[NSP] Re: Doubleday et al

2010-12-19 Thread Richard York
 (I've missed a day on this, while I was daft enough to honour a gig in 
Hampstead: 1 hr 40 there, 7 hours 20 back. The joys of the soft south!)


You're absolutely right, John.
It is, to adapt an earlier comment, pointless comparing apples and potatoes.
But since we've mentioned it
I was going to write and comment that it's all down to so many elements 
of time, place, mood, etc.
And before seeing yours below, was going to say that for me hearing 
Billy Pigg (interesting how often his name crops up in this) playing the 
Wild Hills of Wannie just Did It when I when I was about 18,  had never 
even heard of Northumbrian smallpipes or any pipes other than GHB's, (as 
played by buskers when crossing the border on Scottish holidays) ... a 
seed was set, and ever since then I wanted to play these things. (Pity 
it took until I was in my mid 50's before actually pursuing them!)


And it is enormously subjective. It's like foods, tastes vary so widely.
 I'm not surprised that Paddy Keenan's Blackbird is John Gibbons' 
defining one (quite agree!) Irish pipes, Irish tune  (yes I know 
they're an English invention).


We could go off topic and discuss which instruments do different jobs 
for different people - for me a one row melodeon does a fantastic job 
with some dance tunes, but is 'orrible even when played by a great Irish 
master for a slow air.
 But that's another big discussion, and I've take us off topic too 
often recently, so I won't suggest it :)


It would be interesting to know how many people, either within the North 
Eastern fold or out of it, were first inspired by hearing Mr Pigg's 
playing, though.


Best wishes,
Richard.


On 18/12/2010 17:51, John Dally wrote:

Thanks to everyone for the edifying discussion. To me Doubleday seems
to be saying, the NSP are a rude, wee thing with enough charm to make
them worth preserving, and within its narrowest scope in its own way
it's quite nice, really.  Another way of looking at it is that he's
saying fa\g a phiob bhochd, leave the poor pipes alone, which
makes good sense to me too.  All that is fair enough.  Contrast that
with George Sand's novel, The Bagpipers, which is truly inspired by
the rude sounds of peasant instruments.  I think she wrote about the
same time as Doubleday.

The discussion lost me when it took on the topic of most expressive
instrument.  Whatever gets you through the night, as the late, great
Liverpudlian once sang.  All music is nostalgic and so much depends on
your frame of reference.  When I first heard the NSP when I was about
fifteen I was drinking tea in a close corner by a wood stove after a
cold, wet day of scavaging fire wood from a logged off patch where
alder and madrona were left to rot.  My friend, Sandy Ross (somehow
related to Colin), put a recording of Billy Pigg on the record player
and I was hooked.  If he had put a recording of the best violinist in
the world I would have hurried out the door without finishing my tea.
There is much more to the context of that moment, social and personal,
that made it so important to me.  But suffice it to say that for all
it's many flaws and short comings the NSP are the only thing that
works to express some things for me, and every time I hear and play
them that moment of contentment and happiness shines through.  Of
course, I have many flaws and shortcomings, which explains a lot!



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[NSP] Re: Doubleday et al

2010-12-19 Thread Matt Seattle
   On Sun, Dec 19, 2010 at 12:55 PM, Richard York
   [1]rich...@lizards.force9.co.uk wrote:


 for me hearing Billy Pigg (interesting how often his name crops up
 in this) playing the Wild Hills of Wannie just Did It  ... a seed
 was set

   Yes

   --

References

   1. mailto:rich...@lizards.force9.co.uk


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[NSP] Re: Doubleday et al

2010-12-19 Thread Francis Wood

On 19 Dec 2010, at 12:55, Richard York wrote:

 It would be interesting to know how many people, either within the North 
 Eastern fold or out of it, were first inspired by hearing Mr Pigg's playing, 
 though.

Well, me for a start.

Knowing almost nothing about traditional music, and never having heard of 
Northumbrian pipes,  I came across the Billy Pigg LP on Leader Records in a 
record shop in Colchester. I liked the scholarly presentation with excellent 
illustrations and notes by Colin Ross and bought it immediately, thinking I'd 
got something fascinating and totally obscure. On the way home, I met the 
vicar's wife who said  Oh, I see you've got the Billy Pigg LP!

I immediately played it to my flat-mate who after a couple of minutes, said  
Do we have to have this on?

But by then, I was hooked.  

Francis




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[NSP] Re: Doubleday et al

2010-12-19 Thread Colin
I did mention earlier that Billy Pigg was my first introduction to the pipes 
(although I was familiar with the Irish pipes but not through playing).
1968, Corries TV program and a very unassuming gentleman was being asked by 
them regarding the pipes and giving answers like yes and no.
He played Bill Charlton's Fancy and, from that moment, I wanted to play. 
(Still have the audio of that ob reel-to-reel somewhere).
Took until C1973 when the LP Wild Hills etc came out (or until I found it in 
the record shop) and it had the NPS details on it to actually go about 
getting a set. Phoning Ray (Fisher) Ross put me in touch will Bill Hedworth 
who had just completed a simple set which he could send me in a matter of 
weeks.
If I remember, it cost around £30 and he provided me (on loan - I did send 
it back after copying it longhand - no scanners then) a booklet on how to 
play, a set of reeds at various stages of completion and a sketch on how to 
adjust the bridle. A lifetime membership to the NPS followed (that was 
nearly a whole month's salary)  and, about a year later, a conversion to a 7 
key set which I still play. Conversion (new 7 key chanter, new drone stock 
with extra hole and low D drone) cost £36. I did have to drill a hole in the 
G drone to use the  A as the cover was there but Bill hadn't drilled the 
actual hole under it).
I then made my first (and last) visit to the AGM (by rail) and gawped at the 
likes of Colin Ross and Forster Charlton being there (and suddenly realised 
who Ray Ross was).
Also heard Colin playing border pipes but couldn't persuade my wife to let 
me have a set of them as well!

Happy memories.

Colin Hill

- Original Message - 
From: Francis Wood oatenp...@googlemail.com

To: Richard York rich...@lizards.force9.co.uk
Cc: NSP group nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2010 2:55 PM
Subject: [NSP] Re: Doubleday et al





On 19 Dec 2010, at 12:55, Richard York wrote:

It would be interesting to know how many people, either within the North 
Eastern fold or out of it, were first inspired by hearing Mr Pigg's 
playing, though.


Well, me for a start.

Knowing almost nothing about traditional music, and never having heard of 
Northumbrian pipes,  I came across the Billy Pigg LP on Leader Records in 
a record shop in Colchester. I liked the scholarly presentation with 
excellent illustrations and notes by Colin Ross and bought it immediately, 
thinking I'd got something fascinating and totally obscure. On the way 
home, I met the vicar's wife who said  Oh, I see you've got the Billy 
Pigg LP!


I immediately played it to my flat-mate who after a couple of minutes, 
said  Do we have to have this on?


But by then, I was hooked.

Francis




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http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html









[NSP] Re: Doubleday et al

2010-12-19 Thread brimor
What really got me interested was the gift of Kathryn's first cassette, On 
Kielder Side.   Wonderful music!  It was given to me by friends who live on 
Orkney and heard her at the Orkney festival.  At that point I was trying to 
learn to play the Highland chanter.   The teacher had just received a notice 
from Alan Jones about the North Hero weekend (the 2nd, I think).   I phoned 
Alan forthwith to enquire whether I would be able to borrow and try the NSP if 
I went.  He assured me that I would - but in actual fact that did not happen!   
However I was so impressed by Richard Butler's playing and teaching that I 
ordered a set right away.  


Sheila


-Original Message-
From: Richard York rich...@lizards.force9.co.uk
To: John Dally dir...@gmail.com; NSP group nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Sun, Dec 19, 2010 7:55 am
Subject: [NSP] Re: Doubleday et al


(I've missed a day on this, while I was daft enough to honour a gig in 
Hampstead: 1 hr 40 there, 7 hours 20 back. The joys of the soft south!) 
 
You're absolutely right, John. 
It is, to adapt an earlier comment, pointless comparing apples and potatoes. 
But since we've mentioned it 
I was going to write and comment that it's all down to so many elements of 
time, place, mood, etc. 
And before seeing yours below, was going to say that for me hearing Billy Pigg 
(interesting how often his name crops up in this) playing the Wild Hills of 
Wannie just Did It when I when I was about 18, had never even heard of 
Northumbrian smallpipes or any pipes other than GHB's, (as played by buskers 
when crossing the border on Scottish holidays) ... a seed was set, and ever 
since then I wanted to play these things. (Pity it took until I was in my mid 
50's before actually pursuing them!) 
 
And it is enormously subjective. It's like foods, tastes vary so widely. 
 I'm not surprised that Paddy Keenan's Blackbird is John Gibbons' defining one 
(quite agree!) Irish pipes, Irish tune (yes I know they're an English 
invention). 
 
We could go off topic and discuss which instruments do different jobs for 
different people - for me a one row melodeon does a fantastic job with some 
dance tunes, but is 'orrible even when played by a great Irish master for a 
slow air. 
 But that's another big discussion, and I've take us off topic too often 
recently, so I won't suggest it :) 
 
It would be interesting to know how many people, either within the North 
Eastern fold or out of it, were first inspired by hearing Mr Pigg's playing, 
though. 
 
Best wishes, 
Richard. 
 
On 18/12/2010 17:51, John Dally wrote: 
 Thanks to everyone for the edifying discussion. To me Doubleday seems 
 to be saying, the NSP are a rude, wee thing with enough charm to make 
 them worth preserving, and within its narrowest scope in its own way 
 it's quite nice, really. Another way of looking at it is that he's 
 saying fa\g a phiob bhochd, leave the poor pipes alone, which 
 makes good sense to me too. All that is fair enough. Contrast that 
 with George Sand's novel, The Bagpipers, which is truly inspired by 
 the rude sounds of peasant instruments. I think she wrote about the 
 same time as Doubleday. 
 
 The discussion lost me when it took on the topic of most expressive 
 instrument. Whatever gets you through the night, as the late, great 
 Liverpudlian once sang. All music is nostalgic and so much depends on 
 your frame of reference. When I first heard the NSP when I was about 
 fifteen I was drinking tea in a close corner by a wood stove after a 
 cold, wet day of scavaging fire wood from a logged off patch where 
 alder and madrona were left to rot. My friend, Sandy Ross (somehow 
 related to Colin), put a recording of Billy Pigg on the record player 
 and I was hooked. If he had put a recording of the best violinist in 
 the world I would have hurried out the door without finishing my tea. 
 There is much more to the context of that moment, social and personal, 
 that made it so important to me. But suffice it to say that for all 
 it's many flaws and short comings the NSP are the only thing that 
 works to express some things for me, and every time I hear and play 
 them that moment of contentment and happiness shines through. Of 
 course, I have many flaws and shortcomings, which explains a lot! 
 
 
 
 To get on or off this list see list information at 
 http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html 
 
 


--