65, and 42 ms long), beginning at 
2.8 and ending at 3.8 kHz (generally), were all rising in pitch, and showed a 
complete parallel upper band on two of the calls (the first only had half of 
one).  BHGR was suggested as an ID for the mystery sound, can they give fairly 
short, ascending flight calls differing from the usually monotonal (or slightly 
descending), longer FCs of RBGR?


  Here's a spectrogram of my recording, the call is about 65 ms (compared here 
to some spects of BOBO from the Evans and O'Brien program): 
http://tinyurl.com/np2r7n


  The sound file itself can be heard here (intervals shortened): 
http://tinyurl.com/kto4zc


  The recording is very faint, is it beyond being identifiable?


  I've had some pretty decent flights over my yard this month with 297 flight 
calls recorded on the 18th and 329 last night, basic species breakdowns and 
spectrograms will be posted to the list soon!


  Thanks for the help and good birding,


  -Tayler Brooks from Washington
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