Re: [nfc-l] Interesting Savannah Sparrow Call

2016-09-26 Thread Andrew Horn
Hi all,

In the recent tagging study, the first juvenile Ipswich was detected on the 
mainland on 17 September (Crysler et al. 2016, Movement Ecology DOI 
10.1186/s40462-016-0067-8), and you’d expect a lower frequency call from this 
bigger subspecies (its song is slightly lower, too), so this all makes sense.

Cheers,
Andy Horn
Halifax

On Sep 26, 2016, at 8:44 AM, John Kearney 
mailto:john.kear...@ns.sympatico.ca>> wrote:

Hi All,
As an update to my response to Preston’s post yesterday, Jerald sent me offline 
a copy of a blog entry by Paul Driver on Ipswich Sparrow flight calls 
(http://pjdeye.blogspot.ca/2009/12/ipswich-sparrow-flight-calls.html). 
Recordings of the flight calls of Ipswich Sparrows in NJ show that their 
frequency can be much lower than previously thought and that the feature most 
distinguishing them from the nominate race of Savannah Sparrow is the degree of 
modulation in the call. This sheds a new light on Preston’s call in Westport.
It is interesting to note that I posted what I thought might be an Ipswich 
Sparrow flight call to this forum on 18 September 2013. Attached is a photo of 
the spectrogram, and the wav file can be found in the archives for that date. 
The call was recorded at Canso, NS. The point on the mainland of North America 
closest to Sable Island. Based on Paul Driver’s blog post, this call would also 
be a good candidate for Ipswich Sparrow.
John

From: 
bounce-120823749-28417...@list.cornell.edu<mailto:bounce-120823749-28417...@list.cornell.edu>
 [mailto:bounce-120823749-28417...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of John Kearney
Sent: September-25-16 12:21
To: 'Preston Lust' mailto:prestonl...@yahoo.com>>; 
'NFC-L' mailto:nf...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: RE: [nfc-l] Interesting Savannah Sparrow Call

Hi Preston,
You indeed have an interesting call. My feeling is that it is a highly 
modulated Savannah Sparrow rather than “Ipswich” Savannah Sparrow. I believe an 
Ipswich Sparrow should be of a higher frequency overall. That being said, I 
think we need some more examples of Ipswich flight calls and come up with a 
range of measurements for analyzing spectrograms.
It is also unlikely, not impossible, but unlikely that you would have an 
Ipswich Sparrow in Connecticut this early. Juvenile Ipswich Sparrows start 
leaving Sable Island in late September and will usually spend time on the coast 
of Nova Scotia and Maine before heading further south. Adults don’t leave until 
October.
You might find this You Tube video interesting about recent radio telemetry 
studies on the timing of migration and movements of Ipswich Sparrows: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxtQggEA6XA.
John

Carleton, NS


From: 
bounce-120823611-28417...@list.cornell.edu<mailto:bounce-120823611-28417...@list.cornell.edu>
 [mailto:bounce-120823611-28417...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Preston Lust
Sent: September-25-16 10:05
To: NFC-L mailto:nf...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: [nfc-l] Interesting Savannah Sparrow Call


9/24-25/16, 8:00 PM-6:30 AM -- Yard, Westport CT


While looking through the results of last night's extremely productive 
recording, I stumbled upon a very interesting savannah sparrow call which is 
superficially similar to an Ipswich call, mainly because it is highly 
modulated. As Ipswich savannah sparrows are very rare in Connecticut, I was 
wondering if anyone could confirm or refute this tentative ID. Attached is a 
screenshot of the spectrogram, and (a very brief) clip of the call.


Preston Lust, Westport CT
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RE: [nfc-l] Interesting Savannah Sparrow Call

2016-09-26 Thread John Kearney
Hi All,

As an update to my response to Preston’s post yesterday, Jerald sent me offline 
a copy of a blog entry by Paul Driver on Ipswich Sparrow flight calls 
(http://pjdeye.blogspot.ca/2009/12/ipswich-sparrow-flight-calls.html). 
Recordings of the flight calls of Ipswich Sparrows in NJ show that their 
frequency can be much lower than previously thought and that the feature most 
distinguishing them from the nominate race of Savannah Sparrow is the degree of 
modulation in the call. This sheds a new light on Preston’s call in Westport.

It is interesting to note that I posted what I thought might be an Ipswich 
Sparrow flight call to this forum on 18 September 2013. Attached is a photo of 
the spectrogram, and the wav file can be found in the archives for that date. 
The call was recorded at Canso, NS. The point on the mainland of North America 
closest to Sable Island. Based on Paul Driver’s blog post, this call would also 
be a good candidate for Ipswich Sparrow.

John

 

From: bounce-120823749-28417...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120823749-28417...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of John Kearney
Sent: September-25-16 12:21
To: 'Preston Lust' ; 'NFC-L' 
Subject: RE: [nfc-l] Interesting Savannah Sparrow Call

 

Hi Preston,

You indeed have an interesting call. My feeling is that it is a highly 
modulated Savannah Sparrow rather than “Ipswich” Savannah Sparrow. I believe an 
Ipswich Sparrow should be of a higher frequency overall. That being said, I 
think we need some more examples of Ipswich flight calls and come up with a 
range of measurements for analyzing spectrograms.

It is also unlikely, not impossible, but unlikely that you would have an 
Ipswich Sparrow in Connecticut this early. Juvenile Ipswich Sparrows start 
leaving Sable Island in late September and will usually spend time on the coast 
of Nova Scotia and Maine before heading further south. Adults don’t leave until 
October.

You might find this You Tube video interesting about recent radio telemetry 
studies on the timing of migration and movements of Ipswich Sparrows: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxtQggEA6XA.

John

 

Carleton, NS

 

 

From: bounce-120823611-28417...@list.cornell.edu 
<mailto:bounce-120823611-28417...@list.cornell.edu>  
[mailto:bounce-120823611-28417...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Preston Lust
Sent: September-25-16 10:05
To: NFC-L mailto:nf...@list.cornell.edu> >
Subject: [nfc-l] Interesting Savannah Sparrow Call

 

 

9/24-25/16, 8:00 PM-6:30 AM -- Yard, Westport CT

 

 

While looking through the results of last night's extremely productive 
recording, I stumbled upon a very interesting savannah sparrow call which is 
superficially similar to an Ipswich call, mainly because it is highly 
modulated. As Ipswich savannah sparrows are very rare in Connecticut, I was 
wondering if anyone could confirm or refute this tentative ID. Attached is a 
screenshot of the spectrogram, and (a very brief) clip of the call.

 

 

Preston Lust, Westport CT

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Description: Binary data


RE: [nfc-l] Interesting Savannah Sparrow Call

2016-09-25 Thread John Kearney
Hi Preston,

You indeed have an interesting call. My feeling is that it is a highly 
modulated Savannah Sparrow rather than “Ipswich” Savannah Sparrow. I believe an 
Ipswich Sparrow should be of a higher frequency overall. That being said, I 
think we need some more examples of Ipswich flight calls and come up with a 
range of measurements for analyzing spectrograms.

It is also unlikely, not impossible, but unlikely that you would have an 
Ipswich Sparrow in Connecticut this early. Juvenile Ipswich Sparrows start 
leaving Sable Island in late September and will usually spend time on the coast 
of Nova Scotia and Maine before heading further south. Adults don’t leave until 
October.

You might find this You Tube video interesting about recent radio telemetry 
studies on the timing of migration and movements of Ipswich Sparrows: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxtQggEA6XA.

John

 

Carleton, NS

 

 

From: bounce-120823611-28417...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120823611-28417...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Preston Lust
Sent: September-25-16 10:05
To: NFC-L 
Subject: [nfc-l] Interesting Savannah Sparrow Call

 

 

9/24-25/16, 8:00 PM-6:30 AM -- Yard, Westport CT

 

 

While looking through the results of last night's extremely productive 
recording, I stumbled upon a very interesting savannah sparrow call which is 
superficially similar to an Ipswich call, mainly because it is highly 
modulated. As Ipswich savannah sparrows are very rare in Connecticut, I was 
wondering if anyone could confirm or refute this tentative ID. Attached is a 
screenshot of the spectrogram, and (a very brief) clip of the call.

 

 

Preston Lust, Westport CT

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