RE: [nysbirds-l] Cape May Warbler, etc. - Union Square Pk., NYC Tues., 12/18

2018-12-19 Thread Shaibal Mitra
Hi Tom and all,

Thanks for the information and synthesis of these interesting records. It is 
intriguing that Yellow-throated Warbler, in areas well north of its breeding 
range, occurs more frequently in winter than at any other season.

Regarding Cape May Warblers in winter, I agree that this is probably the most 
frequently encountered species in our area among those that have wholly 
Neotropical wintering ranges (all of the warblers that are more frequent than 
it on our CBCs winter commonly in the southeastern US, with which our area is 
increasingly ecologically associated). Participants on the upcoming CBCs should 
keep in mind that active sapsucker wells are strongly predictive of other 
interesting nectar-feeding species at this season, including Cape May Warblers 
and Baltimore Orioles. Other rarities have also been found in this context, 
such as the Western Tanager at Central Park in March 2008:

https://flic.kr/p/21gDYDh

--and the Scott's Oriole at Union Square Park in January 2008, which was ogled 
by a semi-circle of voyeuristic birders as it wrestled on the ground with a 
none-too-pleased sapsucker at the feet of the statue of Mahatma Gandhi!

Bottom line: if you find active sapsucker wells, linger for 15-20 minutes to 
see whether any commensal nectarivores are around.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

From: bounce-123197124-11143...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-123197124-11143...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Tom Fiore 
[tom...@earthlink.net]
Sent: Wednesday, December 19, 2018 6:26 AM
To: nysbirds-L@cornell.edu
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Cape May Warbler, etc. - Union Square Pk., NYC Tues., 
12/18

Tuesday, 18 December, 2018
Union Square Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City

A 1st-fall, presumed female Cape May Warbler was present again at the above 
park, and again in the same area where Rob Bate had found it first the previous 
day. I had to wait a bit before noticing the warbler, not terribly high in bare 
trees near the w. edge of this park, roughly opposite a starbucks, as a 
landmark on the adjacent street, which is Union Square West, & a bit north of 
E. 15th St.

The Cape May (quite a drab bird as 1st-year females of that species can be, but 
not nearly the grayest I've ever seen in that plumage) then went down into low 
(but raised up from street-level) shrubs that partly surround a fully-fenced 
off dark statue, just below the above-noted area, & the warbler became 
extremely furtive in those shrubs; however I was able to click a number of 
ID-suitable photos in a short time, and at least one from under 5 yards.

After its' brief showing in low perspective, it either went back into the 
shrubs, which are extremely dense evergreens, or possibly gave me the slip by 
going up & away to somewhere. I intentionally visited at an hour sort of 
similar to when Rob Bate had discovered this, & the sun on Tues. afternoon was 
certainly out in full, despite the comparative chill this cold-front passage 
day.

I also took a much shorter time to see & photo. a couple of the other birds 
lately residing at this park, including Ovenbird, Common Yellowthroat (an adult 
male), & Swamp Sparrow with the usual throngs of both hungry and shopping 
humans, & the also-usual-in-winter White-throated Sparrows that Manhattan sees 
so long as major snows do not 'push' the latter on to the south.

The Cape May Warbler might be a 'unique' species for the Lower Hudson CBC-2018 
count (week), but compilers will confirm at a future point if that is so. And 
again, thanks to Rob Bate for some direction-info specific to that 1 warbler, & 
of course for the find.

-  -  -  -
A note from an adjacent state (to NY), an adult-plumaged Yellow-throated 
Warbler (of the race albilora) turned up in Addison County, Vermont, and that 
occurence is in fact just one of many through the years in various northeast 
states & some of the Canadian maritime provinces, in December & also, in a 
number of cases over the decades, wintering birds. I myself have visited a 
modest number of wintering Yellow-throated Warblers in the greater northeast 
over the past 30+ years. Some, perhaps really all, were at least occasional, if 
not quite regular, at various home feeding stations. An eBird report with fun 
photos for anyone with interest in the VT sighting for 12/18/18: 
https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S50782919

There are more than 100 records for Yellow-throated Warbler in the northeast 
states & Maritime provinces in the Dec. thru Feb. period, historically to 
present day. Also, a species such as Cape May (many of which “winter”, which 
actually can mean a stay of more than 6 months for some individuals, on 
Caribbean isles) is not as ‘rare’ as one may assume in the month of December in 
this region, but there are certainly not as many winter records of the latter 
warbler as for Yellow-throated.  A good book, not the most up-to-date in many 
ways, but with a wealth of information on this sort of topic, and many 

Re: [nysbirds-l] Cape May Warbler

2017-05-03 Thread Dan Lynch
Summit Rock is in Central Park which is in Manhattan.  It's on the West Side of 
the Park, just north of 81st Street. The bird had been observed intermittently 
this morning by many, but not, alas, by me.

Danny Lynch

 

 

 

-Original Message-
From: Scott Haber <scotthab...@gmail.com>
To: Carney, Martin <carn...@fordhamprep.org>; NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu 
<nysbirds-l@cornell.edu>
Sent: Wed, May 3, 2017 9:01 am
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Cape May Warbler



Some folks might be interested to know where in New York state "Summit Rock" is


-Scott



On Wed, May 3, 2017 at 8:38 AM, Carney, Martin <carn...@fordhamprep.org> wrote:

At Summit Rock 5 minutes agoMartin Carney
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Re: [nysbirds-l] Cape May Warbler

2017-05-03 Thread Scott Haber
Some folks might be interested to know where in New York state "Summit
Rock" is

-Scott

On Wed, May 3, 2017 at 8:38 AM, Carney, Martin 
wrote:

> At Summit Rock 5 minutes agoMartin Carney
> --
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> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
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