RE: RE:[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry about?

2020-10-16 Thread Shaibal Mitra
When Angus posted his query about this species I was immediately reminded of 
two recent conversations with Tom Burke and Doug Futuyma. Despite living more 
than an hour apart in the quite different realms of Westchester and Suffolk 
Counties, Tom and Gale probably share the most similar birding mode to Pat's 
and mine of all our friends: we cover a large area in southeastern NYS, our 
coverage is much more thorough than that of our more list-motivated friends, 
and yet we follow up reports of unusual birds (chase) much more than our most 
purist, patch-working friends. And given that we've been doing it this way for 
decades, we've developed very similar--and probably relatively 
accurate--perceptions of the status of bird species around here.

My conversation with Tom occurred back in August when an American Golden-Plover 
occurred in some (to me) remote and inconvenient part of southeastern NYS; I 
laughed and said, "I think I'll wait for another one!" Tom understood 
completely but he made the point out loud that the species has been rather 
difficult to find over the past couple of years, and I had to concur. The 
conversation with Doug occurred just a few days ago, when he arrived a little 
later than I to a seawatch. I had just had an AMGP fly past, calling, just my 
third of the entire fall, and I knew Doug hadn't connected with one yet. It 
really is possible for active, capable birders to miss this species nowadays.

So when I saw Willie's post, it really gave me pause. Given how infrequently I 
cover western NYS in late summer and fall, I've run into AMGP there often 
enough that I assumed they were even more regular there than here on LI. For 
instance, when Pat and I chased the Swallow-tailed Kites in Hamlin back in 
September, I sort of assumed that picking up our year-bird AMGP would require 
little more than pulling off the road somewhere nearby, on Andy Guthrie's 
instructions. But Andy couldn't offer an easy target, at least on that day.

Willie's post makes the point again about different modes of occurrence 
(agricultural fields vs. lakeshore roosts), and this distinction is very valid 
in my own Long Island/coastal Rhode Island area. Historically there was a 
series of traditional stopover sites for flocks of this species in a very 
specific physiographic belt, ranging from Ridge in central Suffolk County, 
through Riverhead and the North Fork of Long Island, to similar sites in 
Charlestown, Richmond, and South Kingstown, Rhode Island. I'm not a geologist, 
but this belt of flat farmland lies along the Charlestown Moraine and was 
historically much used for potato farming. Nowadays it has been given over 
mostly to turf farming, where it hasn't been destroyed altogether. (There was 
also a very similar satellite site, set off somewhat from this belt, on the 
South Fork of LI, between Water Mill and East Hampton.) In these places, one 
could often see long-staying flocks of AMGP and other shorebirds. But for those 
of us who tire easily of scanning turf fields, there was another mode of 
occurrence, in which this species could be encountered fairly regularly along 
the outer coast.

My perception is that the turf field context has failed almost completely in 
the past several years. Not only are the flocks of AMGP absent, but my 
perception is that they are utterly birdless now--lacking even the flocks of 
Mourning Doves, Killdeer, Tree Swallows, and Starlings that used to be routine. 
The coastal mode still works, but it seems like it's always single birds now, 
never flocks of six or seven as we sometimes saw in the past. My own fall 
records show a paucity of AMGP in my area 2017-2020. They also reveal other 
periods of low detection rates, but I suspect those might be at least partly 
misleading. As Angus noted, I can imagine that in the past, when I didn't 
perceive the species as rare and lucked into it early along the coast, I might 
have spared myself dedicated scanning of the turf! 

https://flic.kr/p/2jW26Qu

I fear that this species is yet another once common one that we will come to 
miss in the future.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

From: bounce-125041945-3714...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-125041945-3714...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Willie D'Anna 
[dannapot...@roadrunner.com]
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 12:14 PM
To: '& [NYSBIRDS]'
Subject: RE:[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry 
about?

Like Angus, I also have noticed fewer reports and smaller numbers of
American Golden-Plover in Western New York. I live on Lake Ontario in
Niagara County where most autumns I could see this species without any
special effort. That is, I'm not one to hunt down a species for my year
list, unless I am doing a big year, but I still would find them. A few years
ago, I noticed that newer birders were chasing after reports of this species
for their year list and I assumed that they simply did not understand

Re: RE:[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry about?

2020-10-15 Thread david nicosia
 Could it be the mass erection of wind farms in the central Plains? Many of 
these shorebirds including AGPL  migrate up through the Plains in the spring. 
With more and more wind farms and higher ones too in the Plains, could the 
mortality of the breeding adults finally be showing up? I can imagine a whole 
flock of shorebirds in a flooded muddy field surrounded by wind farms. A falcon 
or other predator comes by and they fly right into the turbines. Weather 
patterns could also be a big factor too as mentioned. I do hope it is the 
latter. If it is not, many of our shorebirds (and other species) will be 
imperiled by the growth of wind farms.  
On Thursday, October 15, 2020, 12:24:45 PM EDT, Larry Trachtenberg 
 wrote:  
 
 I wonder if those who regularly bird the dirt / farm fields of Orange County 
black dirt region can weigh in on frequency/infrequency of sightings of golden 
plovers over the last decade or so.  I use to get there but only sporadically 
and remember one really big day with about 25 birds but that was probably five+ 
years ago.  I also see from various posts some of the fields in the Black Dirt 
region are now less accessible than they once were (or even inaccessible) .

Thanks

L.  Trachtenberg
Ossining


-Original Message-
From: bounce-125041945-26736...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Willie D'Anna
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 12:14 PM
To: '& [NYSBIRDS]' 
Subject: RE:[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry 
about?

-CAUTION: EXTERNAL EMAIL



Like Angus, I also have noticed fewer reports and smaller numbers of American 
Golden-Plover in Western New York. I live on Lake Ontario in Niagara County 
where most autumns I could see this species without any special effort. That 
is, I'm not one to hunt down a species for my year list, unless I am doing a 
big year, but I still would find them. A few years ago, I noticed that newer 
birders were chasing after reports of this species for their year list and I 
assumed that they simply did not understand their habitat preferences or else 
they could find their own. However, two years ago, I did a big year in Niagara 
County and I had to actively search for Golden-Plover on two dozen occasions 
before I finally found a single bird.
Two weeks later, I had two birds for a grand total of three in the county for 
the year, a year in which I was exceptionally active. Of course, my difficulty 
might simply be attributed to Golden-Plovers having a poor breeding season but 
I never had any adults and I was active through the summer when they would have 
passed through.

The Buffalo Ornithological Society (BOS) maintains a database of noteworthy 
bird sightings in the BOS Region, which includes all of Kingbird Region One 
plus the Niagara peninsula of Ontario. I don't have the skills to generate a 
graph of high yearly counts from this database but from looking it over, it 
seems that high yearly counts have decreased considerably. For example, there 
are fewer triple-digit counts in the Niagara peninsula of Ontario which is the 
best area in the region to find this species. Western NY would occasionally get 
triple-digit counts as well but there have been none since 1997. And even 
double-digit counts are fewer than before 2000.

This year, I managed to see one Golden-Plover in Niagara County, a bird found 
by someone else, and it was on a pier on Lake Ontario, not in a field.
I spent considerable time looking in fields for this species this fall but 
found none.

Willie D'Anna
Wilson, NY


Subject: American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry about?
From: Angus Wilson 
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2020 16:18:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

I am glad to see an informed discussion about the apparent decline in 
Bonaparte's Gulls both in western and coastal New York State. Birding forms 
tend to focus on the positive such as new sightings, influxes, and 
weather-related events, with much less attention given to species that might be 
disappearing before our eyes. The human brain is not very good at accessing the 
absence of something and birding record systems are seemingly not much better 
either.

Aside from Bonaparte's Gull, I have wondered about the status of America 
Golden-Plover in the state. In the past several years I've noted few if any 
reports of larger flocks that would draw birders to sod fields and other grassy 
habitats in the fall, especially in eastern Long Island. In recent years only a 
scattering of Golden-Plovers have been reported in the fall (principally from 
late August to late October), rarely more than two together. Many people may 
have successfully ticked their 'year bird' and not given much more thought to 
it but the reality is that we probably are all ticking the SAME few birds.

Looking at the tallies for some of the hotspots for southbound plovers it was 
not long ago that flocks of 60-100+ were frequent in and around Riverhead 
(Suffolk NY). 2016 seems to have been the 

RE: RE:[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry about?

2020-10-15 Thread Larry Trachtenberg
I wonder if those who regularly bird the dirt / farm fields of Orange County 
black dirt region can weigh in on frequency/infrequency of sightings of golden 
plovers over the last decade or so.  I use to get there but only sporadically 
and remember one really big day with about 25 birds but that was probably five+ 
years ago.  I also see from various posts some of the fields in the Black Dirt 
region are now less accessible than they once were (or even inaccessible) .

Thanks

L.  Trachtenberg
Ossining


-Original Message-
From: bounce-125041945-26736...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Willie D'Anna
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 12:14 PM
To: '& [NYSBIRDS]' 
Subject: RE:[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry 
about?

-CAUTION: EXTERNAL EMAIL



Like Angus, I also have noticed fewer reports and smaller numbers of American 
Golden-Plover in Western New York. I live on Lake Ontario in Niagara County 
where most autumns I could see this species without any special effort. That 
is, I'm not one to hunt down a species for my year list, unless I am doing a 
big year, but I still would find them. A few years ago, I noticed that newer 
birders were chasing after reports of this species for their year list and I 
assumed that they simply did not understand their habitat preferences or else 
they could find their own. However, two years ago, I did a big year in Niagara 
County and I had to actively search for Golden-Plover on two dozen occasions 
before I finally found a single bird.
Two weeks later, I had two birds for a grand total of three in the county for 
the year, a year in which I was exceptionally active. Of course, my difficulty 
might simply be attributed to Golden-Plovers having a poor breeding season but 
I never had any adults and I was active through the summer when they would have 
passed through.

The Buffalo Ornithological Society (BOS) maintains a database of noteworthy 
bird sightings in the BOS Region, which includes all of Kingbird Region One 
plus the Niagara peninsula of Ontario. I don't have the skills to generate a 
graph of high yearly counts from this database but from looking it over, it 
seems that high yearly counts have decreased considerably. For example, there 
are fewer triple-digit counts in the Niagara peninsula of Ontario which is the 
best area in the region to find this species. Western NY would occasionally get 
triple-digit counts as well but there have been none since 1997. And even 
double-digit counts are fewer than before 2000.

This year, I managed to see one Golden-Plover in Niagara County, a bird found 
by someone else, and it was on a pier on Lake Ontario, not in a field.
I spent considerable time looking in fields for this species this fall but 
found none.

Willie D'Anna
Wilson, NY


Subject: American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry about?
From: Angus Wilson 
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2020 16:18:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

I am glad to see an informed discussion about the apparent decline in 
Bonaparte's Gulls both in western and coastal New York State. Birding forms 
tend to focus on the positive such as new sightings, influxes, and 
weather-related events, with much less attention given to species that might be 
disappearing before our eyes. The human brain is not very good at accessing the 
absence of something and birding record systems are seemingly not much better 
either.

Aside from Bonaparte's Gull, I have wondered about the status of America 
Golden-Plover in the state. In the past several years I've noted few if any 
reports of larger flocks that would draw birders to sod fields and other grassy 
habitats in the fall, especially in eastern Long Island. In recent years only a 
scattering of Golden-Plovers have been reported in the fall (principally from 
late August to late October), rarely more than two together. Many people may 
have successfully ticked their 'year bird' and not given much more thought to 
it but the reality is that we probably are all ticking the SAME few birds.

Looking at the tallies for some of the hotspots for southbound plovers it was 
not long ago that flocks of 60-100+ were frequent in and around Riverhead 
(Suffolk NY). 2016 seems to have been the last good season (many reports of 
60+), with 2012 and 2013 similarly featuring some larger flocks (counts of 102, 
105, etc). Is something going on? Is the apparent decline in birds staging on 
eastern Long Island echoed elsewhere?

American Golden-Plover is an arctic and subarctic tundra nesting species that 
makes a long oceanic flight (a minimum of 2,400 miles nonstop) to wintering 
grounds in the Pampas and Campos regions of southern South America. It is 
possible that weather conditions have allowed birds to launch from further 
north and simply bypass our area. Scrutiny of trends in the Canadian Maritime 
Provinces and New England or the Mississippi/Missouri/Ohio flyway (if the 
southbound route has shifted towards the ce

RE:[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry about?

2020-10-15 Thread Willie D'Anna
Like Angus, I also have noticed fewer reports and smaller numbers of
American Golden-Plover in Western New York. I live on Lake Ontario in
Niagara County where most autumns I could see this species without any
special effort. That is, I'm not one to hunt down a species for my year
list, unless I am doing a big year, but I still would find them. A few years
ago, I noticed that newer birders were chasing after reports of this species
for their year list and I assumed that they simply did not understand their
habitat preferences or else they could find their own. However, two years
ago, I did a big year in Niagara County and I had to actively search for
Golden-Plover on two dozen occasions before I finally found a single bird.
Two weeks later, I had two birds for a grand total of three in the county
for the year, a year in which I was exceptionally active. Of course, my
difficulty might simply be attributed to Golden-Plovers having a poor
breeding season but I never had any adults and I was active through the
summer when they would have passed through.

The Buffalo Ornithological Society (BOS) maintains a database of noteworthy
bird sightings in the BOS Region, which includes all of Kingbird Region One
plus the Niagara peninsula of Ontario. I don't have the skills to generate a
graph of high yearly counts from this database but from looking it over, it
seems that high yearly counts have decreased considerably. For example,
there are fewer triple-digit counts in the Niagara peninsula of Ontario
which is the best area in the region to find this species. Western NY would
occasionally get triple-digit counts as well but there have been none since
1997. And even double-digit counts are fewer than before 2000.

This year, I managed to see one Golden-Plover in Niagara County, a bird
found by someone else, and it was on a pier on Lake Ontario, not in a field.
I spent considerable time looking in fields for this species this fall but
found none.

Willie D'Anna
Wilson, NY


Subject: American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry about?
From: Angus Wilson 
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2020 16:18:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

I am glad to see an informed discussion about the apparent decline in
Bonaparte's Gulls both in western and coastal New York State. Birding forms
tend to focus on the positive such as new sightings, influxes, and
weather-related events, with much less attention given to species that might
be disappearing before our eyes. The human brain is not very good at
accessing the absence of something and birding record systems are seemingly
not much better either.

Aside from Bonaparte's Gull, I have wondered about the status of America
Golden-Plover in the state. In the past several years I've noted few if any
reports of larger flocks that would draw birders to sod fields and other
grassy habitats in the fall, especially in eastern Long Island. In recent
years only a scattering of Golden-Plovers have been reported in the fall
(principally from late August to late October), rarely more than two
together. Many people may have successfully ticked their 'year bird' and not
given much more thought to it but the reality is that we probably are all
ticking the SAME few birds.

Looking at the tallies for some of the hotspots for southbound plovers it
was not long ago that flocks of 60-100+ were frequent in and around
Riverhead (Suffolk NY). 2016 seems to have been the last good season (many
reports of 60+), with 2012 and 2013 similarly featuring some larger flocks
(counts of 102, 105, etc). Is something going on? Is the apparent decline in
birds staging on eastern Long Island echoed elsewhere?

American Golden-Plover is an arctic and subarctic tundra nesting species
that makes a long oceanic flight (a minimum of 2,400 miles nonstop) to
wintering grounds in the Pampas and Campos regions of southern South
America. It is possible that weather conditions have allowed birds to launch
from further north and simply bypass our area. Scrutiny of trends in the
Canadian Maritime Provinces and New England or the Mississippi/Missouri/Ohio
flyway (if the southbound route has shifted towards the center of the
continent) might shed light on this. Changes in pesticide use might also
render the Long Island sod fields less attractive such that birds arriving
at night leave soon after.

It's worth noting that aside from a possible shift in the migration route,
many high latitude breeding species undergo cycles of abundance that reflect
cycles in breeding success - these may relate to lemming cycles, late
snowmelt, and so on. It could be we are in the trough of one of these
cycles. Careful monitoring of the relative numbers of juveniles/1st basic
and adults (estimating the ratio from year to year) can give warnings of
these changes. This could also be done fairly easily with Bonaparte's Gulls
because these two age classes are easy to distinguish. Unfortunately,
relatively few birders keep notes on these things and again there's no
simple 

[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover - another NYS migrant to worry about?

2020-10-14 Thread Angus Wilson
I am glad to see an informed discussion about the apparent decline in
Bonaparte's Gulls both in western and coastal New York State. Birding forms
tend to focus on the positive such as new sightings, influxes, and
weather-related events, with much less attention given to species that
might be disappearing before our eyes. The human brain is not very good at
accessing the absence of something and birding record systems are seemingly
not much better either.

Aside from Bonaparte's Gull, I have wondered about the status of America
Golden-Plover in the state. In the past several years I've noted few if any
reports of larger flocks that would draw birders to sod fields and other
grassy habitats in the fall, especially in eastern Long Island. In recent
years only a scattering of Golden-Plovers have been reported in the fall
(principally from late August to late October), rarely more than two
together. Many people may have successfully ticked their 'year bird' and
not given much more thought to it but the reality is that we probably are
all ticking the SAME few birds.

Looking at the tallies for some of the hotspots for southbound plovers it
was not long ago that flocks of 60-100+ were frequent in and around
Riverhead (Suffolk NY). 2016 seems to have been the last good season (many
reports of 60+), with 2012 and 2013 similarly featuring some larger flocks
(counts of 102, 105, etc). Is something going on? Is the apparent decline
in birds staging on eastern Long Island echoed elsewhere?

American Golden-Plover is an arctic and subarctic tundra nesting species
that makes a long oceanic flight (a minimum of 2,400 miles nonstop) to
wintering grounds in the Pampas and Campos regions of southern South
America. It is possible that weather conditions have allowed birds to
launch from further north and simply bypass our area. Scrutiny of trends in
the Canadian Maritime Provinces and New England or the
Mississippi/Missouri/Ohio flyway (if the southbound route has shifted
towards the center of the continent) might shed light on this. Changes in
pesticide use might also render the Long Island sod fields less attractive
such that birds arriving at night leave soon after.

It's worth noting that aside from a possible shift in the migration route,
many high latitude breeding species undergo cycles of abundance that
reflect cycles in breeding success - these may relate to lemming cycles,
late snowmelt, and so on. It could be we are in the trough of one of these
cycles. Careful monitoring of the relative numbers of juveniles/1st basic
and adults (estimating the ratio from year to year) can give warnings of
these changes. This could also be done fairly easily with Bonaparte's Gulls
because these two age classes are easy to distinguish. Unfortunately,
relatively few birders keep notes on these things and again there's no
simple way that I can find to recover such information from eBird or other
record collections. Maybe folks on this list will have insight into how
best to use the available data in this regard.

All food for thought. Don't get me started on Upland Sandpiper..

-- 
Angus Wilson
New York City

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[nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover

2020-10-11 Thread Gloria Nyc
American Golden Plover is continuing. Location: Randall's Island just north
of Ballfield 6 west of the Fresh Direct building on the Bronxkill.  Very
well camouflaged on the mudflat foraging.

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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Re: [nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover, Randalls Island NYC

2020-10-09 Thread Ethan Goodman
The American Golden Plover flew back into the NE fields of Randall’s Island 
just before 6pm today.  When I left it at about 6:30pm it was in the vicinity 
of field 34. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Friday, October 9, 2020, 5:40 PM, Deborah Allen  
wrote:


Hi All, 

It's important to point out that news of the American Golden-Plover initially 
went out via the Manhattan Bird Alert @BirdCentralPark maintained by David 
Barrett on twitter in a tweet from the finder, Gloria Hong @Lucent508. 

--

Just to confirm the i.d. on this bird: this plover is a 
hatch-year/first-fall/first-cycle American Golden-Plover. 

It has a more rounded head and smaller, more slender bill than Black-bellied 
Plover and lacks the latter's black wingpits (axillaries). This young bird has 
a more distinctly speckled breast than that of an adult American Golden-Plover 
and a less sharply-defined eyebrow (supercilium). 

Here are two views of the bird in flight:

pic.twitter.com/TDVOdjynBZ


Comparing it to Pacific Golden-Plover:

It has longer wings, that is, the wings stick out farther past the end of the 
tail, and a shorter bill. 

It lacks the warm-toned underparts of a Pacific Golden-Plover in the same age 
class. The tertials and scapulars of the bird are less pointed than those of a 
Pacific Golden-Plover. In Pacific Golden-Plover these feathers have thinner, 
plainer borders that contrast more with the dark centers of the feathers. 

Another couple of photos posted on the twitter Manhattan Bird Alert earlier:

pic.twitter.com/pzNdS50uTh

The length of the wings vis-a-vis the tail can be seen in the photo on the left.

--
After relocating the bird with the help of Mary Beth Kooper at around 11:10 
this morning, on a mudflat in the Bronx Kill on the northwest side of Randall's 
Island, Benny Romera, Jordana Mattioli and I waited until it flew off on a 
rising tide with a few Killdeer in a northeasterly direction at around 11:30am. 
We later learned from Junko Suzuki and Linda LaBella that the bird had flown to 
the northeast corner of Randall's Island where they had seen it, and then it 
had flown back west. 

It may be worthwhile checking the northern shore of Randall's Island again 
tomorrow morning at low- to mid-tide.

Deb Allen



-Original Message-
>From: Ryan Zucker 
>Sent: Oct 9, 2020 9:15 AM
>To: NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu
>Subject: [nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover, Randalls Island NYC
>
>Gloria Hong just found an American Golden-Plover on the northeast corner of 
>Randalls Island, on the East River. Bird is associating with a flock of 
>Killdeer near Ballfields 33 and 34. Appears to be the first New York County 
>record.
>
>Good birding,
>
>Ryan Zucker
>New York, NY
>
>
>
>--
>
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>
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>2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
>3) http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01
>
>Please submit your observations to eBird:
>http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
>--
>

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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Re: [nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover, Randalls Island NYC

2020-10-09 Thread Deborah Allen


Hi All, 

It's important to point out that news of the American Golden-Plover initially 
went out via the Manhattan Bird Alert @BirdCentralPark maintained by David 
Barrett on twitter in a tweet from the finder, Gloria Hong @Lucent508. 

--

Just to confirm the i.d. on this bird: this plover is a 
hatch-year/first-fall/first-cycle American Golden-Plover. 

It has a more rounded head and smaller, more slender bill than Black-bellied 
Plover and lacks the latter's black wingpits (axillaries). This young bird has 
a more distinctly speckled breast than that of an adult American Golden-Plover 
and a less sharply-defined eyebrow (supercilium). 

Here are two views of the bird in flight:

pic.twitter.com/TDVOdjynBZ


Comparing it to Pacific Golden-Plover:

It has longer wings, that is, the wings stick out farther past the end of the 
tail, and a shorter bill. 

It lacks the warm-toned underparts of a Pacific Golden-Plover in the same age 
class. The tertials and scapulars of the bird are less pointed than those of a 
Pacific Golden-Plover. In Pacific Golden-Plover these feathers have thinner, 
plainer borders that contrast more with the dark centers of the feathers. 

Another couple of photos posted on the twitter Manhattan Bird Alert earlier:

pic.twitter.com/pzNdS50uTh

The length of the wings vis-a-vis the tail can be seen in the photo on the left.

--
After relocating the bird with the help of Mary Beth Kooper at around 11:10 
this morning, on a mudflat in the Bronx Kill on the northwest side of Randall's 
Island, Benny Romera, Jordana Mattioli and I waited until it flew off on a 
rising tide with a few Killdeer in a northeasterly direction at around 11:30am. 
We later learned from Junko Suzuki and Linda LaBella that the bird had flown to 
the northeast corner of Randall's Island where they had seen it, and then it 
had flown back west. 

It may be worthwhile checking the northern shore of Randall's Island again 
tomorrow morning at low- to mid-tide.

Deb Allen



-Original Message-
>From: Ryan Zucker 
>Sent: Oct 9, 2020 9:15 AM
>To: NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu
>Subject: [nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover, Randalls Island NYC
>
>Gloria Hong just found an American Golden-Plover on the northeast corner of 
>Randalls Island, on the East River. Bird is associating with a flock of 
>Killdeer near Ballfields 33 and 34. Appears to be the first New York County 
>record.
>
>Good birding,
>
>Ryan Zucker
>New York, NY
>
>
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Re: [nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover, Randalls Island NYC

2020-10-09 Thread Adrian Burke
American Golden-Plover continues on Randall’s Island, now on mudflats NW
corner of island in Bronx Kill (40.8023489, -73.9239275)

Thanks, Gloria!

Adrian Burke
NYC

El El vie, oct. 9, 2020 a la(s) 9:17 a. m., Ryan Zucker 
escribió:

> Gloria Hong just found an American Golden-Plover on the northeast corner
> of Randalls Island, on the East River. Bird is associating with a flock of
> Killdeer near Ballfields 33 and 34. Appears to be the first New York County
> record.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Ryan Zucker
> New York, NY
>
>
>
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[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover, Randalls Island NYC

2020-10-09 Thread Ryan Zucker
Gloria Hong just found an American Golden-Plover on the northeast corner of 
Randalls Island, on the East River. Bird is associating with a flock of 
Killdeer near Ballfields 33 and 34. Appears to be the first New York County 
record.

Good birding,

Ryan Zucker
New York, NY



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[nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover at Croton Point today

2019-10-05 Thread Robert Lewis
On the top of the cap, around 11:45.
Bob Lewis 
Sleepy Hollow NY
eBird Checklist - 5 Oct 2019 - Croton Point Park - 18 species

| 
| 
| 
|  |  |

 |

 |
| 
|  | 
eBird Checklist - 5 Oct 2019 - Croton Point Park - 18 species

Submitted by Robert Lewis.
 |

 |

 |




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Re: [nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover, Heckscher State Park, Suffolk County

2019-08-30 Thread lisa . nasta
The American Golden Plover has returned to field 7. Pat Lindsay has the bird 
there now. 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Friday, August 30, 2019, 2:36 PM, lisa.na...@gmail.com wrote:

American Golden Plover was seen until approx 1:15pm in which it took off 
calling, flying high above the tree lines in a west north-westerly direction 
until it was out of sight. 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Friday, August 30, 2019, 11:59 AM, suefeus...@optonline.net 
 wrote:


Being seen in parking field 7.

Sent from my iPhone

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Re: [nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover, Heckscher State Park, Suffolk County

2019-08-30 Thread lisa . nasta
American Golden Plover was seen until approx 1:15pm in which it took off 
calling, flying high above the tree lines in a west north-westerly direction 
until it was out of sight. 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Friday, August 30, 2019, 11:59 AM, suefeus...@optonline.net 
 wrote:


Being seen in parking field 7.

Sent from my iPhone

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[nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover, Heckscher State Park, Suffolk County

2019-08-30 Thread suefeustel


Being seen in parking field 7.

Sent from my iPhone

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[nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover

2018-05-20 Thread Robert A. Proniewych
The above bird was found by Pat Aitken at the Lido Passive Sanctuary.
Located on Lido Blvd. Nassau County. It is transitioning into breeding
plumage. Look for it in the marsh grasses on the west side of the gravel
path down by the platform. It is out a ways in the marsh.
Robert A. Proniewych

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[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover - Yes - Heckscher SP, Suffolk County

2017-11-04 Thread brian . whipple
American Golden-Plover also present, in the parking lot

On Sat, Nov 4, 2017 at 9:25 AM Michael Zito  wrote:

> Long-billed dowitcher also present.
> Mike Zito
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Nov 4, 2017, at 8:51 AM, Michael Zito  wrote:
> >
> > The three godwits remain, also a juvenile pectoral Sandpiper. I have not
> looked for the dowitcher or golden plovers yet.
> >
> > Mike Zito
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
>
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BTW

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[nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover Jones Beach, WE2 Swale.

2017-10-05 Thread Elizabeth Dinapoli
Received a call this morning from Bob P. that Bob A. relocated the American 
Golden Plover that he found on Monday. 

Bird is currently hanging out on the swale with Kildeer, one Lesser Yellowlegs 
and Canada Geese. 

Ed B. had trouble posting this so I did it for him. You missed this one Arie G! 

Time for lunch! 

Elizabeth A. DiNapoli, M.Ed.
Manager of Clerkship Education
Physician Assistant Studies
School of Health Professions
New York Institute of Technology Old Westbury, NY 11568
516.686.3827 (w)
516.404.1984 (c)



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[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover Brooklyn now

2017-09-20 Thread Doug Gochfeld
There is currently an adult American Golden-Plover on the beach at Coney
Island Creek Park, just west of the park proper, adjacent to (and north of)
the eastern edge of Sea Gate. It seems to now be fairly settled into the
wrack/debris line, and the tide is rising, so perhaps it will stay a while.

Good Birding
-Doug Gochfeld. Brooklyn, NY.

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[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover William Hill Park Susquehanna River Johnson City NY Broome Co. Today

2017-09-02 Thread David Nicosia
All,


Once again, the gravel bars on the Susquehanna River are yielding some

great shorebirds from this park in Johnson City Broome County!


Late this afternoon, I found a juvenile AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER

on the gravel bars easily seen from the yellow sign in William Hill Park

not far from the dike near the Johnson City Home Depot. The bird was pretty

much in the same location for over 2 hour feeding on earthworms.


There were also 10 GREAT EGRETS which I believe may be a high

count for Broome County. Additionally, the BAIRD'S SANDPIPER

continues along with several LESSER YELLOWLEGS, a couple

LEAST SANDPIPERS, 2 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and many many

KILLDEER. Our stilt sandpiper that was here seems to have moved on.


Another treat was a flock of COMMON NIGHTHAWKS that were

descending down to the river at times chasing mayflys. I estimated

about 30. I was joined by George Chiu and Victor Lamoureux  and

we really enjoyed the nighthawks, plover and other great birds here.

This place really has been excellent this fall.


ebird list can be found here with poor photos of the american golden-plover.


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38965493


Dave

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[nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover at Miller Field in Staten Island

2015-10-02 Thread Isaac Grant
There is a single juvenile American Golden Plover just off of the middle 
parking lot looking towards New Dorp High School. 

There were also a large group of gulls that included at least 1 adult Lesser 
black Backed Gull but the were flushed by a park truck picking up garbage and 
have not returned. 

Isaac Grant
Senior Loan Officer
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[nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover

2015-08-27 Thread Carney, Martin
A little bit of a late notice, but I saw the Golden Plover in the same
location -- near 2230 Mill Ln., east side of road -- around 12:30
pm yesterday afternoonMartin Carney

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Re: [nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover - No

2015-08-27 Thread Pat Palladino
Although more than 30 Killdeer were present, the A. Golden Plover was not seen 
this morning.

Pat Palladino


 On Aug 27, 2015, at 9:18 AM, Carney, Martin carn...@fordhamprep.org wrote:
 
 A little bit of a late notice, but I saw the Golden Plover in the same 
 location -- near 2230 Mill Ln., east side of road -- around 12:30 pm 
 yesterday afternoonMartin Carney
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[nysbirds-l] American Golden-Plover-- Queens

2013-05-21 Thread Michael Lester
Hi all,

An American Golden-Plover was in the baseball field directly adjacent to
the parking lot at Big Egg Marsh (Broad Channel American Park) ~8:20 this
morning.

Michael Lester
Bayside

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[nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover

2012-12-13 Thread Robert A. Proniewych
The previously reported Amer. Golden Plover found by Ken and Sue Feustel
continues in Heckscher State Park east of field 8 in the center median.
 Robert Proniewych

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[nysbirds-l] American Golden Plover at Heckscher State Park (Suffolk Co.)

2012-12-12 Thread ken feustel
While looking at feeding groups of Red and White-winged Crossbills, we spied a 
late American Golden Plover feeding in the median just east of Field 8. The 
count period for the Captree CBC starts tomorrow. Perhaps (however unlikely) 
the bird will stay till Sunday.  Attempts to turn the bird into a Pacific or 
European Golden Plover were unsuccessful.

A photo of the bird can be seen at http//www.flickr.com/photos/kfeustel/


Ken  Sue Feustel

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