[NSP] Re: Shuttle Pipes for Sale

2012-11-22 Thread Barry Say

Sadly Julian, the link you have posted requires a password.

Barry

On 11/22/2012 02:53 PM, Julian Templeman wrote:

I have a set of shuttle pipes that are surplus to requirements. The
shuttle drones are by Dave Shaw (see
http://www.daveshaw.co.uk/Shuttle_Pipes/_shuttle_pipes.html) and they
have a simple unkeyed chanter.

Having decided that the pipes are, sadly, not the instrument for me,
they have sat, unplayed, for several years (and so may need a bit of
fettling)  I hate to see instruments not being used, so if anyone
wants to make me a reasonable offer (or happens to have a decent
Renaissance lute they could offer in exchange...) do get in touch.

You can find some pictures at http://julian-t.smugmug.com/Music/Shuttle-Pipes

Thanks,

julian






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[NSP] Re: NPS competition results

2012-10-21 Thread Helen
Oh that is really sad. I will do what I can for next year. It will 
depend on where I am. About all I can be sure of is that I will be overseas.
Just as an encouragement to others; for all the possible short falls of 
a competitive situation, the benefits of putting in the preparations for 
these competitions are enormous.
To the committee: Please don't give up on us yet. Just today I was 
giving a lesson to a possible competitor for next year.

Cheers
Helen

On 21/10/2012 2:54 a.m., Julia Say wrote:

I have posted the results of these on the NPS forum at:

http://www.northumbrianpipers.org.uk/pipersforum/index.php

It is particularly disappointing that after all the discussion on this list a 
few
years back, and the expansion of the overseas playing classes as a result, this
year there were no overseas entries at all.

Julia



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[NSP] Re: NPS competition results

2012-10-21 Thread Julia Say
On 21 Oct 2012, Helen wrote: 

 Oh that is really sad. I will do what I can for next year. It will 
 depend on where I am. About all I can be sure of is that I will be overseas.
 Just as an encouragement to others; for all the possible short falls of 
 a competitive situation, the benefits of putting in the preparations for 
 these competitions are enormous.
 To the committee: Please don't give up on us yet. Just today I was 
 giving a lesson to a possible competitor for next year.

Thanks, Helen.
I'll pass the message along - I think few comm. members read this list.

Julia



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[NSP] Re: NPS competition results

2012-10-20 Thread cwhill
That's a great shame the so many had no entries this year - especially 
the overseas players. Hopefully things will pick up again.


Colin Hill


On 20/10/2012 18:24, Julia Say wrote:

I have posted the results of these on the NPS forum at:

http://www.northumbrianpipers.org.uk/pipersforum/index.php

It is particularly disappointing that after all the discussion on this list a 
few
years back, and the expansion of the overseas playing classes as a result, this
year there were no overseas entries at all.

Julia



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[NSP] Re: facebook and the forum

2012-08-17 Thread Bilbo Hill
   One of the problems with the NSP forum is that there seems to be no
   addressing of well discussed problems.  The stuff is spread over too
   many sub forums some of which are just vanity areas for a couple of
   people to bang on about stuff that interests only them.
   I understand that there was a lively discussion earlier this year when
   some sensible suggestions were made but, as usual, nothing came of them
   as the usual inertia and weak excuses took over to avoid making any
   effort to change.
   I did note that one of the people responsible posted:-
   I don't think the forum is hidden away, but I do think that the fact
   that it has an independent URL
   ([1]http://northumbrianpipers.org.uk/piperforum/) and can be reached
   without getting involved in the CMS part of the website is
   advantageous.
   but, as normal, the posted link didn't work and just resulted in  The
   requested URL /piperforum/ was not found on this server.
   The correct URL should have been
   http://www.northumbrianpipers.org.uk/pipersforum/index.php
   so a grand opportunity remains out of reach!!
   Bill Hill-Smith (France)
   AKA The piping Hobbit --

References

   1. http://northumbrianpipers.org.uk/piperforum/


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[NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen

2012-08-17 Thread Anthony Robb
   Derek Lofthouse recently wrote:

   A question I forgot to ask though, are these 2 tunes played much?

   Hello Derek
   The tunes are popular in some circles and have been for some time. I
   remember Chuck Fleming leading us all with 'Peacock Followed ..' in the
   pub at Kathryn's (Tickell) 21st birthday party yelling do it again
   after each time through with words to the effect that it was a very
   enjoyable tune, the best Northumbrian one he'd come across (but not so
   politely put). We played it 10 or 12 times - it might have even been
   more.

   More recently I taught the same tune by ear to 150 youngsters at The
   Youth Summer School in Durham (Folkworks) with the words:

   Won't you come cuddle me, cuddy
   Now won't you come cuddle me reet
   Won't you come cuddle me, cuddy
   Just as ye did yesterday neet ..

   As for 'Small Coals..' it was also popular with the same age group and
   I did some 2nds for the nimble-fingered to do. I've got it as a
   pdf which I can send down the wires to anyone interested.

   Best wishes

   Anthony
   From: DEREK LOFTHOUSE dloftho...@shaw.ca
   To: Matt Seattle theborderpi...@googlemail.com
   Cc: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
   Sent: Wednesday, 15 August 2012, 14:14
   Subject: [NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen
   Thanks Matt, Anthony, John and Kevin for your thoughts on these tunes.
   I will try the ideas you guys have suggested and I guess go with what
   works best for me.
   I guess it a matter of what you are used to, when i play border pipes I
   have no problem with 'discordant' drones, ex. playing in Bm with A
   drones, but i am used to just playing mainly G and D tunes (with the
   occassional venture into A and E)on the NSP with the appropriate
   drones. I'll and do more of it and maybe it will start sounding better
   to me.
   A question I forgot to ask though, are these 2 tunes played much?
   thanks again
   Derek
   - Original Message -
   From: Matt Seattle [1]theborderpi...@googlemail.com
   To: [2]nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
   Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2012 4:27:50 AM
   Subject: [NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen
 On Wed, Aug 15, 2012 at 12:26 AM, Anthony Robb
 [1][3]anth...@robbpipes.com wrote:
   Here is what Forster Charlton, Colin Ross and Roland Wright put
   in the
   introduction to the second edition to the NPS 1st Tune Book:
   Small Coals and Little Money and Cuckold Come Out The Amrey
   are
   in an
   unusual mode for which the drones should be tuned to the notes
   A
   and E.
   Any drone which will not tune to either of these two notes is
   best shut
   off!
   Personally, I agree - others don't.
 Where I disagree is in saying they are in the same mode. Small Coals
   is
 a straightforward A minor tune, although with no 6th (F#) it's
   neither
 dorian nor aeolian mode. There is a case for tuning the drones to A
   for
 Small Coals if you insist on the drones being concordant with the
   home
 key or mode of the tune. I don't personally find that an issue, and
 neither do other bagpipe traditions, where drones are what drones
   were
 meant to be - fixed, so that tunes in different modes sound like they
 are in different modes.
 For me, Cuckold is a mixed-mode tune with alternating A minor and C
 major strains, where A drones have the effect of masking the C major
 sections because, over A drones, these also sound like A minor. So,
   if
 I were an NSP player, I'd leave the drones in G for this tune, which
   I
 am well aware is heresy.
 [2][4]http://youtu.be/71KwJ11O0fI
 --
   References
 1. mailto:[5]anth...@robbpipes.com
 2. [6]http://youtu.be/71KwJ11O0fI
   To get on or off this list see list information at
   [7]http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

   --

References

   1. mailto:theborderpi...@googlemail.com
   2. mailto:nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
   3. mailto:anth...@robbpipes.com
   4. http://youtu.be/71KwJ11O0fI
   5. mailto:anth...@robbpipes.com
   6. http://youtu.be/71KwJ11O0fI
   7. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: facebook and the forum

2012-08-17 Thread cwhill
Well, somewhere along the line I totally missed the fact that there even 
was a forum!

Thanks for bringing the subject up again, I've registered now.

Colin Hill




On 17/08/2012 12:04, Matt Seattle wrote:

On Fri, Aug 17, 2012 at 11:18 AM, Bilbo Hill [1]bilbo_h...@email.com
wrote:

 The stuff is spread over too
 many sub forums some of which are just vanity areas for a couple
  of
 people to bang on about stuff that interests only them.

Is that a projection? I see no vanity areas, only an intelligent and
generally successful attempt to divide it into areas of interest. For
some, the mechanics of the instrument are a consuming passion. I am not
one of these, but I am grateful that there are such people because
without them no pipe music would enter the world. For me, the music
itself is a consuming passion, and I am disappointed that my favorite
[sic] forum, Peacock's Parlour, is not more widely visited and used.
But that is how it is, you can't hit people over the head with it, and
no-one's hitting me over the head about reed-making and key-pads.

--

References

1. mailto:bilbo_h...@email.com


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[NSP] Re: facebook and the forum

2012-08-17 Thread Gibbons, John
The trouble is - all us monomaniacs  followed the Forum, and nobody joined us.
Are they trying to tell us something?

'Here's a lovely forum to have your discussions in', then they tiptoe away 
quietly and have a great party somewhere else.

John

From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of Matt 
Seattle [theborderpi...@googlemail.com]
Sent: 17 August 2012 12:04
To: NSP group
Subject: [NSP] Re: facebook and the forum

   On Fri, Aug 17, 2012 at 11:18 AM, Bilbo Hill [1]bilbo_h...@email.com
   wrote:

The stuff is spread over too
many sub forums some of which are just vanity areas for a couple
 of
people to bang on about stuff that interests only them.

   Is that a projection? I see no vanity areas, only an intelligent and
   generally successful attempt to divide it into areas of interest. For
   some, the mechanics of the instrument are a consuming passion. I am not
   one of these, but I am grateful that there are such people because
   without them no pipe music would enter the world. For me, the music
   itself is a consuming passion, and I am disappointed that my favorite
   [sic] forum, Peacock's Parlour, is not more widely visited and used.
   But that is how it is, you can't hit people over the head with it, and
   no-one's hitting me over the head about reed-making and key-pads.

   --

References

   1. mailto:bilbo_h...@email.com


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[NSP] Re: facebook and the forum

2012-08-17 Thread Richard Evans

Gibbons, John wrote:

The trouble is - all us monomaniacs  followed the Forum, and nobody joined us.
Are they trying to tell us something?

'Here's a lovely forum to have your discussions in', then they tiptoe away 
quietly and have a great party somewhere else.

John


Yes, John, a very good summary! The whole situation makes no sense- the 
forums have great potential as an expanding resource, and no downside at 
all but all the chat is going on on a platform which requires you to 
join an organisation with a terrible reputation for infringing privacy ( 
Facebook, not the NPS!!!).


Cheers
Richard

--
Richard Evans



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[NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen

2012-08-16 Thread Derek Lofthouse

Again, thanks all for the advice.
I tried all 3 tunes with both Gg and Aa drones, both set ups worked okay. I 
think i prefered the Gg sound though. Basically it is the border pipe set 
up, a tone lower.

I suspect i better be able to play all 3 tunes by october though.


Derek

--
From: Julia Say julia@nspipes.co.uk
Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2012 2:32 PM
To: Dartmouth NPS nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Subject: [NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen


On 15 Aug 2012, Matt Seattle wrote:


   And neither does playing Cuckold or Peacock on NSP against A drones
   sound nasty, but it does miss a lot of the musical effect of these
   tunes, the contrasting minor/major strains


Coincidentally (yes, really) I spent part of this afternoon playing 
Peacock

followed the Hen with Colin R.
We tried both G and A drones, both with and without the dominant d or e 
harmony

running.

We also tried playing the only f# (in the B part) as a natural, to test if 
it was 




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[NSP] Re: nps facebook

2012-08-16 Thread cwhill
If I have the right one (and that's far from certain as I don't 
understand facebook at all) it's

http://www.facebook.com/groups/131491660229952/
at least that's what's on the URL bit at the top of the page.

Colin Hill


On 16/08/2012 19:44, Richard Evans wrote:

Barry Say wrote:

More happens on fyecebeuk than anywhere else at the moment. I have been
very disappointed that more NPS committee members have not taken
advantage of the opportunities offered by the NPS forum.


So I created a facebook account and found the nps page but all I see is
a wikipedia extract. Is there some kind of forum or something? And if
so, what's wrong with the excellent and underused NPS forums?

Cheers
Richard





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[NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen

2012-08-15 Thread Matt Seattle
   On Wed, Aug 15, 2012 at 12:26 AM, Anthony Robb
   [1]anth...@robbpipes.com wrote:


Here is what Forster Charlton, Colin Ross and Roland Wright put
 in the
introduction to the second edition to the NPS 1st Tune Book:
Small Coals and Little Money and Cuckold Come Out The Amrey are
 in an
unusual mode for which the drones should be tuned to the notes A
 and E.
Any drone which will not tune to either of these two notes is
 best shut
off!
Personally, I agree - others don't.

   Where I disagree is in saying they are in the same mode. Small Coals is
   a straightforward A minor tune, although with no 6th (F#) it's neither
   dorian nor aeolian mode. There is a case for tuning the drones to A for
   Small Coals if you insist on the drones being concordant with the home
   key or mode of the tune. I don't personally find that an issue, and
   neither do other bagpipe traditions, where drones are what drones were
   meant to be - fixed, so that tunes in different modes sound like they
   are in different modes.
   For me, Cuckold is a mixed-mode tune with alternating A minor and C
   major strains, where A drones have the effect of masking the C major
   sections because, over A drones, these also sound like A minor. So, if
   I were an NSP player, I'd leave the drones in G for this tune, which I
   am well aware is heresy.
   [2]http://youtu.be/71KwJ11O0fI

   --

References

   1. mailto:anth...@robbpipes.com
   2. http://youtu.be/71KwJ11O0fI


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[NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen

2012-08-15 Thread Gibbons, John
On Border pipes, nominally a tone higher, the drones are fixed, in A; they have 
no bead holes.
Cuckold, or the Peacock followed the Hen, swap around between B minor and D 
major above the A harmony of the drone. 
This corresponds to playing them in Aminor/Cmajor against G drones on NSP.

It works, and certainly doesn't sound nasty, which is the only sound argument 
against any musical idea.

John

-Original Message-
From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [mailto:lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] On Behalf Of 
Matt Seattle
Sent: 15 August 2012 11:28
To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Subject: [NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen

   On Wed, Aug 15, 2012 at 12:26 AM, Anthony Robb
   [1]anth...@robbpipes.com wrote:


Here is what Forster Charlton, Colin Ross and Roland Wright put
 in the
introduction to the second edition to the NPS 1st Tune Book:
Small Coals and Little Money and Cuckold Come Out The Amrey are
 in an
unusual mode for which the drones should be tuned to the notes A
 and E.
Any drone which will not tune to either of these two notes is
 best shut
off!
Personally, I agree - others don't.

   Where I disagree is in saying they are in the same mode. Small Coals is
   a straightforward A minor tune, although with no 6th (F#) it's neither
   dorian nor aeolian mode. There is a case for tuning the drones to A for
   Small Coals if you insist on the drones being concordant with the home
   key or mode of the tune. I don't personally find that an issue, and
   neither do other bagpipe traditions, where drones are what drones were
   meant to be - fixed, so that tunes in different modes sound like they
   are in different modes.
   For me, Cuckold is a mixed-mode tune with alternating A minor and C
   major strains, where A drones have the effect of masking the C major
   sections because, over A drones, these also sound like A minor. So, if
   I were an NSP player, I'd leave the drones in G for this tune, which I
   am well aware is heresy.
   [2]http://youtu.be/71KwJ11O0fI

   --

References

   1. mailto:anth...@robbpipes.com
   2. http://youtu.be/71KwJ11O0fI


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[NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen

2012-08-15 Thread Julia Say
On 15 Aug 2012, Matt Seattle wrote: 

And neither does playing Cuckold or Peacock on NSP against A drones
sound nasty, but it does miss a lot of the musical effect of these
tunes, the contrasting minor/major strains

Coincidentally (yes, really) I spent part of this afternoon playing Peacock 
followed the Hen with Colin R.
We tried both G and A drones, both with and without the dominant d or e harmony 
running.

We also tried playing the only f# (in the B part) as a natural, to test if it 
was 
(to our ears) an A minor tune or an A Dorian.

The conclusion we came to was that the drones work in either setting, though 
neither of us cared for the f natural version, and that the use of the dominant 
in 
the drone harmony was also optional.

If I was performing either on my own I would use G drones (only) to mirror the 
usage on BP described by John G.

Yes, Derek, both are played, though I can recall a request by someone ( not me 
or 
any of this list's contributors) for Small Coals causing consternation amongst 
the 
regulars because it was in A at an APS meeting in the early 90s.

Julia



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[NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen

2012-08-15 Thread GibbonsSoinne
   To my ear the best thing about the Peacock with Gg drones is the
   prominent clashing f#, which resolves to a d; it is a strongly
   emphasised note in the 'C major' strains. BP would have a high g  nat
   here instead but Peacock was stuck with f# on NSP and seems to have
   gloried in it.



   With Aa drones, f# dropping to d is just a d major chord - less
   exciting.



   John

   --


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[NSP] Re: small coals, and the peacock following the hen

2012-08-14 Thread Anthony Robb
   Hello Derek'
   In a way you've answered your own question.
   G  D drones would presumably have been used originally for these tunes
   as they probably precede the development of tuning beads but they don't
   sound right to many people.

   Here is what Forster Charlton, Colin Ross and Roland Wright put in the
   introduction to the second edition to the NPS 1st Tune Book:

   Small Coals and Little Money and Cuckold Come Out The Amrey are in an
   unusual mode for which the drones should be tuned to the notes A and E.
   Any drone which will not tune to either of these two notes is best shut
   off!

   Personally, I agree - others don't.

   As for speed it is probably an age thing but slower (allowing pulse to
   permeate through the tune butters my parsnip) these days (wasn't always
   so). I've put a clip here
   [1]http://http://www.robbpipes.com/Hesleyside-Spoots for people
   unfamiliar with this lovely pulse (again not all agree but it is the
   quintessential Northumbrian way of doing it). Two of the players are
   from 'The Shepherds' and were the best exponents of the real old
   country style of playing which cut across all instruments (including
   pipes) in their part of the county.

   Hope this helps
   Best wishes
   Anthony
   From: DEREK LOFTHOUSE dloftho...@shaw.ca
   To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
   Sent: Tuesday, 14 August 2012, 14:36
   Subject: [NSP] small coals, and the peacock following the hen
   I decided to play through the contents of the first 30 tunes book,
   just to see how many of them i actually knew, or could play.
   Fortunately i've played most of them. There are only 2 that i had never
   looked at, as the title suggests, Small coals and little money, and the
   Peacock followed the hen.
   Both of these appear to be what (I think) Matt calls bi-modal.
   switching between G and A minor, they sort of resolve to G, although
   the g drones (to me anyway) dont always seem to work. What drones do
   people use on these tunes? Also how fast should they be played. I've
   heard the Tickel version of small coals, but should it really be that
   fast?
   thanks in advance
   Derek
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References

   1. http://http//www.robbpipes.com/Hesleyside-Spoots
   2. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: [NSP]

2012-07-10 Thread Marianne Hall
   What is this email about? Doesn't seem to have anything to do with
   Piping.
   Marianne.
Date: Mon, 9 Jul 2012 15:36:20 -0400
To: barne...@gmail.com; edt1...@cox.net;
   carol...@ticklehallcross.co.uk; pbtand...@gmail.com;
   nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu; amca...@cox.net; joe.bea...@alexandriava.gov;
   amanda.up...@alexandriava.gov; dpekr...@goodwinhouse.org
From: hbabc...@aol.com
Subject: [NSP]
   
http://rtmpakistan.org/hslkgs.html?zreu=agnbps
   
   
--
   
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   --



[NSP] Re: [NSP]

2012-07-10 Thread cwhill
Quite simply, it's spam. This particular email appears to be doing the 
rounds at the moment on many groups including Google and Yahoo.

Someone, somewhere, has had their address book hacked.
Any mail like this should be deleted and not opened. I doubt anyone in a 
group would send a link with no covering information anyway.
Run a virus check and malware check if you opened it - sometimes the 
sites linked to have nasty things hidden in them!


Colin Hill


On 10/07/2012 10:35, Marianne Hall wrote:

What is this email about? Doesn't seem to have anything to do with
Piping.
Marianne.
 Date: Mon, 9 Jul 2012 15:36:20 -0400
 To: barne...@gmail.com; edt1...@cox.net;
carol...@ticklehallcross.co.uk; pbtand...@gmail.com;
nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu; amca...@cox.net; joe.bea...@alexandriava.gov;
amanda.up...@alexandriava.gov; dpekr...@goodwinhouse.org
 From: hbabc...@aol.com
 Subject: [NSP]

 http://rtmpakistan.org/hslkgs.html?zreu=agnbps


 --

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[NSP] Re: Question

2012-06-14 Thread rob . say

Hi Jenny - there's a set attributed to Robert or James Hall in Edinburgh:

http://hdl.handle.net/10683/17806

(James was Robert's son and was also piper to the Duke about 100 years ago)

I don't know what EUCHMI is or whether the collection is viewable

I used to be able to search the Northumberland museum service archives  
but I can't seem to get to it anymore. Someone will no doubt be along  
shortly with a list of any Hall pipes in the Bagpipe museum in Morpeth


(BTW - there's more traffic elsewhere these days:  
http://www.northumbrianpipers.org.uk/pipersforum/ )


cheers

Rob


Quoting IMPERIAL GLASS  ALUMINUM LTD. jenh...@shaw.ca:


Thank you for accepting me on the mailing list Wayne!

Have one question:  How do I find out where I can see a Northumbrian
Smallpipe specifically made by my great-great grandfather Robert Hall of
Hedgeley, Powburn, Alnwick, NBL?  He made very unique handcrafted ones,
(year about 1840s or 1850's) and I'm very curious if any exist in today's
world - possibly in a museum???  Can anyone guide me in some sort of
direction how I find out about this.  I would appreciate any info on this.
These Northumbrian small pipes are really beautiful and I watched a youtube
video of a gal playing one; the song was so beautiful and sweet and cheerful
and warmed my heart.  Loved it!  Sincerely, Jenny






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http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html








[NSP] Re: Question

2012-06-14 Thread Julia Say
On 14 Jun 2012, rob@milecastle27.co.uk wrote: 

 Hi Jenny - there's a set attributed to Robert or James Hall in Edinburgh:
Someone will no doubt be along  
 shortly with a list of any Hall pipes in the Bagpipe museum in Morpeth

There are about 10 Hall sets known of in total. 2 at least I believe are in 
private 
hands, with the families of those who bought them from the makers. Others are 
still 
with immediate family.

There is an article about the pipemaking Halls in a back issue of the NPS 
magazine 
(about 12 years ago?), written in co-operation with local descendants.

If the one in Edinburgh to which Rob refers is ivory and a relatively recent 
acquisition, then it changed hands at least twice before it got there.

I'm not sure offhand if there is one at the Chantry museum  in Morpeth, but I 
think 
it highly likely.

The best person to ask might be Dr. Graham Wells who recently completed a 
thesis on 
historical Northumbrian smallpipes. Although the Halls were not the immediate 
focus 
of his attention, I suspect he would know better than most folk where the sets 
are.


I hope this helps

Julia



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[NSP] Re: Question

2012-06-14 Thread Gibbons, John
Rob,

The Woodhorn pictures are still visible, but I could not link to the search 
engine either.

Off to the day job

John

From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of 
rob@milecastle27.co.uk [rob@milecastle27.co.uk]
Sent: 14 June 2012 08:35
To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Subject: [NSP] Re: Question

Hi Jenny - there's a set attributed to Robert or James Hall in Edinburgh:

http://hdl.handle.net/10683/17806

(James was Robert's son and was also piper to the Duke about 100 years ago)

I don't know what EUCHMI is or whether the collection is viewable

I used to be able to search the Northumberland museum service archives
but I can't seem to get to it anymore. Someone will no doubt be along
shortly with a list of any Hall pipes in the Bagpipe museum in Morpeth

(BTW - there's more traffic elsewhere these days:
http://www.northumbrianpipers.org.uk/pipersforum/ )

cheers

Rob


Quoting IMPERIAL GLASS  ALUMINUM LTD. jenh...@shaw.ca:

 Thank you for accepting me on the mailing list Wayne!

 Have one question:  How do I find out where I can see a Northumbrian
 Smallpipe specifically made by my great-great grandfather Robert Hall of
 Hedgeley, Powburn, Alnwick, NBL?  He made very unique handcrafted ones,
 (year about 1840s or 1850's) and I'm very curious if any exist in today's
 world - possibly in a museum???  Can anyone guide me in some sort of
 direction how I find out about this.  I would appreciate any info on this.
 These Northumbrian small pipes are really beautiful and I watched a youtube
 video of a gal playing one; the song was so beautiful and sweet and cheerful
 and warmed my heart.  Loved it!  Sincerely, Jenny






 To get on or off this list see list information at
 http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html









[NSP] Re: Mallorca melody

2012-04-29 Thread Philip Gruar
It says The Late Duke of Windsor and I always assumed this was the former 
Edward VIII who succeeded to the throne in 1936, abdicated so he could marry 
Wallace Simpson, and died in 1972 after spending the rest of his life in 
France. According to Wikipedia, the title Duke of Windsor was created for 
him, so it can't have been an earlier Duke - as I briefly thought it might 
have been when considering the phrase Late D of W.
Perhaps he wrote it while Prince of Wales - but I believe he always hated 
Balmoral, so probably wasn't much of an appreciator of Highland pipes, and 
it's plainly a Highland pipe tune.


It's very much like another Highland pipe tune, with a Gaelic name I can't 
remember just now, but the Gaelic does sound close enough to Mallorca for 
this to be an English corruption of it.
Does anybody know any more, which might support my theory that HRH Prince 
Edward may have just renamed an existing tune, maybe with a bit of 
alteration, when he didn't quite hear the Gaelic correctly?


Philip

- Original Message - 
From: Kevin tilb...@yahoo.com

To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2012 9:52 PM
Subject: [NSP] Mallorca melody



  Hi to All,
  Can anyone tell me the origins of the the tune Mallorca (1st NSP Tune
  Book), how old it is, and why it was written, and which member of the
  Royal Family wrote it?

  Best wishes,
  Kevin
  --
  http://www.ethnopiper.com
  http://www.youtube.com/kevnsp
  http://kevnsp.blogspot.com
  http://ethnopiper.blogspot.com
  http://facebook.com/kevin.tilbury
  http://soundcloud.com/kevnsp

  --


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[NSP] Re: Mallorca melody

2012-04-29 Thread Dru Brooke-Taylor
The Late Duke of Windsor was quite proud of the fact that he could play 
the Highland Pipes. Although since Victoria and Albert fell in love 
with the Highlands and bought Balmoral, there had always been a piper 
who woke them up every morning, in their day it was definitely an NCO 
job. When the Prince of Wales learnt, it was unusual for a prince to do 
so.  Most of the rest of the family were rather rude about his skills, 
or why he should want to acquire them.


Since he spent quite a lot of his time swanning around the 
Mediterranean on yachts with fast ladies, it's possible it's not a 
corruption of Gaelic and is called after the island.


Dru


On 29 Apr 2012, at 15:27, Philip Gruar wrote:

It says The Late Duke of Windsor and I always assumed this was the 
former Edward VIII who succeeded to the throne in 1936, abdicated so 
he could marry Wallace Simpson, and died in 1972 after spending the 
rest of his life in France. According to Wikipedia, the title Duke of 
Windsor was created for him, so it can't have been an earlier Duke - 
as I briefly thought it might have been when considering the phrase 
Late D of W.
Perhaps he wrote it while Prince of Wales - but I believe he always 
hated Balmoral, so probably wasn't much of an appreciator of Highland 
pipes, and it's plainly a Highland pipe tune.


It's very much like another Highland pipe tune, with a Gaelic name I 
can't remember just now, but the Gaelic does sound close enough to 
Mallorca for this to be an English corruption of it.
Does anybody know any more, which might support my theory that HRH 
Prince Edward may have just renamed an existing tune, maybe with a bit 
of alteration, when he didn't quite hear the Gaelic correctly?


Philip

- Original Message - From: Kevin tilb...@yahoo.com
To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2012 9:52 PM
Subject: [NSP] Mallorca melody



  Hi to All,
  Can anyone tell me the origins of the the tune Mallorca (1st NSP 
Tune
  Book), how old it is, and why it was written, and which member of 
the

  Royal Family wrote it?

  Best wishes,
  Kevin
  --
  http://www.ethnopiper.com
  http://www.youtube.com/kevnsp
  http://kevnsp.blogspot.com
  http://ethnopiper.blogspot.com
  http://facebook.com/kevin.tilbury
  http://soundcloud.com/kevnsp

  --


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http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html








[NSP] Re: Mallorca

2012-04-29 Thread GibbonsSoinne
   An important bit of advice when discussing Royal Compositions,

   is NEVER EVER CRITICISE THEM!



   This is because you never have any idea who wrote the things



   John



   In a message dated 29/04/2012 20:02:33 GMT Daylight Time,
   ross.ander...@cl.cam.ac.uk writes:

 There were two pipers called William Ross. The first was piper to
 Queen Victoria from 1854-1891; Edward VIII, as he became, was born
 three years later. The other Willie Ross was a top player from
 before
 WW1 to after WW2, and was for many years the chief instructor at the
 school of piping. But he was never a piper to royalty.
 Edward VIII was taught the pipes by Henry Forsyth, the sovereign's
 piper from 1910aEUR1941. If anyone helped the prince polish
 Majorca, PM
 Forsyth is surely the prime suspect
 Ross
 To get on or off this list see list information at
 http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

   --



[NSP] Re: April 2012 Tune of the Month: Morpeth Rant -- 1 April 2012

2012-04-02 Thread Matt Seattle
 Not our pipes, but has anyone else seen this morning's Scotsman?
 [1]http://www.scotsman.com/news/pipes-play-music-of-love-for-edinbur
 gh-zoo-pandas-1-2209167#

   An excellent April fool, and obviously written by someone who knows
   something about the subject

   --

References

   1. 
http://www.scotsman.com/news/pipes-play-music-of-love-for-edinburgh-zoo-pandas-1-2209167


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[NSP] Re: April 2012 Tune of the Month: Morpeth Rant -- 1 April 2012

2012-04-01 Thread cwhill

1,042,012 Naira? That's 3/4d isn't it?

Wait for the next edition Rare panda commits suicide in zoo

Colin Hill


On 01/04/2012 16:45, Dru Brooke-Taylor wrote:

And is this an opportunity to do a kindness to the victims of political
violence, by allowing your bank account to assist the widow of a former
general to access funds in exchange for a token share of the proceeds?

Not our pipes, but has anyone else seen this morning's Scotsman?

http://www.scotsman.com/news/pipes-play-music-of-love-for-edinburgh-zoo-pandas-1-2209167#



On 1 Apr 2012, at 15:32, John Dally wrote:


Ian Lawther has chosen THE MORPETH RANT for April's Tune of the Month.
There are lots different settings out there. Matt Seattle published a
book on the tune. It may be the first tune we've had in D, and it may
be the tune with the most key work we've had so far. It is a melody
firmly rooted in the Northumbrian tradition, but not one I hear played
on the pipes very often.



Also, in an amazing stroke of good look the Royal Bank of Nigeria has
granted anyone who has participated in this sharing of tunes so far an
award of 1,042,012 Naira. The grant is given in thanks to the British
Empire for their efforts to give Nigerians free transport and labor
opportunities in the United States over the centuries. The grants must
be collected in person by any young female relation at the main branch
in Abuja by the end of this month.



cheers

--


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[NSP] Re: rapper dancing

2012-03-20 Thread Ian Lawther
I don't know of any recordings played at proper rapper speed but you 
might not want to start there anyway! One thought might be to look for 
some rapper videos on youtube and capture the sound to your computer.


Ian



DEREK LOFTHOUSE wrote:

This is a little off topic, but i am looking for a little advice.
A few of us (conveniently 5) are starting a rapper dance side. We have swords,
instruction books, a little experience (My father and i had a side 30 odd years 
ago).

Just wondering if anyone can suggest recordings that we can practice to. We 
will work
on getting live musicians, but to start it will likely be less painful (at 
least for the musician)
if we use CD's. 
As my mother is from Amble, I am thinking of trying to persuade the guys to start with

the Amble dance.

thanks

Derek



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[NSP] Re: Book on J. Collingwood Bruce (early NSP supporter) free on GoogleBooks

2012-03-07 Thread Gibbons, John
Matthew,

Bruce was one of the 2 editors of the Northumbrian Minstrelsy, though Stokoe 
was the main editor for the tunes. Both were not ideal - but many of the 
earlier Ancient Melodies Committee, particularly William Kell, had died by the 
time the book was being prepared. They got the book out, but it isn't as good 
as it might have been. In particular it garbled and obscured many of its 
sources.

Bruce was involved in other local issues too, including the conservation of the 
Roman Wall.

Using Google Books as your library gives rise to selection bias - better to try 
and consult the right sources directly, rather than the ones Google Books makes 
patchily available.

John



-Original Message-
From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [mailto:lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] On Behalf Of 
Matthew Boris
Sent: 06 March 2012 22:34
To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Subject: [NSP] Book on J. Collingwood Bruce (early NSP supporter) free on 
GoogleBooks

   I was poking around for some information on some of the individuals
   involved in the sustainment of the NSP tradition heading into the 20th
   century, and it turns out that the book The life and letters of John
   Collingwood Bruce of Newcastle-upon-Tyne is available on GoogleBooks
   for free (having been published in 1905 and thus in the public domain),
   both to read on screen or download to various devices.
   Though not concerned primarily with the NSP, since JCB did a lot of
   other things in his career, a decent number of interesting snippets
   come up if you search the therms pipe, pipes or small-pipes
   (smallpipes as a term does not appear).
   Just though this may be of interest to other folks interested in
   history.  I can't confirm that it's free in all countries, depending on
   Google's licensing agreements and various jurisdictions, but it's worth
   looking into. Hope someone else might enjoy this as well.

   --


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[NSP] Re: Book on J. Collingwood Bruce (early NSP supporter) free on GoogleBooks

2012-03-07 Thread Julia Say
On 7 Mar 2012, Gibbons, John wrote: 

 Bruce was one of the 2 editors of the Northumbrian Minstrelsy, though Stokoe 
 was the
 main editor for the tunes. Both were not ideal - but many of the earlier 
 Ancient
 Melodies Committee, particularly William Kell,

Last week I went through the Ancient Melodies Committee correspondence which 
predates the appearance of the book by some 20-odd years. 
 Bruce had some direct contact with the sources - mainly the Duke's pipers, 
but I 
think  Robert White, Kell and so forth did most of the actual collecting.

Bruce had the most appalling handwriting, anyway, particularly when compared 
with a 
surprisingly elegant hand from William Green, who was my primary interest on 
this 
occasion.

I think, as John says, that Stokoe was primarily an editor of already supplied 
material. The earlier group obviously made extensive enquiries (within certain 
social limitations), and also had access to a number of source publications 
such as 
Oswald,  Aird, and Bewick's MSS, all of which are mentioned. There was a lot of 
deliberation as to which tunes were Scottish and which rightly Northumbrian  - 
in a 
way that wouldn't be seen as so important today, I think.

Julia



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[NSP] Re: Book on J. Collingwood Bruce (early NSP supporter) free on GoogleBooks

2012-03-07 Thread Gibbons, John
Comparing Peacock's 'Cut and Dry Dolly' with Riddell's version, from near 
Moffat, (or the other versions from Dixon, or Bell),
their 2 versions of 'Jockey/Willie stays lang at the Fair',
Or 'I saw my Love', with the 'Drunken Wives of Carlisle',
makes clear the border was a very porous boundary.

Dixon's MS includes many tunes with Scottish versions/antecedents.
Vickers has loads of Scots tunes, and others from Ireland and the continent.
That is to be expected in/near a port near a border.

John

 


-Original Message-
From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [mailto:lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] On Behalf Of 
Julia Say
Sent: 07 March 2012 14:21
To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Subject: [NSP] Re: Book on J. Collingwood Bruce (early NSP supporter) free on 
GoogleBooks

On 7 Mar 2012, Gibbons, John wrote: 

 Bruce was one of the 2 editors of the Northumbrian Minstrelsy, though Stokoe 
 was the
 main editor for the tunes. Both were not ideal - but many of the earlier 
 Ancient
 Melodies Committee, particularly William Kell,

Last week I went through the Ancient Melodies Committee correspondence which 
predates the appearance of the book by some 20-odd years. 
 Bruce had some direct contact with the sources - mainly the Duke's pipers, 
but I 
think  Robert White, Kell and so forth did most of the actual collecting.

Bruce had the most appalling handwriting, anyway, particularly when compared 
with a 
surprisingly elegant hand from William Green, who was my primary interest on 
this 
occasion.

I think, as John says, that Stokoe was primarily an editor of already supplied 
material. The earlier group obviously made extensive enquiries (within certain 
social limitations), and also had access to a number of source publications 
such as 
Oswald,  Aird, and Bewick's MSS, all of which are mentioned. There was a lot of 
deliberation as to which tunes were Scottish and which rightly Northumbrian  - 
in a 
way that wouldn't be seen as so important today, I think.

Julia



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[NSP] Re: Book on J. Collingwood Bruce (early NSP supporter) free on GoogleBooks

2012-03-06 Thread Julia Say
On 6 Mar 2012, Matthew Boris wrote: 

 The life and letters of John
Collingwood Bruce of Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Just though this may be of interest to other folks interested in
history.  . Hope someone else might enjoy this as well.

If that's the one written by his son, it's one of the most turgidly written 
volumes 
I have ever had the misfortune to peruse. Yes, I did struggle through all of it 
in 
the hope of useful information.

If anything it strengthened my somewhat sceptical view of his patronising 
activities.

But it was some years ago, and I'm not a fan, so YMMV.

Julia



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[NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

2012-03-02 Thread GibbonsSoinne
   I once wondered if the ballad fits the tune - can you sing it in 9/4?

   The answer is a tentative yes... But it isn't as obvious as I'd like.

   I have not checked every verse.



   The ballad seems to be a local analogue of a Robin Hood one, with
   Carlisle for Nottingham etc,

   Adam a Bell is not the Robin Hood figure - that job went to William of
   Cloudesley.

   But who had it first is a question I won't go into - except that the
   Borders, and borders in general,

   have always been better bandit country than middles of countries.



   (Duck!)



   John







   In a message dated 29/02/2012 05:53:51 GMT Standard Time,
   dir...@gmail.com writes:

 Many thanks to Julia Say for selecting a classic tune for March.
Julia writes:
William Dixon's Adam a Bell and its tune family - through the
 Peacock
 My Dearie  sits ower late up (and the similar but not
 identical one
in Clough).
If any new players find these too intimidating there's a 2 strain
version in the
NPS first tunebook.
Its an old tune whose title commemorates an even older event in
 West
Border history
- see the ballad of the same name.
Dixon's version has 9 strains, Peacock's 5 - I'm sure others must
 have
extended
these or inserted strains of their own to suit their own taste
 for
inventiveness.
It would be interesting to hear the latest additions.  I'm also
interested in the
different rhythmic emphasis occasioned by the 9/4 or 9/8 time
signatures.
It goes on both BP and nsp: if anyone wants a transposition of
 Dixon's
 version into G for nsp, I can supply either appropriate abc or
 the
dots.
I might even try to find the time to fire up my own recorder and
register
on  soundcloud. Mind...I did say try!
--
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[NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

2012-02-29 Thread Matt Seattle
   If anyone wants the dots of the Dixon version, they're in 'The Master
   Piper', available from NPS. If they need to transcribe it into G before
   playing it that will be a useful exercise.
   See the credit for the photo of the Edinburgh pub sign 'Jingling
   Geordie' which appears with the tune following Adam A Bell in the
   latest edition. A surprise to me, and a nice touch. --


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[NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

2012-02-29 Thread Gibbons, John
Reading in A and playing in G is also a skill worth learning!
It opens up an awful lot of the Scottish repertoire.

John 

-Original Message-
From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [mailto:lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] On Behalf Of 
Matt Seattle
Sent: 29 February 2012 10:24
To: Dartmouth NPS
Subject: [NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

   If anyone wants the dots of the Dixon version, they're in 'The Master
   Piper', available from NPS. If they need to transcribe it into G before
   playing it that will be a useful exercise.
   See the credit for the photo of the Edinburgh pub sign 'Jingling
   Geordie' which appears with the tune following Adam A Bell in the
   latest edition. A surprise to me, and a nice touch. --


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[NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

2012-02-29 Thread John Dally
   Sorry about the spelling.  ;-)

   Wouldn't anyone somewhat familiar with the tradition assume Dixon's
   collection to be smallpipe tunes just by perusing the table of
   contents?  It's after reading your insightful text, Matt, that one sees
   the connection to Border pipes.  Your proof depends in part on the key
   signature.  It is up to the piper to decide as a matter of musical
   taste whether to play the tunes with a flattened seventh or not,
   although that decision should, imho, be informed by the historical
   arguments.  In my experience Dixon's tunes rest very easily on the NSP
   chanter regardless of which key you play them in.

   On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 10:41 AM, Matt Seattle
   [1]theborderpi...@googlemail.com wrote:

 On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 6:21 PM, John Dally [1][2]dir...@gmail.com
 wrote:
   Of course, you could play Dixon's tunes
   in Ionian (major scale), playing F# instead of an Fnat in the key
   of
   G, but the purest might consider that a cop-out if not down right
   wrong.

   The purest of the pure?
   It's played in G major (with F#) on NSP, and arguably Dixon would
 have
   played it in the same mode, whatever his instrument and its actual
 or
   nominal pitch. This corresponds to Dick Hensold's view and I agree
 with
   him about many of the tunes which he has suggested are
 (Northumbrian)
   smallpipe tunes. I did not feel comfortable in changing Mr Dixon's
   notation but I did signal this ambiguity.
 On 2/29/12, Matt Seattle [2][3]theborderpi...@googlemail.com
 wrote:
 On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 2:21 PM, Dave S
 [1][3][4]david...@pt.lu

   wrote:
   
   Reading in F and playing in G is also very worthwhile -- all
   the
   renaissance and boaroque dance music ---
   
   In my not necessarily humble opinion, transposing at sight is
   a
   useful
   skill for any piper curious to look beyond the confines of a
   single
   tradition, given that the nominal pitch of the 6-finger note
   is
   a
   movable feast. As with any other skill, you get better the
   more
   you do
   it.
   
   --
   
References
   

 1. mailto:[4][5]david...@pt.lu

   
   
To get on or off this list see list information at

  [5][6]http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html
 
   --
 References
   1. mailto:[7]dir...@gmail.com
   2. mailto:[8]theborderpi...@googlemail.com
   3. mailto:[9]david...@pt.lu
   4. mailto:[10]david...@pt.lu
   5. [11]http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

   --

References

   1. mailto:theborderpi...@googlemail.com
   2. mailto:dir...@gmail.com
   3. mailto:theborderpi...@googlemail.com
   4. mailto:david...@pt.lu
   5. mailto:david...@pt.lu
   6. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html
   7. mailto:dir...@gmail.com
   8. mailto:theborderpi...@googlemail.com
   9. mailto:david...@pt.lu
  10. mailto:david...@pt.lu
  11. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

2012-02-29 Thread brimor




-Original Message-
From: brimor bri...@aol.com
To: theborderpiper theborderpi...@googlemail.com
Sent: Wed, Feb 29, 2012 3:48 pm
Subject: Re: [NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say


It certainly is also useful to read in G and play in F, if you are a fiddler 
and want to play along with NSP F chanters and, as Matt says, the more you do 
it the easier it becomes.
 
Sheila


-Original Message-
From: Matt Seattle theborderpi...@googlemail.com
To: Dartmouth NPS nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Wed, Feb 29, 2012 9:47 am
Subject: [NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say


   On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 2:21 PM, Dave S [1]david...@pt.lu wrote:
   Reading in F and playing in G is also very worthwhile -- all the
  renaissance and boaroque dance music ---
   In my not necessarily humble opinion, transposing at sight is a useful
  skill for any piper curious to look beyond the confines of a single
  tradition, given that the nominal pitch of the 6-finger note is a
  movable feast. As with any other skill, you get better the more you do
  it.
   --
References
   1. mailto:david...@pt.lu

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--

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[NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

2012-02-29 Thread Matt Seattle
   On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 7:46 PM, John Dally [1]dir...@gmail.com
   wrote:

 Sorry about the spelling.  ;-)

   Wouldn't anyone somewhat familiar with the tradition assume Dixon's
   collection to be smallpipe tunes just by perusing the table of
   contents?

   From the titles, yes, but not by playing tunes such as Dorrington Lads
   or Black And Grey which make sense in a way that the Northumbrian
   smallpipe versions never did, because those tunes were not originally
   made for Northumbrian smallpipe chanters. Some tunes, yes indeed, but
   the majority, no. IMO anyway.

   --

References

   1. mailto:dir...@gmail.com


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[NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

2012-02-29 Thread Gibbons, John
There is also the question of what did Dixon intend by his blank key signature?
Did it mean 'this tune is in Gmix/Cmajor or Adorian'?
Or did it mean, as with Highland pipe music,  
'I am not bothering to say what the actual key signature is, as you know 
already'?

John

From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of Matt 
Seattle [theborderpi...@googlemail.com]
Sent: 29 February 2012 23:01
To: Dartmouth NPS
Subject: [NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

   On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 10:33 PM, John
   Dally [1]dir...@gmail.com wrote:

   Dixon's tunes as transcribed in THE MASTER PIPER are in A mixolydian
   and the NSpiper has to take into account that there is more involved
   than simply transposing to G major, and in the case of some of the
   tunes he/she might just as well play them as written in THE MASTER
   PIPER.

   It's an interesting viewpoint, John. There is the precedent of Billy
   Pigg's 'Skye Crofters' played in nominal A on NSP. In what key do you
   play 'Athol Highlanders' on NSP?

   I have to say, it's not a problem for me. I don't play NSP. I have
   enough other problems.

   --

References

   1. mailto:dir...@gmail.com


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[NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

2012-02-29 Thread Matt Seattle
   On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 11:52 PM, Gibbons,
   John [1]j.gibb...@imperial.ac.uk wrote:

 There is also the question of what did Dixon intend by his blank key
 signature?
 Did it mean 'this tune is in Gmix/Cmajor or Adorian'?
 Or did it mean, as with Highland pipe music,
 'I am not bothering to say what the actual key signature is, as you
 know already'?

   I believe the former. The latter, illiterate, practice was yet to be
   established, and WD shows himself to be literate. But, there is also a
   good argument that the piper would know whether to play the major or
   minor 7th from the nature of the tune, and some need one, some the
   other.

   --

References

   1. mailto:j.gibb...@imperial.ac.uk


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[NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia Say

2012-02-29 Thread John Dally
   From the playing the tunes on my various sorts of pipes, it seems clear
   that Dixon did play an instrument with a flattened 7th.  But in my
   experience the flat 7th is sharper on Highland pipes than on SSP or
   most BP.  I don't think his fingering was anything like modern Highland
   piping fingering though.  And, personally, I like Dixon's tunes on the
   NSP and SSP best.  That's not a judgement or historical argument, just
   a matter of personal taste.

   On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 3:52 PM, Gibbons, John
   [1]j.gibb...@imperial.ac.uk wrote:

 There is also the question of what did Dixon intend by his blank key
 signature?
 Did it mean 'this tune is in Gmix/Cmajor or Adorian'?
 Or did it mean, as with Highland pipe music,
 'I am not bothering to say what the actual key signature is, as you
 know already'?
 John
 
 From: [2]lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [[3]lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on
 behalf of Matt Seattle [[4]theborderpi...@googlemail.com]
 Sent: 29 February 2012 23:01
 To: Dartmouth NPS
 Subject: [NSP] Re: March 2012 TOTM: Adam a Bell selected by Julia
 Say
   On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 10:33 PM, John
   Dally [1][5]dir...@gmail.com wrote:
   Dixon's tunes as transcribed in THE MASTER PIPER are in A
 mixolydian
   and the NSpiper has to take into account that there is more
 involved
   than simply transposing to G major, and in the case of some of the
   tunes he/she might just as well play them as written in THE MASTER
   PIPER.
   It's an interesting viewpoint, John. There is the precedent of
 Billy
   Pigg's 'Skye Crofters' played in nominal A on NSP. In what key do
 you
   play 'Athol Highlanders' on NSP?
   I have to say, it's not a problem for me. I don't play NSP. I have
   enough other problems.
   --
 References
   1. mailto:[6]dir...@gmail.com
 To get on or off this list see list information at
 [7]http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

   --

References

   1. mailto:j.gibb...@imperial.ac.uk
   2. mailto:lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu
   3. mailto:lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu
   4. mailto:theborderpi...@googlemail.com
   5. mailto:dir...@gmail.com
   6. mailto:dir...@gmail.com
   7. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: NSP spotted on ebay UK

2012-02-17 Thread Guy Tindale

   Hi All,

   The ivorycould possibly be walrus. Goeff Wooff used old walrus pieces
   that I think he bought in NZ years ago in the limited number of sets
   of  pipes that he made. Then again  am happy to be proven wrong!!

   Regards,


   Guy T
   --- On Wed, 15/2/12, John Dally dir...@gmail.com wrote:

 From: John Dally dir...@gmail.com
 Subject: [NSP] NSP spotted on ebay UK
 To: NSP group nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
 Date: Wednesday, 15 February, 2012, 16:23

  [1][1]http://www.ebay.com/itm/Northumbrian-Smallpipes-/120858672456?
   pt=UK_
  Woodwind_Instrumentshash=item1c23bcfd48
  Can anyone identify the maker?
  I am not associated with the sale or interested in bidding on them.
  Just curious.
  --
   References
  1.
   [2]http://www.ebay.com/itm/Northumbrian-Smallpipes-/120858672456?pt=UK_
   Woodwind_Instrumentshash=item1c23bcfd48
   To get on or off this list see list information at
   [3]http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

   --

References

   1. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Northumbrian-Smallpipes-/120858672456?pt=UK_
   2. 
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Northumbrian-Smallpipes-/120858672456?pt=UK_Woodwind_Instrumentshash=item1c23bcfd48
   3. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: NSP spotted on ebay UK

2012-02-17 Thread cwhill
A lot of the ivory actually came from old billiard and snooker balls as 
well and a lot of of them (and other ivory work) came from mammoth tusks 
from Russia. Europeans used ivory mainly for piano keys and cutlery handles!
I remember being advised to look out for them to make some bits for the 
pipes - mind you, that was when the recommended cane source was flower 
baskets from Spain :)
I never did get any as my attempt to make a set went very, very wrong 
when the drill came out of the side of the chanter and I realised it was 
beyond me! I think I still have a few pieces of lignum hanging around 
somewhere though (drone size).
Hippo teeth are a common source as well (and sperm whale teeth) and 
anything from a mammal tooth is ivory.

All a bit gross really. Mammoth ivory is still legal.
I'd rather have plastic myself.

Colin Hill


On 17/02/2012 21:21, Guy Tindale wrote:


Hi All,

The ivorycould possibly be walrus. Goeff Wooff used old walrus pieces
that I think he bought in NZ years ago in the limited number of sets
of  pipes that he made. Then again  am happy to be proven wrong!!

Regards,


Guy T
--- On Wed, 15/2/12, John Dallydir...@gmail.com  wrote:



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[NSP] Re: NSP spotted on ebay UK

2012-02-17 Thread GibbonsSoinne
   If that recent footage of a mammoth-shaped object fording a river in
   Chukhotka in the Russian Far East turns out not to have been faked,
   then presumably the species goes on the CITES list pretty sharpish, and
   carrying smallpipes across borders gets harder...



   John



   In a message dated 17/02/2012 21:48:50 GMT Standard Time,
   cwh...@santa-fe.freeserve.co.uk writes:

 A lot of the ivory actually came from old billiard and snooker balls
 as
 well and a lot of of them (and other ivory work) came from mammoth
 tusks
 from Russia. Europeans used ivory mainly for piano keys and cutlery
 handles!
 I remember being advised to look out for them to make some bits for
 the
 pipes - mind you, that was when the recommended cane source was
 flower
 baskets from Spain :)
 I never did get any as my attempt to make a set went very, very
 wrong
 when the drill came out of the side of the chanter and I realised it
 was
 beyond me! I think I still have a few pieces of lignum hanging
 around
 somewhere though (drone size).
 Hippo teeth are a common source as well (and sperm whale teeth) and
 anything from a mammal tooth is ivory.
 All a bit gross really. Mammoth ivory is still legal.
 I'd rather have plastic myself.
 Colin Hill
 On 17/02/2012 21:21, Guy Tindale wrote:
 
  Hi All,
 
  The ivorycould possibly be walrus. Goeff Wooff used old walrus
 pieces
  that I think he bought in NZ years ago in the limited number
 of sets
  of  pipes that he made. Then again  am happy to be proven
 wrong!!
 
  Regards,
 
 
  Guy T
  --- On Wed, 15/2/12, John Dallydir...@gmail.com  wrote:
 
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 02/17/12
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[NSP] Re: NSP spotted on ebay UK

2012-02-16 Thread Anthony Robb
   Hello Mike
   I agree there is nothing of the Hedworth style in this set - keys
   especially. Hedworth taught silver smithing to Colin Ross and was a
   master of beautiful keywork. His style is unique with the key stem
   shaped and silver soldered to reach completely across the domed round
   bit (hope my technical language if not too baffling).
   There is a good sample of various makers' keywork at the bottom of this
   page:
   [1]http://www.robbpipes.com/WindyGyleBand.html
   Hedworth made the ivory (G) chanter and it has absolutely typical
   Hedworth keys.
   As aye
   Anthony
   From: Mike Sharp mike_sh...@pacbell.net
   To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
   Sent: Wednesday, 15 February 2012, 22:28
   Subject: [NSP] Re: NSP spotted on ebay UK
 Colin Hill writes:
 I saw a distinct  Hedworth look in the chanter but note it's brass
 fittings. He, I think, used NS (he did on mine) and there's more
   ivory
 on this one.
 I pretty sure this isn't Bill Hedworth's work.  I don't see his
 distinctive rolled (crimped) line that he used to anchor the
   metalwork
 to the wood, and the keys are also of a style different that what I'm
 use to seeing in his work.
   --Mike
 --
   To get on or off this list see list information at
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References

   1. http://www.robbpipes.com/WindyGyleBand.html
   2. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: NSP spotted on ebay UK

2012-02-16 Thread cwhill

I didn't look at the larger images :(
Quite different and, as you say, especially the keys. Bill's are a work 
of art in themselves. Should really have looked at my own set before 
replying.
The only other chanters I have seen (and not that many) have been rather 
heavy and thick which made me think it may have been his.
Again, even looking at the woodwork says it's not. My humble apologies 
for being too idle to look and replying without thinking.


Colin Hill


On 16/02/2012 08:49, Anthony Robb wrote:

Hello Mike
I agree there is nothing of the Hedworth style in this set - keys
especially. Hedworth taught silver smithing to Colin Ross and was a
master of beautiful keywork. His style is unique with the key stem
shaped and silver soldered to reach completely across the domed round
bit (hope my technical language if not too baffling).
There is a good sample of various makers' keywork at the bottom of this
page:
[1]http://www.robbpipes.com/WindyGyleBand.html
Hedworth made the ivory (G) chanter and it has absolutely typical
Hedworth keys.
As aye
Anthony


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[NSP] Re: NSP spotted on ebay UK

2012-02-16 Thread Barry Say
First of all, I must apologise to Anthony for sending my first reply to 
him rather than the list.  This was a finger slip.


What I wrote was:

As far as I can see, these pipes bear none of the features I would 
expect in Hedworth pipes.  In particular,


Anthony Robb wrote:

 His style is unique with the key stem
shaped and silver soldered to reach completely across the domed round
bit.
Close examination of the third photograph shows keys with pads which are 
far more reminiscent of David Burleigh (for instance) although the touch 
ends do have the bulk I would expect from Hedworth.


Barry



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[NSP] Re: NSP spotted on ebay UK

2012-02-15 Thread Adrian

On 15/02/2012 16:23, John Dally wrote:

[1]http://www.ebay.com/itm/Northumbrian-Smallpipes-/120858672456?pt=UK_
Woodwind_Instrumentshash=item1c23bcfd48



Can anyone identify the maker?



I am not associated with the sale or interested in bidding on them.
Just curious.

--

References

1. 
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Northumbrian-Smallpipes-/120858672456?pt=UK_Woodwind_Instrumentshash=item1c23bcfd48


To get on or off this list see list information at
http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html


I think it's the late Ron Blake of Alderly Edge, Cheshire.
Adrian




[NSP] Re: NSP spotted on ebay UK

2012-02-15 Thread cwhill
Doh! I did reply but sent it to the original sender instead of well 
you know the rest.
I saw a distinct  Hedworth look in the chanter but note it's brass 
fittings. He, I think, used NS (he did on mine) and there's more ivory 
on this one.
I always thought of Bill's as very neat and slim so maybe a follower. 
The case looks too new for Bill as well.


Colin Hill.



On 15/02/2012 21:55, Adrian wrote:

On 15/02/2012 16:23, John Dally wrote:

[1]http://www.ebay.com/itm/Northumbrian-Smallpipes-/120858672456?pt=UK_
Woodwind_Instrumentshash=item1c23bcfd48



Can anyone identify the maker?



I am not associated with the sale or interested in bidding on them.
Just curious.

--

References

1.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Northumbrian-Smallpipes-/120858672456?pt=UK_Woodwind_Instrumentshash=item1c23bcfd48



To get on or off this list see list information at
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I think it's the late Ron Blake of Alderly Edge, Cheshire.
Adrian




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[NSP] Re: NSP spotted on ebay UK

2012-02-15 Thread Mike Sharp
   Colin Hill writes:
   I saw a distinct  Hedworth look in the chanter but note it's brass
   fittings. He, I think, used NS (he did on mine) and there's more ivory
   on this one.
   I pretty sure this isn't Bill Hedworth's work.  I don't see his
   distinctive rolled (crimped) line that he used to anchor the metalwork
   to the wood, and the keys are also of a style different that what I'm
   use to seeing in his work.
 --Mike

   --


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[NSP] Re: TOTM

2012-02-09 Thread Matt Seattle
   Gets the approval of the grumpy old Border pipers on their lunch break
   Matt  Bill

   On Thu, Feb 9, 2012 at 12:03 PM, Anthony Robb
   [1]anth...@robbpipes.com wrote:

   Hello all,
   Here's my offering.
   [1][2]http://youtu.be/sfiCRPct9vQ
   Warmest  best
   Anthony
   --
 References
   1. [3]http://youtu.be/sfiCRPct9vQ
 To get on or off this list see list information at
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References

   1. mailto:anth...@robbpipes.com
   2. http://youtu.be/sfiCRPct9vQ
   3. http://youtu.be/sfiCRPct9vQ
   4. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/%7Ewbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: TOTM

2012-02-09 Thread Gibbons, John
And this one too - though the lunch break hasn't yet started, alas

John 

-Original Message-
From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [mailto:lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] On Behalf Of 
Matt Seattle
Sent: 09 February 2012 12:18
To: Anthony Robb
Cc: DartmouthNPS
Subject: [NSP] Re: TOTM

   Gets the approval of the grumpy old Border pipers on their lunch break
   Matt  Bill

   On Thu, Feb 9, 2012 at 12:03 PM, Anthony Robb
   [1]anth...@robbpipes.com wrote:

   Hello all,
   Here's my offering.
   [1][2]http://youtu.be/sfiCRPct9vQ
   Warmest  best
   Anthony
   --
 References
   1. [3]http://youtu.be/sfiCRPct9vQ
 To get on or off this list see list information at
 [4]http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

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References

   1. mailto:anth...@robbpipes.com
   2. http://youtu.be/sfiCRPct9vQ
   3. http://youtu.be/sfiCRPct9vQ
   4. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/%7Ewbc/lute-admin/index.html





[NSP] Re: February TOTM

2012-02-01 Thread John Dally
Great choice.  Thanks Anthony.

On 2/1/12, Anthony Robb anth...@robbpipes.com wrote:
Hello All,

 John Dally has kindly invited me to choose the TOTM for February and it is:

The Keelman Ower Land
This tune has been a favourite since 1973 when (according to Johnny
Handle)  Carole  I gave its first public airing in years. It is still
yielding up its secrets 38 years on.
3/2 tunes are becoming more popular and widely established as shown by
the following abstract from Stewart Hardy submitted to the North
Atlantic Fiddle  Convention   (A Cos go Cluas - trans. aEUR~from foot
to ear') 2012
I think it might be of interest to some:
Working with Dinosaurs
Triple-time Hornpipes
Stewart Hardy
The triple-time hornpipes of the British Isles suffered a dramatic
reversal of fortune during the eighteenth century: initially one of the
most widely played tune forms, at its end the decline was such that if
extinction was not complete, then continued existence was critically
endangered. Not until the last quarter of the twentieth century was
there a significant effort to reawaken interest in this type of tune. A
wealth of fabulous material has been unearthed, containing great energy
and appeal for performer and listener alike. Without an unbroken oral
tradition and with the disappearance of dances associated with these
tunes, there are significant challenges to developing historically and
contextually informed interpretations. Clues are found in the surviving
manuscripts and published collections, folk song and literary
descriptions of village dance. Attempts to reconstruct the dances also
provide illuminating material. Rediscovering and resurrecting
triple-time hornpipes presents an opportunity to observe the shift from
social process to aesthetic product in reverse - from ear to foot
rather than from foot to ear. In this paper I will explore these
issues, demonstrate tunes and suggest some practical and well-founded
solutions to problems of interpretation.

--


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[NSP] Re: TOTM selection process: new proposal

2011-12-14 Thread Dave S

Hi John,

That sounds like a great proposal, brilliant learning possibilities and 
history background too


Super

Dave S

On 12/14/2011 9:40 AM, John Dally wrote:

How would the group feel if we changed the present tune/topic/theme
selection process?  There must be better ways to make the choice so
that more pipers will want to participate and, equally important,
there will be more useful discussion about the selection.  Pete
Stewart has been very helpful in the selection process so far, and I
hope we will continue to work in tandem with the LBPS.

Perhaps the authorities and masters among us would make the selection,
telling us why they selected it and some of the background to the
selection.  Each month a new person would make his/her selection.

I found Richard Evans comments on my Overseas entries extremely
helpful.  Likewise, perhaps the Expert of the Month would offer
helpful and encouraging comments on the performances.

What do you think?



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[NSP] Re: Spot the tune - urgent

2011-12-09 Thread Julia Say
On 8 Dec 2011, Julia Say wrote: 

 This is an untitled Kathryn T composition. 

Thank you to the various people who responded offlist. I  now know that the 
title 
is Andy's Slip Jig, but whether I can get a stop press change in the book I 
don't 
know - the printers have gone home.

Julia



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[NSP] Re: ebay Northumbrian bagpipe (not)

2011-12-07 Thread Gibbons, John
A puzzle - are there any ethnoorganologists out there who can identify the 
thing?

John

From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of John 
Dally [dir...@gmail.com]
Sent: 06 December 2011 22:29
To: NSP group
Subject: [NSP] ebay Northumbrian bagpipe (not)

Some sort of euro-pipe, very expensive for what it is, but not what
the seller claims it is: ebay item #170741342181.



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[NSP] Re: ebay Northumbrian bagpipe (not)

2011-12-07 Thread cwhill

I just told them that it was not a Northumbrian bagpipe, just a European
one.
The box for typing in the reasons doesn't allow many letters.
Certainly does look like something maybe from  Spanish-influenced areas
like Morocco or that area (they have smaller single drones, in general).
Wouldn't like to narrow it down though.
I suspect the curve of the bellows may be a good clue but beyond my
knowledge.

Colin Hill.

On 06/12/2011 23:02, Barry Say wrote:

I have reported this to ebay as a misleading title.

If others wish to do so this might not be a bad idea.

I have not yet been able to tell them what is wrong, it is a rather
tick-box approach, but I will see what happens.

Barry

John Dally wrote:

Some sort of euro-pipe, very expensive for what it is, but not what
the seller claims it is: ebay item #170741342181.



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[NSP] Re: ebay Northumbrian bagpipe (not)

2011-12-06 Thread Barry Say

I have reported this to ebay as a misleading title.

If others wish to do so this might not be a bad idea.

I have not yet been able to tell them what is wrong, it is a rather 
tick-box approach, but I will see what happens.


Barry

John Dally wrote:

Some sort of euro-pipe, very expensive for what it is, but not what
the seller claims it is: ebay item #170741342181.



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[NSP] Re: New topic?

2011-11-28 Thread cwhill

Drones? isn't that what makes all the buzzing noise in a beehive?

Colin Hill


On 28/11/2011 13:23, Richard York wrote:

I note that our latest copy of the New Internationalist has a cover
story tag for The Rise of the Killer Drones.
Is this an aspect of piping we should be discussing?
Richard.
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[NSP] Re: 4mm or 6mm staples

2011-11-28 Thread Kevin
   Hi To All,
   many thanks to all who wrote. i will give the 4mm rod a try as it is
   the closes i can get to 4.76mm. since it might be a little narrow, will
   i have t compensate in the length or the width of the reed when making
   it? or is the difference to small to make a real difference?
   in time i will order the right rod from the model shops which you have
   kindly sent me, but for now i will have a go with the local brass rods.
   many thanks,
   kevin
 __

   From: Francis Wood oatenp...@googlemail.com
   To: cwhill cwh...@santa-fe.freeserve.co.uk
   Cc: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
   Sent: Sunday, 27 November 2011, 18:26
   Subject: [NSP] Re: 4mm or 6mm staples
   Colin's interesting account of making staples from sheet metal is a
   very good reminder that this was the staple [pun unavoidable] method of
   making staples for historical reeds - they generally relied on the
   binding to keep them airtight.
   No reason why that shouldn't work perfectly well today, although many
   of todays tins are corrugated. However, the easiest source of tube fit
   for the job is brass or (cheaper) aluminium tube from the nearest model
   shop. Quite often this stuff is sourced from the US and though it may
   have nominal metric sizes, is often actually imperial with a 5/32
   (4mm) internal diameter and a 3/16 (4.76mm) exterior.
   I think some experimentation and variation on the standard recommended
   dimensions would be really good (is anyone already doing this?) and the
   hand -rolled staple may be an excellent way of doing this.
   A final word in praise of the NPS Forum and its 'Pipe making and
   Maintenance' area - which is a really good place for following and
   preserving  discussions like the present one.
   Francis
   On 27 Nov 2011, at 16:51, cwhill wrote:
3/16 is 4.76mm (so very near to 5mm) so I presume you meant that and
should you downsize to 4 or try for a 5mm tube?
Personally, I made my staples from a Fray Bentos pie tin lid as brass
tubing was hard to get back then so never had to buy any (it worked -
paint side out - as I had a drill the right size to mould it around.
That was what was in my instruction book - along with getting reed
   cane
from old flower baskets!).
Current reed makers must have gone metric by now so they should know.
Yes, you can get 5mm
[1]http://www.metalsmith.co.uk/metals-materials.htm
BT5 on that page 500mm for -L-2.60
Do note that the size is external diameter so the internal bore is
actually 4mm
Unfortunately I don't know what your instruction book means by 3/16
(internal or external).
   
   
Colin Hill
   
   
On 27/11/2011 15:33, Kevin wrote:
   Hi to All,
   can any one advise me what size staples to buy for making NSP
   chanter
   reeds?
   in my local D.I.Y. there are brass rods of 4mm or 6mm, but i read
   in my
   
   booklet on making reeds that it is 3/16th (imperial) and my chart
   says
   3/16th is 4mm. so what do i go for? is 6mm too big or is 4 too
   small?
   can one get 5mm rods now?
   any advice on what to buy.
   thanks
   kevin
   
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[NSP] Re: 4mm or 6mm staples

2011-11-27 Thread Anthony Robb
   Hello Kevin
   First off, I'm assuming you mean tube and not rod? I follow Mike
   Nelson's advice on this and use model aircraft aluminium fuel tubing
   - 4mm internal, 4.75mm external diameters.
   This is very easily cut to length with a large scalpel/sharp Stanley
   knife ( simply roll it with the blade to score it then carefully snap
   the piece off).
   It is also very easy to shape but be gentle with the metal former
   otherwise the edges of the staple end can be pushed outwards making it
   impossible to get a good seating for the cane slip(s).
   Hope this helps.
   Anthony
   From: Kevin tilb...@yahoo.com
   To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
   Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 3:33 PM
   Subject: [NSP] 4mm or 6mm staples
 Hi to All,
 can any one advise me what size staples to buy for making NSP chanter
 reeds?
 in my local D.I.Y. there are brass rods of 4mm or 6mm, but i read in
   my
 booklet on making reeds that it is 3/16th (imperial) and my chart
   says
 3/16th is 4mm. so what do i go for? is 6mm too big or is 4 too small?
 can one get 5mm rods now?
 any advice on what to buy.
 thanks
 kevin
 --
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[NSP] Re: 4mm or 6mm staples

2011-11-27 Thread Barry Say

Anthony Robb wrote:

- 4mm internal, 4.75mm external diameters.


That is as near as d*mn*t  5/32 id and 3/16 od which is the size of 
brass tube I use. So no argument there.


Personally, I suspect this fuel tube originates in the US where, 
thankfully, the traditional sizes are  alive and kicking.


Barry



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[NSP] Re: 4mm or 6mm staples

2011-11-27 Thread Francis Wood
Colin's interesting account of making staples from sheet metal is a very good 
reminder that this was the staple [pun unavoidable] method of making staples 
for historical reeds - they generally relied on the binding to keep them 
airtight. 

No reason why that shouldn't work perfectly well today, although many of todays 
tins are corrugated. However, the easiest source of tube fit for the job is 
brass or (cheaper) aluminium tube from the nearest model shop. Quite often this 
stuff is sourced from the US and though it may have nominal metric sizes, is 
often actually imperial with a 5/32 (4mm) internal diameter and a 3/16 
(4.76mm) exterior.

I think some experimentation and variation on the standard recommended 
dimensions would be really good (is anyone already doing this?) and the hand 
-rolled staple may be an excellent way of doing this.

A final word in praise of the NPS Forum and its 'Pipe making and Maintenance' 
area - which is a really good place for following and preserving  discussions 
like the present one.

Francis







On 27 Nov 2011, at 16:51, cwhill wrote:

 3/16 is 4.76mm (so very near to 5mm) so I presume you meant that and
 should you downsize to 4 or try for a 5mm tube?
 Personally, I made my staples from a Fray Bentos pie tin lid as brass
 tubing was hard to get back then so never had to buy any (it worked -
 paint side out - as I had a drill the right size to mould it around.
 That was what was in my instruction book - along with getting reed cane
 from old flower baskets!).
 Current reed makers must have gone metric by now so they should know.
 Yes, you can get 5mm
 http://www.metalsmith.co.uk/metals-materials.htm
 BT5 on that page 500mm for £2.60
 Do note that the size is external diameter so the internal bore is
 actually 4mm
 Unfortunately I don't know what your instruction book means by 3/16
 (internal or external).
 
 
 Colin Hill
 
 
 On 27/11/2011 15:33, Kevin wrote:
Hi to All,
can any one advise me what size staples to buy for making NSP chanter
reeds?
in my local D.I.Y. there are brass rods of 4mm or 6mm, but i read in my
 
booklet on making reeds that it is 3/16th (imperial) and my chart says
3/16th is 4mm. so what do i go for? is 6mm too big or is 4 too small?
can one get 5mm rods now?
any advice on what to buy.
thanks
kevin
 
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 http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html
 
 
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 Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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[NSP] Re: December TOTM

2011-11-23 Thread Matt Seattle
 The obvious topic is tunes with a reference to the season (winter,
 soltice, Christmas, Hogmany, New Year). I suggest we pick a tune we
 all want to play and then combine it with one or more other tunes,
 as
 suggested by Barry Say.

   Here's one we prepared earlier, John, I think it satisfies the
   requirements -
   [1]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hQc8MIGqvM

   --

References

   1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hQc8MIGqvM


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[NSP] Re: December TOTM

2011-11-23 Thread Bill
Shame we weren't quite in tune!-compared to the chanters in the Wild Hills
video-but interesting how the chanters begin to attune further on in a
set.!?


-Original Message-
From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [mailto:lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] On Behalf
Of Matt Seattle
Sent: 23 November 2011 13:54
To: Dartmouth NPS
Subject: [NSP] Re: December TOTM

 The obvious topic is tunes with a reference to the season (winter,
 soltice, Christmas, Hogmany, New Year). I suggest we pick a tune we
 all want to play and then combine it with one or more other tunes,
 as
 suggested by Barry Say.

   Here's one we prepared earlier, John, I think it satisfies the
   requirements -
   [1]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hQc8MIGqvM

   --

References

   1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hQc8MIGqvM


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[NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

2011-11-21 Thread Christopher.Birch
Yes! 

-Original Message-
From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu 
[mailto:lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] On Behalf Of Anthony Robb
Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2011 9:41 PM
To: Dartmouth nsp list N.P.S. site
Subject: [NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle


   Hello Kevin and all

   I noticed this in Kevin's email:

   ...so i closed the G hole with glue at one side until it 
was in tune.
   I'm wondering why you put the glue at one side rather than the top?
   Putting glue at the side will flatten the note by making the hole
   smaller but this would need more glue than putting it at 
the top of the
   hole which flattens it by a) slightly moving the hole down and b)
   making the hole smaller. This double whammy effect means less glue
   needed and (more often than not) bright tone preserved.
   Cheers
   Anthony

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[NSP] Re: Kathryn Tickell

2011-11-18 Thread Dave S

Thanks for the link -- time in 1h12'ish to 1h33 on the one I played

Dave S

On 11/18/2011 11:44 AM, Di Jevons wrote:

A fiddler friend of mine has sent me a BBC iplayer link to a Radio
Scotland programme Travelling Folk featuring Chris Stout from Fiddlers
Bid.



Also on the same programme is Kathryn Tickell.  Kathryn is on from
about 8 minutes for about half an hour.



Here is the link for anyone who's interested



[1]http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0175jnm#segments

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[NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

2011-11-17 Thread Anthony Robb
   Hello Kevin and all

   I noticed this in Kevin's email:

   ...so i closed the G hole with glue at one side until it was in tune.
   I'm wondering why you put the glue at one side rather than the top?
   Putting glue at the side will flatten the note by making the hole
   smaller but this would need more glue than putting it at the top of the
   hole which flattens it by a) slightly moving the hole down and b)
   making the hole smaller. This double whammy effect means less glue
   needed and (more often than not) bright tone preserved.
   Cheers
   Anthony

   --


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[NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

2011-11-16 Thread Kevin
   Many thanks to all who wrote about my chanter being flat. i did what
   you advised and it has solved the problem. many thanks my chanter is
   now back in tune.
   best wishes
   kevin
 __

   From: Dave Shaw d...@daveshaw.co.uk
   To: Kevin tilb...@yahoo.com; Dartmouth nsp list N.P.S. site
   nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
   Sent: Tuesday, 15 November 2011, 10:16
   Subject: [NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle
   Hi Kevin
   I would agree with the detail of Philips advice.
   When the octaves are in tune with each other and the fifth is flat then
   the reed is too long.
   You need to shorten the reed by half millimetre cuts(or less) until the
   intervals are correct.
   I use a cut throat type razor for this, on an endgrain hardwood block (
   boxwood).
   A heavy craft knife would do on some firm surface, but you have to be
   careful as you can give yourself a nasty cut
   if the slightest slip occurs.
   Tuning the chanter to proper pitch is a whole different ballgame!
   Cheers,
   Dave
   Dave Shaw, Northumbrian and Scottish Smallpipes, Irish Pipes and SHAW
   Whistles
   www.daveshaw.co.uk
   - Original Message - From: Kevin [1]tilb...@yahoo.com
   To: Dartmouth nsp list N.P.S. site [2]nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
   Sent: Sunday, November 13, 2011 8:20 PM
   Subject: [NSP] flat chanter in the middle
 Hi to All,
 Can anyone advice me on the tuning of my chanter to the drones. The
   top
 G and the bottom G are in tune with the drones but the middle notes
 especially the D is a fraction out of tune, a little flat. is this
 rectified by moving the reed, if so which way? or opening the reed
   or
 closing it?
 the chanter has been in tune in the past but since changing the reed
   i
 find these problems, it is either the top/bottom notes are out or
   the
 middle notes are outany advice?
 thanks
 kevin
   
 --
   
   
To get on or off this list see list information at
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References

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   3. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/%7Ewbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

2011-11-16 Thread Barry Say

Hi all,

I agree with most of what has been said on this thread. I only 
restricted my advice to reed opening because I only wanted to mention 
clipping the reed when all else had been tried. It is after all 
irreversible, unless someone has found a way of gluing the bits back on?


There was one other option I thought  of which was to move the reed 
farther out of the chanter and play at a slightly higher pressure. If 
this cures the problem and the resulting pressure is too high, then the 
reed must be scraped to soften it, clipped to sharpen it c. c.


However, right now I would like to know how Kevin got his chanter in 
tune as this will add to my knowledge.


Barry



Gibbons, John wrote:

Kevin,

What was the trouble in the end?
Or more precisely, what remedy cured it?

I'd trust the ones with hands on experimental knowledge rather than a mere 
theoretician,
but theory is all I have!

John


From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of Kevin 
[tilb...@yahoo.com]
Sent: 16 November 2011 08:57
To: Dartmouth nsp list N.P.S. site
Subject: [NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

Many thanks to all who wrote about my chanter being flat. i did what
you advised and it has solved the problem. many thanks my chanter is
now back in tune.
best wishes
kevin
  __

From: Dave Shawd...@daveshaw.co.uk
To: Kevintilb...@yahoo.com; Dartmouth nsp list N.P.S. site
nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Tuesday, 15 November 2011, 10:16
Subject: [NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle
Hi Kevin
I would agree with the detail of Philips advice.
When the octaves are in tune with each other and the fifth is flat then
the reed is too long.
You need to shorten the reed by half millimetre cuts(or less) until the
intervals are correct.
I use a cut throat type razor for this, on an endgrain hardwood block (
boxwood).
A heavy craft knife would do on some firm surface, but you have to be
careful as you can give yourself a nasty cut
if the slightest slip occurs.
Tuning the chanter to proper pitch is a whole different ballgame!
Cheers,
Dave
Dave Shaw, Northumbrian and Scottish Smallpipes, Irish Pipes and SHAW
Whistles
www.daveshaw.co.uk
- Original Message - From: Kevin[1]tilb...@yahoo.com
To: Dartmouth nsp list N.P.S. site[2]nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Sunday, November 13, 2011 8:20 PM
Subject: [NSP] flat chanter in the middle
   Hi to All,
   Can anyone advice me on the tuning of my chanter to the drones. The
top
   G and the bottom G are in tune with the drones but the middle notes
   especially the D is a fraction out of tune, a little flat. is this
   rectified by moving the reed, if so which way? or opening the reed
or
   closing it?
   the chanter has been in tune in the past but since changing the reed
i
   find these problems, it is either the top/bottom notes are out or
the
   middle notes are outany advice?
   thanks
   kevin

   --


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[NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

2011-11-15 Thread Dave Shaw

Hi Kevin

I would agree with the detail of Philips advice.
When the octaves are in tune with each other and the fifth is flat then the 
reed is too long.
You need to shorten the reed by half millimetre cuts(or less) until the 
intervals are correct.
I use a cut throat type razor for this, on an endgrain hardwood block ( 
boxwood).
A heavy craft knife would do on some firm surface, but you have to be 
careful as you can give yourself a nasty cut

if the slightest slip occurs.

Tuning the chanter to proper pitch is a whole different ballgame!

Cheers,

Dave

Dave Shaw, Northumbrian and Scottish Smallpipes, Irish Pipes and SHAW 
Whistles

www.daveshaw.co.uk

- Original Message - 
From: Kevin tilb...@yahoo.com

To: Dartmouth nsp list N.P.S. site nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Sunday, November 13, 2011 8:20 PM
Subject: [NSP] flat chanter in the middle



  Hi to All,
  Can anyone advice me on the tuning of my chanter to the drones. The top
  G and the bottom G are in tune with the drones but the middle notes
  especially the D is a fraction out of tune, a little flat. is this
  rectified by moving the reed, if so which way? or opening the reed or
  closing it?
  the chanter has been in tune in the past but since changing the reed i
  find these problems, it is either the top/bottom notes are out or the
  middle notes are outany advice?
  thanks
  kevin

  --


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[NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

2011-11-14 Thread Gibbons, John
Kevin

If it is a 7-key chanter, one possible cause is a reflection from the foot of 
the chanter, nearly in resonance with the upper part between the reed and the d 
hole. If so this resonance might be flat, dragging the d down a bit. Try 
pushing the cotton wool plug a few mm up the chanter? This helped with the 
first chanter I owned, though buying one that was made in tune is the way I 
finally cured that problem. As yours has been in tune before, tweaking the plug 
might help. 

John



From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of cwhill 
[cwh...@santa-fe.freeserve.co.uk]
Sent: 13 November 2011 22:14
To: NSP group
Cc: NSP group
Subject: [NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

I'm presuming that both g notes are actually sounding the proper note?
I know you have said they are correct to the drones but those particular
notes sound terrible if the drones are just a wee bit off. Do you have
access to a tuner? I'd check that the g's on the chanter and drones are
actually playing the same note and then check the middle notes to see if
they are actually off (to the d/D drones).
Even the best ears can have off days.
Did you make or buy the reed? There's always a little work today on a
bought reed to get it to suit your own chanter. Even home made ones can
seem fine but do that. I forget how I fixed mine (a long time ago now)
but I never got it spot on.
When Colin Ross refettled my pipes and made me a new reed for them that
problem vanished completely (before I had to just add a little pressure
whenever I played a certain note). I'm afraid my unwarranted pride in
making a (nearly) good reed took over from common sense :)

Colin Hill

On 13/11/2011 20:57, Barry Say wrote:

 Hi Kevin

 Do you know what pitch you are tuning at. Is it the same as before?
 Do you know what pressure you're playing at. Is it the same as before?

 You could have a reed which naturally gives a flatter d .

 My guess would be to open the reed a fraction and increase your playing
 pressure slightly.
 If that works but the playing pressure is too high, get back to me. On
 list will be fine.

 Barry

 -
 These things may solve your worst nightmare,
 or they may eat all of the cheese in your house.
 I make no guarantees.
 YMMV. 



 Kevin wrote:
 Hi to All,
 Can anyone advice me on the tuning of my chanter to the drones. The top
 G and the bottom G are in tune with the drones but the middle notes
 especially the D is a fraction out of tune, a little flat. is this
 rectified by moving the reed, if so which way? or opening the reed or
 closing it?
 the chanter has been in tune in the past but since changing the reed i
 find these problems, it is either the top/bottom notes are out or the
 middle notes are outany advice?
 thanks
 kevin

 --


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[NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

2011-11-14 Thread Philip Gruar

Kevin,
Your problem is most likely to be caused by the reed, though what John says 
about the length of the chanter is also true up to a point. A reed which is 
too weak, having been over-thinned especially at the bridle end, often 
produces false/flat notes in the middle of the chanter. Squeezing the reed 
more open can improve it, as Barry says, though of course makes it harder to 
blow, and with a basically weak reed the tone is still flabby - too lacking 
in high harmonics. I have quite frequently solved a problem like yours by 
clipping a VERY small bit off the end of the reed lips, using sharp 
end-clippers which I keep exclusively for reeds. This is a bit of a risky 
proceedure if you are not used to it, though. After clipping, you will 
probably need to thin just the tips VERY carefully by rubbing on fine 
abrasive paper, but be careful here, because you can easily thin too much 
and weaken it fatally again - so you have to clip a bit more off, and so 
on..!
The best solution may just be to try a new reed which is bright sounding, 
but easy to blow, by being scraped evenly down to a fine tip, while still 
keeping just enough strength in the sides - though beware that a reed that 
is TOO strong in the sides will squeak more easily on the low notes.


Philip

 
From: Gibbons, John j.gibb...@imperial.ac.uk

To: NSP group nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Monday, November 14, 2011 10:32 AM
Subject: [NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle



Kevin

If it is a 7-key chanter, one possible cause is a reflection from the foot 
of the chanter, nearly in resonance with the upper part between the reed 
and the d hole. If so this resonance might be flat, dragging the d down a 
bit. Try pushing the cotton wool plug a few mm up the chanter? This helped 
with the first chanter I owned, though buying one that was made in tune is 
the way I finally cured that problem. As yours has been in tune before, 
tweaking the plug might help.


John



From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of 
cwhill [cwh...@santa-fe.freeserve.co.uk]

Sent: 13 November 2011 22:14
To: NSP group
Cc: NSP group
Subject: [NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

I'm presuming that both g notes are actually sounding the proper note?
I know you have said they are correct to the drones but those particular
notes sound terrible if the drones are just a wee bit off. Do you have
access to a tuner? I'd check that the g's on the chanter and drones are
actually playing the same note and then check the middle notes to see if
they are actually off (to the d/D drones).
Even the best ears can have off days.
Did you make or buy the reed? There's always a little work today on a
bought reed to get it to suit your own chanter. Even home made ones can
seem fine but do that. I forget how I fixed mine (a long time ago now)
but I never got it spot on.
When Colin Ross refettled my pipes and made me a new reed for them that
problem vanished completely (before I had to just add a little pressure
whenever I played a certain note). I'm afraid my unwarranted pride in
making a (nearly) good reed took over from common sense :)

Colin Hill

On 13/11/2011 20:57, Barry Say wrote:


Hi Kevin

Do you know what pitch you are tuning at. Is it the same as before?
Do you know what pressure you're playing at. Is it the same as before?

You could have a reed which naturally gives a flatter d .

My guess would be to open the reed a fraction and increase your playing
pressure slightly.
If that works but the playing pressure is too high, get back to me. On
list will be fine.

Barry

-
These things may solve your worst nightmare,
or they may eat all of the cheese in your house.
I make no guarantees.
YMMV. 



Kevin wrote:

Hi to All,
Can anyone advice me on the tuning of my chanter to the drones. The top
G and the bottom G are in tune with the drones but the middle notes
especially the D is a fraction out of tune, a little flat. is this
rectified by moving the reed, if so which way? or opening the reed or
closing it?
the chanter has been in tune in the past but since changing the reed i
find these problems, it is either the top/bottom notes are out or the
middle notes are outany advice?
thanks
kevin




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http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html


[NSP] Re: flat chanter in the middle

2011-11-13 Thread Barry Say

Hi Kevin

Do you know what pitch you are tuning at. Is it the same as before?
Do you know what pressure you're playing at. Is it the same as before?

You could have a reed which naturally gives a flatter d .

My guess would be to open the reed a fraction and increase your playing 
pressure slightly.
If that works but the playing pressure is too high, get back to me. On 
list will be fine.


Barry

-
These things may solve your worst nightmare,
or they may eat all of the cheese in your house.
I make no guarantees.
YMMV. 



Kevin wrote:

Hi to All,
Can anyone advice me on the tuning of my chanter to the drones. The top
G and the bottom G are in tune with the drones but the middle notes
especially the D is a fraction out of tune, a little flat. is this
rectified by moving the reed, if so which way? or opening the reed or
closing it?
the chanter has been in tune in the past but since changing the reed i
find these problems, it is either the top/bottom notes are out or the
middle notes are outany advice?
thanks
kevin

--


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[NSP] Re: Dots for tune - Our Kate

2011-11-11 Thread Geoff Jones
   'Our Kate' can be found on be [1]JC's ABC Tune Finder and
   [2]www.thesession.org.

   [customLogo.gif?revision=3] Geoff Jones

   BAGPIPE PLAYER  TUTOR

   GREAT HIGHLAND BAGPIPES - SCOTTISH  NORTHUMBRIAN SMALL PIPES - BORDER
   PIPES

   PHONE: 0419 567 038 - E-MAIL: [3]em...@geoffjones.info -
   WEBSITE:[4]www.geoffjones.info
   On 11 November 2011 21:20, Julia Say [5]julia@nspipes.co.uk
   wrote:

 Does anyone have the dots for Our Kate by Kathryn Tickell
 transcribed, by any
 chance?
 I thought I had it, but it must be on a piece of paper buried
 somewhere in my
 filing system.
 The composer herself doesn't have ready access to a copy - I'm sure
 someone must
 have written it out for themselves or others.
 I'd be grateful for a copy if anyone has one, pdf, jpg, abc,
 whatever (can't read
 Sibelius or Noteworthy files, sorry). Then I can get it checked.
 Thanks muchly
 Julia
 To get on or off this list see list information at
 [6]http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

   --

References

   1. 
http://trillian.mit.edu/~jc/cgi/abc/tunefind?P=our+katefind=FINDm=titleW=widescale=0.65limit=1000thresh=5fmt=singleV=1Tsel=tuneNsel=0
   2. http://www.thesession.org/tunes/display/8296
   3. mailto:em...@geoffjones.info
   4. http://www.geoffjones.info/
   5. mailto:julia@nspipes.co.uk
   6. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: Dots for tune - Our Kate

2011-11-11 Thread Julia Say
On 11 Nov 2011, Geoff Jones wrote: 

 'Our Kate' can be found on be JC's ABC Tune
 Finder


Thanks, Geoff. Stupidly, I assumed that because it is still in copyright 
(obviously) it would not be on such sites.

I'll hijack it from there and get it checked.


Julia



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[NSP] Re: Dots for tune - Our Kate

2011-11-11 Thread Julia Say
I now have several copies in two different keys and am getting them checked by 
the 
composer. 

Thanks, one and all.

Julia



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[NSP] Re: triple hornpipes

2011-11-04 Thread mfk_8973
Nice playing, John. I have tried fading out with my pipes for years but never 
succeeded!

Michael 

- Original Message -
From: John Dally dir...@gmail.com
To: NSP group nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Thursday, November 3, 2011 7:53:19 PM
Subject: [NSP] triple hornpipes

This is a follow up to the October TOTM.  Here are three triple
hornpipes played on a SSP, chanter by Mike Sharp, drones by Addison.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxDelZc71YA



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[NSP] Re: hornpipes for October TOTM

2011-10-12 Thread Gibbons, John
It's a great set - Glen Aln is a grand tune that deserves more outings, and 
itgoes well into the Marquis of Lorne; the Redesdale rounds the set off nicely.

I liked the snaps here and there in the Marquis and the Redesdale.

John 

From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of John 
Dally [dir...@gmail.com]
Sent: 12 October 2011 23:00
To: NSP group
Subject: [NSP] hornpipes for October TOTM

Here is a set of three hornpipes for October: The Glen Aln, The
Marquis of Lorne, The Redesdale:
http://soundcloud.com/john-dally/hornpipes-glen-aln-marquis-of
I hope you find these enjoyable.



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[NSP] Re: Piping videos

2011-10-02 Thread marianne.h...@tinyworld.co.uk


Original Message
From: allerwa...@hotmail.com
Date: 
02/10/2011 12:23 
To: marianne.h...@tinyworld.co.uk, Guy Hallguy.
h...@tinyworld.co.uk
Subj: FW: Piping videos




Date: Sun, 25 
Sep 2011 13:13:34 +0100
From: timr...@btinternet.com
Subject: Piping 
videos
To: allerwa...@hotmail.com


Here are the links to the 
videos we took. They are only visible to people who know the link, so 
they are not generally public.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7R9zTdwacxU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRoEvtCSFv0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9eWdIhiJpcw
Love,
Tim--- x   
  




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[NSP] Re: TOTM Hornpipe(s)

2011-09-30 Thread Matt Seattle
   Very nice Anthony! The pipes sound great and there's some fine phrasing
   in the playing.

   For a relatively different aesthetic, and a different reading of the
   word 'hornpipe', see All The Night I Lay With Jackey In My Arms, the
   middle tune of this duet set
   [1]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hQc8MIGqvM
   and please be indulgent regarding our also 'flawed as usual'
   performance! The two sets sound fantastic when they are spot on in
   tune, but of course there's never a recording device running on those
   occasions.
   On Fri, Sep 30, 2011 at 8:08 PM, Anthony Robb
   [2]anth...@robbpipes.com wrote:

   Hellos apiece
   Here we go - flawed as usual - two great tunes that are becoming
   popular but could be more so.
   I've been doing up Jimmy Little's pipes which have spent the last
 18
   years languishing in their box.
   I've given them a new chanter reed and have re-tongued three of
 the
   drone reeds. The set has only been working fully for a couple of
 days
   but should get even better with more playing. According to Jack
   Armstrong they were made by Baty of Wark circa 1850.
   [1][3]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shd_W9kzXpo
   Best wishes
   Anthony
   --
 References
   1. [4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shd_W9kzXpo
 To get on or off this list see list information at
 [5]http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

   --

References

   1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hQc8MIGqvM
   2. mailto:anth...@robbpipes.com
   3. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shd_W9kzXpo
   4. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shd_W9kzXpo
   5. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: October TOTM suggestions?

2011-09-24 Thread Gibbons, John
Thanks for keeping this going.
We could try anything by Billy Pigg?
I could be beastly and suggest 'Billsmoor', 
but 'Raylees' is perhaps more user-friendly, and deserves more airtime.
Another argument for this is that we haven't done any hornpipes yet, either.

John



From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of John 
Dally [dir...@gmail.com]
Sent: 24 September 2011 07:22
To: NSP group
Subject: [NSP] October TOTM suggestions?

This a formal request for suggestions for the October TOTM.  The more
discussion the merrier.



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[NSP] Re: October TOTM suggestions?

2011-09-24 Thread Julia Say
On 24 Sep 2011, Gibbons, John wrote: 

 I could be beastly and suggest 'Billsmoor', 

giggle

 but 'Raylees' is perhaps more user-friendly, and deserves more airtime.

And there's a piper there once more, albeit in a barn conversion not the 
farmhouse 
itself.

But John D's folio idea is also good..

Julia



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[NSP] Re: October TOTM suggestions?

2011-09-24 Thread Gibbons, John
But John D's folio idea is also good..
I seem to have missed that email - 
but there are lots of grand tunes in the new folio.

John G


From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of Julia 
Say [julia@nspipes.co.uk]
Sent: 24 September 2011 12:01
To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Subject: [NSP] Re: October TOTM suggestions?

On 24 Sep 2011, Gibbons, John wrote:

 I could be beastly and suggest 'Billsmoor',

giggle

 but 'Raylees' is perhaps more user-friendly, and deserves more airtime.

And there's a piper there once more, albeit in a barn conversion not the 
farmhouse
itself.

But John D's folio idea is also good..

Julia



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[NSP] Re: Alice Burn Emily Hoile

2011-09-16 Thread Francis Wood
Good result, Anthony!

This lovely item can be heard for the next 6 days at:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b014fj7j

Emily and Alice's slot is at 1.09

Francis


On 13 Sep 2011, at 22:58, Anthony Robb wrote:

 
   Some might be interested to know I sent a couple of tracks
   recorded recently by Emily  Alice down to Radio 3.
   The response has been very positive and as a result they will be
   playing on this week's 'In Tune' (Thurs 15 Sept. 16:30 - 18:30 local
   time).
   Anthony
 
   --
 
 
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[NSP] Re: Alice Burn Emily Hoile

2011-09-16 Thread Richard Shuttleworth

Why did I get Rachmaninov?

Richard
(Puzzled in Quebec)

- Original Message - 
From: Francis Wood oatenp...@googlemail.com

To: Anthony Robb anth...@robbpipes.com
Cc: Dartmouth NPS nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 5:06 AM
Subject: [NSP] Re: Alice Burn  Emily Hoile



Good result, Anthony!

This lovely item can be heard for the next 6 days at:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b014fj7j

Emily and Alice's slot is at 1.09

Francis


On 13 Sep 2011, at 22:58, Anthony Robb wrote:



  Some might be interested to know I sent a couple of tracks
  recorded recently by Emily  Alice down to Radio 3.
  The response has been very positive and as a result they will be
  playing on this week's 'In Tune' (Thurs 15 Sept. 16:30 - 18:30 local
  time).
  Anthony

  --


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[NSP] Re: Alice Burn Emily Hoile

2011-09-16 Thread Francis Wood

On 16 Sep 2011, at 13:18, Richard Shuttleworth wrote:

 Why did I get Rachmaninov?
 
 Richard
 (Puzzled in Quebec)


Because that is the first item on in the programme.

For Alice and Emily go to 1.09 (hours and minutes).

Good luck 

Francis




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[NSP] Re: Alice Burn Emily Hoile

2011-09-16 Thread Richard Shuttleworth






On 16 Sep 2011, at 13:18, Richard Shuttleworth wrote:


Why did I get Rachmaninov?

Richard
(Puzzled in Quebec)



Because that is the first item on in the programme.

For Alice and Emily go to 1.09 (hours and minutes).

Good luck

Francis


Ah, I was thinking minutes and seconds not hours and minutes (not used to 
classical radio programmes lasting more than an hour).  Thank you Francis. 
Lovely playing, I feel old :-))


Richard 




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[NSP] Re: Alice Burn Emily Hoile

2011-09-16 Thread Dave S
I agree, and the playing great, I hope it continues to reach new heights 
and directions for NSP. As was said, it is a chamber instrument ---


Dave S

On 9/16/2011 2:47 PM, Richard Shuttleworth wrote:






On 16 Sep 2011, at 13:18, Richard Shuttleworth wrote:


Why did I get Rachmaninov?

Richard
(Puzzled in Quebec)



Because that is the first item on in the programme.

For Alice and Emily go to 1.09 (hours and minutes).

Good luck

Francis


Ah, I was thinking minutes and seconds not hours and minutes (not used 
to classical radio programmes lasting more than an hour).  Thank you 
Francis. Lovely playing, I feel old :-))


Richard


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[NSP] Re: Alice Burn Emily Hoile

2011-09-16 Thread brimor


I seem to be unable to pick up any of the several slots, those with Alice and 
those of Emily alone.  Is anyone else having the same probl;em?  Can anyone 
suggest a way of seeing and hearing them?

Sheila





-Original Message-
From: Francis Wood oatenp...@googlemail.com
To: Anthony Robb anth...@robbpipes.com
Cc: Dartmouth NPS nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Sent: Fri, Sep 16, 2011 5:07 am
Subject: [NSP] Re: Alice Burn  Emily Hoile


Good result, Anthony!
This lovely item can be heard for the next 6 days at:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b014fj7j
Emily and Alice's slot is at 1.09
Francis

n 13 Sep 2011, at 22:58, Anthony Robb wrote:
 
   Some might be interested to know I sent a couple of tracks
   recorded recently by Emily  Alice down to Radio 3.
   The response has been very positive and as a result they will be
   playing on this week's 'In Tune' (Thurs 15 Sept. 16:30 - 18:30 local
   time).
   Anthony
 
   --
 
 
 To get on or off this list see list information at
 http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



--


[NSP] Re: Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

2011-09-14 Thread Gibbons, John
I had thought the ban was due to crop failures after Laki erupted 
catastrophically - 
but Napoleon is a likelier culprit with this date, 10 years after it quieted 
down again.

John



From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] on behalf of 
Francis Wood [oatenp...@googlemail.com]
Sent: 13 September 2011 17:54
To: NSP group
Subject: [NSP] Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

The note accompanying the fine tune 'Farewell to Whisky' appearing in the Gow 
5th collection states:

This tune alludes to prohibiting the making of Whisky in 1799.
It is expressive of a Highlander's sorrow on
being deprived of his favourite beverage.

Also in the 5th collection is the remedy to this distressing situation: 'Whisky 
 Welcome back again', with the note:

Alluding to permitting Whisky to be distilled in the year 1801.
It is a merry dancing Tune.

I seem to remember reading that the prohibition was caused by a shortage of 
grain. Can anyone provide anything more specific about the relevant 
circumstances in 1799 - 1801?

Francis



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[NSP] Re: Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

2011-09-14 Thread Bill
Yes Rob,  it certainly wasn't about joining AA!

What always strikes me on hearing or playing a Gow tune is what a lovely man
he seems to have been have been. This is borne out  when you read Burns
account of their meeting. 

  In his Journal describes Gow  as

 ''a short, stout-built Highland figure, with his greyish hair shed on his
honest social brow, an interesting face, marking strong sense, kind open
heartedness mixed with unmistrusting simplicity''. 

Wonderful. Oh to have been the metaphorical fly on the wall that day!

Incidentally this is also confirmed by viewing Raeburn's great portrait of
Gow.

Mind you I write this today under the influence of last weekend's visit to
the excellent new Burns Museum in Ayr, and also after viewing again a
wonderful award-winning film  ''The Tree of Liberty'' made in 1987 by
Timothy Neat  -The Songs of Robert Burns sang by Jean Redpath , researched
and arranged by Serge Hovey. A deeply moving experience. It's now available
on DVD. See it.

Bill



-Original Message-
From: lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu [mailto:lute-...@cs.dartmouth.edu] On Behalf
Of Rob Say
Sent: 13 September 2011 19:43
To: nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
Subject: [NSP] Re: Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

My powers of Google are strong this evening:
Agricultural Returns and the Government during the Napoleonic Wars
http://www.bahs.org.uk/01n1a5.pdf

describes wet seasons, harvest failures, and the government reimposing 
restrictions on the use of grain. There's also in depth analysis of the 
large variations in the price of wheat of the period concerned..

R


On 13/09/2011 19:28, Rob Say wrote:
 Hi Francis - I looked in to this one a while back for some track notes 
 - here's a summary

 My understanding is that comment is attributed to Nathaniel and is in 
 the published collection of 1819 (The Beauties of Gow).
 ( Interestingly  the fiddler's companion has words from 1804: 
 http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/FAR_FARE.htm#FAREWELL_TO_WHISKEY_[1])

 I searched for and found reference to the 'British Government 
 prohibition' to save the 'wasting of grain' but found only 
 unreferenced stories. Jack Campin has a long article on grain and meal 
 shortages (and riots). This one:
 http://www.campin.me.uk/Embro/Webrelease/Embro/17riot/17riot.htm gives 
 a 6 fold increase in grain prices:
 The most extreme price rises for grain - to six times the previous 
 level - were in the years 1799 and 1800. This led to several attacks 
 on stores and carts, particularly in Leith, the Grassmarket, the 
 Cowgate, the West Port and the Pleasance, and the Volunteers were 
 called out to defend the dealers. This kind of action made them the 
 target of children's rhymes:
 But no references .. the riots should be relatively easy to find - or 
 ask Jack for his source, I see his name around and about...

 Grain prices are available for that time - e.g. National Archives Doc 
 ref: *152M/C1819/OH142 *(I didn't retrieve it!)
 *Contents*:
 Need to encourage agriculture; suggests use of inferior grains in 
 distilleries; greater demand for barley in north of Scotland for 
 production of whiskey; price of grains in 1801 ands 1810 - 'Agricola' 
 to H.A.

 This book on the haggis: 
 http://www.avrf23.dsl.pipex.com/The%20Haggis%20TYPESET%2016%20feb-2.pdf
 Both references grain prices and crop failures for the period:
  1790s Harvest Failure, 1799 Price of corn was more than double the 
 level of the 1790s, Harvest Failure
 AND has a substantial reference list ... none of which are on my 
 bookshelf.

 Hope this helps

 Rob








 On 13/09/2011 17:54, Francis Wood wrote:
 The note accompanying the fine tune 'Farewell to Whisky' appearing in 
 the Gow 5th collection states:

 This tune alludes to prohibiting the making of Whisky in 1799.
 It is expressive of a Highlander's sorrow on
 being deprived of his favourite beverage.

 Also in the 5th collection is the remedy to this distressing 
 situation: 'Whisky  Welcome back again', with the note:

 Alluding to permitting Whisky to be distilled in the year 1801.
 It is a merry dancing Tune.

 I seem to remember reading that the prohibition was caused by a 
 shortage of grain. Can anyone provide anything more specific about 
 the relevant circumstances in 1799 - 1801?

 Francis



 To get on or off this list see list information at
 http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html






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07:35:00




[NSP] Re: Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

2011-09-14 Thread Francis Wood
Thanks, all, for the many interesting and informative responses!

Francis
On 13 Sep 2011, at 17:54, Francis Wood wrote:

 The note accompanying the fine tune 'Farewell to Whisky' appearing in the Gow 
 5th collection states:
 
 This tune alludes to prohibiting the making of Whisky in 1799. 
 It is expressive of a Highlander's sorrow on
 being deprived of his favourite beverage.
 
 Also in the 5th collection is the remedy to this distressing situation: 
 'Whisky  Welcome back again', with the note:
 
 Alluding to permitting Whisky to be distilled in the year 1801.
 It is a merry dancing Tune.
 
 I seem to remember reading that the prohibition was caused by a shortage of 
 grain. Can anyone provide anything more specific about the relevant 
 circumstances in 1799 - 1801?
 
 Francis
 
 
 
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[NSP] Re: Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

2011-09-13 Thread Anthony Robb

   Hello Francis
   Can't help on that front but I'm told Jack Armstrong would launch into
   that tune when his glass was empty.
   Anthony
   --- On Tue, 13/9/11, Francis Wood oatenp...@googlemail.com wrote:

 From: Francis Wood oatenp...@googlemail.com
 Subject: [NSP] Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow
 To: NSP group nsp@cs.dartmouth.edu
 Date: Tuesday, 13 September, 2011, 17:54

   The note accompanying the fine tune 'Farewell to Whisky' appearing in
   the Gow 5th collection states:
   This tune alludes to prohibiting the making of Whisky in 1799.
   It is expressive of a Highlander's sorrow on
   being deprived of his favourite beverage.
   Also in the 5th collection is the remedy to this distressing situation:
   'Whisky  Welcome back again', with the note:
   Alluding to permitting Whisky to be distilled in the year 1801.
   It is a merry dancing Tune.
   I seem to remember reading that the prohibition was caused by a
   shortage of grain. Can anyone provide anything more specific about the
   relevant circumstances in 1799 - 1801?
   Francis
   To get on or off this list see list information at
   [1]http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

   --

References

   1. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



[NSP] Re: Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

2011-09-13 Thread Matt Seattle
   On Tue, Sep 13, 2011 at 5:54 PM, Francis Wood
   [1]oatenp...@googlemail.com wrote:

 Can anyone provide anything more specific about the relevant
 circumstances in 1799 - 1801?

   Sorry, Francis, no. I do know about Matt Seattle's Farewell to Whisky,
   but it is not relevant here as it did not provide the inspiration for a
   tune, though several tunes preceded it.

   --

References

   1. mailto:oatenp...@googlemail.com


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[NSP] Re: Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

2011-09-13 Thread Richard York


As an aside, my wife found long ago that they go well together as a 
sequenced pair with a story to tell, on small harp!

Richard.

On 13/09/2011 17:54, Francis Wood wrote:

The note accompanying the fine tune 'Farewell to Whisky' appearing in the Gow 
5th collection states:

This tune alludes to prohibiting the making of Whisky in 1799.
It is expressive of a Highlander's sorrow on
being deprived of his favourite beverage.

Also in the 5th collection is the remedy to this distressing situation: 'Whisky 
 Welcome back again', with the note:

Alluding to permitting Whisky to be distilled in the year 1801.
It is a merry dancing Tune.

I seem to remember reading that the prohibition was caused by a shortage of 
grain. Can anyone provide anything more specific about the relevant 
circumstances in 1799 - 1801?

Francis



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[NSP] Re: Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

2011-09-13 Thread Rob Say
Hi Francis - I looked in to this one a while back for some track notes - 
here's a summary


My understanding is that comment is attributed to Nathaniel and is in 
the published collection of 1819 (The Beauties of Gow).
( Interestingly  the fiddler's companion has words from 1804: 
http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/FAR_FARE.htm#FAREWELL_TO_WHISKEY_[1])


I searched for and found reference to the 'British Government 
prohibition' to save the 'wasting of grain' but found only unreferenced 
stories. Jack Campin has a long article on grain and meal shortages (and 
riots). This one:
http://www.campin.me.uk/Embro/Webrelease/Embro/17riot/17riot.htm gives a 
6 fold increase in grain prices:
The most extreme price rises for grain - to six times the previous 
level - were in the years 1799 and 1800. This led to several attacks on 
stores and carts, particularly in Leith, the Grassmarket, the Cowgate, 
the West Port and the Pleasance, and the Volunteers were called out to 
defend the dealers. This kind of action made them the target of 
children's rhymes:
But no references .. the riots should be relatively easy to find - or 
ask Jack for his source, I see his name around and about...


Grain prices are available for that time - e.g. National Archives Doc 
ref: *152M/C1819/OH142 *(I didn't retrieve it!)

*Contents*:
Need to encourage agriculture; suggests use of inferior grains in 
distilleries; greater demand for barley in north of Scotland for 
production of whiskey; price of grains in 1801 ands 1810 - 'Agricola' to 
H.A.


This book on the haggis: 
http://www.avrf23.dsl.pipex.com/The%20Haggis%20TYPESET%2016%20feb-2.pdf

Both references grain prices and crop failures for the period:
 1790s Harvest Failure, 1799 Price of corn was more than double the 
level of the 1790s, Harvest Failure

AND has a substantial reference list ... none of which are on my bookshelf.

Hope this helps

Rob








On 13/09/2011 17:54, Francis Wood wrote:

The note accompanying the fine tune 'Farewell to Whisky' appearing in the Gow 
5th collection states:

This tune alludes to prohibiting the making of Whisky in 1799.
It is expressive of a Highlander's sorrow on
being deprived of his favourite beverage.

Also in the 5th collection is the remedy to this distressing situation: 'Whisky 
 Welcome back again', with the note:

Alluding to permitting Whisky to be distilled in the year 1801.
It is a merry dancing Tune.

I seem to remember reading that the prohibition was caused by a shortage of 
grain. Can anyone provide anything more specific about the relevant 
circumstances in 1799 - 1801?

Francis



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[NSP] Re: Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

2011-09-13 Thread Rob Say

My powers of Google are strong this evening:
Agricultural Returns and the Government during the Napoleonic Wars
http://www.bahs.org.uk/01n1a5.pdf

describes wet seasons, harvest failures, and the government reimposing 
restrictions on the use of grain. There's also in depth analysis of the 
large variations in the price of wheat of the period concerned..


R


On 13/09/2011 19:28, Rob Say wrote:
Hi Francis - I looked in to this one a while back for some track notes 
- here's a summary


My understanding is that comment is attributed to Nathaniel and is in 
the published collection of 1819 (The Beauties of Gow).
( Interestingly  the fiddler's companion has words from 1804: 
http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/FAR_FARE.htm#FAREWELL_TO_WHISKEY_[1])


I searched for and found reference to the 'British Government 
prohibition' to save the 'wasting of grain' but found only 
unreferenced stories. Jack Campin has a long article on grain and meal 
shortages (and riots). This one:
http://www.campin.me.uk/Embro/Webrelease/Embro/17riot/17riot.htm gives 
a 6 fold increase in grain prices:
The most extreme price rises for grain - to six times the previous 
level - were in the years 1799 and 1800. This led to several attacks 
on stores and carts, particularly in Leith, the Grassmarket, the 
Cowgate, the West Port and the Pleasance, and the Volunteers were 
called out to defend the dealers. This kind of action made them the 
target of children's rhymes:
But no references .. the riots should be relatively easy to find - or 
ask Jack for his source, I see his name around and about...


Grain prices are available for that time - e.g. National Archives Doc 
ref: *152M/C1819/OH142 *(I didn't retrieve it!)

*Contents*:
Need to encourage agriculture; suggests use of inferior grains in 
distilleries; greater demand for barley in north of Scotland for 
production of whiskey; price of grains in 1801 ands 1810 - 'Agricola' 
to H.A.


This book on the haggis: 
http://www.avrf23.dsl.pipex.com/The%20Haggis%20TYPESET%2016%20feb-2.pdf

Both references grain prices and crop failures for the period:
 1790s Harvest Failure, 1799 Price of corn was more than double the 
level of the 1790s, Harvest Failure
AND has a substantial reference list ... none of which are on my 
bookshelf.


Hope this helps

Rob








On 13/09/2011 17:54, Francis Wood wrote:
The note accompanying the fine tune 'Farewell to Whisky' appearing in 
the Gow 5th collection states:


This tune alludes to prohibiting the making of Whisky in 1799.
It is expressive of a Highlander's sorrow on
being deprived of his favourite beverage.

Also in the 5th collection is the remedy to this distressing 
situation: 'Whisky  Welcome back again', with the note:


Alluding to permitting Whisky to be distilled in the year 1801.
It is a merry dancing Tune.

I seem to remember reading that the prohibition was caused by a 
shortage of grain. Can anyone provide anything more specific about 
the relevant circumstances in 1799 - 1801?


Francis



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[NSP] Re: Farewell to Whisky - Niel Gow

2011-09-13 Thread Julia Say
On 13 Sep 2011, Rob Say wrote: 

 This book on the haggis: 
 http://www.avrf23.dsl.pipex.com/The%20Haggis%20TYPESET%2016%20feb-2.pdf
 Both references grain prices and crop failures for the period:
  1790s Harvest Failure, 1799 Price of corn was more than double the 
 level of the 1790s, Harvest Failure
 AND has a substantial reference list ... none of which are on my bookshelf.

The prices were additionally hiked by the British government requisitioning 
foodstuffs for the troops/navies / etc for the various ongoing military 
campaigns 
at the time. 

I can find no reference to whisky in A History of the Scottish People 
1560-1830 - 
generally reckoned a standard social history text, if now a bit dated. The only 
famine it mentions is the big 1690s one which took out 25% of the Scottish 
population (and by extrapolation probably a sizeable chunk of the Northumbrian, 
since the area looked north, not south).

Julia



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[NSP] Re: Matching tune parts.....

2011-09-11 Thread Matt Seattle
   Ian Lawther wrote:

 I was playing through Tom Clough's Bobby Shaftoe this evening and
 realized that the 6th part is identical in pattern to the 4th part
 of the highland pipe march The Barren Rocks of Aden (P/M A MacKeller
 c. 1843).

   A very interesting observation, Ian! The version I have of Barren Rocks
   in David Glen's Tutor corroborates what you say. Further observation
   shows that the harmonic foundation of Tom Clough's Bobby Shaftoe is
   consistent with itself and with all other versions, whereas Barren
   Rocks is harmonically built on shifting sands, and it is, strangely,
   only the 4th part which follows the Bobby Shaftoe harmonic pattern.
   What does it all mean? We know which tune came first.
   On an semi-related note, as you will have seen on the dunsire forum, I
   have been pursuing the original Teribus (the Hawick Toun Tune) as
   distinct from the Teribus which Highland pipers play, which is related
   to - wait for it - Bobby Shaftoe. This weekend being the Teribuskers
   Festival in Hawick, yesterday Bill Telfer and I played the original
   Teribus on Border pipes in the town for the first time since Toun Piper
   Walter Ballantyne laid down his pipes in 1797. It rocked.

   --


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[NSP] Re: (no subject)

2011-09-09 Thread Francis Wood
Is there an obvious repertoire of tunes for this useful variant?

Francis
On 8 Sep 2011, at 10:40, Richard York wrote:

 I wonder when someone will develop the double action bellows - one to inflate 
 the pipes, another to fit a vacuum cleaner attachment, which if you think 
 about it could look remarkably like a large bagpipe set with an extra long 
 open ended chanter...




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