Re: [openstack-dev] [all] Something about being a PTL

2015-09-09 Thread Michael Krotscheck
Beautiful summary, Flavio, especially the points about creating new PTL's.
It's the bus-number argument: How many people have to get hit by a bus for
the project to falter? It's best to have a backup.

Also: Being a PTL is a full-time job.

>From working with current and former PTL's, I've noticed that it's almost
impossible to split your time between being a PTL and, say, being a member
of the TC, or working on an employer's private
feature/cloud/deployment/etc. For a far more eloquent explanation of why
this is, I defer to Devananda's wonderful non-candidacy email last spring.

http://lists.openstack.org/pipermail/openstack-dev/2015-April/062364.html

Not many people have the privilege of working for a company that supports
that level of upstream commitment. If your employer doesn't, send me your
Resumé ;).

Michael

On Wed, Sep 9, 2015 at 8:15 AM Flavio Percoco  wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> Next week many folks will be running for PTL positions and I thought
> about taking the time to dump[0] some thoughts about what being a PTL
> means - at least for me - and what one should consider before running.
>
> Since the audience I want to reach is mostly in this mailing list, I
> thought about sending it here as well.
>
> [0] http://blog.flaper87.com/post/something-about-being-a-ptl/
> Flavio
>
>
> It's that time of the cycle, in OpenStack, when projects need to elect
> who's going to be the PTL for the next 6 months. People look at the,
> hopefully many, candidacies and vote based on the proposals that are
> more sound to them. I believe, for the PTL elections, the voting
> process has worked decently, which is why this post is not meant for
> voters but for the, hopefully many, PTL candidates.
>
> First and foremost, thank you. Thanks for raising your hand and
> willing to take on this role. It's an honor to have you in the
> community and I wish you the best of lucks in this round. Below are a
> few things that I hope will help you in the preparation of your
> candidacy and that I also hope will help making you a better PTL and
> community member.
>
>
> Why do you want to be a PTL?
> 
>
> Before even start writing your candidacy, please, ask yourself why you
> want to be a PTL. What is it that you want to bring to the project
> that is good for both, the project and the community. You don't really
> need to get stuck on this question forever, you don't really need to
> bring something new to the project.
>
> In my opinion, a very good answer for the above could be: "I believe
> I'll provide the right guidance to the community and the project."
>
> Seriously, one mistake that new PTLs often do is to believe they are
> on their own. Turns out that PTLs arent. The whole point about being a
> PTL is to help the community and to improve it. You're not going to do
> that if you think you're the one pulling the community. PTLs ought to
> work *with* the community not *for* the community.
>
> This leads me to my next point
>
> Be part of the community
> 
>
> Being a PTL is more than just going through launchpad and keeping an
> eye on the milestones. That's a lot of work, true. But here's a
> secret, it takes more time to be involved with the community of the
> project you're serving than going through launchpad.
>
> As a PTL, you have to be around. You have to keep an eye on the
> mailing list in a daily basis. You have to talk to the members of the
> community you're serving because you have to be up-to-date about the
> things that are happening in the project and the community. There may
> be conflicts in reviews, bugs and you have to be there to help solving
> those.
>
> Among all the things you'll have to do, the community should be in the
> top 2 of your priorities. I'm not talking just about the community of
> the project you're working on. I'm talking about OpenStack. Does your
> project have an impact on other projects? Is your project part of
> DefCore? Is your project widely deployed? What are the deprecation
> guarantees provided? Does your project consume common libraries? What
> can your project contribute back to the rest of the community?
>
> There are *many* things related to the project's community and its
> interaction with the rest of the OpenStack community that are
> important and that should be taken care of. However, you're not alone,
> you have a community. Remember, you'll be serving the community, it's
> not the other way around. Working with the community is the best thing
> you can do.
>
> As you can imagine, the above is exhausting and it takes time. It
> takes a lot of time, which leads me to my next point.
>
> Make sure you'll have time
> ==
>
> There are a few things impossible in this world, predicting time
> availability is one of them. Nonetheless, we can get really close
> estimates and you should strive, *before* sending your candidacy, to
> get the closest estimate of your upstream 

Re: [openstack-dev] [all] Something about being a PTL

2015-09-09 Thread Fox, Kevin M
Very well said. Thank you for this.

Kevin

From: Flavio Percoco [fla...@redhat.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 09, 2015 8:10 AM
To: openstack-dev@lists.openstack.org
Subject: [openstack-dev] [all] Something about being a PTL

Greetings,

Next week many folks will be running for PTL positions and I thought
about taking the time to dump[0] some thoughts about what being a PTL
means - at least for me - and what one should consider before running.

Since the audience I want to reach is mostly in this mailing list, I
thought about sending it here as well.

[0] http://blog.flaper87.com/post/something-about-being-a-ptl/
Flavio


It's that time of the cycle, in OpenStack, when projects need to elect
who's going to be the PTL for the next 6 months. People look at the,
hopefully many, candidacies and vote based on the proposals that are
more sound to them. I believe, for the PTL elections, the voting
process has worked decently, which is why this post is not meant for
voters but for the, hopefully many, PTL candidates.

First and foremost, thank you. Thanks for raising your hand and
willing to take on this role. It's an honor to have you in the
community and I wish you the best of lucks in this round. Below are a
few things that I hope will help you in the preparation of your
candidacy and that I also hope will help making you a better PTL and
community member.


Why do you want to be a PTL?


Before even start writing your candidacy, please, ask yourself why you
want to be a PTL. What is it that you want to bring to the project
that is good for both, the project and the community. You don't really
need to get stuck on this question forever, you don't really need to
bring something new to the project.

In my opinion, a very good answer for the above could be: "I believe
I'll provide the right guidance to the community and the project."

Seriously, one mistake that new PTLs often do is to believe they are
on their own. Turns out that PTLs arent. The whole point about being a
PTL is to help the community and to improve it. You're not going to do
that if you think you're the one pulling the community. PTLs ought to
work *with* the community not *for* the community.

This leads me to my next point

Be part of the community


Being a PTL is more than just going through launchpad and keeping an
eye on the milestones. That's a lot of work, true. But here's a
secret, it takes more time to be involved with the community of the
project you're serving than going through launchpad.

As a PTL, you have to be around. You have to keep an eye on the
mailing list in a daily basis. You have to talk to the members of the
community you're serving because you have to be up-to-date about the
things that are happening in the project and the community. There may
be conflicts in reviews, bugs and you have to be there to help solving
those.

Among all the things you'll have to do, the community should be in the
top 2 of your priorities. I'm not talking just about the community of
the project you're working on. I'm talking about OpenStack. Does your
project have an impact on other projects? Is your project part of
DefCore? Is your project widely deployed? What are the deprecation
guarantees provided? Does your project consume common libraries? What
can your project contribute back to the rest of the community?

There are *many* things related to the project's community and its
interaction with the rest of the OpenStack community that are
important and that should be taken care of. However, you're not alone,
you have a community. Remember, you'll be serving the community, it's
not the other way around. Working with the community is the best thing
you can do.

As you can imagine, the above is exhausting and it takes time. It
takes a lot of time, which leads me to my next point.

Make sure you'll have time
==

There are a few things impossible in this world, predicting time
availability is one of them. Nonetheless, we can get really close
estimates and you should strive, *before* sending your candidacy, to
get the closest estimate of your upstream availability for the next 6
months.

Being a PTL is an upstream job, it's nothing - at the very least it
shouldn't have - to do with your actual employer. Being a PTL is an
*upstream* job and you have to be *upstream* to do it correctly.

If you think you won't have time in a couple of months then, please,
don't run for PTL. If you think your manager will be asking you to
focus downstream then, please, don't run for PTL. If you think you'll
have other personal matters to take care of then, please, don't run
for PTL.

What I'm trying to say is that you should sit down and think of what
your next 6 months will look like time-wise. I believe it's safe
enough to say that you'll have to spend 60% to 70% of your time
upstream, assuming the porject is a busy one.

The abo

[openstack-dev] [all] Something about being a PTL

2015-09-09 Thread Flavio Percoco

Greetings,

Next week many folks will be running for PTL positions and I thought
about taking the time to dump[0] some thoughts about what being a PTL
means - at least for me - and what one should consider before running.

Since the audience I want to reach is mostly in this mailing list, I
thought about sending it here as well.

[0] http://blog.flaper87.com/post/something-about-being-a-ptl/
Flavio


It's that time of the cycle, in OpenStack, when projects need to elect
who's going to be the PTL for the next 6 months. People look at the,
hopefully many, candidacies and vote based on the proposals that are
more sound to them. I believe, for the PTL elections, the voting
process has worked decently, which is why this post is not meant for
voters but for the, hopefully many, PTL candidates.

First and foremost, thank you. Thanks for raising your hand and
willing to take on this role. It's an honor to have you in the
community and I wish you the best of lucks in this round. Below are a
few things that I hope will help you in the preparation of your
candidacy and that I also hope will help making you a better PTL and
community member.


Why do you want to be a PTL?


Before even start writing your candidacy, please, ask yourself why you
want to be a PTL. What is it that you want to bring to the project
that is good for both, the project and the community. You don't really
need to get stuck on this question forever, you don't really need to
bring something new to the project.

In my opinion, a very good answer for the above could be: "I believe
I'll provide the right guidance to the community and the project."

Seriously, one mistake that new PTLs often do is to believe they are
on their own. Turns out that PTLs arent. The whole point about being a
PTL is to help the community and to improve it. You're not going to do
that if you think you're the one pulling the community. PTLs ought to
work *with* the community not *for* the community.

This leads me to my next point

Be part of the community


Being a PTL is more than just going through launchpad and keeping an
eye on the milestones. That's a lot of work, true. But here's a
secret, it takes more time to be involved with the community of the
project you're serving than going through launchpad.

As a PTL, you have to be around. You have to keep an eye on the
mailing list in a daily basis. You have to talk to the members of the
community you're serving because you have to be up-to-date about the
things that are happening in the project and the community. There may
be conflicts in reviews, bugs and you have to be there to help solving
those.

Among all the things you'll have to do, the community should be in the
top 2 of your priorities. I'm not talking just about the community of
the project you're working on. I'm talking about OpenStack. Does your
project have an impact on other projects? Is your project part of
DefCore? Is your project widely deployed? What are the deprecation
guarantees provided? Does your project consume common libraries? What
can your project contribute back to the rest of the community?

There are *many* things related to the project's community and its
interaction with the rest of the OpenStack community that are
important and that should be taken care of. However, you're not alone,
you have a community. Remember, you'll be serving the community, it's
not the other way around. Working with the community is the best thing
you can do.

As you can imagine, the above is exhausting and it takes time. It
takes a lot of time, which leads me to my next point.

Make sure you'll have time
==

There are a few things impossible in this world, predicting time
availability is one of them. Nonetheless, we can get really close
estimates and you should strive, *before* sending your candidacy, to
get the closest estimate of your upstream availability for the next 6
months.

Being a PTL is an upstream job, it's nothing - at the very least it
shouldn't have - to do with your actual employer. Being a PTL is an
*upstream* job and you have to be *upstream* to do it correctly. 


If you think you won't have time in a couple of months then, please,
don't run for PTL. If you think your manager will be asking you to
focus downstream then, please, don't run for PTL. If you think you'll
have other personal matters to take care of then, please, don't run
for PTL.

What I'm trying to say is that you should sit down and think of what
your next 6 months will look like time-wise. I believe it's safe
enough to say that you'll have to spend 60% to 70% of your time
upstream, assuming the porject is a busy one.

The above, though, is not to say that you shouldn't run when in doubt.
Actually, I'd rather have a great PTL for 3 months that'll then step
down than having the community being led by someone not motivated
enough that was forced to run.

Create new PTLs
===

Just like in every 

Re: [openstack-dev] [all] Something about being a PTL

2015-09-09 Thread Kyle Mestery
Flavio, thanks for sending this out. I agree with everything you've written
below. Having served as PTL for 3 cycles now, I can say it's very
rewarding, but it's also very exhausting and takes an incredibly thick skin.

Before jumping in and throwing your hat into the ring (especially for a
large OpenStack project), please read Flavio's post carefully below. You
owe it to the project you're running for, the broader OpenStack ecosystem,
and yourself.

Thanks,
Kyle

On Wed, Sep 9, 2015 at 10:10 AM, Flavio Percoco  wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> Next week many folks will be running for PTL positions and I thought
> about taking the time to dump[0] some thoughts about what being a PTL
> means - at least for me - and what one should consider before running.
>
> Since the audience I want to reach is mostly in this mailing list, I
> thought about sending it here as well.
>
> [0] http://blog.flaper87.com/post/something-about-being-a-ptl/
> Flavio
>
>
> It's that time of the cycle, in OpenStack, when projects need to elect
> who's going to be the PTL for the next 6 months. People look at the,
> hopefully many, candidacies and vote based on the proposals that are
> more sound to them. I believe, for the PTL elections, the voting
> process has worked decently, which is why this post is not meant for
> voters but for the, hopefully many, PTL candidates.
>
> First and foremost, thank you. Thanks for raising your hand and
> willing to take on this role. It's an honor to have you in the
> community and I wish you the best of lucks in this round. Below are a
> few things that I hope will help you in the preparation of your
> candidacy and that I also hope will help making you a better PTL and
> community member.
>
>
> Why do you want to be a PTL?
> 
>
> Before even start writing your candidacy, please, ask yourself why you
> want to be a PTL. What is it that you want to bring to the project
> that is good for both, the project and the community. You don't really
> need to get stuck on this question forever, you don't really need to
> bring something new to the project.
>
> In my opinion, a very good answer for the above could be: "I believe
> I'll provide the right guidance to the community and the project."
>
> Seriously, one mistake that new PTLs often do is to believe they are
> on their own. Turns out that PTLs arent. The whole point about being a
> PTL is to help the community and to improve it. You're not going to do
> that if you think you're the one pulling the community. PTLs ought to
> work *with* the community not *for* the community.
>
> This leads me to my next point
>
> Be part of the community
> 
>
> Being a PTL is more than just going through launchpad and keeping an
> eye on the milestones. That's a lot of work, true. But here's a
> secret, it takes more time to be involved with the community of the
> project you're serving than going through launchpad.
>
> As a PTL, you have to be around. You have to keep an eye on the
> mailing list in a daily basis. You have to talk to the members of the
> community you're serving because you have to be up-to-date about the
> things that are happening in the project and the community. There may
> be conflicts in reviews, bugs and you have to be there to help solving
> those.
>
> Among all the things you'll have to do, the community should be in the
> top 2 of your priorities. I'm not talking just about the community of
> the project you're working on. I'm talking about OpenStack. Does your
> project have an impact on other projects? Is your project part of
> DefCore? Is your project widely deployed? What are the deprecation
> guarantees provided? Does your project consume common libraries? What
> can your project contribute back to the rest of the community?
>
> There are *many* things related to the project's community and its
> interaction with the rest of the OpenStack community that are
> important and that should be taken care of. However, you're not alone,
> you have a community. Remember, you'll be serving the community, it's
> not the other way around. Working with the community is the best thing
> you can do.
>
> As you can imagine, the above is exhausting and it takes time. It
> takes a lot of time, which leads me to my next point.
>
> Make sure you'll have time
> ==
>
> There are a few things impossible in this world, predicting time
> availability is one of them. Nonetheless, we can get really close
> estimates and you should strive, *before* sending your candidacy, to
> get the closest estimate of your upstream availability for the next 6
> months.
>
> Being a PTL is an upstream job, it's nothing - at the very least it
> shouldn't have - to do with your actual employer. Being a PTL is an
> *upstream* job and you have to be *upstream* to do it correctly.
> If you think you won't have time in a couple of months then, please,
> don't run for PTL. If you think your 

Re: [openstack-dev] [all] Something about being a PTL

2015-09-09 Thread Dolph Mathews
+1 Fantastically well said. I'd encourage all current and potential PTLs to
take these words to heart.

> I believe it's safe enough to say that you'll have to spend 60% to 70% of
your time upstream, assuming the porject is a busy one.

The busier the project, the closer to 100% this becomes. For keystone, I
would expect nothing less than 100%. It's truly a full time job.

Also note that there is no mention of writing code! :( Your job is to serve
the community, and writing code is simply not the most efficient way to
accomplish that.

And as Michael Krotscheck mentioned, if you believe you'd be a great PTL
but your employer would not fully support the time commitment, then for
both the health of OpenStack and your success, I'd encourage you to change
employers (look for the employers who have a history of supporting multiple
PTLs that aren't quickly burning out).

On Wed, Sep 9, 2015 at 10:10 AM, Flavio Percoco  wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> Next week many folks will be running for PTL positions and I thought
> about taking the time to dump[0] some thoughts about what being a PTL
> means - at least for me - and what one should consider before running.
>
> Since the audience I want to reach is mostly in this mailing list, I
> thought about sending it here as well.
>
> [0] http://blog.flaper87.com/post/something-about-being-a-ptl/
> Flavio
>
>
> It's that time of the cycle, in OpenStack, when projects need to elect
> who's going to be the PTL for the next 6 months. People look at the,
> hopefully many, candidacies and vote based on the proposals that are
> more sound to them. I believe, for the PTL elections, the voting
> process has worked decently, which is why this post is not meant for
> voters but for the, hopefully many, PTL candidates.
>
> First and foremost, thank you. Thanks for raising your hand and
> willing to take on this role. It's an honor to have you in the
> community and I wish you the best of lucks in this round. Below are a
> few things that I hope will help you in the preparation of your
> candidacy and that I also hope will help making you a better PTL and
> community member.
>
>
> Why do you want to be a PTL?
> 
>
> Before even start writing your candidacy, please, ask yourself why you
> want to be a PTL. What is it that you want to bring to the project
> that is good for both, the project and the community. You don't really
> need to get stuck on this question forever, you don't really need to
> bring something new to the project.
>
> In my opinion, a very good answer for the above could be: "I believe
> I'll provide the right guidance to the community and the project."
>
> Seriously, one mistake that new PTLs often do is to believe they are
> on their own. Turns out that PTLs arent. The whole point about being a
> PTL is to help the community and to improve it. You're not going to do
> that if you think you're the one pulling the community. PTLs ought to
> work *with* the community not *for* the community.
>
> This leads me to my next point
>
> Be part of the community
> 
>
> Being a PTL is more than just going through launchpad and keeping an
> eye on the milestones. That's a lot of work, true. But here's a
> secret, it takes more time to be involved with the community of the
> project you're serving than going through launchpad.
>
> As a PTL, you have to be around. You have to keep an eye on the
> mailing list in a daily basis. You have to talk to the members of the
> community you're serving because you have to be up-to-date about the
> things that are happening in the project and the community. There may
> be conflicts in reviews, bugs and you have to be there to help solving
> those.
>
> Among all the things you'll have to do, the community should be in the
> top 2 of your priorities. I'm not talking just about the community of
> the project you're working on. I'm talking about OpenStack. Does your
> project have an impact on other projects? Is your project part of
> DefCore? Is your project widely deployed? What are the deprecation
> guarantees provided? Does your project consume common libraries? What
> can your project contribute back to the rest of the community?
>
> There are *many* things related to the project's community and its
> interaction with the rest of the OpenStack community that are
> important and that should be taken care of. However, you're not alone,
> you have a community. Remember, you'll be serving the community, it's
> not the other way around. Working with the community is the best thing
> you can do.
>
> As you can imagine, the above is exhausting and it takes time. It
> takes a lot of time, which leads me to my next point.
>
> Make sure you'll have time
> ==
>
> There are a few things impossible in this world, predicting time
> availability is one of them. Nonetheless, we can get really close
> estimates and you should strive, *before* sending your candidacy,