Re: [openstack-dev] Thanks for fixing my patch

2013-10-13 Thread Angus Salkeld

On 11/10/13 11:34 -0700, Clint Byrum wrote:

Recently in the TripleO meeting we identified situations where we need
to make it very clear that it is ok to pick up somebody else's patch
and finish it. We are broadly distributed, time-zone-wise, and I know
other teams working on OpenStack projects have the same situation. So
when one of us starts the day and sees an obvious issue with a patch,
we have decided to take action, rather than always -1 and move on. We
clarified for our core reviewers that this does not mean that now both
of you cannot +2. We just need at least one person who hasn't been in
the code to also +2 for an approval*.

I think all projects can benefit from this model, as it will raise
velocity. It is not perfect for everything, but it is really great when
running up against deadlines or when a patch has a lot of churn and thus
may take a long time to get through the rebase gauntlet.

So, all of that said, I want to encourage all OpenStack developers to
say thanks for fixing my patch when somebody else does so. It may seem
obvious, but publicly expressing gratitude will make it clear that you
do not take things personally and that we're all working together.

Thanks for your time -Clint

* If all core reviewers have been in on the patch, then any two +2's
work.


Note the commit will authored by the original poster, so perhaps
if you modify a patch we should add a Modified-by:  line to indicate
that it was dual authored.

-Angus



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Re: [openstack-dev] Thanks for fixing my patch

2013-10-13 Thread Jeremy Stanley
On 2013-10-14 09:45:38 +1100 (+1100), Angus Salkeld wrote:
 Note the commit will authored by the original poster, so perhaps
 if you modify a patch we should add a Modified-by:  line to indicate
 that it was dual authored.

We encourage the use of Co-Authored-By: name n...@example.com in
commit messages to indicate people who worked on a particular patch.
It's a convention for recognizing multiple authors, and our projects
would encourage the stats tools to observe it when collecting
statistics.

https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/GitCommitMessages#Including_external_references

That said, if the work I'm doing is trivial fixup to someone else's
change and I'm not substantially contributing to the overall
idea/implementation, I don't bother to add one... only if it's a
significant departure from/improvement on the original author's
work.
-- 
Jeremy Stanley

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Re: [openstack-dev] Thanks for fixing my patch

2013-10-13 Thread Angus Salkeld

On 13/10/13 22:58 +, Jeremy Stanley wrote:

On 2013-10-14 09:45:38 +1100 (+1100), Angus Salkeld wrote:

Note the commit will authored by the original poster, so perhaps
if you modify a patch we should add a Modified-by:  line to indicate
that it was dual authored.


We encourage the use of Co-Authored-By: name n...@example.com in
commit messages to indicate people who worked on a particular patch.
It's a convention for recognizing multiple authors, and our projects
would encourage the stats tools to observe it when collecting
statistics.

https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/GitCommitMessages#Including_external_references


Well there you go, I missed that. Always read the little writing at
the bottom :)

-Angus



That said, if the work I'm doing is trivial fixup to someone else's
change and I'm not substantially contributing to the overall
idea/implementation, I don't bother to add one... only if it's a
significant departure from/improvement on the original author's
work.


Sure.


--
Jeremy Stanley

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Re: [openstack-dev] Thanks for fixing my patch

2013-10-13 Thread Kieran Spear
On 14 October 2013 09:58, Jeremy Stanley fu...@yuggoth.org wrote:
 On 2013-10-14 09:45:38 +1100 (+1100), Angus Salkeld wrote:
 Note the commit will authored by the original poster, so perhaps
 if you modify a patch we should add a Modified-by:  line to indicate
 that it was dual authored.

 We encourage the use of Co-Authored-By: name n...@example.com in
 commit messages to indicate people who worked on a particular patch.
 It's a convention for recognizing multiple authors, and our projects
 would encourage the stats tools to observe it when collecting
 statistics.

 https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/GitCommitMessages#Including_external_references

 That said, if the work I'm doing is trivial fixup to someone else's
 change and I'm not substantially contributing to the overall
 idea/implementation, I don't bother to add one... only if it's a
 significant departure from/improvement on the original author's
 work.

While we're talking about attribution - it's polite to reassign the
bug to the original author when it finally merges, since launchpad
automatically assigns you whenever you push a new patchset.

Kieran

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 Jeremy Stanley

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Re: [openstack-dev] Thanks for fixing my patch

2013-10-12 Thread Lingxian Kong
Really a good idea! It's painful for us to summit a patch, then waiting for
reviewing because of the time difference. It's more painful if we get a -1
after getting up. It's very appreciated that if someone could help, and we
can help others, too.


2013/10/12 Nikhil Manchanda nik...@manchanda.me

 Just wanted to chime in that Trove also follows this approach and it's
 worked pretty well for us.
 +1 on Doug's suggestion to leave a comment on the patch so that two
 reviewers don't end up doing the same work fixing it.

 Cheers,
 -Nikhil



 On Fri, Oct 11, 2013 at 12:17 PM, Dolph Mathews 
 dolph.math...@gmail.comwrote:


 On Fri, Oct 11, 2013 at 1:34 PM, Clint Byrum cl...@fewbar.com wrote:

 Recently in the TripleO meeting we identified situations where we need
 to make it very clear that it is ok to pick up somebody else's patch
 and finish it. We are broadly distributed, time-zone-wise, and I know
 other teams working on OpenStack projects have the same situation. So
 when one of us starts the day and sees an obvious issue with a patch,
 we have decided to take action, rather than always -1 and move on. We
 clarified for our core reviewers that this does not mean that now both
 of you cannot +2. We just need at least one person who hasn't been in
 the code to also +2 for an approval*.

 I think all projects can benefit from this model, as it will raise
 velocity. It is not perfect for everything, but it is really great when
 running up against deadlines or when a patch has a lot of churn and thus
 may take a long time to get through the rebase gauntlet.

 So, all of that said, I want to encourage all OpenStack developers to
 say thanks for fixing my patch when somebody else does so. It may seem
 obvious, but publicly expressing gratitude will make it clear that you
 do not take things personally and that we're all working together.

 Thanks for your time -Clint

 * If all core reviewers have been in on the patch, then any two +2's
 work.


 +1 across the board -- keystone-core follows this approach, especially
 around feature freeze / release candidate time.


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**
*Lingxian Kong*
Huawei Technologies Co.,LTD.
IT Product Line CloudOS PDU
China, Xi'an
Mobile: +86-18602962792
Email: konglingx...@huawei.com; anlin.k...@gmail.com
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Re: [openstack-dev] Thanks for fixing my patch

2013-10-11 Thread David Kranz

On 10/11/2013 02:34 PM, Clint Byrum wrote:

Recently in the TripleO meeting we identified situations where we need
to make it very clear that it is ok to pick up somebody else's patch
and finish it. We are broadly distributed, time-zone-wise, and I know
other teams working on OpenStack projects have the same situation. So
when one of us starts the day and sees an obvious issue with a patch,
we have decided to take action, rather than always -1 and move on. We
clarified for our core reviewers that this does not mean that now both
of you cannot +2. We just need at least one person who hasn't been in
the code to also +2 for an approval*.

I think all projects can benefit from this model, as it will raise
velocity. It is not perfect for everything, but it is really great when
running up against deadlines or when a patch has a lot of churn and thus
may take a long time to get through the rebase gauntlet.

So, all of that said, I want to encourage all OpenStack developers to
say thanks for fixing my patch when somebody else does so. It may seem
obvious, but publicly expressing gratitude will make it clear that you
do not take things personally and that we're all working together.

Thanks for your time -Clint

* If all core reviewers have been in on the patch, then any two +2's
work.

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Thanks, Clint. I have wanted to do this in the past but was not sure 
how. Can you provide the steps to take over some one else's patch and 
submit it? I volunteer to add it to 
https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Gerrit_Workflow.


 -David

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Re: [openstack-dev] Thanks for fixing my patch

2013-10-11 Thread Doug Hellmann
Running git review -d $gerrit_id will download the patch and create a
local branch for you.

For example, if I wanted to work on Sandy's patch
https://review.openstack.org/#/c/51249 I would git review -d 51249. I can
then amend the changeset, rebase, or whatever. Running git review will
push it up to gerrit again, and as long as I leave the Change-Id in the
commit message intact, gerrit will add a new patchset to the existing
review.

One small procedural suggestion: Leave a comment on the review to minimize
race conditions with other reviewers who are also considering providing
fixes.




On Fri, Oct 11, 2013 at 2:46 PM, David Kranz dkr...@redhat.com wrote:

 On 10/11/2013 02:34 PM, Clint Byrum wrote:

 Recently in the TripleO meeting we identified situations where we need
 to make it very clear that it is ok to pick up somebody else's patch
 and finish it. We are broadly distributed, time-zone-wise, and I know
 other teams working on OpenStack projects have the same situation. So
 when one of us starts the day and sees an obvious issue with a patch,
 we have decided to take action, rather than always -1 and move on. We
 clarified for our core reviewers that this does not mean that now both
 of you cannot +2. We just need at least one person who hasn't been in
 the code to also +2 for an approval*.

 I think all projects can benefit from this model, as it will raise
 velocity. It is not perfect for everything, but it is really great when
 running up against deadlines or when a patch has a lot of churn and thus
 may take a long time to get through the rebase gauntlet.

 So, all of that said, I want to encourage all OpenStack developers to
 say thanks for fixing my patch when somebody else does so. It may seem
 obvious, but publicly expressing gratitude will make it clear that you
 do not take things personally and that we're all working together.

 Thanks for your time -Clint

 * If all core reviewers have been in on the patch, then any two +2's
 work.

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 OpenStack-dev@lists.openstack.**org OpenStack-dev@lists.openstack.org
 http://lists.openstack.org/**cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/**openstack-devhttp://lists.openstack.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/openstack-dev

 Thanks, Clint. I have wanted to do this in the past but was not sure how.
 Can you provide the steps to take over some one else's patch and submit it?
 I volunteer to add it to 
 https://wiki.openstack.org/**wiki/Gerrit_Workflowhttps://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Gerrit_Workflow
 .

  -David


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Re: [openstack-dev] Thanks for fixing my patch

2013-10-11 Thread Dolph Mathews
On Fri, Oct 11, 2013 at 1:34 PM, Clint Byrum cl...@fewbar.com wrote:

 Recently in the TripleO meeting we identified situations where we need
 to make it very clear that it is ok to pick up somebody else's patch
 and finish it. We are broadly distributed, time-zone-wise, and I know
 other teams working on OpenStack projects have the same situation. So
 when one of us starts the day and sees an obvious issue with a patch,
 we have decided to take action, rather than always -1 and move on. We
 clarified for our core reviewers that this does not mean that now both
 of you cannot +2. We just need at least one person who hasn't been in
 the code to also +2 for an approval*.

 I think all projects can benefit from this model, as it will raise
 velocity. It is not perfect for everything, but it is really great when
 running up against deadlines or when a patch has a lot of churn and thus
 may take a long time to get through the rebase gauntlet.

 So, all of that said, I want to encourage all OpenStack developers to
 say thanks for fixing my patch when somebody else does so. It may seem
 obvious, but publicly expressing gratitude will make it clear that you
 do not take things personally and that we're all working together.

 Thanks for your time -Clint

 * If all core reviewers have been in on the patch, then any two +2's
 work.


+1 across the board -- keystone-core follows this approach, especially
around feature freeze / release candidate time.


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-Dolph
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Re: [openstack-dev] Thanks for fixing my patch

2013-10-11 Thread Nikhil Manchanda
Just wanted to chime in that Trove also follows this approach and it's
worked pretty well for us.
+1 on Doug's suggestion to leave a comment on the patch so that two
reviewers don't end up doing the same work fixing it.

Cheers,
-Nikhil



On Fri, Oct 11, 2013 at 12:17 PM, Dolph Mathews dolph.math...@gmail.comwrote:


 On Fri, Oct 11, 2013 at 1:34 PM, Clint Byrum cl...@fewbar.com wrote:

 Recently in the TripleO meeting we identified situations where we need
 to make it very clear that it is ok to pick up somebody else's patch
 and finish it. We are broadly distributed, time-zone-wise, and I know
 other teams working on OpenStack projects have the same situation. So
 when one of us starts the day and sees an obvious issue with a patch,
 we have decided to take action, rather than always -1 and move on. We
 clarified for our core reviewers that this does not mean that now both
 of you cannot +2. We just need at least one person who hasn't been in
 the code to also +2 for an approval*.

 I think all projects can benefit from this model, as it will raise
 velocity. It is not perfect for everything, but it is really great when
 running up against deadlines or when a patch has a lot of churn and thus
 may take a long time to get through the rebase gauntlet.

 So, all of that said, I want to encourage all OpenStack developers to
 say thanks for fixing my patch when somebody else does so. It may seem
 obvious, but publicly expressing gratitude will make it clear that you
 do not take things personally and that we're all working together.

 Thanks for your time -Clint

 * If all core reviewers have been in on the patch, then any two +2's
 work.


 +1 across the board -- keystone-core follows this approach, especially
 around feature freeze / release candidate time.


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