[nysbirds-l] Lawrence Warbler

2020-05-26 Thread Carney, Martin
Saw the warbler near the intersection of Farm Meadow Trail and Ash Tree
Loop at 3:40 pm.  This is where it was reported the other day.  Thrilling...

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[nysbirds-l] Croton point park - late migration today

2020-05-26 Thread Larry Trachtenberg
Because of early morning fog, a heads up on the radar from C. Roberto, and the 
delay in migration I’ve been hearing about, I headed to the CPP nature center 
early this morning.  It‘s just off the river with a good mix of trees including 
many oaks and in the past fog has yielded some nice drop-ins.  Joined by K Lamb 
we were treated (distanced) to 14 species of wood warblers (many migrants) 
including multiples of Bay Breasted, Canada, Magnolia, Blackpoll, Chestnut 
sided, BTGW, and Black and white. Also a Blackburnian and a BTBW.  Also a good 
mix of other species. 

There are also bobolinks on the main and secondary landfills (less it seems 
than when they first arrived earlier this month because injudicious and 
indiscriminate mowing practices), and grasshopper sparrow has been seen and 
heard. Finally, I was lucky enough a few days ago to have the first reported 
sighting at CPP of yellow crowned night heron in 20+ years (and the first 
recorded on ebird from the park).  

L. Trachtenberg 
Ossining, NY 

Sent from my iPhone
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[nysbirds-l] Syracuse area RBA

2020-05-26 Thread Joseph Brin

RBA

 

*  New York

*  Syracuse

* May 18, 2020

*  NYSY  05. 18. 20

 

Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird Alert

Dates(s):




May 11 2020 to May 18, 2020

to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com

covering upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge

and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),

Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortland

compiled: May 18 AT 6:00 p.m. (EDT)

compiler: Joseph Brin

Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondagaaudubon.org

 

 

#702 Monday May 18, 2020

 

Greetings. This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week of 

May 11, 2020

 

Highlights:

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WESTERN GREBE (Extralimital)

LEAST BITTERN

BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON

GLOSSY IBIS

BRANT

GREATER SCAUP

LESSER SCAUP

SANDHILL CRANE

BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER

UPLAND SANDPIPER

WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER

GULL-BILLED TERN (Extralimital)

WHIP-POOR-WILL

COMMON NIGHTHAWK

RED-HEADED WOODPECKER

OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER

YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER

ACADIAN FLYCATCHER

PHILADELPHIA VIREO

SEDGE WREN

GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH

GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER

CONNECTICUT WARBLER

PROTHONOTARY WARBLER

CERULEAN WARBLER

PRAIRIE WARBLER

GRASSHOPPER SPARROW

LARK SPARROW

CLAY-COLORED SPARROW

ORCHARD ORIOLE







Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)






     5/20: A GLOSSY IBIS was found on the Wildlife Drive. It continues thru the 
22nd. A SEDGE WREN was reported from the Wildlife drive.

     5/22: An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER and a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER were spotted at 
Howland Island.

     5/23: A WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER was seen at the Visitor’s Center.

     5/24: Late GREATER and LESSER SCAUP were seen at VanDyne Spoor Road. 
CERULEAN and PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS were reported from Howland Island. 4 
SANDHILL CRANES were spotted at the Morgan Road Marshes.

     5/25: An ORCHARD ORIOLE and 2 SANDHILL CRANES were seen along the Wildlife 
Trail. A CERULEAN WARBLER was seen at VanDyne Spoor Road. A PROTHONOTARY 
WARBLER was again present at the Wooded area of Armitage Road.







Cayuga County






     5/18: 17 species of Warblers including GOLDEN-WINGED were found at 
theSterling Nature Center.

     5/20: A CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was seen at West Barrier Bar Park in Fair 
Haven.

     5/21: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER continues at Fair Haven State Park. 12 
species of Warblers including a PRAIRIE WARBLER were seen at West Barrier Bar 
Park.

     5/22: A LARK SPARROW was found at West Barrier Park.

     5/24: A LEAST BITTERN, a YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER and a very rare for our 
area CONNECTICUT WARBLER were reported from West Barrier Bar Park. A 
GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH was seen at Sterling Nature Center.

     5/25: A BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, a YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER, a PHILADELPHIA 
VIREO and 16 species of Warblers were reported from West Barrier Bar Park. An 
ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was found at the Sterling Nature Center.







Onondaga County






     5/20: 2 SANDHILL CRANES were seen at the Gerber Topsoil Farm in Kirkville 
and were present thru the 25th. A LEAST BITTERN was heard at Three Rivers WMA 
north of Baldwinsville and was heard thru the 25th. A female GOLDEN-WINGED 
WARBLER was seen at Three Rivers WMA. A PRAIRIE WARBLER was found at Green 
Lakes State Park. It had continued through today.

     5/23: Up to 2 ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS have returned to Whiskey Hollow Nature 
Preserve west of Baldwinsville and have been found thru today.

     5/25: An OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was seen at Labrador Hollow Unique Area.







Derby Hill Bird Observatory






     A total of 5,681 hawks were counted at Derby Hill this week. 5/25 was the 
best day with a total of 3,041 hawks counted 2,589 of which were BROAD-WINGED 
HAWKS. It was also a record day for BALD EAGLES with 152 counted. Other 
notables were a resident RED-HEADED WOODPECKER(S) on 5/19 and a BLACK-CROWNED 
NIGHT-HERON on 5/21.







Oswego County






     5/20: 18 BRANT and 2 SNOW GEESE were seen on Oneida Lake form Mill Street 
in Constantia. 

     5/21: WHIP-POOR-WILLS were heard from Martin Road and the Roosevelt Gravel 
Pits north of Oneida Lake. A CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was seen by many at Sunset 
Bay Park on Lake Ontario in Scriba.

     5/22: 2 RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were seen at Three Mile Bay on Oneida Lake. 
An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen on Hinman Road north of Pulaski.

     5/23: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen at Deer Creek Marsh on Lake 
Ontario.A LEAST BITTERN was heard at the Phoenix Water Wells north of County 
Rt. 12.

     5/24: GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSHES were found at the Sithe Energy Trail on 
LakeOntario and at Deer Creek Marsh on Lake Ontario. A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER 
was seen at Sunset Bay Park on Lake Ontario.

     5/25: A PHILADELPHIA VIREO and a YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER were seen at 
Sunset Bay Park.







Madison County






     5/22: 5 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were seen at 

[nysbirds-l] Mill road - Yaphank

2020-05-26 Thread leormand
I walked some town and county open space properties on either side of Mill Rd 
in Yaphank today.  The northern side Is a successional cedar forest and aside 
from ticks didn’t seem to hold much activity other than chipping sparrows and a 
surprise flyover by a glossy ibis. There was at least one indigo bunting but I 
suspect many more given size of property and habitat. 

The south side is typical pine oak forest and held the expected species 
including a few great views of oven birds. I also stumbled upon a female turkey 
and her young poults. 

- Luke 
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[nysbirds-l] Birdingwatching In the Time of Covid-19.

2020-05-26 Thread Alan Drogin
This pandemic has forced me into birding the same mile of Riverside Park south 
of 96th Street, just down the block from where I live, almost every day for 
over two months now. Unable to chase birds throughout the hot spots of New York 
State this season, the fortunate timing during peak Spring migration at least 
has provided me with plenty of FOY pleasures.  Nevertheless, this routine has 
shown me that not all nature just passes through affording thrilling chance 
encounters, but that there is a natural “neighborhood" just outside my door 
which changes slowly with the seasons.  Fortunately, Springtime is when the 
male birds must stake out a territory and proclaim their constant presence 
through glorious song in order to attract mates.

It has been my newfound pleasure to recognize the singing 7+ days of individual 
Towhees, Cardinals, House Finches, and finally the Catbirds in their respective 
“blocks” (there are just too many House Sparrows, Pigeons, Robins, and 
Starlings to keep track of).  This has been a chance to watch the gradual 
cessation of White-throated Sparrows, the aggressive courtship of House 
Sparrows, Robins giving chase, Starlings gathering nest material, and now the 
constant high-pitched pleas for food from the gaping yellow mouths of awkward 
fledgelings.

I now identify exactly three male Northern Flickers who alert each other with 
their steady staccato calls of their “turf” across from 82nd, 84th, and 91st 
streets.  A pair of Downy Woodpeckers whinny in the middle at 86th.  I’ve found 
two of the Flickers clearing out respective tree holes in Hippo Playground and 
just south of River Run Playground.  Last week I saw a female sticking her head.

Since my first walk I have expected every day the loud “teakettle, teakettle  
teakettle” of the Carolina Wren just north of Hippo Playground.  Last Wednesday 
I saw the wren on a tree stump by the high stone wall, but heard the song from 
a few yards away - this must be the female mate. But then came a plaintive peep 
a few yards in the other direction.  Then all three swooped to a scrawny 
sapling across my path - it was the baby getting fed.  Dare I say a tinge of 
grandparental pride?

Stay safe birding,

Alan Drogin







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Re: [nysbirds-l] Birdingwatching In the Time of Covid-19.

2020-05-26 Thread Anne Lazarus
Thank you Alan, and I will not forget the Golden-winged Warbler.
Stuyvesant Town we have seen 15 warbler species and today a Yellow-billed
Cuckoo was reported by one of my fellow birders there.  What is sad, and I
hope we can stop it, is extensive herbicide cosmetic application.  My
friend is coughing and I feel irritated from it, and I am sure it is toxic
to all life in Stuyvesant Town.  We will try to stop it.  Birding is in
your own backyard.  I have gone to CP, and I drive there.  I have only gone
about 5 times. You can go to other places, but do it carefully.  I spray my
car with Dr. Schulz`s essential oils, quite powerful.  I use his nasal
application, very powerful, his hand cleanser, powerful.  We all spray our
masks with silver or safe disinfectant, and do it more than once.  I
appreciate your posting.

On Tue, May 26, 2020 at 10:59 PM Alan Drogin  wrote:

> This pandemic has forced me into birding the same mile of Riverside Park
> south of 96th Street, just down the block from where I live, almost every
> day for over two months now. Unable to chase birds throughout the hot spots
> of New York State this season, the fortunate timing during peak Spring
> migration at least has provided me with plenty of FOY pleasures.
> Nevertheless, this routine has shown me that not all nature just passes
> through affording thrilling chance encounters, but that there is a natural
> “neighborhood" just outside my door which changes slowly with the seasons.
> Fortunately, Springtime is when the male birds must stake out a territory
> and proclaim their constant presence through glorious song in order to
> attract mates.
>
> It has been my newfound pleasure to recognize the singing 7+ days of
> individual Towhees, Cardinals, House Finches, and finally the Catbirds in
> their respective “blocks” (there are just too many House Sparrows, Pigeons,
> Robins, and Starlings to keep track of).  This has been a chance to watch
> the gradual cessation of White-throated Sparrows, the aggressive courtship
> of House Sparrows, Robins giving chase, Starlings gathering nest material,
> and now the constant high-pitched pleas for food from the gaping yellow
> mouths of awkward fledgelings.
>
> I now identify exactly three male Northern Flickers who alert each other
> with their steady staccato calls of their “turf” across from 82nd, 84th,
> and 91st streets.  A pair of Downy Woodpeckers whinny in the middle at
> 86th.  I’ve found two of the Flickers clearing out respective tree holes in
> Hippo Playground and just south of River Run Playground.  Last week I saw a
> female sticking her head.
>
> Since my first walk I have expected every day the loud “teakettle,
> teakettle  teakettle” of the Carolina Wren just north of Hippo Playground.
> Last Wednesday I saw the wren on a tree stump by the high stone wall, but
> heard the song from a few yards away - this must be the female mate. But
> then came a plaintive peep a few yards in the other direction.  Then all
> three swooped to a scrawny sapling across my path - it was the baby getting
> fed.  Dare I say a tinge of grandparental pride?
>
> Stay safe birding,
>
> Alan Drogin
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
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> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
> 3) http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>

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