Re: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian

2019-09-04 Thread Michael Cooper
It probably won’t apply in this case, but in general east of the eye is usually 
best- or along the ‘normal’ eastern seaboard, that would be north of the eye. 

Mike Cooper
Ridge, LI

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 4, 2019, at 4:54 PM, Peter Post  wrote:
> 
> Experience has shown that most hurricane blown birds immediately return 
> out-to-sea. You have to get out there during the storm or as soon as possible 
> afterward.
> 
> 
>> On Sep 4, 2019, at 4:44 PM, Purbita Saha wrote:
>> 
>> Thank you Shai and Peter for these insights. What day do you recommend going 
>> out then to see what this devastating event dredges up? Saturday morning? 
>> (Sorry if you already mentioned).
>> 
>> Cheers,
>> Purbita Saha
>> 
>>> On Wed, Sep 4, 2019 at 5:07 AM Shaibal Mitra  
>>> wrote:
>>> Dear Peter,
>>> 
>>> It's amazing to hear these first-hand accounts of your experiences in past 
>>> storms! And yes, access could be an issue for any storm that directly 
>>> affects our area. But a major reason why I posted these summaries was to 
>>> show people with less experience the birding potential of storms, like 
>>> David, Fran, and Ernesto, that pass inland well to the west of us and pose 
>>> less of a direct weather challenge to us. I particularly recall Ernesto, 
>>> which after seemingly immense hype regarding direct threats to Long Island, 
>>> made landfall so far south and west that birders mainly ignored him. I 
>>> vividly recall driving over the bridges to the beach in the morning and 
>>> seeing Great South Bay's glassy, mirror-like surface--"it's a mill pond!" I 
>>> exclaimed to Pat, using indelicate expressions as well. Even so, we had 
>>> great birds that morning. Storms like dorian that churn past to the south 
>>> cause much more trouble and produce far fewer rarities for us than do 
>>> storms like David.
>>> 
>>> Shai Mitra
>>> Bay Shore
>>> 
>>> From: Peter Post [pwp...@nyc.rr.com]
>>> Sent: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 12:39 AM
>>> To: Shaibal Mitra
>>> Cc: NYSBIRDS (NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu)
>>> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian
>>> 
>>> All well and good, but the problem nowadays is access, access, access! Or I 
>>> should say lack of access!
>>> 
>>> I spent most of the Sept. 7th, 1979, during hurricane David, at Robert 
>>> Mosses SP. Every 10 or 15 minutes a small flock of Sooty Terns would fly by 
>>> with an occasional Bridled. By the end of the day I totaled 90 Sooty and 3 
>>> Bridled. Nowadays that beach is closed during hurricanes!
>>> 
>>> On Sept. 27, 1985, during hurricane Gloria, the Jones Beach strip was open 
>>> in the morning but closed in the afternoon unless you could prove you had a 
>>> house on the strip. And it's been closed during hurricanes ever since. The 
>>> authorities I am told are afraid of looting. As a result I missed the 3,000 
>>> Cape May warblers that day, but I was able to get out to Pt. Lookout where 
>>> a Northern Phalarope was spinning in a puddle in the parking lot. And where 
>>> I had my first intermedius Lesser Black-backed Gull for NY.
>>> 
>>> During hurricane Irene, August, 27, 2011, I went to Central Park in the 
>>> morning hoping to see some storm blown birds. I ignored the signs that the 
>>> park was closed. The City is afraid that they will be sued if a branch or 
>>> tree hits or kills someone. There was nothing of interest on the Great Lawn 
>>> and the reservoir was covered in thick flog. I passed several police who 
>>> ignored me but I ran into the parks Director of Operations, whom I knew, 
>>> and who tried to evict me. Later that afternoon I tried my luck at 
>>> Riverside Park, where I ran into Dale Dancis and was later joined  by 
>>> Ardith Bondi. I added both Sooty and Bridled Terns, Wilson's and Leach's 
>>> Storm-Petrels, Royal Tern, and White-tailed Tropicbird to my NY County 
>>> list. Ardith had a large dark swift which I couldn't get on. Unfortunate, 
>>> because there was a Black Swift seen at Cape May that day! (All of this was 
>>> written up in the Linnaean Newsletter). The following year, during 
>>> hurricane Sandy, one couldn't get near the Hudson River. They authorities 
>>> threatened us with arrest if we didn't leave. We had to hide as best we 
>>> could. But before being kicked out I added Oystercatcher and Black Scoter 
>>> to my NY Co., list.

Re: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian

2019-09-04 Thread Peter Post
Experience has shown that most hurricane blown birds immediately return 
out-to-sea. You have to get out there during the storm or as soon as possible 
afterward.


On Sep 4, 2019, at 4:44 PM, Purbita Saha wrote:

> Thank you Shai and Peter for these insights. What day do you recommend going 
> out then to see what this devastating event dredges up? Saturday morning? 
> (Sorry if you already mentioned).
> 
> Cheers,
> Purbita Saha
> 
> On Wed, Sep 4, 2019 at 5:07 AM Shaibal Mitra  
> wrote:
> Dear Peter,
> 
> It's amazing to hear these first-hand accounts of your experiences in past 
> storms! And yes, access could be an issue for any storm that directly affects 
> our area. But a major reason why I posted these summaries was to show people 
> with less experience the birding potential of storms, like David, Fran, and 
> Ernesto, that pass inland well to the west of us and pose less of a direct 
> weather challenge to us. I particularly recall Ernesto, which after seemingly 
> immense hype regarding direct threats to Long Island, made landfall so far 
> south and west that birders mainly ignored him. I vividly recall driving over 
> the bridges to the beach in the morning and seeing Great South Bay's glassy, 
> mirror-like surface--"it's a mill pond!" I exclaimed to Pat, using indelicate 
> expressions as well. Even so, we had great birds that morning. Storms like 
> dorian that churn past to the south cause much more trouble and produce far 
> fewer rarities for us than do storms like David.
> 
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
> 
> From: Peter Post [pwp...@nyc.rr.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 12:39 AM
> To: Shaibal Mitra
> Cc: NYSBIRDS (NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu)
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian
> 
> All well and good, but the problem nowadays is access, access, access! Or I 
> should say lack of access!
> 
> I spent most of the Sept. 7th, 1979, during hurricane David, at Robert Mosses 
> SP. Every 10 or 15 minutes a small flock of Sooty Terns would fly by with an 
> occasional Bridled. By the end of the day I totaled 90 Sooty and 3 Bridled. 
> Nowadays that beach is closed during hurricanes!
> 
> On Sept. 27, 1985, during hurricane Gloria, the Jones Beach strip was open in 
> the morning but closed in the afternoon unless you could prove you had a 
> house on the strip. And it's been closed during hurricanes ever since. The 
> authorities I am told are afraid of looting. As a result I missed the 3,000 
> Cape May warblers that day, but I was able to get out to Pt. Lookout where a 
> Northern Phalarope was spinning in a puddle in the parking lot. And where I 
> had my first intermedius Lesser Black-backed Gull for NY.
> 
> During hurricane Irene, August, 27, 2011, I went to Central Park in the 
> morning hoping to see some storm blown birds. I ignored the signs that the 
> park was closed. The City is afraid that they will be sued if a branch or 
> tree hits or kills someone. There was nothing of interest on the Great Lawn 
> and the reservoir was covered in thick flog. I passed several police who 
> ignored me but I ran into the parks Director of Operations, whom I knew, and 
> who tried to evict me. Later that afternoon I tried my luck at Riverside 
> Park, where I ran into Dale Dancis and was later joined  by Ardith Bondi. I 
> added both Sooty and Bridled Terns, Wilson's and Leach's Storm-Petrels, Royal 
> Tern, and White-tailed Tropicbird to my NY County list. Ardith had a large 
> dark swift which I couldn't get on. Unfortunate, because there was a Black 
> Swift seen at Cape May that day! (All of this was written up in the Linnaean 
> Newsletter). The following year, during hurricane Sandy, one couldn't get 
> near the Hudson River. They authorities threatened us with arrest if we 
> didn't leave. We had to hide as best we could. But before being kicked out I 
> added Oystercatcher and Black Scoter to my NY Co., list.
> 
> If it isn't the closing of areas it's the downing of trees/power lines. 
> During one hurricane years ago I got as far as Bridgehampton. Downed tress 
> blocked my way from going any further east or to the beaches. When I tried 
> going back home a recently downed tree blocked my return. I wound up spending 
> the afternoon in the Bridgehampton High School which had been setup as a 
> shelter. Free coffee and donuts.Tony Lauro and Paul Buckley managed to make 
> it to Montauk Pt., but had to use a chainsaw to get there.
> 
> Peter Post
> 
> 
> 
> On Sep 3, 2019, at 8:57 PM, Shaibal Mitra wrote:
> 
> > The earliest models for Dorian’s track indicated a likelihood that the 
> > storm would track almost due north and pass to the west of Long Island—or 
> > at l

Re: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian

2019-09-04 Thread Purbita Saha
Thank you Shai and Peter for these insights. What day do you recommend
going out then to see what this devastating event dredges up? Saturday
morning? (Sorry if you already mentioned).

Cheers,
Purbita Saha

On Wed, Sep 4, 2019 at 5:07 AM Shaibal Mitra 
wrote:

> Dear Peter,
>
> It's amazing to hear these first-hand accounts of your experiences in past
> storms! And yes, access could be an issue for any storm that directly
> affects our area. But a major reason why I posted these summaries was to
> show people with less experience the birding potential of storms, like
> David, Fran, and Ernesto, that pass inland well to the west of us and pose
> less of a direct weather challenge to us. I particularly recall Ernesto,
> which after seemingly immense hype regarding direct threats to Long Island,
> made landfall so far south and west that birders mainly ignored him. I
> vividly recall driving over the bridges to the beach in the morning and
> seeing Great South Bay's glassy, mirror-like surface--"it's a mill pond!" I
> exclaimed to Pat, using indelicate expressions as well. Even so, we had
> great birds that morning. Storms like dorian that churn past to the south
> cause much more trouble and produce far fewer rarities for us than do
> storms like David.
>
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
> 
> From: Peter Post [pwp...@nyc.rr.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 12:39 AM
> To: Shaibal Mitra
> Cc: NYSBIRDS (NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu)
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian
>
> All well and good, but the problem nowadays is access, access, access! Or
> I should say lack of access!
>
> I spent most of the Sept. 7th, 1979, during hurricane David, at Robert
> Mosses SP. Every 10 or 15 minutes a small flock of Sooty Terns would fly by
> with an occasional Bridled. By the end of the day I totaled 90 Sooty and 3
> Bridled. Nowadays that beach is closed during hurricanes!
>
> On Sept. 27, 1985, during hurricane Gloria, the Jones Beach strip was open
> in the morning but closed in the afternoon unless you could prove you had a
> house on the strip. And it's been closed during hurricanes ever since. The
> authorities I am told are afraid of looting. As a result I missed the 3,000
> Cape May warblers that day, but I was able to get out to Pt. Lookout where
> a Northern Phalarope was spinning in a puddle in the parking lot. And where
> I had my first intermedius Lesser Black-backed Gull for NY.
>
> During hurricane Irene, August, 27, 2011, I went to Central Park in the
> morning hoping to see some storm blown birds. I ignored the signs that the
> park was closed. The City is afraid that they will be sued if a branch or
> tree hits or kills someone. There was nothing of interest on the Great Lawn
> and the reservoir was covered in thick flog. I passed several police who
> ignored me but I ran into the parks Director of Operations, whom I knew,
> and who tried to evict me. Later that afternoon I tried my luck at
> Riverside Park, where I ran into Dale Dancis and was later joined  by
> Ardith Bondi. I added both Sooty and Bridled Terns, Wilson's and Leach's
> Storm-Petrels, Royal Tern, and White-tailed Tropicbird to my NY County
> list. Ardith had a large dark swift which I couldn't get on. Unfortunate,
> because there was a Black Swift seen at Cape May that day! (All of this was
> written up in the Linnaean Newsletter). The following year, during
> hurricane Sandy, one couldn't get near the Hudson River. They authorities
> threatened us with arrest if we didn't leave. We had to hide as best we
> could. But before being kicked out I added Oystercatcher and Black Scoter
> to my NY Co., list.
>
> If it isn't the closing of areas it's the downing of trees/power lines.
> During one hurricane years ago I got as far as Bridgehampton. Downed tress
> blocked my way from going any further east or to the beaches. When I tried
> going back home a recently downed tree blocked my return. I wound up
> spending the afternoon in the Bridgehampton High School which had been
> setup as a shelter. Free coffee and donuts.Tony Lauro and Paul Buckley
> managed to make it to Montauk Pt., but had to use a chainsaw to get there.
>
> Peter Post
>
>
>
> On Sep 3, 2019, at 8:57 PM, Shaibal Mitra wrote:
>
> > The earliest models for Dorian’s track indicated a likelihood that the
> storm would track almost due north and pass to the west of Long Island—or
> at least parts of Long Island. This is the scenario that is likely to
> produce tropical terns and other Gulf Stream birds onshore on Long Island.
> With many people talking about Dorian and buzzing over the potential for
> storm birds, I’ve pulled out maps and bird data for several storms that
> passed west

RE: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian

2019-09-04 Thread Shaibal Mitra
Dear Peter,

It's amazing to hear these first-hand accounts of your experiences in past 
storms! And yes, access could be an issue for any storm that directly affects 
our area. But a major reason why I posted these summaries was to show people 
with less experience the birding potential of storms, like David, Fran, and 
Ernesto, that pass inland well to the west of us and pose less of a direct 
weather challenge to us. I particularly recall Ernesto, which after seemingly 
immense hype regarding direct threats to Long Island, made landfall so far 
south and west that birders mainly ignored him. I vividly recall driving over 
the bridges to the beach in the morning and seeing Great South Bay's glassy, 
mirror-like surface--"it's a mill pond!" I exclaimed to Pat, using indelicate 
expressions as well. Even so, we had great birds that morning. Storms like 
dorian that churn past to the south cause much more trouble and produce far 
fewer rarities for us than do storms like David.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

From: Peter Post [pwp...@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 12:39 AM
To: Shaibal Mitra
Cc: NYSBIRDS (NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu)
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian

All well and good, but the problem nowadays is access, access, access! Or I 
should say lack of access!

I spent most of the Sept. 7th, 1979, during hurricane David, at Robert Mosses 
SP. Every 10 or 15 minutes a small flock of Sooty Terns would fly by with an 
occasional Bridled. By the end of the day I totaled 90 Sooty and 3 Bridled. 
Nowadays that beach is closed during hurricanes!

On Sept. 27, 1985, during hurricane Gloria, the Jones Beach strip was open in 
the morning but closed in the afternoon unless you could prove you had a house 
on the strip. And it's been closed during hurricanes ever since. The 
authorities I am told are afraid of looting. As a result I missed the 3,000 
Cape May warblers that day, but I was able to get out to Pt. Lookout where a 
Northern Phalarope was spinning in a puddle in the parking lot. And where I had 
my first intermedius Lesser Black-backed Gull for NY.

During hurricane Irene, August, 27, 2011, I went to Central Park in the morning 
hoping to see some storm blown birds. I ignored the signs that the park was 
closed. The City is afraid that they will be sued if a branch or tree hits or 
kills someone. There was nothing of interest on the Great Lawn and the 
reservoir was covered in thick flog. I passed several police who ignored me but 
I ran into the parks Director of Operations, whom I knew, and who tried to 
evict me. Later that afternoon I tried my luck at Riverside Park, where I ran 
into Dale Dancis and was later joined  by Ardith Bondi. I added both Sooty and 
Bridled Terns, Wilson's and Leach's Storm-Petrels, Royal Tern, and White-tailed 
Tropicbird to my NY County list. Ardith had a large dark swift which I couldn't 
get on. Unfortunate, because there was a Black Swift seen at Cape May that day! 
(All of this was written up in the Linnaean Newsletter). The following year, 
during hurricane Sandy, one couldn't get near the Hudson River. They 
authorities threatened us with arrest if we didn't leave. We had to hide as 
best we could. But before being kicked out I added Oystercatcher and Black 
Scoter to my NY Co., list.

If it isn't the closing of areas it's the downing of trees/power lines. During 
one hurricane years ago I got as far as Bridgehampton. Downed tress blocked my 
way from going any further east or to the beaches. When I tried going back home 
a recently downed tree blocked my return. I wound up spending the afternoon in 
the Bridgehampton High School which had been setup as a shelter. Free coffee 
and donuts.Tony Lauro and Paul Buckley managed to make it to Montauk Pt., but 
had to use a chainsaw to get there.

Peter Post



On Sep 3, 2019, at 8:57 PM, Shaibal Mitra wrote:

> The earliest models for Dorian’s track indicated a likelihood that the storm 
> would track almost due north and pass to the west of Long Island—or at least 
> parts of Long Island. This is the scenario that is likely to produce tropical 
> terns and other Gulf Stream birds onshore on Long Island. With many people 
> talking about Dorian and buzzing over the potential for storm birds, I’ve 
> pulled out maps and bird data for several storms that passed west of or 
> across Long Island near this date: David (1979), Fran (1996), Floyd (1999), 
> Ernesto (2006), and Irene (2011)—all of these were productive for storm birds.
>
> For better or worse, at this point, it appears that Dorian will almost 
> certainly whip out to sea to the south and east of us, as so many tropical 
> systems do. Storms of this sort often interrupt the trans-oceanic migrations 
> of species that would otherwise pass over us (various shorebirds, jaegers, 
> Black Tern, etc.), but they do not bring tropical terns, etc.
>
> (N

Re: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian

2019-09-03 Thread Peter Post
All well and good, but the problem nowadays is access, access, access! Or I 
should say lack of access!

I spent most of the Sept. 7th, 1979, during hurricane David, at Robert Mosses 
SP. Every 10 or 15 minutes a small flock of Sooty Terns would fly by with an 
occasional Bridled. By the end of the day I totaled 90 Sooty and 3 Bridled. 
Nowadays that beach is closed during hurricanes!

On Sept. 27, 1985, during hurricane Gloria, the Jones Beach strip was open in 
the morning but closed in the afternoon unless you could prove you had a house 
on the strip. And it's been closed during hurricanes ever since. The 
authorities I am told are afraid of looting. As a result I missed the 3,000 
Cape May warblers that day, but I was able to get out to Pt. Lookout where a 
Northern Phalarope was spinning in a puddle in the parking lot. And where I had 
my first intermedius Lesser Black-backed Gull for NY.

During hurricane Irene, August, 27, 2011, I went to Central Park in the morning 
hoping to see some storm blown birds. I ignored the signs that the park was 
closed. The City is afraid that they will be sued if a branch or tree hits or 
kills someone. There was nothing of interest on the Great Lawn and the 
reservoir was covered in thick flog. I passed several police who ignored me but 
I ran into the parks Director of Operations, whom I knew, and who tried to 
evict me. Later that afternoon I tried my luck at Riverside Park, where I ran 
into Dale Dancis and was later joined  by Ardith Bondi. I added both Sooty and 
Bridled Terns, Wilson's and Leach's Storm-Petrels, Royal Tern, and White-tailed 
Tropicbird to my NY County list. Ardith had a large dark swift which I couldn't 
get on. Unfortunate, because there was a Black Swift seen at Cape May that day! 
(All of this was written up in the Linnaean Newsletter). The following year, 
during hurricane Sandy, one couldn't get near the Hudson River. They 
authorities threatened us with arrest if we didn't leave. We had to hide as 
best we could. But before being kicked out I added Oystercatcher and Black 
Scoter to my NY Co., list.

If it isn't the closing of areas it's the downing of trees/power lines. During 
one hurricane years ago I got as far as Bridgehampton. Downed tress blocked my 
way from going any further east or to the beaches. When I tried going back home 
a recently downed tree blocked my return. I wound up spending the afternoon in 
the Bridgehampton High School which had been setup as a shelter. Free coffee 
and donuts.Tony Lauro and Paul Buckley managed to make it to Montauk Pt., but 
had to use a chainsaw to get there. 

Peter Post



On Sep 3, 2019, at 8:57 PM, Shaibal Mitra wrote:

> The earliest models for Dorian’s track indicated a likelihood that the storm 
> would track almost due north and pass to the west of Long Island—or at least 
> parts of Long Island. This is the scenario that is likely to produce tropical 
> terns and other Gulf Stream birds onshore on Long Island. With many people 
> talking about Dorian and buzzing over the potential for storm birds, I’ve 
> pulled out maps and bird data for several storms that passed west of or 
> across Long Island near this date: David (1979), Fran (1996), Floyd (1999), 
> Ernesto (2006), and Irene (2011)—all of these were productive for storm birds.
> 
> For better or worse, at this point, it appears that Dorian will almost 
> certainly whip out to sea to the south and east of us, as so many tropical 
> systems do. Storms of this sort often interrupt the trans-oceanic migrations 
> of species that would otherwise pass over us (various shorebirds, jaegers, 
> Black Tern, etc.), but they do not bring tropical terns, etc.
> 
> (Note: my obvious desire to see storm birds has NO influence on the weather 
> and is not responsible for any harm or good wrought by any storm; the storm 
> will do what it does, and we may simply wish to be prepared for the 
> ornithological as well as other consequences).
> 
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
> 
> 
> 1979 Major Hurricane David
> 
> https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/1979/Major-Hurricane-David
> 
> From Richard L. Ferren, summarizing effects in Rhode Island: “A minimum of 62 
> Sooty Terns, at least five Bridled Terns, and a Brown Noddy passed Point 
> Judith heading northeastward in the very late afternoon hours, with 
> additional Sooties audibly passing the point after dark. Other Sooties were 
> found dead at Napatree Point and seen exhausted inland at Kingston, while 
> eight oystercatchers appeared at Napatree. More Sandwich Terns were seen the 
> next day.  Five Royal,  16 Black,  and one Gull-billed Tern, and three Black 
> Skimmers were also seen. A flock of 68 Red and six Red-necked Phalaropes at 
> Galilee, and a Red-necked Phalarope and seven Black Terns were seen inland at 
> Richmond the day of the storm; eight oystercatchers at Napatree the day after 
> was then a large number. A final total of seven Sandwich Terns was a maximum 
> count for 

Re: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian

2019-09-03 Thread david nicosia
 Dorian likely will pass well southeast of LI Friday night to Saturday. There 
will be northerly winds from the surface to at least 30,000 feet AGL Saturday 
morning. In the lowest few thousand feet winds will be primarily north to 
northeast.  I am not sure what this means for LI exactly, but the deep 
northerly winds no doubt will bring a lot of birds from Canada.  I wonder if 
some migrants would head south over the ocean and then turn back and head north 
or west as they likely will avoid the storm. It could be interesting along the 
coast even if we don't see typical hurricane birds. Wish I was on the island 
Saturday 
Dave Nicosia 
On Tuesday, September 3, 2019, 07:57:25 PM CDT, Shaibal Mitra 
 wrote:  
 
 The earliest models for Dorian’s track indicated a likelihood that the storm 
would track almost due north and pass to the west of Long Island—or at least 
parts of Long Island. This is the scenario that is likely to produce tropical 
terns and other Gulf Stream birds onshore on Long Island. With many people 
talking about Dorian and buzzing over the potential for storm birds, I’ve 
pulled out maps and bird data for several storms that passed west of or across 
Long Island near this date: David (1979), Fran (1996), Floyd (1999), Ernesto 
(2006), and Irene (2011)—all of these were productive for storm birds.

For better or worse, at this point, it appears that Dorian will almost 
certainly whip out to sea to the south and east of us, as so many tropical 
systems do. Storms of this sort often interrupt the trans-oceanic migrations of 
species that would otherwise pass over us (various shorebirds, jaegers, Black 
Tern, etc.), but they do not bring tropical terns, etc.

(Note: my obvious desire to see storm birds has NO influence on the weather and 
is not responsible for any harm or good wrought by any storm; the storm will do 
what it does, and we may simply wish to be prepared for the ornithological as 
well as other consequences).

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore


1979 Major Hurricane David

https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/1979/Major-Hurricane-David

>From Richard L. Ferren, summarizing effects in Rhode Island: “A minimum of 62 
>Sooty Terns, at least five Bridled Terns, and a Brown Noddy passed Point 
>Judith heading northeastward in the very late afternoon hours, with additional 
>Sooties audibly passing the point after dark. Other Sooties were found dead at 
>Napatree Point and seen exhausted inland at Kingston, while eight 
>oystercatchers appeared at Napatree. More Sandwich Terns were seen the next 
>day.  Five Royal,  16 Black,  and one Gull-billed Tern, and three Black 
>Skimmers were also seen. A flock of 68 Red and six Red-necked Phalaropes at 
>Galilee, and a Red-necked Phalarope and seven Black Terns were seen inland at 
>Richmond the day of the storm; eight oystercatchers at Napatree the day after 
>was then a large number. A final total of seven Sandwich Terns was a maximum 
>count for the state at the time.”


1996 Major Hurricane Fran

https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/1996/Major-Hurricane-Fran

morning: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S20370719
morning: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S20370663
evening: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S20467354
next day: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S20467579


1999 Major Hurricane Floyd

https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/1999/Major-Hurricane-Floyd

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S24442955
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S27002826


2006 Hurricane Ernesto

https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/2006/Hurricane-Ernesto

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S24420867


2011 Hurricane Irene

https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/2011/Hurricane-Irene

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S8737686
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S8737724
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S8737900
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S8737940


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http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

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