Re: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning

2017-09-10 Thread david nicosia
I am going through many of my ebird lists from years ago and am changing to 
nocturnal flight count and following the protocol below. I have been using 
ebird for many many years and am a reviewer for my local county. So far, I am 
the only one in my county who does NFC so I appreciate your comments. Like I 
said, I should have known this... 


  From: Geoff Malosh 
 To: 'Night Flight Call Discussions'  
 Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 12:18 PM
 Subject: RE: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning
   
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{}#yiv6096731939 Dave,  In your recording I am able to hear mostly Swainson’s 
Thrush and some Wood Thrush, along with a few others, perhaps Scarlet Tanager, 
and a few “zeep” calls and maybe one or two “up seeps”. The audio is very hard 
to hear so there could easily be more. I didn’t pick out any for-sure 
Gray-cheeked Thrushes.  I should also point out that eBird requests that counts 
of nocturnal flight calls be entered under a specific protocol and in a very 
specific way. The reason is so that these counts of nocturnal calls do not skew 
the analysis of “stationary” and “traveling” counts that are used by day, when 
detecting birds is done much differently. More information on how eBird 
requests nocturnal counts be entered is here: 
http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/1010492-entering-nocturnal-flight-call-counts
  Things that should be corrected on your checklist include changing the 
protocol from Stationary to Nocturnal Flight Call Count, changing the count of 
“passerine sp.” to X and moving the count of 500 into the notes field (although 
most of these are Swainson’s Thrush), and changing the answer to “are you 
submitting a complete checklist” to No.   Here in Pittsburgh the past two early 
mornings have been outstanding listening, with hundreds Swainson’s Thrush and 
many other calls just in the period between astronomical and civil twilights 
each morning. Gray-cheeked Thrushes have started moving through here too. When 
everything is analyzed I expect there will be in excess of 1000 calls of 
Swainson’s Thrush alone, and perhaps double that number for total flight calls, 
for each of the overnight periods Sept 9 and 10.  Good listening!  Geoff 
MaloshPittsburgh, Pennsylvania      From: 
bounce-2378437-53236...@mm.list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-2378437-53236...@mm.list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Meena Madhav 
Haribal
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 11:30 AM
To: NFC-L
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning  Hi Dave, 
In the Ebird post I can hear hardly anything even noise. Can you send the 
recordings as  whole directly to me? Yesterday night we were at mount Pleasant 
and among at least 30 or forty calls we had one or two Gray-cheeked. At my home 
pout of 100+ calls I did not get any Gray-cheeked.  CheersMeena   Meena 
HaribalIthaca NY 
1485042.429007,-76.47111http://www.haribal.org/http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/Ithaca
 area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/postsDragonfly book 
sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf   From: 
bounce-2378433-53237...@mm.list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of david nicosia 

Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 11:11:01 AM
To: NFC-L
Subject: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning  All,   I used 
my phone to record a nocturnal flight near twilight as the birds werecoming 
down this morning. I know I had SWAINSON'S THRUSH and VEERY. I ampretty sure I 
had a GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH and also WOOD THRUSHand ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS. I 
also had some unidentified calls. So I amplified the audio, and uploaded to 
ebird. To my dismay, the spectrogramshows nothing but you can still hear calls

Re: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning

2017-09-10 Thread david nicosia
Thanks. I should know better on this one!!!  I will do so. 

  From: Geoff Malosh 
 To: 'Night Flight Call Discussions'  
 Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 12:18 PM
 Subject: RE: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning
   
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{}#yiv6096731939 Dave,  In your recording I am able to hear mostly Swainson’s 
Thrush and some Wood Thrush, along with a few others, perhaps Scarlet Tanager, 
and a few “zeep” calls and maybe one or two “up seeps”. The audio is very hard 
to hear so there could easily be more. I didn’t pick out any for-sure 
Gray-cheeked Thrushes.  I should also point out that eBird requests that counts 
of nocturnal flight calls be entered under a specific protocol and in a very 
specific way. The reason is so that these counts of nocturnal calls do not skew 
the analysis of “stationary” and “traveling” counts that are used by day, when 
detecting birds is done much differently. More information on how eBird 
requests nocturnal counts be entered is here: 
http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/1010492-entering-nocturnal-flight-call-counts
  Things that should be corrected on your checklist include changing the 
protocol from Stationary to Nocturnal Flight Call Count, changing the count of 
“passerine sp.” to X and moving the count of 500 into the notes field (although 
most of these are Swainson’s Thrush), and changing the answer to “are you 
submitting a complete checklist” to No.   Here in Pittsburgh the past two early 
mornings have been outstanding listening, with hundreds Swainson’s Thrush and 
many other calls just in the period between astronomical and civil twilights 
each morning. Gray-cheeked Thrushes have started moving through here too. When 
everything is analyzed I expect there will be in excess of 1000 calls of 
Swainson’s Thrush alone, and perhaps double that number for total flight calls, 
for each of the overnight periods Sept 9 and 10.  Good listening!  Geoff 
MaloshPittsburgh, Pennsylvania      From: 
bounce-2378437-53236...@mm.list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-2378437-53236...@mm.list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Meena Madhav 
Haribal
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 11:30 AM
To: NFC-L
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning  Hi Dave, 
In the Ebird post I can hear hardly anything even noise. Can you send the 
recordings as  whole directly to me? Yesterday night we were at mount Pleasant 
and among at least 30 or forty calls we had one or two Gray-cheeked. At my home 
pout of 100+ calls I did not get any Gray-cheeked.  CheersMeena   Meena 
HaribalIthaca NY 
1485042.429007,-76.47111http://www.haribal.org/http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/Ithaca
 area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/postsDragonfly book 
sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf   From: 
bounce-2378433-53237...@mm.list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of david nicosia 

Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 11:11:01 AM
To: NFC-L
Subject: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning  All,   I used 
my phone to record a nocturnal flight near twilight as the birds werecoming 
down this morning. I know I had SWAINSON'S THRUSH and VEERY. I ampretty sure I 
had a GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH and also WOOD THRUSHand ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS. I 
also had some unidentified calls. So I amplified the audio, and uploaded to 
ebird. To my dismay, the spectrogramshows nothing but you can still hear calls. 
Can someone listen to thisand let me know what I had?? Its 7 minutes long. I 
would appreciate anyone's take onthis...  see 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39101824  Thanks  Dave Nicosia --NFC-L 
List Info:Welcome and BasicsRules and InformationSubscribe, Configuration

Re: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning

2017-09-10 Thread david nicosia
I am uploading two 82 MB files to google drive for you. I actually have 14 
minutesof data. I didn't upload the second file to ebird...  Thanks. I am 
pretty sure I heard the  heee...aa'  call of the GCTHNot 100% sure... sorry you 
can't hear these. I turned the volumeup and with headphones I can hear the 
birds from my laptop... if you can amplifythe sounds of the birds etc that 
would be awesome. 
  From: Meena Madhav Haribal 
 To: NFC-L  
 Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 11:30 AM
 Subject: Re: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning
   
#yiv9189441510 #yiv9189441510 -- P 
{margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}#yiv9189441510 Hi Dave, 
In the Ebird post I can hear hardly anything even noise. Can you send the 
recordings as  whole directly to me? Yesterday night we were at mount Pleasant 
and among at least 30 or forty calls we had one or two Gray-cheeked. At my home 
pout of 100+ calls I did not get any Gray-cheeked.
CheersMeena 
Meena HaribalIthaca NY 
1485042.429007,-76.47111http://www.haribal.org/http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/Ithaca
 area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/postsDragonfly book 
sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf   From: 
bounce-2378433-53237...@mm.list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of david nicosia 

Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 11:11:01 AM
To: NFC-L
Subject: [nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning All, 
I used my phone to record a nocturnal flight near twilight as the birds 
werecoming down this morning. I know I had SWAINSON'S THRUSH and VEERY. I 
ampretty sure I had a GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH and also WOOD THRUSHand ROSE-BREASTED 
GROSBEAKS. I also had some unidentified calls. So I amplified the audio, and 
uploaded to ebird. To my dismay, the spectrogramshows nothing but you can still 
hear calls. Can someone listen to thisand let me know what I had?? Its 7 
minutes long. I would appreciate anyone's take onthis...
see http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39101824
Thanks
Dave Nicosia --NFC-L List Info:Welcome and BasicsRules and 
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[nfc-l] NFC recording 7 minutes twilight this morning

2017-09-10 Thread david nicosia
All, 
I used my phone to record a nocturnal flight near twilight as the birds 
werecoming down this morning. I know I had SWAINSON'S THRUSH and VEERY. I 
ampretty sure I had a GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH and also WOOD THRUSHand ROSE-BREASTED 
GROSBEAKS. I also had some unidentified calls. So I amplified the audio, and 
uploaded to ebird. To my dismay, the spectrogramshows nothing but you can still 
hear calls. Can someone listen to thisand let me know what I had?? Its 7 
minutes long. I would appreciate anyone's take onthis...
see http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39101824
Thanks
Dave Nicosia 
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[nfc-l] Heavy Nocturnal Flight Binghamton Airport Last Night

2016-05-05 Thread david nicosia
  I got finished by with work at 11 pm last evening andin the parking lot 
before I got into my car I heard a"stream" of chips, zips, zeets and zeeps! I 
listened for about5 minutes and it was constant. There were at least 3 SOLITARY 
SANDPIPERS that flew by. Additionally, I was surprised to heara BARN SWALLOW 
and right before I leftan early SWAINSON'S THRUSH!! The birds were very lowas 
cloud ceilings have dropped to a few hundred feetand there was a heavy drizzle 
falling. 
When I arrived at home which is at 1300 feet a few hundredfeet lower than the 
airport I still could hear the chips, zipsand zeeps etc but they were higher 
up. I listened forseveral more minutes and heard one more SOLITARYSANDPIPER but 
nothing else than I could ID. The radarshows modest echoes at this time. 
Dave Nicosia
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[nfc-l] Beginnings of Fall Migration evident on radar last night

2015-07-02 Thread david nicosia
Worked the overnight shift last night and noticed classic radar blossoms 
develop after sunset. Of course they were much smaller than peak migration but 
the doppler winds did show a northwesterly to north component. The radar echoes 
were biological in nature so I imagine they were birds already heading south. 
The echoes were prevalent on other radars where the winds were north too. First 
shorebirds at Knox-Marcellus marsh tomorrow??? '

Dave Nicosia

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[nfc-l] Major migratory push across northeast PA on radar now

2015-04-30 Thread david nicosia

Radar shows  high returns over northeast pa heading north. Tommorow could be an 
awesome day with many new arrivals!

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


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[nfc-l] Migration evident on radar in the deep south tonight!!

2014-02-18 Thread david nicosia
This is the first time I personally have noticed bird echoes on radar in the 
deep southern U.S 
in the southerly wind flow now. Spring is coming!!! 
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[nfc-l] Thrush Migration 5-6 am this morning 9/9

2013-09-09 Thread david nicosia
Got up at 5 am and listened for night calls, particularly thrushes,
and found a decent flight, especially as they descended between
540 am and 555 am. During this time there were so many
thrushes coming down that it was hard to count so I just
estimated my numbers. Many times it was hard to tell if
it was the same bird calling more than once. 
I did have 3 separate GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSHES
at different times all very low. One was right over
the house and sounded like it circled. As expected
most thrushes were SWAINSON'S and I estimated about 60.

VEERY was about 20 and WOOD THRUSH about 10 or so. 

By 600 am I think it was mostly over but it was hard to tell from
increased traffic. Radar still showed some echoes
so it could have continued further. 

Good birding to all. 

Dave Nicosia 
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Re: [nfc-l] Fw: [cayugabirds-l] Migration beginning to become evident on radar

2013-07-14 Thread david nicosia
In upstate NY I should say...sorry...



 From: david nicosia 
To: "NFC-L@cornell.edu"  
Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2013 10:46 PM
Subject: [nfc-l] Fw: [cayugabirds-l] Migration beginning to become evident on 
radar
 




- Forwarded Message -----
From: david nicosia 
To: Cayugabirds- L ; Bluewing 
 
Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2013 10:45 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Migration beginning to become evident on radar
 


I have noticed radar echoes blossoming some after sunset more so than the last 
couple weeks.
At altitudes of about 3000 to 5000 feet AGL the echoes were moving from north 
to south, below that;
the echoes are moving more west to east suggesting maybe some of these are 
insects?? Or maybe
some are birds migrating or wandering toward the coast??? Not sure. 

There is a large high over the region with very light winds so I think what we
are seeing in the velocity images are biological. Dual polar hydrometeor
classification product suggests all echoes are biological this evening.

This link has all the dual polar radar products along with the legacy 
reflectivity and velocity
products.  http://weather.cod.edu/satrad/nexrad/

Cheers,
Dave Nicosia 

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[nfc-l] Fw: [cayugabirds-l] Migration beginning to become evident on radar

2013-07-14 Thread david nicosia



- Forwarded Message -
From: david nicosia 
To: Cayugabirds- L ; Bluewing 
 
Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2013 10:45 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Migration beginning to become evident on radar
 


I have noticed radar echoes blossoming some after sunset more so than the last 
couple weeks.
At altitudes of about 3000 to 5000 feet AGL the echoes were moving from north 
to south, below that;
the echoes are moving more west to east suggesting maybe some of these are 
insects?? Or maybe
some are birds migrating or wandering toward the coast??? Not sure. 

There is a large high over the region with very light winds so I think what we
are seeing in the velocity images are biological. Dual polar hydrometeor
classification product suggests all echoes are biological this evening.

This link has all the dual polar radar products along with the legacy 
reflectivity and velocity
products.  http://weather.cod.edu/satrad/nexrad/

Cheers,
Dave Nicosia 

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Re: [nfc-l] [nysbirds-l] Minimal Migration or Population Decline?

2013-06-17 Thread david nicosia
This is anecdotal. But each year I do an informal survey of the singing males 
at New
Michigan State Forest in Pharsalia Chenango County, NY. I try very hard to not 
recount birds 
and I have been doing this almost yearly since 2009. This is a boreal like 
forest...one of the 
few you can find outside the Catskills and Adirondacks in the highlands of 
central NY. This 
year I found all typical boreal breeders to be as common as past years. 
BLACKBURNIAN, 
MAGNOLIA WARBLERS were most abundant like other years as well as tons of 
OVENBIRDS. 
My total numbers were a bit down but I did not have time to do a couple roads 
that I did past years. 
If I did these roads I have no doubt numbers who have been comparable to other 
years. The 
dawn chorus was very active. This is just one spotso hard to make any 
conclusions here.  

I am assuming this is just this year for many of you? If so, it has to be 
weather related. 
If it is a gradual decline through the years...then one would think it could be 
habitat 
changes...possibly wintering grounds and/or breeding grounds?? 

Of course, if resident birds are not as common either as has been stated...is 
there a 
disease affecting birds???

let's hope they rebound. Quite spring/summer woodlands is just downright 
depressing. 



 From: Joan E. Collins 
To: 'Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes'  
Cc: 'NYSBIRDS-L' ; 'NFC-L' 
; 'Sean O'Brien' ; 'Chris Rimmer' 
; northern_ny_bi...@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2013 3:35 PM
Subject: RE:[nfc-l] [nysbirds-l] Minimal Migration or Population Decline?
 


Hi Chris/All,
 
I am out every day and I have not noticed any improvement.  As I walk through 
the forest (or bogs), the lack of birds is all I can think about.  I am 
surprised this has not been a dominant discussion on our NYS Birds list serve.  
It is so disturbing and everyone is anxiously awaiting BBS data for this year – 
but of course roadside surveys don’t work well for many species.  I can barely 
find a Lincoln’s Sparrow (I jump up and down when I hear one now) – a species 
that is normally abundant in our Adirondack bogs.  Canada Warbler numbers are 
way down.  I have also noticed the same lack of species that you listed 
(although, I have not noticed a lack of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in northern 
NY).  Indigo Bunting is another species that is hard to find.  Scarlet Tanager, 
Veery….I could keep going…
 
Chris Rimmer, Director of the Vermont Center for Ecostudies, emailed about the 
lack of neotropical migrants in e-central VT, and he is hearing the same thing 
from others – how quiet the forests are this spring.  He has noticed that 
Swainson’s Thrush numbers are down up on Mount Mansfield in VT.  I’ve been 
finding a few more on dawn tours up Whiteface Mountain since the Memorial Day 
Weekend 3-foot snowfall melted away.  I plan to conduct the Mountain Birdwatch 
survey of that peak on Thursday, and the results should shed some light on 
Swainson’s Thrush numbers (at least in high elevation), in addition to numbers 
for all the other species we tally for that survey (I have the data from last 
year to compare to).
 
Jeff Nadler, photographer, just emailed about a 3 day trip he took to boreal 
habitat areas in northern VT & NH, which he visits every year, and the lack of 
birds this year.  He noticed not only a lack of neotropical migrants, but also 
a lack of year-round boreal species!  He echoed the same thing everyone is 
noticing – the forests are “quiet” with no loud dawn chorus.
 
I think we are all wondering the same question: “What happened?”  I hope this 
question will eventually have an answer.
 
Joan Collins
Long Lake, NY
 
 
From:Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes [mailto:c...@cornell.edu] 
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2013 11:17 AM
To: Joan E. Collins
Cc: NYSBIRDS-L; NFC-L; Sean O'Brien
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Fwd: Minimal Migration or Population Decline?
 
Thank you, Joan, for this anecdotal evidence. Since it has been a couple of 
weeks now, I'm curious to know if anyone has noted an improvement in their 
local area birding spots, or if it has been more of the same. For me, I've 
noted a serious lack of typical neighborhood birds that used to be a regular 
part of the acoustic atmosphere: Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Baltimore Oriole and 
Red-eyed Vireo, just to name a few. I've also noticed a lack of Ruby-throated 
Hummingbirds this year – usually, they are zipping around and chittering in the 
neighborhood. Not so this year, yet anyway. If this is region-wide, I'd think 
it critically important to collect as much data as possible to help monitor or 
track this seeming dearth of activity. I expect this fall migration to be 
fairly telling, if there was a pop-ulation-wide impact of some kind. 
 
Sincerely,
Chris T-H
 
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[nfc-l] Update on Night Flight

2012-09-28 Thread david nicosia
The radar bird echoes are not as expansive as last night from NWS Binghamton's 
radar. It is noteworthy
that radar sites tothe south where cloud ceilings are non-existent or much much 
higher have expansive
bird echoes. Cloud ceilings are running between 500 and 1000 feet in much of 
central NY at this time. 

Fog was covering the highest hills. There was drizzle and light rain but mostly 
in northern NY. 

This begs the question if the birds are flying too low and mostly under the 
radar beam...or not migrating
en-mass like last night due to the light rains and drizzle. 




 From: david nicosia 
To: david nicosia ; Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
; CAYUGABIRDS-L ; NFC- L 
; Bluewing  
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2012 7:33 PM
Subject: [bluewing-group] Re: [cayugabirds-l] FOG - Night Flight
 

Bird echoes rapidly expanding on radar after sunset!   




 From: david nicosia 
To: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
; NFC- L  
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2012 4:41 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] FOG - Night Flight
 

As it stands now, I think there is a good chance for low ceilings lasting
well into the night. Probably less than 1000 feet all night...there will be fog 
too...
especially over the hills. Winds are expected to be NW around 5-15 knots up 
through about 
5-6 thousand feet through the night. Not sure how many birds will be taking off
in the foggy/drizzly air mass in NY...but north into Ontario (which is north of 
the low cloud
shield) there is a chilly mass in place and northerly winds which will increase 
through
the night with a colder air mass pouring south. I would imagine
this will get birds going south from Ontario into NY.  It will be interesting
to see if birds fly above the lower cloud shield or go below it ...or both. 
There also
will be a cloud layer between 2000 and 4000 feet above ground
 level. 

This could be a great night...or a bust. Depends on what the birds do. 
Forecasting weather is hard enough, forecasting what birds will do
is beyond my expertise. Maybe someone else can help here with the birds??  

If the flight is low enough it may fall below the radar beam and not show up as 
well.
If we see radar echo "blossoming" after sunset then we know there is a flight 
at 2000-5000
feet above ground level which still could mean many birds below the clouds and 
in the fog.
Since there is also drizzle and light rain showers, the radar is picking up 
precipitation echoes. I have
access to dual polar radar data which will be able to determine between the 
precipitation and
the bird echoes. This will be interesting to see also. 

In any event, I hope, in some ways, the flight is not too low because the risk 
of tower 
and wind turbine kills will go way up.  If people go out listening
 tonight,
please share on this listserver. If you live near a tower and it is foggy you 
may
want to check for kills. Let's hope this does not happen. Good luck everyone! 

Dave Nicosia  




 From: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L  
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2012 3:49 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] FOG - Night Flight
 

Good afternoon, birders! 

Tonight the forecast for the Ithaca, NY area (at least) is looking very 
interesting.

The local forecast is calling for a light NW wind (3-5 mph). Currently, we've 
got foggy conditions (very low cloud ceiling). If the weather pattern holds 
true, we may see a slowly increasing cloud ceiling height over the course of 
the night (thanks Dave Nicosia for this info!).

If this condition persists into the night, we may see an excellent night flight 
of low-flying night migrants (thrushes, warblers, sparrows, etc.). This means 
that migrants will be easily heard, but it also means that they may temporarily 
circle around or even temporarily settle down near well lighted areas (lighted 
athletic fields, mall parking lots, etc.).

On the potentially detrimental side of things, this means that birds may be 
more prone to striking human-made objects that are in unexpectedly in the way 
of these night-flying birds (for example: radio towers, wind turbines, tall 
lighted buildings, etc.). The negative side-effects from this type of weather 
event may include higher than normal numbers of tower-killed and wind 
turbine-killed birds and an increased incidence of nighttime window-strikes at 
tall lighted buildings.

Local areas to go to listen for migrants and check for birds (healthy or 
otherwise) include: lighted athletic fields (Schoellkopf Field Stadium or other 
practice fields around Cornell University and Ithaca College), lighted parking 
lots (especially those at higher elevations, such as Shops at Ithaca Mall, 
Ithaca College Campus, Cornell Campus, Cayuga Medical Center, etc.), near tall 
lighted buildings, and possibly include checking radio towers or wind turbine 
sites for deceased or injured birds.

Hopefully, tonight won't 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] FOG - Night Flight

2012-09-28 Thread david nicosia
Bird echoes rapidly expanding on radar after sunset!   




 From: david nicosia 
To: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
; NFC- L  
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2012 4:41 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] FOG - Night Flight
 

As it stands now, I think there is a good chance for low ceilings lasting
well into the night. Probably less than 1000 feet all night...there will be fog 
too...
especially over the hills. Winds are expected to be NW around 5-15 knots up 
through about 
5-6 thousand feet through the night. Not sure how many birds will be taking off
in the foggy/drizzly air mass in NY...but north into Ontario (which is north of 
the low cloud
shield) there is a chilly mass in place and northerly winds which will increase 
through
the night with a colder air mass pouring south. I would imagine
this will get birds going south from Ontario into NY.  It will be interesting
to see if birds fly above the lower cloud shield or go below it ...or both. 
There also
will be a cloud layer between 2000 and 4000 feet above ground level. 

This could be a great night...or a bust. Depends on what the birds do. 
Forecasting weather is hard enough, forecasting what birds will do
is beyond my expertise. Maybe someone else can help here with the birds??  

If the flight is low enough it may fall below the radar beam and not show up as 
well.
If we see radar echo "blossoming" after sunset then we know there is a flight 
at 2000-5000
feet above ground level which still could mean many birds below the clouds and 
in the fog.
Since there is also drizzle and light rain showers, the radar is picking up 
precipitation echoes. I have
access to dual polar radar data which will be able to determine between the 
precipitation and
the bird echoes. This will be interesting to see also. 

In any event, I hope, in some ways, the flight is not too low because the risk 
of tower 
and wind turbine kills will go way up.  If people go out listening
 tonight,
please share on this listserver. If you live near a tower and it is foggy you 
may
want to check for kills. Let's hope this does not happen. Good luck everyone! 

Dave Nicosia  




 From: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L  
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2012 3:49 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] FOG - Night Flight
 

Good afternoon, birders! 

Tonight the forecast for the Ithaca, NY area (at least) is looking very 
interesting.

The local forecast is calling for a light NW wind (3-5 mph). Currently, we've 
got foggy conditions (very low cloud ceiling). If the weather pattern holds 
true, we may see a slowly increasing cloud ceiling height over the course of 
the night (thanks Dave Nicosia for this info!).

If this condition persists into the night, we may see an excellent night flight 
of low-flying night migrants (thrushes, warblers, sparrows, etc.). This means 
that migrants will be easily heard, but it also means that they may temporarily 
circle around or even temporarily settle down near well lighted areas (lighted 
athletic fields, mall parking lots, etc.).

On the potentially detrimental side of things, this means that birds may be 
more prone to striking human-made objects that are in unexpectedly in the way 
of these night-flying birds (for example: radio towers, wind turbines, tall 
lighted buildings, etc.). The negative side-effects from this type of weather 
event may include higher than normal numbers of tower-killed and wind 
turbine-killed birds and an increased incidence of nighttime window-strikes at 
tall lighted buildings.

Local areas to go to listen for migrants and check for birds (healthy or 
otherwise) include: lighted athletic fields (Schoellkopf Field Stadium or other 
practice fields around Cornell University and Ithaca College), lighted parking 
lots (especially those at higher elevations, such as Shops at Ithaca Mall, 
Ithaca College Campus, Cornell Campus, Cayuga Medical Center, etc.), near tall 
lighted buildings, and possibly include checking radio towers or wind turbine 
sites for deceased or injured birds.

Hopefully, tonight won't contribute to many deaths, but these conditions 
invariably result in some level of casualties.

Good birding and good night listening.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

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Re:[nfc-l] [cayugabirds-l] FOG - Night Flight

2012-09-28 Thread david nicosia
As it stands now, I think there is a good chance for low ceilings lasting
well into the night. Probably less than 1000 feet all night...there will be fog 
too...
especially over the hills. Winds are expected to be NW around 5-15 knots up 
through about 
5-6 thousand feet through the night. Not sure how many birds will be taking off
in the foggy/drizzly air mass in NY...but north into Ontario (which is north of 
the low cloud
shield) there is a chilly mass in place and northerly winds which will increase 
through
the night with a colder air mass pouring south. I would imagine
this will get birds going south from Ontario into NY.  It will be interesting
to see if birds fly above the lower cloud shield or go below it ...or both. 
There also
will be a cloud layer between 2000 and 4000 feet above ground level. 

This could be a great night...or a bust. Depends on what the birds do. 
Forecasting weather is hard enough, forecasting what birds will do
is beyond my expertise. Maybe someone else can help here with the birds??  

If the flight is low enough it may fall below the radar beam and not show up as 
well.
If we see radar echo "blossoming" after sunset then we know there is a flight 
at 2000-5000
feet above ground level which still could mean many birds below the clouds and 
in the fog.
Since there is also drizzle and light rain showers, the radar is picking up 
precipitation echoes. I have
access to dual polar radar data which will be able to determine between the 
precipitation and
the bird echoes. This will be interesting to see also. 

In any event, I hope, in some ways, the flight is not too low because the risk 
of tower 
and wind turbine kills will go way up.  If people go out listening tonight,
please share on this listserver. If you live near a tower and it is foggy you 
may
want to check for kills. Let's hope this does not happen. Good luck everyone! 

Dave Nicosia  




 From: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L  
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2012 3:49 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] FOG - Night Flight
 

Good afternoon, birders! 

Tonight the forecast for the Ithaca, NY area (at least) is looking very 
interesting.

The local forecast is calling for a light NW wind (3-5 mph). Currently, we've 
got foggy conditions (very low cloud ceiling). If the weather pattern holds 
true, we may see a slowly increasing cloud ceiling height over the course of 
the night (thanks Dave Nicosia for this info!).

If this condition persists into the night, we may see an excellent night flight 
of low-flying night migrants (thrushes, warblers, sparrows, etc.). This means 
that migrants will be easily heard, but it also means that they may temporarily 
circle around or even temporarily settle down near well lighted areas (lighted 
athletic fields, mall parking lots, etc.).

On the potentially detrimental side of things, this means that birds may be 
more prone to striking human-made objects that are in unexpectedly in the way 
of these night-flying birds (for example: radio towers, wind turbines, tall 
lighted buildings, etc.). The negative side-effects from this type of weather 
event may include higher than normal numbers of tower-killed and wind 
turbine-killed birds and an increased incidence of nighttime window-strikes at 
tall lighted buildings.

Local areas to go to listen for migrants and check for birds (healthy or 
otherwise) include: lighted athletic fields (Schoellkopf Field Stadium or other 
practice fields around Cornell University and Ithaca College), lighted parking 
lots (especially those at higher elevations, such as Shops at Ithaca Mall, 
Ithaca College Campus, Cornell Campus, Cayuga Medical Center, etc.), near tall 
lighted buildings, and possibly include checking radio towers or wind turbine 
sites for deceased or injured birds.

Hopefully, tonight won't contribute to many deaths, but these conditions 
invariably result in some level of casualties.

Good birding and good night listening.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

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[nfc-l] Black Bellied Plovers Broome County

2012-09-22 Thread david nicosia
While packing my car later this evening, I heard at least 4 BLACK-BELLIED
PLOVERS flying pretty low as cloud ceilings are low after the rain has
stopped. They were calling their typical unmistakable call. I also heard several
SWAINSON'S THRUSH. I was not doing any "official" night counting.
Migration is heavy though and fairly low given lower cloud ceilings. Hard to
miss these guys. 

Dave Nicosia  
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[nfc-l] Heavy Nocturnal Migration Johnson City, NY September 15th, 2012

2012-09-15 Thread david nicosia
In one hour, 1015 to 1115 pm I counted 280 SWAINSON'S THRUSHES
and 13 GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSHES by nocturnal calls. There were many 
many other weaker, zips, seeps chips etc that I don't know. There were a couple
moments with up to 5 thrushes calling at once! Some were very low and
of course many were very high. I probably sampled only the lower
portion of the true flight. Good birding. 

Dave Nicosia 
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[nfc-l] Thrushes early this morning

2012-09-02 Thread david nicosia
While working the overnight shift at NWS Binghamton I stepped
outside for just a few minutes at the airport around 430 am  and  
heard 4 SWAINSON'S THRUSH and 1 WOOD THRUSH. 
There were also quite a few chips...zeeps and other calls I don't know.
It was a heavy flight no doubt.  The radar was full of bird echoes 
not only from our radar site but up and down the east coast. 

Dave Nicosia
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[nfc-l] Nocturnal Migrant before sunrise this morning

2012-08-13 Thread david nicosia
Woke at 430 am and could not fall back asleep.
So instead of counting sheep, I decided to sit on my
deck and count migrating birds or at least try. 
I began 450 am and ended at 520 am so it was

a solid half hour...then back to sleep!

There was a decent flight going on as I could hear
many calls up there that were unidentifiable. 
I did have some lower flyers that I was easily
able to ID. 

Numbers aren't high but again there were many more birds
higher up that I could barely hear. 

15 VEERY, 9 WOOD THRUSH, 3 INDIGO BUNTINGS,
2 BOBOLINKS, 2 YELLOW WARBLERS and
the best bird for me was a SCARLET TANAGER
that was flying very low and half singing his
song. It was a "whisper" song with a few chip-burrs.
The bird was not flying as fast as he persisted for
20-30 seconds while calling. 

I also heard my resident SCREECH OWL that
I have not heard in a long time. I also had an AMERICAN 
GOLDFINCH call once but this guy probably was a 
local bird since I regularly have 20-30 at my feeder 
each day.

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY  
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Re: [nfc-l] First Big Southbound push of fall migrants next few days in northern U.S??

2012-08-04 Thread david nicosia
Bill,

I have noticed this quite a bit lately too. Birds moving no matter what the 
wind direction is. 
Looking at base velocities I did notice very weak velocities on a couple 
occasions with
the predominant direction close to the actual wind direction. This could 
suggest 
birds were not favoring a particular direction or were wandering with the 
winds. 
Winds were light in these two instances. 

However, if we do get more northerly winds, wouldn't the movements increase 
even this
early? If not, does this suggest a lot of birds just wandering around, post 
breeding dispersal etc? 
Since it is still summer and there is plenty of insect life around, why would 
most insectivorous species
have to be in such a rush to fly south? And if they were in such a rush, they 
certainly 
would take advantage of favorable northerly winds, at least you would think 
they would. 
This is all pure speculation. 

I have seen big pushes after fronts in September and October like you state. 
Since insect life and light is 
declining fast by this time, this makes more sense since the birds are running 
out of time and want to get
south as fast as possible. 

So maybe we are witnessing a lot of birds wandering around this early that are 
not as serious
about getting to the tropics?  I know some species migrate to the tropics very 
early so this does
not universally apply. It will be interesting nevertheless to see if this first 
front increases
the bird echoes or not. These are all mysteries I guess...which makes the whole 
migration thing so
fascinating. I will also look at the lighter echo nights more closely and 
compare base velocity signatures
with actual wind data to see if we are witnessing wandering or a true southerly 
component or
a component along the wind. Thanks Bill, you have sparked some ideas for me...  

Best, 

Dave Nicosia 



 From: Bill Evans 
To: david nicosia ; NFC- L  
Sent: Saturday, August 4, 2012 9:00 AM
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] First Big Southbound push of fall migrants next few days 
in northern U.S??
 

I’ve noticed via flight call monitoring at this time of year (in NY and 
vicinity) that songbirds tend to move every night regardless of cold fronts -- 
unless there are strong southerly winds or substantial rain events. Later in 
the 
season (mid-September – October) the flights seem more tied to coldfront 
passage. I have a transect of acoustic monitoring stations across NY this fall, 
repeating my 1992 VCR effort. As with the Alfred, NY acoustic station last 
fall, 
I’m putting the previous night’s warbler and sparrow flight call tallies and 
tentative species IDs online in the morning at http://www.oldbird.org. By 
browsing the data 
you can see that substantial nocturnal migration has been underway in NY over 
the past three weeks, and there are already interesting species patterns 
apparent. For example, while Black-and-white Warbler flight calls are just 
beginning to be detected across eastern NY in the past week, a small but steady 
pulse of Black-and-white Warbler night flight calling has been occurring over 
south Texas for the past three weeks. Btw, for anyone interested, the whole 
audio archive from the Old Bird acoustic stations this season will be available 
early next year on a ~5 TB external drive.  This will have the raw audio 
files, extracted flight calls, and contributed analyses. Anyone out there 
recording with the 21c or comparable mic in a relatively clean acoustic 
environment is welcome to merge their work into this evolving public archive. 
 
Many lifetimes needed to get a handle on all this!
 
Bill E 
From: david nicosia 
Sent: Friday, August 03, 2012 6:25 PM
To: NFC- 
L 
Subject: [nfc-l] First Big Southbound push of fall migrants next few 
days in northern U.S??
  All, 
 
I have noticed every night that the radar bird echoes are picking up more 
and more
even when the winds are not that favorable. 
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[nfc-l] First Big Southbound push of fall migrants next few days in northern U.S??

2012-08-03 Thread david nicosia
All, 

I have noticed every night that the radar bird echoes are picking up more and 
more
even when the winds are not that favorable. A significant cold front, the first
of this budding upcoming "cold" season, will be upon the northern U.S soon. It 
will first cross the 
upper Plains Saturday and by Saturday Night the mid to upper Plains should be 
really good 
and by Sunday night...Great Lakes will have post frontal northwest winds.  By 
Monday 
night...front  clears the east coast but the winds will be lighter and not have 
as
much of a northerly component. Nevertheless, I wouldn't be surprised to see 
increasing
nocturnal migration in the northeast Monday Night too.   

Good listening (and birding) to all... 

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY  
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[nfc-l] Night Flight Calls Johnson City, NY 9/26/11

2011-09-26 Thread david nicosia
Got up early this morning and listened for 1 hour
between 430 am and 530 am. There was very 
little wind and light fog. There was little traffic and
other noise. Great listening conditions. There
was a fairly heavy flight, especially of SWAINSON'S
THRUSH. 
 
Below are my counts: 
 
SWAINSON'S THRUSH:  225
GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH:  27
HERMIT THRUSH: 7 
WOOD THRUSH: 1
BOBOLINK: 1
PALM WARBLER: 2
ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK: 4
Unidentified calls- ~ 300 (mostly short chips)
 
Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY 
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[nfc-l] Night calls 9/24/2011

2011-09-24 Thread david nicosia
Listened for one hour this evening
 
1040 pm to 1140 pm...the flight appears high as skies are clear,
winds light southwesterly. Not ideal. Many calls very high up
and inaudible. But have had some nice fairly low GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH
and SWAINSONS THRUSH calls. 
 
Numbers are as follows:
 
SWAINSON'S THRUSH   48
GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH   10
WOOD THRUSH  12
HERMIT THRUSH  8
THRUSH sp. 21
 
Also had one INDIGO BUNTING and what I think
was a PALM WARBLER. 
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[nfc-l] NIght Flight Calls 9/12/11

2011-09-12 Thread david nicosia
Got up before dawn to listen for night migrants. 
Radar echoes were "moderate" as I have seen
much heavier bird migration echoes on radar. 
>From 515 am to 600 am from my deck I heard
the following: 
 
85 SWAINSON'S THRUSH
39 WOOD THRUSH
~ 20 THRUSH sp (wood thrushes and/or veeries???)
11 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK
~ 100 other calls unidenified, mainly "chips, zips and
zeeps".  
 
At first the calls were faint and high up, 
but as sunrise approached the calls 
got louder and louder as the birds were
descending. By 6 am, there was too 
much road noise, dogs
barking etc... but the flight was not over. 
 
Dave Nicosia
Johnson City,  NY 
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[nfc-l] A first look at Dual Polar Radar Imagery for a noctural migration event 8/5/11

2011-08-05 Thread david nicosia
All,
 
I now have access to real-time dual polar radar imagery from NWS Pittsburgh 
from work.
Early this morning on 8/5/11, there was a modest migratory echo pattern around 
the
NWS Pittburgh radar. I have the legacy "base reflectivity"or  "Z"  images that
we are accustomed to. In these legacy images, you will see the typical 
blossoming
echo pattern at night that eventually diminishes after sunrise, with 
small "rings" appearing after sunset
which are likely larger birds taking off after sunrise from bodies of water. 
Then I have a new product 
"differential reflectivity"  or "ZDR" which is the log of the ratio of the 
returned power to the radar
in the horizontal plane vs the returned power in the vertical plane. For a 
raindrop, 
when it falls, it becomes flattened and its width is greater in the horizontal 
plane 
vs the vertical plane like a watermelon. In this case, the differential 
reflectivity 
will be larger than 1. For a sphere, like a hailstone, the ZDR is near zero.
A vertical oriented object will be less than zero.  See  
 
 http://www.cimms.ou.edu/~kscharf/pol/zdr.html
   
for more detailed info. 
 
Then I also include correlation coefficient (CC)which is a measure of how
similar the echoes are within the range bin of the radar. CC above
.97 is typically rain. Lower values indicate much more variability in the
sampled range bin. So in very basic terms, the higher the CC the more
similar the echoes are, the lower the values the more variability of the 
shapes of the radar echoes. For more info see...
 
http://www.cimms.ou.edu/~kscharf/pol/rhohv.html
 
All these images are uploaded to my flickr site since I don't have a website. 
In the next few days I will try to brainstorm some ideas as to what we may be 
seeing. 
This is all cutting edge and new. I also am not an expert on dual pol yet as I
am taking the NWS training classes now. So anyone who has ideas etc
feel free to chime in. We may stand to learn a lot. Will we be able to
detect passerine movements  vs.  waterfowl/larger bird movements with this 
data? 
Will the resolution be enough for such very general bird size determination? 
 
see below for the images:  
 
Base Reflectivity (legacy)  Z   
http://www.flickr.com/photos/davenicosia/sets/72157627241598335/
 
Differential Reflectivity  ZDR   
http://www.flickr.com/photos/davenicosia/sets/72157627365963798/
 
Correlation Coefficient CC   
http://www.flickr.com/photos/davenicosia/sets/72157627241652541/
 
 
More on this in the next few days...ideas welcome!!! 
 
Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY 
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[nfc-l] Nocturnal Calls This morning

2011-05-16 Thread david nicosia
Woke up at 4 am this morning and was not that tired
so decided to sit out on my deck and see what kind of
migration was taking place. I checked the radar and there
was fairly heavy migration south of my location with
much less farther north. Cloud ceilings were very low
as occasional fog clipped the top of the trees on
the hill where I live. Winds were from the north as
we were north of a frontal system. Migrants were
likely descending as they ran into lower cloud ceilings
and north winds? Anyway, the calls were  low and
quite loud but the numbers were not that impressive
at least compared to fall. 

I had the following in 40 minutes of listening:

4 veeries, 4 swainson's thrushes, 3 wood thrushes,
1 bobolink, 2 solitary sandpipers and 19 unidentified
zeeps, chips and zitswarblers/sparrows?? That is
a total of  33 calls in 40 minutes...almost 1 per minute. 

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY 
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Re: [nfc-l] Good migration conditions tonight?

2011-05-15 Thread david nicosia
Check out the radars now...there appears to be good migration echoes 
near and east of the showers and storms. Great fallout conditions 
for middle atlantic???





From: David La Puma 
To: Andrew Albright 
Cc: nfc-l 
Sent: Sun, May 15, 2011 10:07:33 PM
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Good migration conditions tonight?

Without knowing the average distribution of NFC's throughout a season, my hunch 
is that it should be good. We're still within the "peak flight" period for NY 
State, which makes me think the Mid-Atlantic still has some solid nights ahead 
of it. I'm firing up my mic now!

cheers

David





David A. La Puma
Postdoctoral Associate
New Jersey Audubon Society
600 Route 47 North
Cape May Court House, NJ 08210
Office: 609.861.1608 x33
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On Sun, May 15, 2011 at 9:38 PM, Andrew Albright  
wrote:

Here outside of Philly (NW) the clouds have disappeared and there is
>actually a full moon and winds out of the south.
>
>Should there still be good possibilities for nfc's tonight or are we
>getting too late in the migration season?
>
>Sincerely,
>Andrew Albright
>Maple Glen, PA
>
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Re: [nfc-l] Bird Echoes on the Radars Early This Morning!

2011-02-16 Thread david nicosia
I will definitely check this next couple nights. Makes
sensebugs go with the wind, birds use the wind
to go where they need to go. Thanks Dave. 



From: David La Puma 
To: david nicosia 
Cc: Samuel Galick ; NFC-L 
Sent: Wed, February 16, 2011 3:29:13 PM
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Bird Echoes on the Radars Early This Morning!

David, Sam, et al.

If you check the target velocities against the wind velocity you
should be able to determine whether they were birds or not. Insects
will move across the radar at similar winds speed and direction as the
prevailing winds, while birds will tend to move 10-15kts faster than
the reported winds (use the nearest radiosonde data) and often at a
bearing slightly different than the prevailing winds (they know where
they want to go, and don't mind a little corrective flight).

Cheers- and good radar watching,

David


David A. La Puma
Postdoctoral Associate
New Jersey Audubon Society
600 Route 47 North
Cape May Court House, NJ 08210
Office: 609.861.1608 x33
Fax:    609.861.1651

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On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 1:13 PM, david nicosia  wrote:
> Thanks!! I did not know about insect blooms. Neat.
> That would make more sense since waterfowl migrate
> fairly high up and go day and night to my knowledge.
>
> It looks like the south will remain in prolonged southerly
> winds at 925 mb until friday night when a cold front pushes
> southward. There will be a 48 hour period between
> today and Friday with southerly winds across
> the Gulf of Mexico. Purple Martins likely will make a
> push into the deep south. I am not sure
> of any other neotropical migrant that begins to
> arrive in the Gulf States so early. any thoughts??
> Dave Nicosia
> Johnson City, NY
> ________
> From: Samuel Galick 
> To: david nicosia 
> Cc: NFC-L 
> Sent: Wed, February 16, 2011 12:55:20 PM
> Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Bird Echoes on the Radars Early This Morning!
>
> Hey Dave,
>
> I saw this too! But more often than not so early in the season, these can be
> insect blooms from recent warm temperatures. There's no denying that this
> crazy shot of temperatures will cause some bird migration this week. Other
> thoughts or observations from the South or elsewhere?
>
> Sam
>
> On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 12:48 PM, david nicosia  wrote:
>>
>> While finishing my overnight shift at the National Weather
>> Service this morning, I couldn't help notice a sure sign
>> of spring: bird echoes on NWS radars from the lower
>> Mississippi valley to the lower Ohio Valley!  The echoes
>> correlated well with southwesterly winds at 925 mb
>> of around 20-25 knots. The echoes were very "light" and not
>> nearly as extensive as we see later in spring but it is the beginning.
>> I wonder if this is waterfowl or early migrant songbirds like
>> red-winged blackbirds, robins, grackles, song sparrows etc?
>> I always though that blackbirds, robins and the like
>> migrated during the day. So would it be waterfowl? H.
>>
>> Anyway, I expect this early migration to continue through
>> the Ohio Valley into the Northeast/Mid-Atlantic states
>> as a southerly flow will remain until Friday. I wonder if I
>> will see my first migrant red-winged blackbirds, grackles
>> and robins by Friday in upstate NY?
>> Think Spring!!!
>> Dave Nicosia
>> Johnson City, NY
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Sam Galick
> Cape May, NJ
> sam.gal...@gmail.com
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/
>
>



  
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Re: [nfc-l] Bird Echoes on the Radars Early This Morning!

2011-02-16 Thread david nicosia
Thanks!! I did not know about insect blooms. Neat.
That would make more sense since waterfowl migrate
fairly high up and go day and night to my knowledge. 

It looks like the south will remain in prolonged southerly
winds at 925 mb until friday night when a cold front pushes
southward. There will be a 48 hour period between
today and Friday with southerly winds across
the Gulf of Mexico. Purple Martins likely will make a 
push into the deep south. I am not sure
of any other neotropical migrant that begins to
arrive in the Gulf States so early. any thoughts?? 

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY 




From: Samuel Galick 
To: david nicosia 
Cc: NFC-L 
Sent: Wed, February 16, 2011 12:55:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Bird Echoes on the Radars Early This Morning!

Hey Dave,

I saw this too! But more often than not so early in the season, these can be 
insect blooms from recent warm temperatures. There's no denying that this crazy 
shot of temperatures will cause some bird migration this week. Other thoughts 
or 
observations from the South or elsewhere?

Sam


On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 12:48 PM, david nicosia  wrote:

While finishing my overnight shift at the National Weather
>Service this morning, I couldn't help notice a sure sign
>of spring: bird echoes on NWS radars from the lower 
>Mississippi valley to the lower Ohio Valley!  The echoes 
>correlated well with southwesterly winds at 925 mb 
>of around 20-25 knots. The echoes were very "light" and not
>nearly as extensive as we see later in spring but it is the beginning.
>I wonder if this is waterfowl or early migrant songbirds like 
>red-winged blackbirds, robins, grackles, song sparrows etc? 
>I always though that blackbirds, robins and the like
>migrated during the day. So would it be waterfowl? H. 
>
>Anyway, I expect this early migration to continue through
>the Ohio Valley into the Northeast/Mid-Atlantic states
>as a southerly flow will remain until Friday. I wonder if I 
>will see my first migrant red-winged blackbirds, grackles 
>and robins by Friday in upstate NY? 
>
>Think Spring!!! 
>Dave Nicosia
>Johnson City, NY 
>
>


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.gal...@gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/



  
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[nfc-l] Bird Echoes on the Radars Early This Morning!

2011-02-16 Thread david nicosia
While finishing my overnight shift at the National Weather
Service this morning, I couldn't help notice a sure sign
of spring: bird echoes on NWS radars from the lower 
Mississippi valley to the lower Ohio Valley!  The echoes 
correlated well with southwesterly winds at 925 mb 
of around 20-25 knots. The echoes were very "light" and not
nearly as extensive as we see later in spring but it is the beginning.
I wonder if this is waterfowl or early migrant songbirds like 
red-winged blackbirds, robins, grackles, song sparrows etc? 
I always though that blackbirds, robins and the like
migrated during the day. So would it be waterfowl? H. 

Anyway, I expect this early migration to continue through
the Ohio Valley into the Northeast/Mid-Atlantic states
as a southerly flow will remain until Friday. I wonder if I 
will see my first migrant red-winged blackbirds, grackles 
and robins by Friday in upstate NY? 

Think Spring!!! 
Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY 



  
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Re: [nfc-l] Night Migrants Binghamton/Johnson City NY Wed 9/15/10

2010-09-15 Thread david nicosia
Now that I am fully awake...I meant
the ratio of Swainson's Thrushes to Veeries is increasing from the past
couple weeks with the ratio of Swainson's to Gray-Cheeked
thrushes decreasing.

This is what happens when you are up in the middle
of the night!!! 





From: david nicosia 
To: bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com; NFC-L@cornell.edu
Sent: Wed, September 15, 2010 8:20:35 AM
Subject: [nfc-l] Night Migrants Binghamton/Johnson City NY Wed 9/15/10


Between 3:15 and 5:15 am heard the following
night migrants from my home: 

SWAINSON'S THRUSH - 631
VEERY- 33
GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH - 14 
WOOD THRUSH- 2

Large flight of SWAINSON'S THRUSH.
Ratio of SWAINSON'S to VEERIES 
is falling... with GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSHES
increasing as expected. 

There were many other calls too that
I did not recognize. 

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY


  
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[nfc-l] Night Migrants Binghamton/Johnson City NY Wed 9/15/10

2010-09-15 Thread david nicosia
Between 3:15 and 5:15 am heard the following
night migrants from my home: 

SWAINSON'S THRUSH - 631
VEERY- 33
GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH - 14 
WOOD THRUSH- 2

Large flight of SWAINSON'S THRUSH.
Ratio of SWAINSON'S to VEERIES 
is falling... with GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSHES
increasing as expected. 

There were many other calls too that
I did not recognize. 

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY



  
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[nfc-l] Good Nocturnal Flight Upstate NY 9/11/10

2010-09-11 Thread david nicosia
Got up before sunrise and from my deck 
I counted the following nocturnal migrants
between 515 am and 600 am...

265 SWAINSON'S THRUSH
83 VEERY
9 WOOD THRUSH 
6 GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH
1 SOLITARY SANDPIPER

many other chips, zeeps, dzrts etc that I could
not id. I thought I heard a DICKCISSEL but
was not sure enough to count it. 

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY 



  
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[nfc-l] The Next Cold Front

2010-09-06 Thread david nicosia
Let me try this again...

As Bill Evans has stated previously, the next cold front
will pass through the northeast by Wednesday evening. 
Initially, northern New England will have some post-frontal
showers with northern NY having some lake effect rain showers
(not quite cold enough yet for the white stuff). South of these
areas to the middle Atlantic coast, the winds are projected
to be west near the surface to northwest at 850 mb or
 ~ 5000 feet above ground level(AGL) Wednesday night. 

As the front moves farther east, the winds try to turn
more northwesterly Thursday night from the surface
to 850 mb/~5000 feet AGL. Showers may linger in
the far north. 

Friday night- winds are projected to be more northerly...
possibly north to northwest from the surface to 
850 mb/~5000 AGL. north-northeast winds are forecast across southeast 
Canada. In 
addition, the winds
will be lightening up. The showers should be gone
in northern New England. Could this be the best night
for New England? The models are not showing 
any period of prolonged northeast winds 
at the low-levels at this point for quite some time 
looking at the long range projections (10 days). 

One note of caution: the farther out in time we project
the weather the less certainty. The chaotic nature
of the atmosphere amplifies small sub-grid model 
errors into large enough scale errors to change 
the forecast markedly. So Thursday night
and Friday are less certain. That is what happened
with Earl and this past weekend's front. Initially the winds
were projected to be northwest but it turned
out to be more west behind the front. 
The flight was decent south and west of  the northeast
U.S. but not in the northeast as Bill predicted. 

Any ideas or comments...please share. 

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City NY 

P.S for those not familiar with wind directions- A north
winds blows from north to south. A south wind blows
from south to north etc. It is the direction the wind
is coming from, NOT blowing toward. 



  
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[nfc-l] Big Nocturnal Migration possible this holiday weekend in the Northeast/Middle Atlantic States

2010-08-30 Thread david nicosia
The unusual warmth will remain with us most of the week in the northeast.
This could stall any major migratory push for a time. But...
a strong cold front will pass through the eastern
seaboard by Friday night after Hurricane Earl passes to 
the northeast. Northerly winds will prevail beginning late Friday night
and continue Saturday night and linger into Sunday night. Could be
a great early fall nocturnal flight in the northeast/Mid Atlantic. 

Dave Nicosia 
Johnson City NY 


  
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Re: [nfc-l] Dual-Polar Radar coming 2011-2012

2010-07-08 Thread david nicosia
Thanks Bryan for more details on this. I recently saw a presentation on 
Dual-polarization and
that is where I gleaned the information. I don't have the in-depth knowledge 
that you do. 

Our office (WFO Binghamton) is getting the dual-pole upgrade in June 2011. I 
know
we are near the top of the list but there will be others coming on-line before 
us. You are
correct that Norman is a research radar. I don't know if that data is available 
or
not for study before they deploy the others. 
 take care. 





From: Bryan Guarente 
To: nfc-l@cornell.edu
Sent: Thu, July 8, 2010 4:45:40 PM
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Dual-Polar Radar coming 2011-2012


David, Andy, and other interested parties,
According to some Technical Information Notices put out by the National Weather 
Service (NWS), the beta test for live data starts on November 17th.  I haven't 
heard recently, but I thought the test bed was going to be Wichita, KS.  Plans 
may have changed since I last heard.  [Colby any word on this one?]  The 
Norman, 
OK radar is a research radar, and usually isn't available for regular viewing 
that I know of.  There are other dual-pol radars, multiple on trucks (used 
during Vortex 2) and a few that are portable, but not really mobile.  The 
Norman 
radar has been the go-to for dual-pol radars for some time in the U.S., but 
that 
will not likely turn over to be operational any time.  When the NWS upgrade to 
all the radars comes along, then most of the nation should be covered with this 
data.  There are other radars (phased array) on the horizon that might be 
useful 
for bird detection as well, but I don't know enough about them yet to make any 
solid statements.  


I wanted to make a quick clarification about David's original posting.  David 
mentioned that the radars will be able to get the drop-size distributions from 
their scans, but this is not exactly true.  The drop-size distributions may be 
inferred from the radar imagery, but this will be a poor assumption initially 
until we learn more about storms from this new source.  One of the things, we 
will get is actually hydrometeor characterization (precipitation type) from the 
radar scans.  However, the algorithm to identify the hydrometeors is not 
perfect, so there will be some issues.  According to the algorithm though, 
there 
is a distinct type/color for non-meteorological targets (i.e., birds, insects, 
and I think dust as well).  So it would be significantly easier to pick out 
possible birds on radar once these are in place, if we get access to this 
product.

Bryan Guarente
Instructional Designer
The COMET Program
University Corporation for Atmospheric Research
Boulder, CO



  
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Re: [nfc-l] Dual-Polar Radar coming 2011-2012

2010-07-08 Thread david nicosia
I know they have a test radar at Norman, OK but I don't believe the data is
operational or available. When I get some time( probably next
week) I am going to find out more on the availability of the data and will share
with this list. 

Dave Nicosia 





From: Andy Martin 
To: david nicosia ; nfc-l@cornell.edu
Sent: Thu, July 8, 2010 11:30:29 AM
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] Dual-Polar Radar coming 2011-2012

Dave,

Are there any polarimetric radar stations (a beta site) with a web link up and 
running at the moment that we might view in coming weeks as fall migration 
starts to intensify?

Thanks,

Andy Martin
Gaithersburg, MD

On 7/6/2010 10:26 AM, david nicosia wrote: 
All, 
>
>The next two years will see all NWS radars equipped with
>dual polarization which essentially adds a vertically oriented pulse
>to the horizontal oriented pulse of energy. There will be a 
>slew of new radar products to learn and interpret. 
>
>The advantages of dual polar are that meteorologists will
>be able to better determine precipitation types, drop-sized
>distributions of raindrops and mixed precipitation. It also
>will determine non-meteorological targets better (birds!!). 
>
>There are interesting radar products like differential phase,
>which helps us with rainfall drop-sized distributions. I wonder
>if this new technology will help determine the size of migrating
>birds? Will a flock of geese appear different than
>songbirds? This could be an exciting time for "radar" birding. 
>
>For more information on this
>check out this website
>
>http://www.cimms.ou.edu/%7Eschuur/radar.html
>
>Dave Nicosia
>Johnson City, NY 
>
>
>



  
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[nfc-l] Dual-Polar Radar coming 2011-2012

2010-07-06 Thread david nicosia
All, 

The next two years will see all NWS radars equipped with
dual polarization which essentially adds a vertically oriented pulse
to the horizontal oriented pulse of energy. There will be a 
slew of new radar products to learn and interpret. 

The advantages of dual polar are that meteorologists will
be able to better determine precipitation types, drop-sized
distributions of raindrops and mixed precipitation. It also
will determine non-meteorological targets better (birds!!). 

There are interesting radar products like differential phase,
which helps us with rainfall drop-sized distributions. I wonder
if this new technology will help determine the size of migrating
birds? Will a flock of geese appear different than
songbirds? This could be an exciting time for "radar" birding. 

For more information on this
check out this website

http://www.cimms.ou.edu/~schuur/radar.html

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY 


  
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[nfc-l] Big Migratory Push Next Week Eastern U.S??

2010-03-26 Thread david nicosia
All, 

Being a meteorologist, I can't help myself here, but
the potential exists for an early "heat" wave in the eastern 1/2 of 
U.S beginning Wednesday and lasting into next weekend(April 3-4). 

A very large and anomalous high pressure system is projected
to set up off the southeast U.S coast by Wednesday/Thursday next week
and bring strong southerly winds across the Gulf into the Plains/Midwest
Wednesday/Thursday and to the northeast/Middle Atlantic Friday 
to Saturday. This is a classic "Bermuda" High pressure set-up. 

Very unusual warmth is expected if these projections hold true. I could
see widespread 70s and 80s all the way north to the Great Lakes and
possibly even to New England. 

This would certainly mean a major early migratory push with many species
arriving very early relative to median arrival dates. The first
major influx of neo-tropical migrants would be seen into the southern
and even central U.S. 

check out the following website for 925 mb(few thousand feet AGL) 
wind projections for late next week

http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/model/gfs180hr_925_wnd.gif

or a loop. 

http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/model/displayMod.php?var=gfs_925_wnd=1

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY 


  
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[nfc-l] Nocturnal migration will become heavy next couple nights.

2009-05-12 Thread david nicosia
All, 

As this cold high pressure system overhead shifts offshore
by Wednesday afternoon a strong southerly flow of air
aloft will set up for Wednesday Night. 
Latest computer models are showing 
between 40 and 50 knots from the south-southwest 
between about 2000 and 5000 feet 
above ground level(925 to 850 mb) Wednesday night. 
Migration should be very heavy considering the cool north 
winds of the past couple days holding migrants back. Even tonight 
with the high pressure system overhead and light winds, 
migration will pick up and I would expect a fairly heavy 
flight as well.

Also, does anyone have the nocturnal flight call
of the dickcissel that they would be willing to
share? is it the same as the "flight" call ...

http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/703/galleries/audio/DICK5-1509a/media_popup_view?t=audio=http://clomedia.ornith.cornell.edu/audio/1509A/1509A.mov

from bna online? 

Thanks
Dave Nicosia 



  
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