[NSP] Re: key question

2010-12-17 Thread Tim Rolls
Just when you thought it was all over, it seems it depends upon your point of view, and this may depend on your position in the history. Below an extract from Mr. Thomas Doubleday's letter to the Duke of Northumberland. date a bit difficult due to Google's OCR not coping with Roman dates, but

[NSP] Re: key question

2010-12-17 Thread Anthony Robb
Hello Tim Wonderful stuff! Discuss? I'll have to print off, re-read (probably several times) and inwardly digest it first. It has, however, already given me a warm glow which more than compensates for the sub -zero temperature outside. Cheers Anthony -- To get on

[NSP] Re: key question

2010-12-17 Thread John Dally
Mr. Doubleday takes great pains to prove his sophistication. Even allowing for how the sense of some of the words used have changed since he wrote them, it appears that Doubleday was not enthusiastic about the NSP or NSPipers in general. So, are we to trust his judgement overall? On the one

[NSP] Re: key question

2010-12-17 Thread Julia Say
On 17 Dec 2010, John Dally wrote: Mr. Doubleday I would like to know more about the cultural context of the document. What prompted Doubleday to write this? Here's a bit about him as a starter: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Doubleday Julia To get on or off this list see list

[NSP] Re: key question

2010-12-17 Thread Francis Wood
On 17 Dec 2010, at 16:44, Tim Rolls wrote: Discuss! One of the most remarkable qualities of this paper is Doubleday's extraordinary talent for using a colossal number of words to say absolutely nothing of any importance. A very narrow bore, in my view. Perhaps I'm being too unkind to him.

[NSP] Re: key question

2010-12-17 Thread Tim Rolls
Hi John, Interesting that the extract gives you that impression. Having read the whole document I didn't infer that. I tried to isolate the particular part that led me to feel that way, but failed. I think you may need to set aside quarter of an hour and read the whole thing which is in essence

[NSP] Re: key question

2010-12-17 Thread Tim Rolls
This seems to be a feature of a great many Victorian literary works in my experience. Unfortunately it's a feature which seems to be infectious. Tim On 17 Dec 2010, at 20:33, Francis Wood wrote: On 17 Dec 2010, at 16:44, Tim Rolls wrote: Discuss! One of the most remarkable qualities of

[NSP] Doubleday

2010-12-17 Thread Anthony Robb
Hello John This is what Doubleday said of the pipes (my underscores): Thus, this instrument is limited to a single octave; and this (little as it is) admits of all the airs, to which it is really suited, being executed by it's means ; with the additional improvement that it may be

[NSP] Doubleday

2010-12-17 Thread Anthony Robb
Hello Richard Doubleday wrote: The Northumberland small-pipe is fitted up upon the plan of construction common to all bagpipes aEUR that is to say, aEUR it consists of a pipe with stops, by means of which the melody is played, and of three longer pipes sounding different

[NSP] Re: Doubleday

2010-12-17 Thread Richard York
I'll think more on what he meant when I have more time! For expression - I quite agree with you on fiddle tunes. On the other hand, there are expressive tunes written primarily for pipes, surely, where they sound superbly best on pipes? And it is truly hard for anyone to make them work with

[NSP] Re: Doubleday

2010-12-17 Thread Colin
Ooh, need to take care with words like expressive, I think. In an attempt to get more expression, isn't that what choyting is all about? We need to be careful when comparing different instruments. I have found a great deal of expressiveness listening to some pipers but in the way they play and

[NSP] Doubleday

2010-12-17 Thread Anthony Robb
Hello Colin and Richard I agree with much you say. I like the comparison with apples and potatoes. But that is exactly what Doubleday is saying: 'don't try and make chips with apples or apple crumble with potatoes'. Cheers Anthony -- To get on or off this list see list