Re: [Origami] Help with Joseph Wu's snowflake

2023-03-09 Thread Himanshu Agrawal via Origami
Joseph's Snowflake is my absolute favorite model! It was one of the first
ones I could fold without diagrams.  :)

I made a small video with steps 7 & 8 for you. Hope this helps:
Joseph Wu Origami Snowflake steps 7 & 8 

Regards,
--
Himanshu Agrawal
Origami Gallery 



On Thu, Mar 9, 2023 at 7:06 PM Bernie Cosell  wrote:

> I'm folding it for the first time in years and I'm stuck on step 7.I
> can't figure out how to make the symmetric squash.  Every time I try to
> squash, it comes out symmetric -- I can't figure how to do it so there's an
> thin part and a thick part.  And help or advice would be appreciated.
> Thanks!
>   /Bernie\
>  Bernie Cosell
>  ber...@fantasyfarm.com
> -- Too many people; too few sheep --
>


[Origami] Help with Joseph Wu's snowflake

2023-03-09 Thread Bernie Cosell
I'm folding it for the first time in years and I'm stuck on step 7.I can't 
figure out 
how to make the symmetric squash.  Every time I try to squash, it comes out 
symmetric -- I can't figure how to do it so there's an thin part and a thick 
part.  
And help or advice would be appreciated.  Thanks!
  /Bernie\

 Bernie Cosell
 ber...@fantasyfarm.com
-- Too many people; too few sheep --



Re: [Origami] Help with Joseph Wu's "snowflake"

2016-01-14 Thread Joseph Wu
On Jan 14, 2016, at 19:58, Doug Philips  wrote:

>> On 1/14/16 7:17 PM, Bernie Cosell wrote:
>> And it is a *beautiful* model.  Thanks!!
> 
> Being somewhat non-objective, I would heartily agree!
> I lost track of how many I've made, easily over 100.
> Glad I was able to help!

Glad you like it, Bernie. And thanks, Doug! I haven't done that in so long that 
I don't remember it...
--
Joseph Wu, Origami Artist (via iPhone)
e: josep...@origami.as
w: http://www.origami.as
flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/josephwuorigami/
facebook: http://www.facebook.com/joseph.wu.origami



Re: [Origami] Help with Joseph Wu's "snowflake"

2016-01-09 Thread Bernie Cosell
> If you look at the solid lines in step 1, you'll see that they are
> (partially)
> mountain folds in step 4. So if you track the flip-overs, that means
> they were
> valley folds in step 0 (the one before step 1).

I see that!  I don't exactly understand what's happening at that cormer 
[working from the outside only now]: if I try to fold the corner 
[mountain fold] over so that it lies along the the indicated line, that 
makes a NEW non-prefolded fold perpendicular to the edge.  Is that right 
so far?

> So it's kind of like the twist collapse in the Kawasaki rose.
> Well, uhm, at least the way I do it.

Alas, I don't know that...  BUT; if you're willing I'll try following and 
throw occasional followup questions [like the above]..   I can see as I 
do what I said above the outside is *trying* to twist in over the inner 
big hexagon.  i'm going to see if observing that gives me a hint of the 
remainging "twisting'

THANKS! very much!!  [aslo, if Doug is actually willing to be more 
pestered by me, but the rest of you don't want to see it, just say so and 
I'll be happy to take it offline]

Thanks again!!
  /bernie\

-- 
Bernie Cosell Fantasy Farm Fibers
mailto:ber...@fantasyfarm.com Pearisburg, VA
-->  Too many people, too few sheep  <--   





Re: [Origami] Help with Joseph Wu's "snowflake"

2016-01-09 Thread Bernie Cosell
On 9 Jan 2016 at 16:24, Bernie Cosell wrote:

> I see that!  I don't exactly understand what's happening at that cormer
> [working from the outside only now]: if I try to fold the corner 
> [mountain fold] over so that it lies along the the indicated line, that
> makes a NEW non-prefolded fold perpendicular to the edge.  Is that right
> so far?

I think it is and I have one more question and then I think I can try to 
press ahead: am I correct that the folds *SHOWN* in the diagram [e.g., 
diagram 4, the great collapse] are the ONLY precreases involved in that 
step?  So that having done the outside, if I identify the relatively few 
indicated-creases inside the central hexagon I can see if I can just use 
*those* to tease the thing to collapse.

  /bernie\

-- 
Bernie Cosell Fantasy Farm Fibers
mailto:ber...@fantasyfarm.com Pearisburg, VA
-->  Too many people, too few sheep  <--   





Re: [Origami] Help with Joseph Wu's "snowflake"

2016-01-09 Thread Doug Philips
On 1/9/16 7:18 PM, Bernie Cosell wrote:
> I think it is and I have one more question and then I think I can try to
> press ahead: am I correct that the folds *SHOWN* in the diagram [e.g.,
> diagram 4, the great collapse] are the ONLY precreases involved in that
> step?

Correct!

> So that having done the outside, if I identify the relatively few
> indicated-creases inside the central hexagon I can see if I can just use
> *those* to tease the thing to collapse.

Indeed. I just did another one to double check my memory.
Here's the collapse that I do.
Make the indicated creases quite sharp. Esp. the valley folded
interior hexagon (note that it is not the inner most hexagon, but one
hexagon "out".
So I start from the corners and pinch the mountain folds until I come to the 
outermost
creased hexagon. As I do this, I keep the center of the model as flat as I can 
and
I hold the model in the air allowing the corners to fold down and in. I then
reinforce the creases along the outermost creased hexagon so that they are all
mountain creases too. To my eye, I am starting to create a hexagonal table.
The center part of the model is mostly flat, but it does have an inner hexagon 
(all valley folds) that is somewhat depressed/sunken.
The mountain creases coming in from the corner are like the legs of the table 
and
as you work your way in, the corners will pivot downward and get closer to each 
other.
If your inner hexagon valley creases are sharp, you can work your way around 
the model
pinching the outermost sides of the table top together. This will swivel the 
legs up
so that the bottom of the model can again lie flat, and you can fold each 
corner flap
towards the center. If you look at the crease pattern, parallel to the corner 
mountain
folds (which end at the corners of the outer mountain folded hexagon) are valley
folds which end at the mid points of the sides of that same hexagon.  As you 
swivel
the legs up, those corners will all fold in to the middle of the model.
The points formed where the corner mountain folds meet the outermost mountain 
folded
hexagon will not meet in the middle.

-=D'gou



Re: [Origami] Help with Joseph Wu's "snowflake"

2016-01-08 Thread Doug Philips
This is one of my all-time favorite models, so I'll take a shot at it:

On 1/8/16 10:26 PM, Bernie Cosell wrote:
> For reference, the diagram is at:
>
> 
> I'm a bit baffled at how to get started, and so any advice would be
> appreciated!  First off, although it isn't Joseph's normal diagramming
> style, I assume the solid lines in image 1 are mountain folds, although
> i'm thinking that they're not since they don't turn into valley folds
> when you turn the paper over for the image-2 folds.  So I'm thinking
> they're not folds at all but just reference lines for the other folds.

If you look at the solid lines in step 1, you'll see that they are (partially)
mountain folds in step 4. So if you track the flip-overs, that means they were
valley folds in step 0 (the one before step 1).

> Anyhow, where I'm mystified is in the "collapse" going from image 4 to
> image 5.   Can anyone give me some hints/help about how to do that
> collapse?  I can't quite tell from the diagrams what's happening and what
> goes where.

So it's kind of like the twist collapse in the Kawasaki rose.
Well, uhm, at least the way I do it.
Also, if you look ahead to step 6, you can see that the part of each flap
that is closest to the center of the model has a tiny pocket. Each side of
that pocket is folded edge. This makes the pocket part thicker than the rest
of the flap, which is just one layer of paper on each side.
Without a video (cough, hint to the videographers in the list, cough,
with Joseph's permission, cough cough)...
Basically it really helps if all your folds are very crisp and you
take the time to reinforce the folds shown in step 4.
I also find it easier to do the collapse by working it in gradually from
the outside going around to each flap in turn and nudging it further in to the 
center.

The next trick comes up at step 7. Because of the inner flap, when you squash
the end nearest the center, can be tricky. If you look at step 9 with it's 
subtle shading,
that thicker part alternates left and right around the center. My fingers are 
too fat to really
force the paper, so I find that the best way to tease the paper to the way I 
want is to alternate
the precrease. Specifically, the precrease shown as the step 7 mountain fold in 
the grey center area.
You would think that folding that crease back and forth to both sides would be 
best, but my experience
is that you want to make those precreases only in one direction (which 
alternates as you go around
the center pre-creasing each flap), as that rather directly "tells" the inner 
layer of paper what you
are trying to do.

Hope this makes some sense and helps. It'll probably be a little less muddy as 
you work with the paper
in hand.

-=D'gou




[Origami] Help with Joseph Wu's "snowflake"

2016-01-08 Thread Bernie Cosell
For reference, the diagram is at:
  

I'm a bit baffled at how to get started, and so any advice would be 
appreciated!  First off, although it isn't Joseph's normal diagramming 
style, I assume the solid lines in image 1 are mountain folds, although 
i'm thinking that they're not since they don't turn into valley folds 
when you turn the paper over for the image-2 folds.  So I'm thinking 
they're not folds at all but just reference lines for the other folds.

Anyhow, where I'm mystified is in the "collapse" going from image 4 to 
image 5.   Can anyone give me some hints/help about how to do that 
collapse?  I can't quite tell from the diagrams what's happening and what 
goes where.

THANKS!!  /bernie\


-- 
Bernie Cosell Fantasy Farm Fibers
mailto:ber...@fantasyfarm.com Pearisburg, VA
-->  Too many people, too few sheep  <--