[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden

2019-09-07 Thread Steve Walter
Now for a happier post. For the first time in years, I tried hawk watching
at Fort Tilden in early September. It was a bit different than back in the
day. The highlight was a surprisingly good flight of Ospreys for what I
consider still an early date - 102 counted, until I had to leave at 2 P.M.
It used to be that Kestrels were relied on for anything resembling a decent
flight this early. But only 3 of them among the 9 non-Osprey raptors. Why so
many Ospreys so soon (246 at Cape May)? I hope it's because there are more
of them. Whatever the reason, it makes me think about the contributions to
our database that could be made by more frequent coverage at Fort Tilden (at
least on northerly winds). If anyone is interested in watching for hawks
there, please contact me.

 

And there's more than hawks to be seen. Copying and pasting below my notes
entered at hawkcount.org . 

 

Fair numbers of Tree Swallow, still some Barn Swallows, and even 1 Cliff
Swallow. Fair numbers of Chimney Swift and Cedar Waxwing on the move. Also
seen were 2 Semipalmated Plovers, 3 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, 2 Eastern
Kingbirds, and a flock of about 20 Bobolink. A couple of Royal Terns over
the ocean. Developing Dragonfly flight: species noted in order of abundance:
Green Darner, Wandering Glider, Black Saddlebags, Spot-winged Glider,
Carolina Saddlebags, Twelve-spotted Skimmer, Swamp Darner, Blue Dasher. Lots
of butterfly activity. Red Admiral and at least on Question Mark migrating
south, 3 Cloudless Sulphurs emigrating north. Few Monarchs at this point.
Lots of Buckeyes around.

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY


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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden morning flight and Northern Shrike now

2018-11-11 Thread Doug Gochfeld
There is currently an excellent westbound morning flight underway at Fort
Tilden in Queens including an Evening Grosbeak, and many Rusty Blackbirds
and small finches. A juvenile Northern Shrike also just came in and is
currently perched in a tree due south of Battery Harris.

-Doug Gochfeld

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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden after the storm

2018-10-28 Thread Alan Drogin
Didn’t luck out with last week’s raptor parade  (only a lone Peregrine, Merlin 
and Coopers) -  just off shore where huge flocks of Black Scoter heading east 
and plenty of dive bombing Northern Gannets making use of the breaking 
afternoon sunlight.  The dunes and grasses were teaming with Yellow-rumps, 
plenty of Eastern Phoebes, and decent numbers of sparrows.  A huge flock of 
Brants settled in the baseball fields with the Herring Gulls.  Among the morass 
were a decent numbers of White-Crowned Sparrows (appear to be healthier numbers 
this fall) and one Vesper.  36 species in all.

Alan
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[nysbirds-l] fort Tilden wrap up

2014-10-25 Thread Isaac Grant
Highlights were
1 Western Kingbird. Landed briefly at edge of field across from ball park. Then 
quickly flew west towards Breezy Point. 
1 Clay-colored Sparrow along fence line bordering military building
1 Vesper Sparrow in same area
1 Orange-crowned Warbler in maintenance area
1 Bobolink in grass along fence line of golf course at Riis
Hundreds of Siskins and Putple finch landed in trees 
Plus loads of the common  fall migrants
10 sparrow species total. 

Isaac Grant
Senior Loan Officer
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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden and Jacob RIIS Park

2014-09-19 Thread Andrew Baksh
A whirlwind bit of birding this morning that included a brief stop on the south 
end of the East Pond at Jamaica Bay did not produce many birds.

Getting my shorebird fix just after dawn on the East Pond at Jamaica Bay, I 
headed out to bird Fort Tilden and Jacob RIIS Park.  After an uneventful 
seawatching, I turned my attention to looking for land birds.  A bit of ground 
and pound for about 5 hours, resulted in a paltry number of 13 species of 
warblers.

The highlights were a stunning adult Red-headed Woodpecker seen near the RIIS 
parking lot adjacent to the golf course. Later in my second round at Fort 
Tilden, I came upon a very bright Cape May Warbler that was a delight to 
observe.

If you missed the spectacular showing of Western Sandpipers and White-rumped 
Sandpipers over the past few weeks at Jamaica Bay, you may have to wait until 
next year.  Since last weekend, the number of shorebirds on the pond have 
dropped significantly and only a handful of peeps have been around over the 
past few days.

Earlier in the week, a Philadelphia Vireo and Lincoln Sparrow were the only 
notable birds from a few hours at Kissena Park and Kissena Corridor 
respectively.


Cheers,

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden King Eider Yes

2014-01-01 Thread Matthew Wills
Drake King Eider patrolling along Fort Tilden shore today. It was moving 
eastwards with a small flock of mergansers, heading towards Riis, when we saw 
it around noon. 

I think the large group of Audubon/Linnaean/Littoral New Year's Day walkers 
must have seen it as well.


Happy New Year!
Matthew

http://matthewwills.com
(picture later)

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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden, RIIS Park and Floyd Bennett Field...

2013-09-14 Thread Andrew Baksh
Certainly not as birdy as the reports from other sites suggested but there 
were birds in the sites mentioned in the SUBJECT line.  However, one had to 
cover a lot of ground to get them.  I wondered if the winds had anything to do 
with what was observed since it was windy at both Fort Tilden and RIIS park for 
most of the morning.

Birding with Isaac Grant for some time at Fort Tilden, RIIS Park and finally 
along archery road at Floyd Bennett Field.  Our overall warbler tally for the 
day was 14 with ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER being the highlight in that group, seen 
only by Isaac before I ran into him at Fort Tilden. 

A second pass for Isaac and first for me near the golf course at RIIS Park 
resulted in us finding a DICKCISSEL near the south west corner of the fence 
line of the golf course.  Earlier, we also had 
LINCOLN SPARROW in a scrubby area at the beginning of the trail as you made 
your west towards the Hawk Watch platform at Fort Tilden.

Later on at Floyd Bennett Field, in another scrubby area along Archery Road we 
had very nice looks at a PHILADELPHIA VIREO.

While we did have multiples of warblers species, the numbers were nothing like 
those we were picking up on the wire being reported from other city parks where 
the birds appeared to be more concentrated. Our only significant multiple worth 
mentioning is Common Yellowthroat with a conservative count of 110 when 
combining all three sites.

As far as hawk flights, we did have 3 American Kestrels, 1 Merlin and 1 Osprey 
at Fort Tilden and 1 Sharp-shinned Hawk at Floyd Bennett Field.  Other flight 
movements noted included good numbers of Tree Swallows, Barn Swallows, Cedar 
Waxwings and a few Bobolinks, most seen at Fort Tilden.

In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand 
like a rock. - Thomas Jefferson

Andrew Baksh
Queens, NY
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

Sent from my iPad
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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden access Re: Marbled Godwit....

2013-08-02 Thread Andrew Baksh
Sorry folks, I forgot about this yesterday and had I seen the eBird
list from Avi and Barbara Lewis I would have noted that Fort Tilden
remains closed to the public.  Please note that Park Police do patrol
the area to enforce the closure.

Avi and Barbara were the original finders of the Marbled Godwit while
doing Piping Plover monitoring and they reminded me today about the
area being closed to the public.

Breezy Point is open to the public but as Isaac Grant noted, you need
a day pass or fisherman's seasonal pass to park in the fisherman' s
parking lot.

Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

On Aug 1, 2013, at 2:48 PM, Andrew Baksh birdingd...@gmail.com wrote:

 Passing on a second hand report. A Marbled Godwit was apparently seen
 and photographed at Fort Tilden Queens on the 25th of July.

 Yesterday a Marbled Godwit was also seen at Breezy Point, quite
 possibly the same bird. Both sightings were by Piping Plover monitors
 and I understand photos were taken.  Good luck if you try for it.

 Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

 Andrew Baksh
 www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden

2012-10-22 Thread Steve Walter
There are some differences in the migration between Fort Tilden and points
east on the barrier beach. While American Robins were noted in modest
numbers in the Fire Island report, there was actually a spectacular flight
at Tilden today, with several thousand passing through between 7:00 and
11:00. Stragglers continued until about 2:00, as did Pine Siskins and Purple
Finches. Eastern Meadowlark and American Pipit were fly bys noted today (and
not yesterday). A Red-shouldered Hawk, another one of those not so easy Long
Island hawk species, highlighted the count of over 200 (of 10 species).
About half were Sharp-shinned Hawks. At one busy point, I considered using
Shai's method for counting Yellow-rumped Warblers. That idea was aborted
when some quick math indicated we would be on pace for 5,000 Sharpies. That
just didn't seem right.

For what it's worth, the Hooded Crow was not deleted from my web site. The
bird might not have been real, but the picture is.


Steve Walter
Bayside, NY




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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden

2012-10-08 Thread Isaac Grant

There was a modest flight of birds along the beach today.  It was dominated by 
Tree Swallows and Pine Siskins (numbering well into the hundreds)The only other 
birds of note there were a continuing Bobolink along the fence line near the 
army reserve building and a Blue Grosbeak found by Corey Finger in the 
community garden.  

-Isaac
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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden

2012-09-24 Thread Isaac Grant
There is currently (since 10:00 a.m.) thousands of swallows and others 
passerines moving along the beach.

Isaac Grant
Senior Loan Officer
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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden

2012-09-24 Thread Isaac Grant

There were more Tree Swallows than I could count migrating down the beach at 
Fort Tilden today. There was literally no morning flight from sun up until 
10:00am and then the flood gates opened. For 2 and a half hours, hundreds of 
birds were flying over at any given moment. I do not know how to estimate how 
many Tree Swallows flew over, but would put it in the tens of thousands.After 
an early push of passerines, they diminished leaving clouds of swallows flying 
over.Had many Rough-winged and Bank, 2 Cliff, 1 Barn, countless TreeAlso 100+ 
Purple Finch2 SiskinsMany House and Goldfinch, Flickers, Blue Jays, Cedar 
WaxwingsSmall numbers of Yellow-rumped Warblers25 Red-breasted NuthatchPlus 
many Kestrels, Merlins, Shapries, Coopers, 1 Harrier, 1 Bald Eagle 

-Isaac
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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden 10/30

2011-10-30 Thread Steve Walter
It was a great day for hawks along the inland ridges - I would think. But
getting there, maybe not so good. Scrapping plans for an October trip
because of snow - that's a first. So there's Fort Tilden - beautiful and
snowless -- as a fallback. And it was an interesting day, so excuse the
length of this post.

 

Being in the mood to watch migrants migrate, I parked myself at the western
border on 193rd St. (forget that wind battered, cold platform) a little
after 7:30 and stuck with it for as long as there was activity (3:00 as it
turned out). Some 250 hawks moved by, a good total for Long Island so late
in the season. Sharp-shinned Hawk was most numerous with 172 (mostly
colorful, photogenic adults). Northern Harriers came in with 26 (6 or so
adult males), by far the best day I've seen anywhere in what's been a poor
season for them. Stragglers of Merlin, Kestrel, Cooper's Hawk, and Peregrine
Falcon filled out the roster of expected Long Island migrants. Where Fort
Tilden gets interesting as opposed to points east on the island is the
potential for a variety of mainly inland migrating hawks. Today that
included a Bald Eagle, Northern Goshawk, Red-shouldered Hawk, Red-tailed
Hawk, and a Turkey Vulture. The latter moved through at the most unexpected
time of 7:45. Thermal using raptors by and large have always been seen here
between the hours of 10 and 2. To round out the raptor report, observers
that ventured to the platform reported a Short-Eared Owl flying in from the
ocean.

 

The number of Goshawks could have been 1, 2, 3, who knows? Goshawks don't
move through Fort Tilden in the manner that most hawks do. Tilden is an
attractive place for Accipiters and they (particulary Cooper's) often hang
around a while. From my vantage point, I would say there was a male and a
female. People birding other sections of Tilden reported birds they thought
were Goshawks. One person mentioned one that he eventually decided was a
Cooper's, sort of giving the impression of shooting down someone else's ID
of a Goshawk. So it should be noted that it was a hawk flight day and there
were multiple large Accipiters around. The upshot of this is that if you're
interested in searching for Goshawk, I am of the opinion that this is a
chaseable species at Fort Tilden right now - just don't expect one to stay
in sight for long.

 

I also planned on counting diurnal passerine migrants. But only blackbirds
were worthwhile in that respect. Some 6700 (not really a big number for
Tilden) passed through. I didn't want to overdo it by trying to separate all
to species, but would say the large majority were Red-wings. Brown-headed
Cowbirds were well represented and Rusty Blackbirds were in the mix, as
evidenced by a group of 6 that landed in a nearby tree (soon followed by 6
Pipits landing in the field behind me). Only about 200 Common Grackles
appeared. They can stage a spectacular show on their own, but not today. If
that floats your boat, around Veteran's Day is peak time.

 

A couple of people told me of large numbers of scoters on the ocean. While I
hawk watched, 3 White-winged Scoters flew over me. Offhand, I can't remember
seeing scoters fly over land. I eventually made my way to the beach to see
the flocks that were predominantly Black Scoter, but with a few of the
others. I took a bunch of pictures. Upon review, one of the pictures held a
bizarre surprise -- a Wood Duck sitting on the ocean with the scoters.  A
few minutes later I was back at 193rd St., to show Andrew Baksh the spot. I
mentioned that Wood Duck is surprisingly regular as a flyover at that spot.
Almost on cue, one (the one from the ocean?) flew over.

 

Finally, Andrew (and earlier Peter Dorosch) told me of up to 3 Vesper
Sparrows in the community garden. I did get to see a couple, so thanks guys.

 

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY 

 


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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden Record Osprey Flight‏

2011-10-01 Thread Steve Walter
With the help of Don Davis, I recorded a daily site record 142 Ospreys
migrating past Fort Tilden (Queens) today. Also seen flying by were
something on the order of 60 to 70 Atlantic Menhaden. Yes, the guys were
having a good fishing day off Tilden and Riis Park. With a total flight of
about 300 hawks, the Ospreys comprised about 47% of the flight, very similar
to last Sunday (in smaller numbers). That’s certainly unusual, but probably
all that means is that Ospreys are more reliable than other hawks in showing
up at Tilden under the marginal flight conditions we’ve been able to get
(such as a general overcast for much of the day). 

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY   


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[nysbirds-l] Fort Tilden and Jacob Riis Park, Queens this AM

2010-10-17 Thread Corey Finger
Seth Ausubel, Isaac Grant, Tom (whose last name I can't remember, sorry) and I 
birded Fort Tilden and Jacob Riis this morning from dawn until just after noon. 
 
Highlights were two Vesper Sparrows that flushed from the community garden to 
the trees over the houses north of the garden, a Yellow-breasted Chat near the 
manure pile (west of the baseball fields along the path the hawkwatch), over 
100 
Purple Finch, 20 Pine Siskins and a Rusty Blackbird as part of the morning 
flight, and 3 Royal Terns heading west.

eBird list below (low estimates, and the siskin number doesn't correspond with 
the number above because I personally only saw one of the siskins).

Good Birding,
Corey Finger
http://1birds.comLocation: Fort Tilden
Observation date: 10/17/10
Number of species: 62

Brant - Branta bernicla X
Canada Goose - Branta canadensis X
Black Scoter - Melanitta nigra 6
Common Loon - Gavia immer 1
Double-crested Cormorant - Phalacrocorax auritus X
Great Blue Heron - Ardea herodias 1
Northern Harrier - Circus cyaneus 1
Sharp-shinned Hawk - Accipiter striatus 7
Cooper's Hawk - Accipiter cooperii 4
Merlin - Falco columbarius 2
Peregrine Falcon - Falco peregrinus 1
Killdeer - Charadrius vociferus 6
Laughing Gull - Leucophaeus atricilla X
Ring-billed Gull - Larus delawarensis X
Herring Gull - Larus argentatus X
Herring Gull (American) - Larus argentatus smithsonianus X
Great Black-backed Gull - Larus marinus X
Royal Tern - Thalasseus maximus 3
Rock Pigeon - Columba livia X
Mourning Dove - Zenaida macroura X
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - Sphyrapicus varius 1
Northern Flicker - Colaptes auratus 100
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) - Colaptes auratus [auratus Group] 100
Eastern Phoebe - Sayornis phoebe 5
American Crow - Corvus brachyrhynchos 6
Tree Swallow - Tachycineta bicolor 6
Black-capped Chickadee - Poecile atricapillus 1
Red-breasted Nuthatch - Sitta canadensis 2
Carolina Wren - Thryothorus ludovicianus 2
Golden-crowned Kinglet - Regulus satrapa 6
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - Regulus calendula 3
Hermit Thrush - Catharus guttatus 3
American Robin - Turdus migratorius 40
Gray Catbird - Dumetella carolinensis 1
Northern Mockingbird - Mimus polyglottos 10
European Starling - Sturnus vulgaris 600
American Pipit - Anthus rubescens 1
Cedar Waxwing - Bombycilla cedrorum 20
Yellow-rumped Warbler - Dendroica coronata 400
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) - Dendroica coronata coronata 400
Palm Warbler - Dendroica palmarum 2
Palm Warbler (Western) - Dendroica palmarum palmarum 1
Palm Warbler (Yellow) - Dendroica palmarum hypochrysea 1
Common Yellowthroat - Geothlypis trichas 2
Yellow-breasted Chat - Icteria virens 1
Chipping Sparrow - Spizella passerina 7
Field Sparrow - Spizella pusilla 2
Vesper Sparrow - Pooecetes gramineus 2
Savannah Sparrow - Passerculus sandwichensis 12
Song Sparrow - Melospiza melodia 20
Swamp Sparrow - Melospiza georgiana 5
White-throated Sparrow - Zonotrichia albicollis 20
White-crowned Sparrow - Zonotrichia leucophrys 7
Dark-eyed Junco - Junco hyemalis 10
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) - Junco hyemalis hyemalis/carolinensis 10
Northern Cardinal - Cardinalis cardinalis 2
Red-winged Blackbird - Agelaius phoeniceus 100
Rusty Blackbird - Euphagus carolinus 1
Purple Finch - Carpodacus purpureus 100
Pine Siskin - Spinus pinus 1
American Goldfinch - Spinus tristis 30
House Sparrow - Passer domesticus X

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)


  
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NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
3) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

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